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Surplus US Defence Equipment: Disposal to EU Member States

Lord Hardy of Wath asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Gilbert: The security interests of Western Europe are served by the maintenance of an adequate defence capability by the countries of Western Europe, as well as by the continued engagement of the United States in European security. Decisions on the acquisition of defence equipment are a matter for national governments.

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General Pinochet: Arrest Warrant

Lord Lamont of Lerwick asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answers by the Lord Chancellor on 26 January (WA 138-139), why the Crown Prosecution Service was not involved in the preparation of the first warrant for the extradition of General Pinochet; and what criteria determine whether the CPS will act as the agent of a foreign bid for extradition.[HL821]

The Lord Chancellor (Lord Irvine of Lairg): Extradition arrangements between the United Kingdom and the Kingdom of Spain are governed by the European Convention on Extradition 1957 ("the Convention"), which was given force in our domestic law by the European Convention on Extradition Order 1990. The position in English law is also regulated by the provisions of the Extradition Act 1989. Article 1 of the convention imposes an obligation on the contracting parties to surrender fugitives whose extradition is sought by another party to the convention in respect of proceedings for a criminal accusation or the carrying out of a sentence of imprisonment, provided the requirements of the convention are met.

For many years the Director of Public Prosecutions (who is now also Head of the Crown Prosecution Service of England and Wales, has acted in extradition proceedings before the English courts as the agent of foreign states with whom the United Kingdom has extradition arrangements. Pursuant to Section 3(2)(g) of the Prosecution of Offences Act 1985, this function was formally assigned to the Director by the Attorney General on 10 December 1996. The Crown Prosecution Service therefore acts on behalf of all states with whom the United Kingdom has extradition arrangements, including parties to the European Convention on Extradition 1957, unless the requesting state elects to be privately represented. This rarely happens.

Senator Pinochet was arrested by officers of the Extradition Squad of the Metropolitan Police Service at the request of the Kingdom of Spain on the evening of 16 October 1998, pursuant to a Provisional Warrant issued earlier the same evening by Bow Street Magistrates' Court under Section 8 of the Extradition Act 1989 and Article 16 of the convention. The Crown Prosecution Service was informed of the arrest and requested to act on behalf of the Kingdom of Spain on 19 October 1998. Since that time it has acted as the agent of the Kingdom of Spain in respect of this matter.

Cases involving provisional arrest are by their nature urgent. Such requests are transmitted by the prosecuting authorities in the requesting state via Interpol direct to the Extradition Squad of the Organised Crime Group of the Metropolitan Police Service. The practice is for officers from the Extradition Squad to apply for a provisional warrant directly to Bow Street Magistrates' Court. Once the warrant is issued, it will be executed by the officers from the Extradition Squad. Those officers then take the fugitive to Bow Street Magistrates' court and present any objections to bail on behalf of the requesting state. The case will be adjourned to a future

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date so that a lawyer from the Crown Prosecution Service can attend on behalf of the requesting state.

Scotland: Housing

Lord Selkirk of Douglas asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Sewel on 2 February relating to housing, what percentage figure of the total number of public sector houses sold in Scotland since 1970 423,860 represents; and[HL909]

    When the Scottish Office will have an estimate of home ownership as a percentage of all housing in Scotland at 31 December 1998; and[HL910]

    What percentage of the total housing stock of Scotland the figure of 117,937 housing association dwellings represents; and[HL911]

    Whether they will publish a graph showing the trend of public sector sales in Scotland of--


    (a) all public sector housing; and


    (b) tenant public sector housing;

    in comparison to England from 1979 to date; and[HL912]

    What is the total number of rents to mortgage sales in Scotland; and[HL913]

    What is the number of--


    (a) public sector houses; and


    (b) private sector houses;

    in Scotland built from 1979 to date.[HL914]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Scottish Office (Lord Sewel): The figure of 423,860 represents the total number of public sector house sales in Scotland between January 1973 and March 1998, as reported to the Scottish Office by local authorities, New Town Development Corporations, the former Scottish Special Housing Association and Scottish Homes. This should, therefore, represent 100 per cent. of all public sector sales in this period. As stated in my Answer of

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2 February (House of Lords Hansard, col. WA 192), information prior to 1973 is not held centrally. It is not possible therefore to calculate what percentage of all sales since 1970 the figure of 423,860 represents.

Provisional estimates of dwelling stock by tenure as at 31 December 1998 are expected to be available by the end of October 1999.

The figure of 117,937 represents the total number of housing association dwellings at 31 March 1998. There is no estimate of the total dwelling stock at 31 March 1998. However, The Scottish Office Statistical Bulletin (Housing Series HSG/1998-7) contains an estimate of dwelling stock by tenure at 31 December 1997. An estimated 5.1 per cent. of the Scottish housing stock at this time was owned by housing associations.

The information requested on public sector sales since 1979 in Scotland and in England is shown in the following table, and illustrated in the chart below:

Sales of public authority dwellings in Scotland: 1979 to 1997

YearAll sales in ScotlandSales to sitting tenants in Scotland(3)All sales in EnglandSales to sitting tenants in England(4)
19791,4031,01041,313--
19806,3145,91383,559--
198110,99510,54597,69991,439
198215,26414,235190,923185,027
198318,26917,877136,933128,102
198417,61616,519101,62495,335
198515,60114,92594,51184,210
198614,25813,99285,59181,279
198720,11918,988102,45893,417
198832,30531,591150,478139,677
198939,27538,943174,370149,130
199033,67332,968139,17696,572
199124,73523,00776,40452,860
199230,95624,03271,21842,288
199323,49720,06271,68142,607
199429,48021,29090,75046,163
199527,63416,96581,14934,094
199619,46513,12064,24831,797
199728,57116,51563,79839,292

(3) Includes Right to Buy, Voluntary sales and Rent to Mortgage.

(4) Includes Right to Buy and Voluntary Sales.

Source of English figures Housing and Construction Statistics 1979 to 1989 and 1987 to 1997.


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    1 Includes Right to Buy, Voluntary sales and Rent to Mortgage.


    2 Includes Right to Buy and Voluntary Sales.


    Source of English figures Housing and Construction Statistics 1979 to 1989 and 1987 to 1997.

Up to 31 March 1998, there have been 1,111 rent to mortgage sales made known to the Scottish Office by public authorities and housing associations.

The numbers of public and private sector houses which have been built in Scotland in each year since 1979 are given in the table below:

New Dwellings Completed in Scotland: 1979 to 1997

YearTotalPrivate SectorHousing AssociationsPublic Authorities
197923,78215,1755448,063
198020,61112,2428817,488
198120,01111,0211,9287,062
198216,42311,5231,1673,733
198317,92913,1661,2713,492
198418,83814,1152,0762,647
198518,41114,4351,1482,828
198618,63714,8701,4662,301
198717,70713,9041,1692,634
198818,27214,1791,2782,815
198920,19016,2871,6202,283
199020,36216,4611,9631,938
199119,52915,5332,2641,732
199218,44314,3893,0441,010
199321,39217,7112,723958
1994(5)21,404(5)17,7532,990(6)661
1995(5)24,486(5)18,3105,003(6)1,173
1996(5)20,754(5)17,8132,683(6)258
1997(5)21,680(5)17,0654,507(6)108

(5) Includes estimates for outstanding returns.

(6) Figures based on incomplete returns.


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