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Consultant Psychiatrists Working in Mental Illness

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Jay of Paddington: The latest available information is shown in the following table.

Hospital medical consultants by psychiatry group 30 September 1970 to 1996. Whole-time equivalents, rounded to the nearest 10

YearGBUK
19701,130--
19711,190--
19721,250--
19731,330--
19741,390--
19751,440--
19761,520--
19771,530--
19781,590--
19791,630--
19801,690--
19811,740--
19821,820--
19831,860--
19841,900--
19851,930--
19861,980--
19872,010--
19882,090--
19892,130--
19902,2002,250
19912,2002,260
19922,2102,270
19932,2402,300
19942,2702,330
19952,4402,500
19962,4702,550

Source:

The medical and dental workforce census 30 September 1970 to 1996.

Notes:

1. Northern Ireland data are consultants working in mental illness, psychotherapy and child and adolescent psychiatry.

2. Scotland data exclude consultants working in community psychiatry.

3. GB data available from 1970 onwards, but UK data only available from 1990.

4. The census is a snapshot at 30 September each year.


Meningitis: Research

Lord HolmPatrick asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In what ways they contribute to, and what progress is being made in, research into meningitis,

14 Oct 1997 : Column WA152

    particularly the meningococcal virus, in view of the number of fatalities it causes among the young.

Baroness Jay of Paddington: The main agency through which the Government support medical and clinical research is the Medical Research Council (MRC). The MRC is an independent body which receives its grant-in-aid from the Office of Science and Technology, which is part of the Department of Trade and Industry. The council is always willing to consider for support soundly based new scientific proposals in competition with other applications. As regards research into meningitis, the MRC is currently providing support for two MRC units and funding 12 research grants at a cost of £2.3 million in 1995-96. The Department of Health's Policy Research Programme (PRP) recently commissioned a study entitled Phase 2 evaluation of meningococcal and pneumococcal vaccines in UK children. The study is being carried out by the Public Health Laboratory Service at a total cost of over £1 million. In addition, the PRP has funded studies entitled Phase 2 clinical trial of candidate meningococcal vaccines (£197,581) and Acquisition of meningococcal in marine commando recruits (£93,478).

The National Health Service Research and Development Programme is currently funding, at a cost of £80,000, a study in North Thames Region entitled Neurodevelopmental examination at nine years of age of children who suffered neonatal meningitis.

Following its recent research review, one of the objectives of the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research (CAMR) is to identify and characterise antigens that may have potential for inclusion in vaccines against group B meningococcal disease and pneumococcal disease or for the diagnosis and immunotherapy of these diseases. The Department of Health is currently funding two studies within this objective, Meningococcal antigens and pneumococcal antigens, at an estimated cost of £185,000 in 1997-98. Other studies within this objective are being taken forward by the National Meningitis Trust and the World Health Organisation, in collaboration with the Department of Health.

Meningitis: Advice on Diagnosis

Lord HolmPatrick asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What procedures the NHS has in place to ensure the effective and speedy diagnosis of meningitis, particularly in young children.

Baroness Jay of Paddington: Guidance on the diagnosis of meningococcal disease was published by the Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) in 1995 Control of Meningococcal Disease: Guidelines for Consultants in Communicable Disease Control and, Control of Meningococcal Disease: Guidance for Microbiologists. This gives details of the various methods for diagnosis, including new methods under evaluation by the PHLS. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) investigation is now routinely provided by the

14 Oct 1997 : Column WA153

PHLS Meningococcal Reference Unit. Attention is drawn to the importance of close communication between clinicians, microbiologists and consultants in communicable disease control. Advice on the diagnosis of meningitis is contained in the memorandum Immunisation against infectious disease which is provided free to all doctors. Additionally, the chief medical officer writes annually to all doctors alerting them to the expected winter rise in cases of meningococcal infection and reminding them of the value of early treatment with penicillin.

NHS Cancer Patients: Cost

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the average cost of NHS treatment for a patient suffering from cancer.

Baroness Jay of Paddington: The average cost to the National Health Service of treating a patient suffering from cancer cannot be identified separately. Overall, expenditure on cancer services accounts for an estimated seven per cent. of NHS resources.

NHS Cancer Patients: Waiting Lists

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many patients suffering from cancer are on NHS waiting lists.

Baroness Jay of Paddington: Information collected centrally on patients currently on a waiting list at hospitals in England is specialty based and does not separately identify patients by their prospective diagnosis. Information on patients actually admitted is available by diagnosis and in 1994-95, the latest year for which data are available in England, 364,000 people with a diagnosis of cancer were admitted for surgical or non-surgical treatment from a waiting list. Information on patients currently on a waiting list at hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is collected on the same basis as in England. The latest information on admissions available for Wales is for 1995-96 and shows that during that year 33,000 patients with a diagnosis of cancer were admitted to Welsh hospitals from waiting lists. The latest information for Northern Ireland is also for 1995-96. There, 15,000 patients with a diagnosis of cancer were admitted from a waiting list during that year. Comparable information for Scotland is not available.

NHS Heart Bypass Surgery

Lord Lucas asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many NHS coronary artery bypass grafts have been carried out each year since 1970.

14 Oct 1997 : Column WA154

Baroness Jay of Paddington: The information is shown in the following table.

Table: coronary artery bypass grafts performed in NHS hospitals

YearEnglandScotlandWalesNorthern IrelandYearly Total
1970--(29)------(31)0
1971--(29)------(31)0
1972--(29)6----(31)6
1973--(29)2610--(31)36
1974--(29)238--(31)31
1975--(29)6714--(31)81
1976--(29)11327--(31)140
1977--(29)18729--(31)216
1978--(29)22324--(31)247
1979--(29)24438--(31)282
1980--(29)26537--(31)302
1981--(29)33766--(31)403
1982--(29)39271--(31)463
1983--(29)425155--(31)580
1984--(29)646163--(31)809
1985--(29)814222--(31)1,036
1986--(29)1,058206--(31)1,264
1987-88--(29)1,295212--(31)1,507
1988-899,6551,426184--(31)11,265
1989-9010,6111,544249--(31)12,404
1990-9111,7971,364144--(31)13,305
1991-9212,8371,6124103914,898
1992-9314,4881,6874726016,707
1993-9415,8632,20953549319,100
1994-9517,1362,29856071920,713
1995-96--(30)2,2686297643,661

Notes:

England:

Moved to counting over the financial year rather than calendar year from 1987-88.

(29) Method of data collection prior to 1988 means that coronary artery by-pass grafts are not separately identifiable. No data available.

(30) Data not yet available.

Scotland:

All operations relate to those carried out in NHS hospitals as principal operation.

Wales:

Moved to counting over the financial year rather than calendar year from 1983-84.

Northern Ireland:

(31) Adequate data prior to 1991-92 is not available.



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