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25 Oct 1999 : Column WA1

Written Answers

Monday, 25th October 1999.

Climate Change Levy: CHP

Lord Campbell of Croy asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they intend to exempt combined heat and power (CHP) plant from the proposed climate change levy in order to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted from sources in the United Kingdom and so help to reach the targets to which they are internationally committed.[HL 4207]

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: Combined heat and power (CHP) schemes are a form of electricity generation. The Customs and Excise consultation document asked for views on whether they should be treated as conventional generators by relieving their input fuels and applying the levy to their outputs or afforded special treatment whereby their input fuels are subject to the levy and the electricity they produced relieved. Officials are currently analysing responses to this excercise.

Kosovo: Policing

Baroness Park of Monmouth asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Which countries have promised to provide police with the necessary skills in Kosovo; how many of these are now there; and when it is expected that (a) the full agreed complement of police will be in place; and (b) it will be possible to make a corresponding reduction in the numbers of United Kingdom troops now carrying out police duty in Kosovo.[HL3955]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): Fifty-seven countries from all regions of the world have so far promised to provide some 2,300 police for executive policing in Kosovo. The UK has offered 60 officers. Of the police promised, about 1,700 are now in theatre, with the majority of the remainder arriving by the end of October. The UN has recently notified substantial additional requirements for policing in Kosovo. These are being considered by member states.

The OSCE has also requested 165 officers for the Police Training School in Kosovo. Of these, 131 officers are in place, including the full complement of 32 UK police officers. Other contributors are the Americans and Scandinavians.

Chevening Scholarships and the Baltic States

The Earl of Carlisle asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Why they rejected the advice of Her Majesty's three ambassadors to the Baltic states to increase the

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    Chevening scholarship budget to £200,000 per annum for each nation (from approximately £70,000); and whether they will re-examine the allocation.[HL4146]

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: Worldwide demand for Chevening scholarships is considerable but funds are limited. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania will each receive £90,000 for scholarships in the next financial year, an increase of some 30 per cent over the previous allocation. These increased amounts were agreed with, and welcomed by, Her Majesty's ambassadors, who at no stage requested £200,000 for each country.

NATO: European Security and Defence Identity

Lord Kennet asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether, under the new regime in NATO to be set up as the European Security and Defence Identity, all ESDI actions, however partial or modest, will continue to be subject to a veto by any member state of NATO.[HL4155]

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: NATO takes decisions and will continue to take decisions by consensus.

Moldova

The Earl of Carlisle asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What steps they are taking to urge the authorities in Transnistria to release Mr Ilascu and three other citizens of the Republic of Moldova who have been illegally imprisoned under inhumane conditions since June 1992.[HL4201]

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: We support the work of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Mission to Moldova which monitors the conditions of detention of Mr Ilascu and his associates. An OSCE representative visited one of his fellow detainees, Andrei Ivantoc, in July. We also support the efforts of the Council of Europe which is pressing the Transdniestrian authorities to grant access to the prisoners by the International Committee for the Red Cross. As requested by us, the Troika of the European Union expressed the EU's concern over the treatment of the prisoners and the conditions in which they are detained during talks with the Transdniestrian authorities on 15 October.

Sanctions Regimes

Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What changes to sanctions regimes have been implemented by the United Kingdom in 1999.[HL4307]

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Baroness Scotland of Asthal: New measures have been introduced against Indonesia; certain measures against Libya have been lifted; and amendments have been made to measures in place against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Details are as follows.

Indonesia: On 16 September, the Council of the European Union adopted a Common Position (1999/624/CFSP) imposing restrictive measures against Indonesia. These measures are an embargo on the export of arms, munitions and military equipment; a ban on the supply of equipment which might be used for internal repression or terrorism; and the suspension of bilateral military co-operation.

The embargo on the export of arms, munitions and military equipment is being applied to all goods and technology on the Military List which forms Part III of the Export of Goods (Control) Order 1994, as amended.

The Common Position will expire on 17 January 2000.

Following from this Common Position, the EC adopted Regulation 2158/1999 on 11 October which prohibits:

(a) the sale, supply, export or shipment, directly or indirectly, of equipment listed in an annex to the regulation, whether or not originating in the Community, to any person or body in the Republic of Indonesia or to any person or any body for the purpose of any business carried on in, or operated from, the territory of the Republic of Indonesia;

(b) the participation in related activities the object of which is, directly or indirectly, to promote the transactions or activities referred to in (a) above.

EU member states may authorise the transactions or activities referred to at (a) and (b) above in respect to certain items in the annex when they have obtained conclusive evidence that the end use of these items is not for internal repression or terrorism.

The regulation applies within the territory of the Community, including its air space, and on board any aircraft or any vessel under the jurisdiction of a member state and to any person elsewhere who is a national of a member state and any body which is incorporated or constituted under the law of a member state.

The regulation entered into force on 13 October and is directly applicable in the UK. Legislation has been introduced to provide for licensing and enforcement, including penalties. The Indonesia (Supply, Sale, Export and Shipment of Equipment) (Penalties and Licences) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/2822) came into force on 14 October.

The regulation will expire on 17 January 2000.

Libya: On 13 September, the Council of the European Union adopted a Common Position (1999/611/CFSP) lifting a number of EU sanctions against Libya which were imposed in 1986. These measures were restrictions on the freedom of

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movement of Libyan diplomats and consular personnel; the reduction of staff of diplomatic and consular missions; and stricter visa requirements and procedures. The EU arms embargo against Libya, also imposed in 1986, remains in force.

Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY): On 3 September, the Council of the European Union adopted a Common Position (1999/604/CFSP) allowing exceptions to the EU oil embargo and flight ban in relation to Kosovo and Montenegro.

Following from this Common Position, the EC adopted two regulations.

Regulation 2111/1999, adopted on 4 October, repeals and replaces Regulation 900/1999 prohibiting the sale and supply of petroleum and petroleum products to the FRY and provides for member states to authorise the sale, supply, export or shipment of such goods provided that the goods are shipped from the Community to Montenegro or Kosovo without transiting through other parts of Serbia and that the goods shall not leave the territory of Montenegro or Kosovo for any destination elsewhere in Serbia.

The regulation entered into force on 5 October and is directly applicable in the UK. Legislation has been introduced to provide for licensing and enforcement, including penalties. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Supply, Sale and Export of Petroleum and Petroleum Products) (Penalties and Licences) (No. 3) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/2821) came into force on 14 October.

Regulation 2151/1999, adopted on 11 October, repeals and replaces Regulation 1064/1999 imposing a ban on flights between the European Community and the FRY and provides for member states to authorise specified flights between the territories of the Community and Montenegro or Kosovo provided that the points of departure, intermediate points and points of final destination in the FRY are located only in Montenegro or Kosovo.

The regulation entered into force on 12 October and is directly applicable in the UK.

Animal Procedures Committee

Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What changes there have been to the membership of the Animal Procedures Committee.[HL4382]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Bassam of Brighton): My honourable friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, Mr O'Brien is pleased to be able to say that Mr Robert McCracken, a barrister, has joined the committee with effect from 1 September 1999. My honourable friend is sorry to have to announce the departure from the committee of Professor Colin Johnson on grounds of ill health.

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