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Betting Duty

Lord Burnham asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The table below shows receipts for calendar years 1995 and 1996, the periods which correspond most closely to the accruals periods requested.

£ million

YearsGeneral Betting DutyPools DutyTotal Duty
1995501.3242.1743.4
1996448.5130.9579.4

For general betting duty, the figures shown for each year represent duty on monies staked for the year to end November. The rate of duty was 7.75 per cent. prior to 1 March 1996 and 6.75 thereafter. For pools, the 1995 figure represents duty on moneys staked from late December 1994 to late December 1995. Because of a change from weekly to monthly payment, the 1996 figure represents duty on stakes for late December 1995 to end November 1996. The rates of duty were 37.5 per cent. from August 1991; 32.5 per cent. from 6 May 1995; 27.5 per cent. from 3 December 1995 and 26.5 per cent. from 5 May 1996.

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Government Contracts: Prompt Payment

Baroness Denton of Wakefield asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What are their requirements of contractors to departments with regard to prompt payment, and how these can be enforced.

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: Since April 1992 it has been a requirement that government contracts should require contractors to include clauses in their contracts with sub-contractors requiring them to be paid promptly, normally within 30 days of receipt of a valid invoice. Where a contractor fails to comply with the terms of its sub-contracts, sub-contractors may enforce payment through the courts in the normal way.

Census Returns: Preservation

Lord Teviot asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What decisions have been or are to be taken by the Public Record Office, in conjunction with the Office for National Statistics, to decide the form in which the census returns for the 20th Century are to be preserved as public records; and where they will be retained.

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Chief Executive of the Office of National Statistics. I have asked him to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Lord Teviot from the Chief Executive of the Office for National Statistics, Dr. Tim Holt, dated 12 August 1997.

I have been asked to reply, as Director of the Office for National Statistics, to your recent question concerning the form in which census returns for the 20th century are to be preserved and retained.

Census records are subject to two main pieces of legislation. The first is the Census Act 1920, as amended by the Census (Confidentiality) Act 1991, which gives protection to personal information given by the public at the time of the census. The second is the Public Records Act 1958. Lord Chancellor's Instrument No. 12 of 1966, made under Section 5(1) of the Act, closes census returns for 100 years, because the information they contain is given under a pledge of confidentiality.

The census returns for England and Wales for the years 1901 and 1911 are in the custody of the Public Record Office. The 1901 census returns are being microfilmed to enable researchers to have available the same facility as for the censuses of 1841-1891.

The Public Records Act 1958 Section 3(4) permits the retention by the person responsible for them, of those public records selected for permanent preservation after they are 30 years old, if the Lord Chancellor gives his approval. In the case of census returns, I am the person responsible as Registrar General, and permission is sought from the Lord

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Chancellor for the retention of census records by my departmental records office every 10 years. The census returns for 1921, 1951 and 1961 are retained under this provision. There are currently no plans to deposit records from these censuses with the Public Record Office by a specified date. The returns for 1931 were destroyed by fire during the Second World War and there was no census in 1941. The returns for the later censuses of 1971, 1981 and 1991 are of course not yet 30 years old and are held in my custody.

Discussions are currently taking place between the Office for National Statistics and the Public Record Office on the issue of how census returns will be preserved but no decisions have yet been made.

Census Returns: Viewing

Lord Teviot asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When the public including local and family history researchers, will be able to consult the census returns of 1911, 1921, 1951, 1961, 1971, 1981, and 1991; and whether they plan to review the prescription of closure periods of the census returns; and

    Whether they intend to destroy the original census material presently held by the Registrar General; and, if the decision is taken to microfilm the original records, whether the originals will nevertheless be retained and preserved.

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Chief Executive of the Office for National Statistics. I have asked him to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Lord Teviot from the Chief Executive of the Office for National Statistics, Dr. Tim Holt, dated 12 August 1997.

I have been asked to reply, as Director of the Office for National Statistics, to your recent questions concerning viewing census returns and microfilming original records.

The census returns for the years 1911, 1921, 1951, 1961, 1971, 1981 and 1991 are subject to the provisions of the Lord Chancellor's Instrument No. 12 of 1966, made under Section 5(1) of the Public Records Act 1958. They are closed from public inspection for a period of 100 years. The Economic Secretary to the Treasury has recently considered the case for the early release of census records for the purposes of genealogical research, but is of the opinion that, whilst it is recognised that the release of such information would be of both historical interest and commercial value to researchers, the maintenance of public confidence in the census is paramount. It would be unwise to amend retrospectively the period of closure as the credibility of assurances about recent and future censuses would be affected if the Government is seen to be departing from previous assurances.

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No decision on the microfilming of the census returns currently in the custody of the Registrar General or on the permanent retention and preservation of the original records has yet been made.

Tobacco Products: Tax Revenue

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the latest total of taxes including VAT paid by (a) smokers, (b) the tobacco manufacturing industry, (c) wholesale distributors of tobacco products and (d) tobacco retailers.

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: Information is not available in the form requested. The total of excise duty and VAT on tobacco products and of income and corporation tax paid by tobacco manufacturers was some £10 billion in 1996-97.

NHS Intensive Care: Nursing and Midwifery Staff

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What has been the number of whole-time equivalent NHS hospital and community health services qualified nursing and midwifery staff working in (a) general/coronary intensive care and (b) paediatrics intensive care for each year since 1970.

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Baroness Jay of Paddington): The numbers of qualified nursing and midwifery staff in England, working in general/coronary intensive care and paediatric intensive care areas of work, between 1981 and 1994, are shown in the following table. These staff

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are not separately identified from other hospital nursing staff in England before 1981 and after 1994, and not separately identified in figures for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

NHS Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) nursing and midwifery staff (excluding agency) working in specific intensive care areas in England as at 30 September of each year
Whole-time equivalent

YearGeneral/coronaryPaediatrics intensive care
19813,420160
19824,130220
19834,640240
19845,190300
19855,630340
19865,880360
19876,090400
19886,240440
19896,580510
19906,900560
19917,300640
19927,750690
19937,960650
19948,190760

Notes:

A new classification for non-medical NHS staff was introduced in 1995 which does not separately identify nurses in intensive care areas of work. Figures are rounded to the nearest ten whole-time equivalents.

Source:

Department of Health non-medical workforce census.


NHS Project 2000: Statistics

Baroness Cumberlege asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What was the number of Project 2000 students in each year since the scheme was introduced.

Baroness Jay of Paddington: The information requested is set out in the following table.

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1989-19901990-19911991-19921992-19931993-19941994-19951995-19961996-1997
England(8)1,051(8)5,554(9)14,142(10)23,810(10)31,097(10)32,619(8)33,764(10)36,215
Wales------1,8712,0621,798(6)--(6)--
Northern Ireland----4631,1021,6531,5451,3081,117
Scotland------2,0483,9695,6085,8305,933

Notes:

-- no data collected at this time.

(6) no data yet available.

(7) From ENB Annual Report 1989-1990.

(8) From ENB Annual Report 1990-1991.

(9) From ENB Annual Report 1991-1992.

(10) From ENB Annual Report 1996-1997.

ENB = English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting.

Data for England and Scotland is collected at 31 March while data for Northern Ireland and Wales is collected at 30 September.

Data for Scotland includes midwives.


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