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NATO Multi-national Formations: UK Participation

Lord Wallace of Saltaire asked Her Majesty's Government:

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Earl Howe): The UK currently commits forces to the following NATO multi-national formations: the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC), Allied Command Europe Mobile Force (Land) (AMF(L)), Multi-National Division (Central) (MNDC), the Standing Naval Force Mediterranean (STANAVFORMED), the Standing Naval Force Atlantic (STANAVFORLANT), the Standing Naval Mine Countermeasures Force (STANAVMINFOR), NATO Airborne Early Warning Force (NAEWF), Immediate Reaction Force (Air) (IRF(A)).

The formal basis for the commitment of HM Forces to these multi national formations and to NATO's integrated military command structure is the 1949 Washington Treaty and the 1954 Paris Agreements. The Paris Agreements provide the framework for the commitment, command and control of national military units assigned to the multi-national formations listed above. Within these agreements, nations have agreed detailed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with NATO's military authorities to formalise the manning, administrative and support arrangements. Records of MoUs are not held centrally and a comprehensive list of MoUs involving the UK could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

On 9th May 1973 the UK and Netherlands signed an MoU creating the UK/Netherlands Amphibious Landing Force (UK/NL LF). This MoU was re-adapted in 1979 and 1987 and is currently being revised again.

Warsaw Pact Countries:Joint Exercises with British Troops

Lord Wallace of Saltaire asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In which countries formerly members of the Warsaw Pact British troops have taken part in exercises over the past two years, and in which of these countries it is currently planned that British troops will participate in exercises in the coming year.

Earl Howe: The information requested is contained in the Statement on the Defence Estimates 1995 (page 20) and the Statement on the Defence Estimates 1996 (page 7), copies of which are in the Library of the House.

Warsaw Pact Countries: UK Military Advisers

Lord Wallace of Saltaire asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In which countries formerly members of the Warsaw Pact British military or civilian personnel are currently acting as advisers to defence ministries and armed forces.

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Earl Howe: One British officer currently has an appointment as the Deputy Chief of Staff in Latvia; and one officer is serving as an adviser to the Czech General Staff.

Children: Employment in TV Programmesand Advertising

Lord Jenkins of Putney asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Under what circumstances it is legal to employ children in television programmes and advertising and whether the law is enforced.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Baroness Cumberlege): Local authorities are responsible for enforcing the law in this area and may license children to take part in such activities in any 12-month period for up to 40 days for those under 14 years of age and up to 80 days for those who are over 14.

Prison Service: Plans and Performance Indicators

Baroness Seccombe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether the Prison Service will publish its plans for 1996-99 and what key performance indicators will measure the service's performance in 1996-97?

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Blatch): The Prison Service is today publishing its plan for 1996-99. The six strategic objectives of the period are:


    1. To achieve unit cost reductions of 10.2 per cent.; and to contain capital spending by encouraging greater private sector involvement; while maintaining the balance between security, control, purposeful regimes, and support for staff.


    2. To sustain a permanent step improvement in performance on escapes, building on what we achieved in 1995-96; in particular to complete the programme of work to enhance security for Category A and high profile Category B prisoners, and to achieve a significant reduction in escapes from escorts.


    3. To maintain control and a safe environment for staff and prisoners in the face of cost reductions and operational pressures: specifically, to carry through work on incentives, the drugs strategy and prevention of suicide.


    4. To maintain balanced regimes which support control and include affordable, effective activities to reduce risk of re-offending.

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    5. To meet basic health care needs of the population, and to target particularly the transfer of mentally ill prisoners to hospital.


    6. To strengthen effectiveness of staff at all levels and specifically to increase the effectiveness of financial controls and systems.

The plan also sets performance targets for 1996-97.

With the agreement of colleagues in the Treasury and the Office of Public Service, as required by the Prison Service Framework Document, my honourable friend the Minister of State has decided to make changes to the service's key performance indicators.

These changes aim to:


    recognise that the service has achieved some of its key performance targets in full;


    reflect the merging priorities for the services in the coming years: and


    take account of the recommendations made by Sir John Learmont on performance indicators.

For 1996-97 my honourable friend has decided that the service should drop two of its existing KPIs. These are:


    KPI4 (access to sanitation): the service achieved its target of ensuring that all prisoners have 24-hour access to sanitation on 12th April 1996: and


    KPI7 (access to minimum visits): all prisoners have had the opportunity to exceed the minimum visiting entitlement for the last two years, so KP17 has been fully achieved.

In their place, the service has three new KPIs, covering:


    the proportion of random drug tests that prove positive. This new indicator was recommended by Sir John Learmont and will measure the service's performance in achieving one of its key priorities, dealing with drug abuse in prisons;


    the number of prisoners who complete programmes accredited as being likely to reduce the risks of re-offending. This new indicator will measure the service's performance in fulfilling one of its primary functions: preparing prisoners for release;


    the number of days per year staff spend in training. This new indicator was recommended by Sir John Learmont. It will encourage the service to improve its performance on staff training, which in turn will lead to improvements in performance across the board.

