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Varroa Mite Control

Lord Swinfen asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Donoughue: The Government are monitoring the situation on the Continent but are not aware of any incidence of varroa mite resistance in the United Kingdom.

The question of any application for authorisation of new veterinary medicines to control varroa mites is one for the pharmaceutical industry. No veterinary medicine

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is authorised unless it satisfies the statutory criteria of safety, quality and efficacy.

Whilst the administration of unauthorised veterinary medicinal products is prohibited by the Animals and Animal Products (Examination for Residues and Maximum Residue Limits) Regulations 1997, the situation is different for non-medicinal substances such as talc, formic or lactic acid. The regulations prohibit the administration of such products only where, if transmitted to an animal product, they would be likely to be harmful to human health. These regulations are implemented primarily through residues surveillance programmes and it is likely that, only where residues of an unauthorised substance are detected, would further action be taken in relation to the use of that substance. In such circumstances the Government would take expert advice on the human health implications and any relevant information on the implications for bee welfare and the industry in general before considering further action.

Beef Imports: Origins

Lord Stanley of Alderley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether all raw, cooked or processed imported beef is traced back to the origin of the animals' birth; and if so how.

Lord Donoughue: In common with domestically produced beef, there is currently no requirement for imported raw, cooked or processed beef to be traced back to the origin of the animals' birth.

Bone Meal Fertilisers

Lord Stanley of Alderley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether it is permissible to use bone meal from beef animals on the garden, and if so, whether individuals are allowed to obtain these bones to process into bone meal.

Lord Donoughue: Under the Beef Bones Regulations 1997, bovine bones removed from any bone-in beef deboned in Great Britain must be disposed of as animal waste under Part II of Schedule I to the Animal By-Products Order 1992. Such bones will not therefore be available to individual consumers and may not be sold or used in the preparation of any food or ingredient for human consumption. They can however, continue to be used for other purposes such as commercial manufacture of bone meal fertiliser for the garden.

Beef Bones for Dog Food

Lord Stanley of Alderley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether it is permissible to obtain bones from beef animals to feed to dogs.

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Lord Donoughue: Bones removed from bone-in beef deboned in butchers shops in Great Britain may not be sold or given away to feed to dogs. Such bones must be disposed of as animal waste under Part II of Schedule I to the Animal By-Products Order 1992, in accordance with the Beef Bones Regulations 1997. Dog owners can purchase sterilised bones from knackers' yard.

Fisheries Surveillance

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Which offshore vessels are at present used within the Fisheries Protection Squadron (Sea Fisheries Inspectorate) and Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency, what is the expected lifespan of such vessels and the contingency plans to replace them; and whether it is expected that the number of vessels will increase or decrease: (a) up to the end of the year 2002; (b) after the year 2002.

Lord Donoughue: Responsibility for fisheries surveillance in British fisheries limits is shared between the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) and the Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency (SFPA) on behalf of the Scottish Office Agriculture, Environment and Fisheries Department.

In the waters adjacent to England and Wales, fisheries surveillance is undertaken on behalf of MAFF by the Royal Navy's Fishery Protection Squadron. The squadron comprises a core of eight purpose-built vessels and is supplemented by the short term deployment of Hunt Class Mine Countermeasure Vessels. The core vessels are:

NameDate of commissioningCurrent expected lifespan
HMS "Guernsey"197730 years
HMS "Shetland"197730 years
HMS "Orkney"197730 years
HMS "Lindisfarne"197830 years
HMS "Alderney197930 years
HMS "Anglesey"197930 years
HMS "Leeds Castle"198130 years
HMS "Dumbarton Castle"198230 years

Each year the Navy undertakes to provide MAFF with an agreed number of patrol days using the above vessels and mine hunters.

In the waters adjacent to Scotland, the SFPA operates four offshore vessels. These are:

NameDate of commissioningCurrent expected lifespan
"Westra"1975until 2005
"Sulisker"1980until 2010
"Vigilant"1982until 2012
"Norna"1987until 2017

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Additionally the SFPA operates two inshore vessels which were commissioned in 1983 with an expected lifespan of some 15 years.

The Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland also operates an inshore patrol vessel, the "Ken Vickers", which was commissioned in 1992 with an expected lifespan of 10 years.

Future requirements for fisheries surveillance in British fishery limits are reviewed from year to year.

No decisions have yet been taken with regard to the replacement of the vessels named above or to the number of vessels that will be required for fisheries surveillance up to the year 2002 and beyond.

Fish Spawning Stock

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the expected drop in spawning stock biomass for hake, plaice and megrim from the year 2000, given that the landing sizes have been set at 27 cm, 22 cm and 20 cm from this date.

Lord Donoughue: Changes in landing size will not, of themselves, result in any change in spawning stock biomass. It is the mesh size of nets, not the permitted landing size, which determines the size at which fish are killed.

From 1 January 2000, fishermen will be able to land hake, plaice and megrim at these smaller sizes rather than be forced to discard and waste fish that have already been killed.

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Marine Resource Consumption in the EC

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What proportion of the annual consumption of marine resources in the European Community came from:


    (a) waters within the 200 mile limit of member states;


    (b) waters of third world countries with which special agreements have been made;


    (c) countries other than those mentioned in (a) and (b)

    in each year since 1983.

Lord Donoughue: The available information on consumption of marine resources in the European Community does not permit the requested identification of the geographical origin of the products contributing to that consumption.

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What has been the total annual consumption of fish and other marine resources in each year since 1985 for the 15 member states of the European Community.

Lord Donoughue: The available information which has been produced by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations is set out in the table below.

These estimates of consumption are calculated by FAO as production adjusted for imports net of exports and non-food uses. Data are given for all years since 1985, though not all the current 15 member states have been part of the European Community for the whole of this period.

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Total consumption of fish and other marine resources--FAO estimates
Metric tons in live weight (thousands)

19851986198719881989199019911992199319941995
Belgium/ Luxembourg181184185184181196194203187202215
Greece168179186175196213219232246279254
Finland153156158161161164163165163172169
France1,3551,4401,5201,6111,5901,7371,6961,6541,5921,5821,537
Germany8489128288719521,0469821,0269871,0601,052
Ireland55666159565853606470nd
Italy1,1311,0901,2451,1511,2041,2231,2981,2551,2261,2301,245
Netherlands188155175203207162155203210215223
Portugal547554569586581582606571585575573
Spain1,2771,3281,3391,3761,3541,3511,3391,3731,4071,4571,446
Sweden215225218225232233230229235248nd
UK 1,0201,0211,0301,0471,0751,1071,0821,1121,1001,1221,113
Austria464953616971728078ndnd
Denmark100101105109109101105110103ndnd

nd: no data available.

Source:

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations.




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