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Assisted Places Scheme: Savings from Abolition

Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department for Education and Employment (Baroness Blackstone): All the savings from the phasing out of the assisted places scheme will be used to reduce infant class sizes in the maintained sector. Pupils who might otherwise have taken up assisted places will not necessarily enter the maintained sector instead: some may take up independent school places with funding from private sources. Any net increase in maintained pupil numbers and costs which might result from the phasing out of the scheme would, of course, be one of the many factors taken into account in local authority settlements.

Maintained Special Schools: Inspection

Lord Northbourne asked Her Majesty's Government:

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Baroness Blackstone: There is no current provision is statute. The Government are considering the recommendations made by Sir William Utting in his recent report, People Like Us: The Report Of The Review Of The Safeguards For Children Living Away From Home. One of the recommendations is that the provision in Section 87 of the Children Act 1989 for local authority social services departments to inspect independent boarding schools be extended to cover maintained schools, maintained special schools and non-maintained special schools offering boarding provision.

National Childcare Strategy: Green Paper

Lord Bassam asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When the Green Paper on the National Childcare Strategy will be launched.[HL1964]

Baroness Blackstone: My right honourable friends the Secretary of State and the Secretary of State for Social Security and Minister for Women are launching a joint Green Paper on the National Childcare Strategy, Meeting the Childcare Challenge, today. In developing our proposals, we have been working closely with my right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, who has responsibility for lottery funding, and other colleagues.

The Green Paper sets out how we intend to make a reality of our manifesto commitment to develop a National Childcare Strategy. It is the first time a government have taken a coherent and strategic approach to childcare. We are backing the strategy with a substantial investment of public money--over £125 million in England over the coming years--and we are making available £170 million from the Lottery New Opportunities Fund to develop new out-of-school childcare provision.

The Green Paper sets out three steps to the strategy: raising quality, making childcare more affordable and making it more accessible. We will achieve this through working in partnership at local level, building on what already exists. Our aim is to ensure good quality, affordable childcare for children aged 0 to 14 in every neighbourhood, including both formal childcare and support for informal arrangements.

Our Green Paper sets out the principles of the National Childcare Strategy covering the whole of the UK, but the specific proposals for implementation relate to England. My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Scotland is launching a Green Paper on the childcare strategy in Scotland today. My right honourable friends the Secretaries of State for Northern Ireland and Wales are also planning to consult on the National Childcare Strategy in the near future.

The Green Paper has today been laid before Parliament and copies are available in the Printed Paper Office.

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Cancers: Incidence and Screening

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What information they have on the likely incidence of life-threatening breast cancer in women unscreened for the condition in the age groups 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL 1793]

    What information they have on the likely incidence of life-threatening lung cancer in the age group 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL1794]

    What information they have on the likely incidence of life-threatening cervical cancer in women unscreened for the condition in the age groups 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL1795]

    What information they have on the incidence of potentially life-threatening urological tumours in males aged 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL1796]

    What information they have on the incidence of potentially life-threatening cancer of the bowel in the age groups 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL1797]

    What information they have on the incidence of potentially life-threatening cancer of the liver in the age groups 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above; from what sources their information is drawn; and how much is spent on screening by each health authority.[HL1831 ]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Baroness Jay of Paddington): Most cancers are diseases of older age. Of the cancers to which the noble Lord refers, only breast and cervical cancers are screened for nationally. In England these two screening programmes are estimated to cost respectively £35 million and £132 million each year. The National Screening Committee in England is currently considering the case for colorectal cancer screening. The age ranges for incidence in the various cancers is shown in the tables together with the source of the data.

All cancers are potentially life threatening. Although lung cancer usually develops slowly over many decades, 80 per cent. of patients die within one year of diagnosis. Similarly for pancreatic cancer, about 90 per cent. of patients die within one year. In contract, prostate cancer can be life-threatening, but many are slow growing and death occurs through other causes. Breast cancer

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frequently occurs in middle age for no understood reason and there is no known method of prevention, and the risk of a secondary cancer can continue for up to 20 years.

Cancer incidence, selected sites, England and Wales, 1992: Number of new cases and rate per 100,000 population

Lung cancer (ICD9 162)
Males Females
NumberRateNumberRate
30-39711.9671.8
40-4984418.644812.9
50-592,53495.91,10841.7
60-697,464316.63,835139.9
70+14,042852.06,986194.8

Colorectal cancer (ICD9 153 & 154)
Males Females
NumberRateNumberRate
30-391323.81113.1
40-4960017.351614.9
50-591,77667.21,25847.3
60-694,128175.13,066118.0
70+8,005371.79,559266.6

Breast cancer (female)* Cervical cancer*
(ICD9 174) (ICD9 180)
NumberRateNumberRate
30-391,50741.876921.3
40-494,822139.768118.7
50-596,813256.448518.5
60-697,354263.053220.5
70+10,848302.587024.3

Prostate cancer Testicular cancer
(ICD9 185) (ICD9 186)
NumberRateNumberRate
30-3940.145912.5
40-49401.42747.9
50-5958721.11013.8
60-693,325141.0482.0
70+11,854550.5492.3

Cancer of the penis
(ICD9 187)
NumberRate
30-3980.2
40-49411.2
50-59552.1
60-69763.2
70+1697.8

Bladder cancer (males)
(ICD9 188)
NumberRate
30-39501.4
40-492878.3
50-5984131.6
60-692,375100.7
70+4,961230.4


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Kidney cancer (males)
(ICD9 189)
NumberRate
30-39571.5
40-492086.0
50-5944116.7
60-6979033.5
70+1,19955.7

Liver cancer (ICD9 155)
Males Females
NumberRateNumberRate
30-39100.390.2
40-49331.0210.8
50-591284.8451.5
60-6925911.01295.0
70+45120.93369.4

* All women, i.e. both screened and unscreened.

Source:

Registrations of cancer diagnosed in 1992, England and Wales, Monitor MB1 97/1, ONS, 1997.


Cancer incidence in Scotland 1996 Numbers of new cases

Age group
ICD30 to 3940 to 4950 to 5960 to 6970+
Males
162 Lung10713628051,308
185 Prostate081164881,135
186 Testes69271054
187 Penis16131017
188 Bladder53396245492
189 Kidney5284897149
153 to 154 Bowel1569231478917
155 Liver15144150
Females
174 Breast161513781711933
180 Cervical7485535186
182 Lung897180551965
188 Bladder51137101282
189 Kidney3142667110
153 to 154 Bowel14781673511,015
155 Liver04121650

Note:

There were no new reported cases of cancer of the liver in the 20 to 29 age group.

Source:

Information and Statistics Division--National Health Service in Scotland.


Cancer incidence in Northern Ireland 1995 (provisional) Number of new cases

Age group
30 to 3940 to 4950 to 5960 to 6970+
Breast1879164203408
Lung235114251343
Cervical61710723
Urological in Males142877382
Bowel682192303930
Liver1351737

Note 1:

"Urological in males" refers to kidney, prostate and bladder cancers.

Note 2:

"Bowel" refers to colon, colorectal and rectal cancers.

Source:

Northern Ireland Registry.


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