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Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: Helicopter operations are among the exciting activities which help to improve recruitment and retention to the cadet forces, but there is no specific objective which states that helicopter training is a requirement for cadet units. The use of helicopters for cadets is arranged subject to the availability of aircraft and as part of the aircraft's normal operational training hours.

ACF and CCF Units: Ammunition Allocation

Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

10 Apr 2000 : Column WA10

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: Live and blank ammunition is allocated to Army cadet force (ACF) and combined cadet force (CCF) units on a slightly different basis because of the different training patterns they follow. ACF units are allocated a higher quantity of ammunition per head because they train on a continuous and regular basis throughout the year. CCF units are allocated a slightly lower quantity because they generally train only during school term time, but the CCF receives an additional central pool allocation of ammunition which individual units are able to draw on if necessary.

The actual amounts of ammunition issued and drawn are matters for each individual unit. This varies considerably from unit to unit, both in the ACF and the CCF. There is no shortage of ammunition available for the use of cadets.

Act of Union Bicentenary: Post Office Decision on Stamp Issue

Lord Laird asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by Lord Sainsbury of Turville on 27 March (WA 45), whether the Post Office will publish the detailed research which indicated that the bicentenary of the creation of the United Kingdom was not an appropriate subject for the stamp programme; and whether they will indicate how the research was carried out and by whom.[HL1749]

The Minister for Science, Department of Trade and Industry (Lord Sainsbury of Turville): The research undertaken for the Post Office on stamps is a commercially confidential matter to the Post Office. Telephone research for the 2001 programme was undertaken by NOP on behalf of the Post Office among a cross- section of the UK population to determine the popularity of each subject on a list. This was followed up by in-depth market research carried out among small focus groups (including children) by market research group BPRI.

Art Resales: Droit de Suite Terms

Baroness Anelay of St Johns asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by Lord Sainsbury of Turville on 27 March (WA 45), whether the start date for the 10-year derogation under which the droit de suite levy will only apply to the works of living artists will be the date of the ratification of the agreement by the European Parliament or the date of the transposition of the droit de suite levy into British law.[HL1759]

10 Apr 2000 : Column WA11

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: The start date of the derogation will be 10 years from the date of transposition of the directive into British law. However, in the event of a successful conclusion, before expiry of the 10-year period, of international negotiations aimed at extending droit de suite at international level, the Commission may submit proposals to curtail the 10-year period.

"Family": Definition for Tax Purposes

Lord Tebbit asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by Lord McIntosh of Haringey on 21 March (WA 18) stating that there is no statutory definition of family in the Taxes Acts, whether they will say what definition they use, and upon what authority they use it, in decisions concerning the exemption of businesses from payment of the national minimum wage to members of a family working in their family business.[HL1813]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: There is no definition of "family" in the national minimum wage legislation. The exemption in Regulations 2.3 and 4 of the National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 is limited to family members who reside in the family home of their employer and participate in the running of the family business.

Takeovers Directive

Lord Pearson of Rannoch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Answers by Baroness Jay of Paddington on 27th March (H.L. Deb., cols. 525-26), how they justify the statements that the proposed Takeovers Directive:


    (a) "was not specifically addressed at Lisbon" in view of the second paragraph of point 21 on page 7 of the Presidency Conclusions of the Lisbon European Council; and


    (b) "will have to be considered in the broader context of the tax package", and what is the present state of play of the Takeovers Directive.[HL1785]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: The proposed Takeovers Directive was not discussed at the Lisbon European Council, although it was agreed to include a reference to it in the Presidency Conclusions because it has been subject to delay. There was general agreement on the text of the directive at a meeting of the Internal Market Council in June 1999, with the exception of one point concerning the application of the directive to

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Gibraltar. It is one of a number of EU instruments currently delayed on this issue. The issue is the subject of ongoing discussions between Spain and the UK, in consultation with the Government of Gibraltar. The Government do not see a linkage between the Takeovers Directive and any measures on taxation. I hope that this clarifies the position.

Lord Pearson of Rannoch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the present state of play on the Takeovers Directive.[HL1816]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: There was general agreement on the text of the directive at a meeting of the Internal Market Council in June 1999, with the exception of one point concerning the application of the directive to Gibraltar. It is one of a number of EU instruments currently delayed on this issue. The issue is the subject of ongoing discussions between Spain and the UK, in consultation with the Government of Gibraltar.

Teacher Training

Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What are:


    (a) the average A-level points score; and


    (b) the upper and lower decile of the distribution of A-level point scores for entrants to initial teacher training courses, showing figures for BEd and PGCE courses separately, for each of the last 10 years.[HL1835]

The Minister of State, Department for Education and Employment (Baroness Blackstone): Statistics based upon available A-level point scores data for entrants to initial teacher training courses for BEd degrees with qualified teacher status in England for the academic year 1997-98 are shown in the following table.

AverageUpper decileLower decile
14.4226

Source:

Teacher Training Agency--data collected for the performance profiles.

Note:

Candidates with more than three A-levels are scored for the best three, all candidates with

three or fewer A-levels are scored and counted. AS-levels are scored as half an A-level.


The following table gives statistics based upon available A-level point scores data for applicants accepted for degrees mainly leading to a BEd with qualified teacher status.

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Year of entryAverageUpper decileLower decile
199413.9228
199514.1228
199614.4228
199714.8228
199815.2248
199915.2248

Source:

Universities and Colleges Admissions Service.

