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Lord Lucas asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Hunt of Kings Heath: There is strong epidemiological evidence to suggest that classic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (CJD) is not transmitted through blood. Donors who have received blood or blood products from people who subsequently developed classic CJD are therefore not barred from giving blood. However, there is far less knowledge about the routes of transmission of variant CJD and, as a precautionary measure, no blood from donors who received blood from people who subsequently developed variant CJD enters the blood supply. As an additional precaution against the theoretical risk that variant CJD may be transmitted through blood, all blood taken from United Kingdom donors is leucodepleted (the white cells are removed) and all blood products are made with plasma sourced from outside the UK.

Village Halls: VAT Refunds

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The construction of village halls used for charitable purposes is already zero-rated for VAT. During the Review of Charity Taxation, many charities sought more VAT relief, including compensation for the irrecoverable VAT on their purchases. The Government made it clear in the consultation document issued in March 1999 that this

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was unacceptable on the grounds of both principle and cost. The Chancellor's Budget gave tax reliefs to charities worth £400 million a year.

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What guidance the Treasury has given Customs and Excise on whether (and under what circumstances) village halls should be eligible for VAT refunds.[HL1516]

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: None. Guidance on VAT matters is the responsibility of the Commissioners of Customs and Excise.

Employment Changes 1948-98, by Industry

Lord Marlesford asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will publish, for the industries specified (a) the total employee job figures for 1948 and (b) an index based on 1948 = 100, showing the changes that have occurred in these industries from 1948 to 1998 in 10-year steps: coal mining; ports and docks; railways; steel production; shipbuilding; agriculture; motor vehicle manufacture.[HL1602]

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Director of the Office for National Statistics who has been asked to reply.

Letter to Lord Laird from the Director of the Office for National Statistics, Dr T Holt, dated 27 March 2000

As Director of the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your recent question on the changes in employment by industry in the United Kingdom since 1948.

The figures for 1948 to 1968 are based on information from British Labour Statistics Historical Abstract 1886-1968. For the years 1978 to 1998, figures are based on employment surveys in the nearest available year.

You should be aware that the figures given in the reply are based on industry classifications that have changed several times since 1948 and therefore some estimates may not be strictly comparable over time.

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Employee jobs in the United Kingdom

Number (thousands)Index (1948=100)
1948194819581968197819881998
Coal Mining794100986137152
Ports and docks15610010087422316
Railways5721008751442716
Steel production2681001141231013718
Shipbuilding245100886460248
Agriculture7841007449474040
Motor vehicle manufacture2801001131691693936

Notes:

1. The figures are arranged according to the five versions of the Standard Industrial Classification in use from 1948 to date. For this reason the figures are broadly comparable but there may be some fine definitional differences in certain industries.

2. The 1988 figures are interpolations based on the 1987 and 1989 Censuses of Employment. There was no Census of Employment in 1988.

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