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16 Oct 1995 : Column WA67

Written Answers

Monday, 16th October 1995.

Taxing Masters: Professional Qualifications

Lord Cocks of Hartcliffe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What professional qualifications are held by the Taxing Masters.

The Lord Chancellor (Lord Mackay of Clashfern): Taxing Masters of the Supreme Court are required to be persons who have a seven-year general qualification (Supreme Court Act 1981, Schedule 2 and the Courts and Legal Services Act 1990, Section 71). There are six full-time Taxing Masters, all of whom qualified as solicitors. There are 15 deputy Taxing Masters, of whom 13 qualified as solicitors and two as barristers.

Legal Aid Payments

The Lord Cocks of Hartcliffe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What amounts were paid to individual counsel and firms of solicitors in R v Saunders, R v Kellard and R v Levy.

The Lord Chancellor: Total Crown Court legal aid payments, including additional costs approved on appeal to the Taxing Master, to individual counsel and solicitor firms in R v Saunders & Others, R v Kellard & Others and R v Levy & Others, were as follows:

Counsel and solicitor firms £
R v Saunders & Others
Landau & Landau Solicitors 46,901
Pannone Blackburn Solicitors 665,513
R. Ferguson QC Counsel 315,987
A. Shaw QC Counsel 257,833
R v Kellard & Others (Britannia Parks)
Offenbach & Co Solicitors 1,389,158
Smith Partnership Solicitors 174,566
Daynes Hills & Perks Solicitors 117,371
Warren & Allen Solicitors 12,408
D. Day QC Counsel 460,299
R. Offenbach Counsel 322,803
N. Purnell QC Counsel 1,725
L. Kershen QC Counsel 5,282
D. McEvoy QC Counsel 419,337
C. B. Nicholls Counsel 278,218
R. Gibbs QC Counsel 11,546
J. Orrell Counsel 2,300
J. Stobart Counsel 34,848
A. T. Smith QC Counsel 68,156
N. Mylne QC Counsel 365,012
S. Clayton Counsel 269,118
C. Donnellan Counsel 173,138
J. Goldring QC Counsel 25,290
N. Godsmark Counsel 17,638
R v Levy & Others (Barlow Clowes)
Burton Copeland Solicitors 2,080,795
Kingsley Napley Solicitors 606,967
Walker Morris Turnbull Solicitors 1,282,335
Peters & Peters Solicitors 283,987
Pickering Kenyon Solicitors 84,926
B. D. Laddie Solicitors 72,731
A. Hacking QC Counsel 261,014
M. Steiger QC Counsel 185,854
A. Glass QC Counsel 315,641
P. Ader Counsel 210,746
R. Rhodes QC Counsel 332,144
M.H.K. Hamer Counsel 171,560
D. Whitehouse QC Counsel 309,312
J. Blair-Gould Counsel 206,569
S. Solley QC Counsel 28,750
C. Salmon Counsel 41,617
R. Marshall-Andrews QC Counsel 30,218
R. O'Rourke Counsel 24,894

These amounts have been assessed as reasonable by the appropriate taxing authorities. They include VAT, disbursements and other necessary expenses incurred.


16 Oct 1995 : Column WA68

Lord Cocks of Hartcliffe asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether legal aid payments to counsel and solicitors in R v Saunders, R v Kellard and R v Levy were increased on appeal to the Taxing Masters.

The Lord Chancellor: Additional costs were awarded by the Taxing Master as follows to counsel and solicitors in R v Saunders & Others. R v Kellard & Others and R v Levy & Others:

Counsel and solicitor firms £
R v Saunders & Others
Pannone Blackburn Solicitors 140,623
R. Ferguson QC Counsel 86,114
A. Shaw QC Counsel 83,521
R v Kellard & Others (Britannia Parks)
D. Day QC Counsel 110,608
R. Offenbach Counsel 79,521
D. McEvoy QC Counsel 95,448
C. B. Nicholls Counsel 63,791
N. Mylne QC Counsel 100,758
S. Clayton Counsel 71,469
R v Levy & Others (Barlow Clowes)
D. Whitehouse QC Counsel 75,056
J. Blair-Gould Counsel 51,073

Prisoners: Transfer Criteria

Lord Tebbitt asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to their Answer of 19th July (HL WA34) whether they will say when they expect the eight prisoners convicted of terrorist offences at present temporarily transferred to Northern Ireland prisons to be returned to Great Britain; and

    By what criteria they are guided in deciding which prisoners convicted of terrorist offences in Great Britain should be transferred to prisons in Northern Ireland and which of those should be transferred to Northern Ireland jurisdiction.

