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The Countryside: Financial Support

The Earl of Clanwilliam asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Hayman: The financial support given to the following activities in each of the years 1996 to 1999 is as follows:

1996-971997-981998-991999-00
Scheme£m£m£m£m (forecast)
ESAs27.5932.9836.3841.00
Organic aid schemes0.480.701.328.00
Countryside Stewardship Scheme10.9315.0819.9026.30
Sites of special scientific interest7.057.567.3310.10

The support given to SSSIs is the responsibility of English Nature, which has provided these data.


New Deal Scheme and MAFF

Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many young people on the New Deal scheme have been taken on by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food since April 1998.[HL3831]

Baroness Hayman: The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food has recruited five individuals under the New Deal scheme for young people since April 1998.

BSE and French Wine

Lord Cocks of Hartcliffe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Given that French wine producers have been forbidden to add dried bulls blood to French wines by the European Community since October 1997, whether imported French wine produced before 1997 is a health hazard to British drinkers.[HL3825]

Baroness Hayman: There is no evidence that wine produced in France before 1997 and which was clarified with blood albumin poses a threat to human health.

11 Oct 1999 : Column WA47

Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In relation to the genetically engineered hormone rBST, which stimulated IGF-1, a blood hormone which causes cells to divide, how many cows in the United Kingdom have so far been injected with such a modified hormone; whether the milk of such cows has been sold without special labelling or health warning; if so, in what quantities; and over what period.[HL4004]

Baroness Hayman: There is a moratorium on the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) in the European Union. Trials on products containing rBST were carried out in the UK in the mid to late 1980s. The maximum number of cows which may have been treated in the trials was estimated at 1,130, although the number treated at any one time would have been lower. The maximum number represented about 0.03 per cent. of the national herd and the sales of milk from treated cows was estimated at around 0.01 per cent. of national milk production. The use of rBST does not substantially increase the level of BST, which occurs naturally in all cows' milk.

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In relation to the genetically engineered hormone rBST, which stimulates IGF-1, a blood hormone which causes cells to divide, whether women with relatively small increases in their blood-levels of IGF-1 are up to seven times more likely to develop post-menopausal breast cancer.[HL4005]

Baroness Hayman: The use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) is currently subject to a moratorium in the European Union. There is a great deal of information on research on the human and animal health effects of its use. The Veterinary Products Committee (VPC), which advises the Government on veterinary medicinal products, has been asked to consider the latest scientific information. Ministers expect to receive the VPC's report very soon and it is expected to be published.

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In relation to the genetically engineered hormone rBST, which stimulates IGF-1, a blood hormone which causes cells to divide, what research has been carried out into the side-effects of rBST in cows, such as increased mastitis and higher antibiotic residues in milk; whether research has been, or will be, commissioned into related sterility, birth defects, cancer and immunological derangements in both cows and humans; and, if not, why not.[HL4006]

Baroness Hayman: The use of recombinant bovine somatotripin (rBST) is currently subject to a moratorium in the European Union. There is a great deal of information on research on the human and animal health effects of its use. The Veterinary Products Committee (VPC), which advises the Government on veterinary medicinal products, has been asked to consider the latest scientific information.

11 Oct 1999 : Column WA48

Ministers expect to receive the VPC's report very soon and it is expected to be published.

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What information they have on the use in continental Europe of the genetically engineered hormone rBST in cows; and whether milk from injected cows has been imported into the United Kingdom.[HL4054]

Baroness Hayman: On 11 November 1996 Commissioner Fischler, in reply to a European Parliamentary Question, stated that to the Commission's knowledge the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) was authorised in the following non-EU European countries: the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania and Bulgaria. Under the current EU moratorium on the use of rBST there is no barrier to the importation of milk or milk products from rBST-treated cows. Trade statistics for 1998 indicate that the United Kingdom imported no milk from any of these countries. The only milk product imported was 2.3 tonnes of cheese from Romania, but there is no indication as to whether the cows which produced the milk had been treated with rBST.

Offshore Farmed Fish

Lord Rotherwick asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What pesticide rules apply to the offshore farmed fish industry.[HL4030]

Baroness Hayman: The “pesticides" used by the offshore fish farming industry are veterinary medicines for the control of sea lice. These are veterinary medicinal products that must meet the statutory criteria of safety, quality and efficacy laid down by Council Directive 81/851/EEC and implemented in the UK by the Marketing Authorisations for Veterinary Medicinal Products Regulations 1994. Discharge consents from the relevant environment agency are also required before the products in question can be administered.

Lord Rotherwick asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What particular codes of conduct apply to the offshore farmed fish industry.[HL4031]

Baroness Hayman: Most marine fish farming in the UK takes place in Scotland and is now a matter for the Scottish Parliament. There is no statutory code of conduct for marine fish farming, but we understand that a joint Scottish Executive/industry working group is carrying out a review of management and husbandry methods and that codes of practice and legislation are to be recommended.

EU Structural Funds: SEM 2000 Datasheets

Lord Inglewood asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the legal base for the instructions for applying for European Structural Funds, SEM 2000

11 Oct 1999 : Column WA49

    Datasheets: Eligibility of Expenditure under the Structural Funds Summary.[HL3890]

The Minister for Science, Department of Trade and Industry (Lord Sainsbury of Turville): The legal base is a Commission decision dated 23 April 1997 which modified existing Commission Decisions approving EU Structural Funds programmes to include the requirements of the SEM 2000 data sheets. The data sheets were included in all new Commission decisions thereafter.

Non-Fossil Fuel Order Planning Applications

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many successful Non-Fossil Fuel Order (NFFO) planning applications have been made over the last three years and how many NFFO projects have failed to gain planning consent.[HL4036]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: Information provided to the House of Lords Energy, Industry and Transport Select Committee on 31 March 1999 showed that, of the contracted Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation-3 (NFFO-3) projects, some 56 per cent. had either obtained planning permission, or did not require express consent by virtue of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order (the GPDO). Planning applications had still to be submitted for 18 per cent. of the projects. Only 11 per cent. of the total number of schemes had been refused planning permission; appeals had been lodged against some of these decisions.

Similar information provided at that time for NFFO-4 projects showed that some 37 per cent. had either obtained planning permission, or did not require express consent by virtue of the GPDO. Planning applications had still to be submitted for 46 per cent. of the projects. Only 6 per cent. of the total number of schemes had been refused planning permission. Again, appeals had been lodged against some of these decisions.

The DTI made the fifth NFFO Order in September 1998. The DTI will be monitoring the success of NFFO-5 projects in obtaining planning permission. At 31 March 1999, three NFFO-5 projects were operational.


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