Previous Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page


15 Mar 1999 : Column WA55

Written Answers

Monday, 15th March 1999.

Education Action Zones

Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    (a) whether they will list each Education Action Zone now in place;

    (b) what contribution has been secured for each Education Action Zone from the private sector in (i) kind and (ii) cash;

    (c) what contribution is being made by each relevant local education authority to each Education Action Zone;

    (d) what contribution is being made by the Government to each Education Action Zone; and

    (e) by what criteria the Education Action Zones will be judged.[HL1379]

The Minister of State, Department for Education and Employment (Baroness Blackstone): Twelve Education Action Zones were established in September 1998: Barnsley, Blackburn with Darwen, Grimsby, Hereford, Lambeth, Leicester, Middlesbrough, New Addington, Newcastle, Newham, Salford & Trafford and Weston super Mare. A further 13 Education Action Zones were established in January 1999: Birmingham-Aston & Nechells, Birmingham-Kitts Green & Shard End, Brighton & Hove, East Basildon, Halifax, Kingston-upon-Hull, Leigh, Nottingham, Plymouth, Sheffield, South Tyneside, Southwark and Thetford.

The 25 zones have so far raised some £5 million towards the £6 million target for business contributions in their first year of operation. We will be in a position to provide a more detailed statement of the private sector contributions to each zone when they submit their audited financial statements for the financial year 1998-99.

Each local education authority is a partner on the forum of each zone. Cash and in kind contributions from a local education authority do not count as business contributions unless they are sourced from the private sector.

Each zone receives help and guidance from its DfEE Education Adviser, who is a partner on the forum of each zone, as well as from officials on an "as appropriate" basis. Each zone will also receive up to £750,000 per annum from government funds and is required to raise £250,000 per annum from the private sector.

Zones will be assessed at both national and local level to measure their effectiveness in raising standards.

15 Mar 1999 : Column WA56

Tourism: Consultation

Baroness Anelay of St. Johns asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When they will place in the Library of the House copies of the responses to their consultation on tourism which led to the publication of Tomorrow's Tourism on 26 February.[HL1432]

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The Government's recent consultations on tourism, which considered support structures and sustainability respectively, attracted a total of 591 responses from individuals and organisations. The summary of results from both consultations were made publicly available in documents A New Cultural Framework and Tomorrow's Tourism, copies of which have been placed in the Libraries of the House. In accordance with the existing Code of Practice on Access to Government Information, requests from consultees for confidentiality of responses will be respected. Other responses will be made available by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on request.

Scotland: Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Recommendations

Lord Mackay of Drumadoon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they intend to refer to the Scottish Law Commission Recommendation 38 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report (Cm 4262-I), which raises the question of whether the law should be amended to permit the further prosecution of an accused after his acquittal, in circumstances where fresh and viable evidence has become available to the Crown.[HL1367]

The Minister of State, Scottish Office (Lord Macdonald of Tradeston): The Government have no plans to do so.

Lord Mackay of Drumadoon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they consider there is any need to amend the law of Scotland to permit the prosecution in Scotland of offences involving racist language or behaviour and of offences involving the possession of offensive weapons, where such conduct can be proved to have taken place otherwise than in a public place; and, if so, whether they intend to refer to the Scottish Law Commission, Recommendation 39 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report (CM 4262-I).[HL1368]

Lord Macdonald of Tradeston: In Scotland, the common law crime of breach of the peace may be committed otherwise than in a public place. Clearly there is a limit to the extent to which it is appropriate or practicable for the law to attempt to control the expression of views which takes place entirely in private, although if a substantive offence is committed any proven racist motivation would be regarded as an

15 Mar 1999 : Column WA57

aggravation of that offence under Section 96 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. We have no present plans to change the law of Scotland but will consider the matter further in the light of the outcome of the current debates on the Report of the Lawrence Inquiry, which was addressed to the Home Secretary.

