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Millennium Dome Site: Sale Terms

Baroness Anelay of St Johns asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Whitty: English Partnerships paid British Gas the sum of £20 million for British Gas's property interests in the Greenwich Peninsula. Under the terms of the sale, British Gas will receive 7.5 per cent of all sale proceeds from the disposal of parts of the site, including the land on which the Millennium Dome sits.

Midwives: Local Policy Involvement

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Lord Hunt of Kings Heath): We have made it clear in guidance that we expect all primary care trusts and primary care groups to engage actively in the decision-making process all those who have a legitimate interest and who wish to be involved. It is a matter for health authorities, National Health Service trusts and general practitioners locally to work with midwives to decide how they will be involved in decisions affecting midwives.

Diazinon: Stabiliser Use in Pesticides

The Countess of Mar asked Her Majesty's Government:

7 Mar 2000 : Column WA136

The Minister of State, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Baroness Hayman): A stabiliser is used in every authorised pesticide and veterinary medicinal product with diazinon as its active ingredient.

Chernobyl Disaster: Livestock Movement Restrictions

Lord Laird asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Following the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, whether any of the restrictions on the movement of sheep or cattle in the restricted areas are still in force; and, if not, when was the last such restriction lifted, and in what part or parts of the United Kingdom.[HL1237]

Baroness Hayman: There are restrictions still in force on the movement, sale and slaughter of sheep in parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. There were never any restrictions on the movement, sale or slaughter of cattle in the UK after the Chernobyl accident.

Lord Laird asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Following the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, whether any particular areas of the United Kingdom were more severely affected by the fall-out than other areas; and, if so, which were the worst affected areas.[HL1239]

Baroness Hayman: Following the accident in Chernobyl in 1986 the radioactive cloud drifted over the UK and the affected areas were those where heavy rainfall occurred. As a precaution, restrictions on the movement, sale and slaughter of sheep were placed on certain areas within parts of the English counties of Cumbria and Yorkshire; Central, Dumfries and Galloway and Strathclyde regions in Scotland; Gwynedd, Powys and Clwyd in Wales and counties Antrim and Londonderry in Northern Ireland.



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