16 Oct 1995 : Column WA69

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Blatch: All requests by prisoners for permanent or temporary transfer to another United Kingdom jurisdiction are considered on their individual merits under criteria announced to Parliament in answer to a Written Question from Lord Hylton on 23 November 1992 (HL WA60).

A permanent transfer has the effect of transferring responsibility for the prisoner's continued detention and release to the receiving jurisdiction. A request for such a transfer which meets the criteria may, however, be refused if it is considered that the prisoner's crimes were so serious as to make it inappropriate that he or she should benefit from a substantial reduction in time to serve if that would be a consequence of the transfer.

If a permanent transfer is refused, a temporary transfer may be granted. A temporary transfer does not disturb a prisoner's release arrangements; these remain the responsibility of the sentencing jurisdiction.

Of the eight prisoners convicted of terrorist-related offences and granted a temporary transfer to Northern Ireland, four have been granted a period of temporary transfer of up to six months from 28 July. The temporary transfers of the other four expire on 1 September.

The criteria for considering transfer requests provide for prisoners granted a period of temporary transfer to apply for extensions. It is open to the eight terrorist prisoners to apply for further periods of temporary transfer before expiry of their current transfer. Any such request will be considered on its individual merits.

Fire Safety: Review

Lord Harris of Greenwich asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When they propose to announce the result of the Fire Safety Scrutiny and introduce the Places of Work Regulations.

Baroness Blatch: Consultation on the Interdepartmental Review of Fire Safety Legislation and Enforcement resulted in over 460 responses, many of them raising important and complex issues. The Deregulation Task Force, set up to help the Government promote deregulation, is now being consulted about the way ahead on fire regulation and enforcement, including the draft Fire Precautions (Places of Work) Regulations and the emerging findings on the review. The Government's response will be announced as soon as this is complete.

Local and Parliamentary Representatives: Emoluments

Lord Monkswell asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will list, for the United Kingdom in 1993–94, the numbers of district councillors, county or regional councillors, MPs, MEPs and Peers,

16 Oct 1995 : Column WA70

    together with an estimate of their average remuneration, expenses and value of facilities provided free of charge.

Baroness Blatch: The following information is given for the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland.

There are currently 21,066 district council and 4,024 regional or county council seats. Local authorities have the discretion to set their own allowances and travel and subsistence rates, although the Government do set a ceiling for some rates. The figures for average remuneration and expenses are not collected centrally.

There are 651 Members of the House of Commons. The total salary cost for 1993–94 was £22,934,000, giving an average salary cost of £35,229. The total allowances cost was £43,599,000, giving an average allowance cost of £66,972.

As at 31 March 1994, there were 1,202 Members of the House of Lords, of whom 92 were Peers without writs and 79 were Peers' with leave of absence. Of the 1,031 eligible to attend the House, 936 did so. Payments from the Peer's Expenses subhead of the Lords' Vote totalled £6,274,000, giving an average of £6,700 per Peer. Remuneration is restricted to a few specific Peers and it would therefore not be appropriate to provide an average for this. The value of facilities provided free of charge to MPs and Peers could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

There are 87 Members of the European Parliament representing the United Kingdom. 85 received the full salary payable at 1 January 1994 of £31,687. Two received a reduced, one-third rate of £10,562 because they held dual mandates (that is, were MEPs and UK MPs at the same time). Allowances and expenses are met directly from the budget of the European Commission and figures could only be provided at disproportionate cost.


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