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My honourable friend has also decided that the service's existing KPI on time unlocked should be amended. Currently this measures the proportion of prisoners held in establishments that unlock all prisoners for at least 12 hours per weekday. The Director General has advised her that some establishments have experienced problems, including drugs trafficking and intimidation of vulnerable prisoners, where prisoners are unlocked in the evenings without constructive activities being available to keep them occupied. My honourable friend judges a lower threshold more appropriate. Therefore, from 1996-97, the KPI will measure the proportion of prisoners who are held in establishments that unlock all prisoners on standard or enhanced regimes for more than 10 hours per weekday. This will maintain pressure for improvement in those establishments unlocking only for eight or nine hours. There will be an increased target for purposeful activity of 26.5 hours per week for 1996-97 compared with 25.5 hours per week for 1995-96.

In addition, the plan will include additional performance information covering:


    a breakdown of assaults showing separately those on staff and on prisoners and others;


    the number and distribution of self inflicted deaths;


    staff turnover and sickness rates; and


    the rate of reduction in the headquarters overhead.

Taken together these changes will give the Prison Service a challenging set of targets across the range of its activities, while allowing it to focus on its top priorities of custody, control, tackling drug abuse and working to reduce re-offending.

The targets my honourable friend has set for 1996-97 will require the service to improve performance against most of its indicators, including escapes, the rate of assaults, the rate of positive testing for drug misuse, the amount of purposeful activity for prisoners, investment in staff training and cost per prisoner place.

Foreign Nationals in UK Prisons

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will publish, for the latest convenient date, a list of foreign nationals in the prisons of England and Wales and of Scotland giving the name of the country and the number of prisoners who are citizens of that country.

Baroness Blatch: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Lord Avebury from the Director General of the Prison Service, Mr. Richard Tilt, dated 20th May 1996.

Lady Blatch has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking for the number and nationalities of foreign nationals in the prison population.

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Information for England and Wales is given in the attached table. Information for Scottish prisons is available from the Scottish Office.

Foreign nationals in the prison population of England and Wales on 30th April 1996(1), by nationality and sex

NationalityMalesFemalesMales and Females
All Nationalities52,0612,18154,242
British47,3541,84849,202
Foreign nationals3,9562874,243
Europe1,391691,460
Albania6--6
Austria5--5
Azerbaijan1--1
Belgium28432
Bosnia-Herzegovina2--2
Bulgaria5--5
Croatia112
Cyprus70171
Czechoslovakia5--5
Denmark123
Finland3--3
France44145
Georgia2--2
Germany55560
Gibraltar1--1
Greece17--17
Hungary819
Iceland1--1
Irish Republic61225637
Italy83487
Kirgizstan1--1
Latvia1--1
Lithuania9--9
Luxembourg1--1
Malta11112
Netherlands12217139
Norway2--2
Poland29332
Portugal38--38
Romania17--17
Russia11112
San Marino1--1
Serbia2--2
Sweden3--3
Slovakia1--1
Spain24125
Switzerland3--3
Turkey1401141
Turkmenistan2--2
Yugoslavia23124
Asia80624830
Bangladesh67269
British Indian Ocean Territory2--2
Burma2--2
China26127
Hong Kong11--11
India2815286
Indonesia3--3
Korea (south)1--1
Lao Peoples Democratic Republic1--1
Malaysia13--13
Maldives1--1
Nepal2--2
Pakistan3117318
Philippines459
Singapore8--8
Sri Lanka30131
Thailand314
Vietnam34236
Yemen (north)5--5
Yemen (south)1--1
West Indies58975664
Anguilla1--1
Antigua7--7
Barbados19221
Bermuda1--1
Cuba2--2
Dominica314
Dominican Republic5--5
Grenada13114
Guyana331346
Jamaica46356519
Montserrat 3--3
St. Kitts and Nevis1--1
St. Lucia10111
St. Vincent and the Grenadines4--4
Trinidad and Tobago23124
Virgin Islands1--1
Central/South America11014124
Argentina1--1
Belize2--2
Bolivia1--1
Brazil9211
Chile1--1
Colombia65772
Costa Rica--11
Ecuador3--3
Honduras1--1
Mexico1--1
Nicaragua6--6
Panama1--1
Peru9312
Uruguay1--1
Venezuela9110
North America731790
Canada27229
USA461561
Middle East1133116
Afghanistan17--17
Egypt9110
Iran31--31
Iraq13--13
Israel10--10
Jordan6--6
Kuwait2--2
Lebanon13--13
Oman1--1
Saudi Arabia3--3
Syria527
United Arab Emirates3--3
Africa82779906
Algeria102--102
Angola14216
Benin1--1
Burundi1--1
Cameroon2--2
Central African Republic5--5
Congo1--1
Djibouti1--1
Ethiopia718
Gabon1--1
Gambia27128
Ghana9414108
Guinea1--1
Ivory Coast6--6
Kenya39342
Liberia9--9
Libya14--14
Madagascar1--1
Malawi4--4
Mauritania213
Mauritius12113
Morocco31--31
Moza mbique2--2
Namibia1--1
Niger4--4
Nigeria24542287
Rwanda1--1
Seychelles2--2
Sierra Leone12--12
Somalia44246
South Africa26228
St. Helena1--1
Sudan6--6
Tanzania13215
Togo3--3
Tunisia426
Uganda31233
Zaire40--40
Zambia8412
Zimbabwe9--9
Oceania47653
Australia34236
Fiji1--1
New Zealand12416
Unrecorded75146797

(1) Provisional data.


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