Lord Mackay of Drumadoon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they consider there is any need to amend the law of Scotland to permit the prosecution in Scotland of offences involving racist language or behaviour and of offences involving the possession of offensive weapons, where such conduct can be proved to have taken place otherwise than in a public place; and, if so, whether they intend to refer to the Scottish Law Commission, Recommendation 39 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report (Cm 4262-I).[HL1368]

Lord Macdonald of Tradeston: In Scotland, the common law crime of breach of the peace may be committed otherwise than in a public place. Clearly there is a limit to the extent to which it is appropriate or practicable for the law to attempt to control the expression of views which takes place entirely in private, although if a substantive offence is committed any proven racist motivation would be regarded as an aggravation of that offence under Section 96 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. We have no present plans to change the law of Scotland but will consider the matter further in the light of the outcome of the current debates on the Report of the Lawrence Inquiry, which was addressed to the Home Secretary.

Lord Mackay of Drumadoon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they accept that Recommendation 57 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report (Cm 4262-I) should apply to police officers in Scotland; and, if so, what steps they intend to take to implement that recommendation in Scotland.[HL1369]

Lord Macdonald of Tradeston: The implications for the Scottish police service of the recommendations in the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report are being considered in detail in consultation with the Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland.

NHS Regional Office Budgets

Lord Harris of Haringey asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What was the budget for running each of the NHS Regional Offices in England in 1998-99 and 1999-2000.[HL1359]

15 Mar 1999 : Column WA58

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Baroness Hayman): The information requested is set out in cash terms in the table.

1998-99 Allocation1999-2000 Allocation
Regional Office(£ million)(£ million)
Northern & Yorkshire6.917.28
North West7.007.38
Trent6.977.15
West Midlands7.037.25
Anglia & Oxford6.91n/a
North Thames9.17n/a
South Thames8.44n/a
South & West6.93n/a
Easternn/a7.08
Londonn/a9.56
South Eastn/a9.06
South Westn/a7.11
Total59.3661.86

Notes:

North Thames Regional Office allocation for 1998-99 includes funding for the High Security Psychiatric Hospitals Commissioning Board of some £0.77 million. For 1999-2000, this funding has transferred into the National Health Service Executive Headquarters.

The London, South East, South West and Eastern Regional Offices were established on 1 January 1999 and replace the former North Thames, South Thames, Anglia and Oxford and South and West Regional Offices.

Figures exclude capital allocations.


Medicines Advertising: Control

Lord Harris of Haringey asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many times they have sought an injunction to prevent the publication of an advertisement for a medicinal product.[HL1428]

Baroness Hayman: To date there has been no need to seek an injunction to prevent the issue of an advertisement for a medicine. The circumstances in which this route would be used are expected to be rare. The control of medicines advertising focuses on monitoring, and responding to complaints about, published advertisement.

Lord Harris of Haringey asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Why they have deemed it necessary to introduce Regulation 13 of the Medicines (Advertising and Monitoring of Advertising) Amendment Regulations 1999 (S.I. No. 267); why there is no appeal to the courts proposed in respect of Regulation 13; and what are the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998 for Regulation 13.[HL1429]

Baroness Hayman: The Amendment Regulations fully implement Directive 92/28/EEC on the advertising of medicines and make explicit current powers of the Medicines Control Agency. In response to concerns expressed by industry following consultation, the regulations introduce significant safeguards for advertisers prior to any final decision being reached.

15 Mar 1999 : Column WA59

Regulation 13 gives effect to a process of review of preliminary decisions and ensures opportunity for re-examination of advertising. Detailed proposals for the independent panel which will review preliminary decisions on advertising will be available shortly.

The interpretation of legislation will remain a matter for the courts. Our legal advice is to the clear effect that the proposals are compatible with both Community law and the European Convention on Human Rights. Recital 11 and Article 12 of Council Directive 92/28/EC and Article 5(3) of Council Directive 84/450/EC make it clear that the proposed procedures and judicial controls were contemplated when those directives were adopted by the Council of Ministers. It is normal and appropriate for administrative authorities to exercise decision- making powers in a technical area of this kind subject to the supervisory jurisdiction of the High Court in judicial review proceedings.


Next Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page