Notes:

1 For 1994, entry figures include physical education courses not leading to a BEd with

qualified teacher status.

2 For 1995, entry figures include sports science and leisure recreation courses not

leading to a BEd with qualified teacher status.

3 From 1995 onwards, figures include combined courses of education with another

subject not necessarily leading to a BEd with qualified teacher status.

7sup4; Candidates with more than three A-levels are scored for the best three, candidates

with two or more A-levels are scored, candidates with fewer than two A-

levels are excluded. AS-levels are scored as half an A-level.

Reliable data for A-level point scores for postgraduate trainees are not collected centrally.


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Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many initial teacher trainees for years for which the information is available:


    (a) did not enter the teaching profession;


    (b) entered the teaching profession and were still teaching five years later; and


    (c) entered the teaching profession and were still teaching 10 years later. showing the figures for primary and secondary teachers separately and for secondary teachers showing the numbers for each subject separately.[HL1836]

Baroness Blackstone: The information requested is shown in the following tables.

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Teachers trained in England (1) for nursery, primary and secondary
teaching, by phase and subject (1), who had not entered the teaching profession(1) within five years after completing initial teacher training

Qualified in calendar year 1988Qualified in calendar year 1993
Of which:Of which:
Total qualifiednot entered by 31 March 1993Total qualifiednot entered by 31 March 1998
Nursery/primary trained(1)6,88049011,0201,130
Secondary trained(1)
Mathematics9201301,370210
English(1)790901,250100
Science1,3201801,960250
Modern foreign languages620601,250130
Technology(1)9401201,490210
History3203056050
Geography2803043030
Art37050530110
Music2702041040
Religious education2503032030
Physical education6709074080
Other62011035050
Total secondary7,36094010,6701,290
Total nursery, primary and secondary14,2401,43021,6802,410

NB Figures may not add to the total because of rounding.

(1) Trained in England or through the Open University.

(1) First subject recorded.

(1) Those who are not recorded as having entered any sector of teaching in

England or Wales. Some teachers will be counted as not entering service because their

service is not recorded, i.e. teachers in the old university sector, those in independent

schools who are not members of the teachers pension scheme (TPS), those in part-time

service outside the maintained nursery, primary secondary and special sector who are not

members of the TPS.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of primary age.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of secondary age.

(1) English includes drama.

(1) Technology includes design and technology, engineering, computer

studies, business studies, commerce, home economics and needlecraft.


Teachers trained in England (1) for nursery, primary and secondary
teaching, by phase, subject (1) and whether they were in service in their fifth year after completing initial teacher training.

Qualified in calendar year 1988 Qualified in calendar year 1993
Total qualifiedIn service in March 1993(1)Total qualifiedIn service in March 1998(1)
Nursery/primary trained(1)6,8805,11011,0207,570
Secondary trained(1)
Mathematics9205801,370840
English(1)7905401,250850
Science1,3208601,9601,260
Modern foreign languages6204101,250800
Technology(1)9406701,490990
History320230560390
Geography280210430310
Art370230530320
Music270200410270
Religious education250150320220
Physical education670450740510
Other620390350220
Total secondary7,3604,94010,6706,990
Total primary and secondary14,24010,05021,68014,550

NB Figures may not add to the total because of rounding.

(1) Trained in England or through the Open University.

(1) First subject recorded.

(1) Those who are recorded as in service in any sector of teaching in England

or Wales. Some teachers will be counted as not entering service because their service is not

recorded, i.e. teachers in the "old" university sector, those in independent

schools who are not members of the teachers pension scheme (TPS); those in part-time

service outside the maintained nursery, primary, secondary and special sector who are not

members of the TPS.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of primary age.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of secondary age.

(1) English includes drama.

(1) Technology includes design and technology, engineering, computer

studies, business studies, commerce, home economics and needlecraft.


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10 Apr 2000 : Column WA15



Teachers trained in England (1) for nursery, primary and secondary
teaching, by phase, subject (1) and whether they were in service in their tenth year after completing initial teacher training

Qualified in calendar year 1988
Total qualifiedIn service in March 1998(1)
Nursery/primary trained(1)6,8804,160
Secondary trained(1)
Mathematics920510
English(1)790480
Science1,320770
Modern foreign languages620330
Technology(1)940610
History320200
Geography280180
Art370210
Music270170
Religious education250140
Physical education670420
Other620320
Total secondary7,3604,330
Total primary and secondary14,2408,480

NB Figures may not add to the total because of rounding.

(1) Training in England or through the Open University.

(1) First subject recorded.

(1) Those who are recorded as in service in any sector of teaching in England

or Wales. Some teachers will be counted as not entering service because their service is not

recorded, ie teachers in the "old" university sector; those in independent

schools who are not members of the teachers pension scheme (TPS); those in part-time

service outside the maintained nursery primary; secondary and special sector who are not

members of the TPS.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of primary age.

(1) Those whose training specialised in teaching pupils of secondary age.

(1) English includes drama.

(1)


10 Apr 2000 : Column WA16

Techology includes design and technology, engineering, computer studies, business studies, commerce, home economics and needlecraft.

The Government were particularly concerned about the numbers who have left the profession (excluding those taking career breaks, often for family reasons), within 10 years, which is why they have introduced the teachers pay reforms to improve retention.


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