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Wales: Boundary Commission Reviews of European Constituencies

Lord Lyell asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Blatch: The commission has informed us that it intends to consider making a supplementary report on the European Parliamentary constituencies in Wales, and to commence forthwith a general review of the European Parliamentary constituencies in Wales.

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Voluntary Bodies: Government Funding

Lord Lyell asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What was the total amount of funding given by central Government departments to voluntary bodies in the financial year 1993–94.

Baroness Blatch: Central Government funding of voluntary organisations in 1993–94 amounted to £3,567 million. Of this, £2,955 million was payments to housing associations and £612 million went directly to voluntary organisations to support the provision of services and a wide range of activities and projects. This latter figure shows that government funding of the voluntary sector excluding housing associations increased in cash terms by 9 per cent. and in real terms by 5 per cent. over the level of provision in 1992–93.

The amount spent by each department in 1993–94 was as follows:

£
Attorney General's Office (Crown Prosecution Service)
Direct grants 20,000
Agriculture, Fisheries and Food
Direct grants 242,500
Defence
Direct grants 18,919,259
Education
Direct grants 5,907,649
Employment
Direct grants 50,057,200
Equal Opportunities Commission 18,108
Environment
Direct grants 27,981,147
Countryside Commission 4,178,000
English Nature 804,183
Housing Corporations 2,510,000,000
Rural Development Commission 4,743,870
Urban Development Corporations 11,036,000
Urban Programme 28,305,927
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Direct grants 3,594,248
Alcohol and drug misuse 2,300,000
Health Education Authority 1,250,000
Health
Direct grants 49,433,555
Alcohol and drug misuse 2,300,000
Health Education Authority 1,250,000
Home Office
Direct grants 59,204,588
Commission for Racial Equality 5,213,000
Lord Chancellor's Department
Direct grants 182,500
Legal Aid Board 942,052
National Heritage
Direct grants 832,420
Sports Council 20,218,645
Northern Ireland Office
Direct grants 19,764,035
Housing associations 49,292,631
Sports Council for Northern Ireland 728,484
Youth Council for Northern Ireland 1,421,339
Overseas Development Administration
Direct grants 158,449,755
Scottish Office
Direct grants 24,230,855
Highland and Islands Enterprise 1,075,000
Housing associations 273,302,000
Mental Illness Specific Grant 5,141,834
Scottish Arts Council 176,164
Scottish National Heritage 2,900,000
Sports Council for Scotland 1,897,932
Urban Programme 48,062,000
Social Security
Direct grants 13,109,895
Trade and Industry
Direct grants 14,434,830
Transport
Direct grants 422,000

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Homicide: Year and a Day Rule

Lord Gainford asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When they intend to respond to the report of the Home Affairs Select Committee on the year and a day rule in homicide.

Baroness Blatch: We have today published our response to the report of the Home Affairs Select Committee. A copy of the response has been placed in the Library. We agree with the committee that the year and a day rule should be abolished. This will entail difficult decisions for prosecutors in some cases, and we have decided that the consent of the Attorney-General should be required for a homicide prosecution where either the defendant has previously been convicted of another offence for the injury which resulted in death, or there has been an interval of three years or more between the injury and death.

Prisoners Transferred to Northern Ireland: Jurisdiction

Lord Tebbit asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether any or all of the prisoners convicted of terrorist offences and transferred from prisons in Great Britain to prisons in Northern Ireland have been placed under Northern Ireland jurisdiction.

Baroness Blatch: Four prisoners convicted in England and Wales of terrorist offences are serving their sentences in Northern Ireland having been permanently transferred there. As a consequence of their permanent transfer, the prisoners' detention and release are considered under Northern Ireland jurisdiction. Eight

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prisoners convicted in England and Wales of terrorist offences have been transferred to Northern Ireland temporarily. These prisoners remain under the jurisdiction of England and Wales.

Prisoners Self-inflicted Deaths

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many self-inflicted deaths of prisoners were there between 1990 and 1994, and what proportion of these were prisoners on remand.

Baroness Blatch: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Baroness David from the Director General of the Prison Service, Mr. Derek Lewis, dated 19/7/95.

Lady Blatch has asked me to reply to your recent Question about self inflicted deaths in Prison Service establishments in England and Wales.

Between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 1994 there were 240 self inflicted deaths in prisons in England and Wales. One hundred and twenty two of these prisoners were on remand at the time of death.

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Unconvicted and Unsentenced Prisoners: Reception and Outcome

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many (a) male and (b) female unconvicted and unsentenced prisoners were received into custody in 1994, and what number and proportion were found not guilty, received non-custodial sentences and were sentenced to custody respectively.

Baroness Blatch: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Baroness David from the Director General of the Prison Service, Mr. Derek Lewis, dated 19/7/95.

Lady Blatch has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking for information on the number of receptions of unconvicted and unsentenced prisoners in 1994 and the outcome of the cases at court.

In 1994, provisional figures show that 64,295 males and 3,683 females were received into Prison Service establishments either as an unconvicted prisoner or an unsentenced prisoner or as both. Information is not yet available on the court decisions for these prisoners. Information for 1993 is published in Tables 2.5 and 2.6 of Prison Statistics England and Wales 1993, an extract of which is attached.

Table 2.5 Receptions(i) into Prison Service establishments of untried and convicted unsentenced prisoners: by outcome of court proceedings(ii) and sex, 1983–93 England and Wales Males and femalesNumber of persons

Type of prison and disposal 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993
Males
Untried prisoners 45,285 49,366 52,032 52,766 56,515 55,009 55,708 50,431 51,997 47,501 50,918
Received under sentence 25,956 28,326 29,932 28,369 29,371 26,320 23,403 21,437 20,816 19,098 19,967
Other outcome 19,329 21,040 22,100 24,397 27,144 28,689 32,305 28,994 31,181 28,403 30,951
Convicted unsentenced prisoners 18,851 17,325 17,360 15,528 17,269 16,222 16,744 19,229 18,828 20,051 28,593
Received under sentence 10,634 9,926 9,929 8,715 9,729 8,656 8,164 8,900 9,559 10,787 16,156
Other outcome 8,217 7,399 7,431 6,813 7,540 7,566 8,580 10,329 9,269 9,264 12,437
All remand prisoners 55,798 58,687 61,035 60,265 63,306 61,494 62,270 56,967 59,422 54,614 59,914
Received under sentence 31,010 32,860 34,297 31,880 32,506 29,064 25,931 24,023 23,919 22,260 24,436
Other outcome 24,788 25,827 26,738 28,385 30,800 32,430 36,339 32,944 35,503 32,354 35,478
Proportion of remand prisoners subsequently received under sentence
All remand 56 56 56 53 51 47 42 42 40 41 41
Untried 57 57 58 54 52 48 42 43 40 40 39
Convicted unsentenced 56 57 57 56 56 53 49 46 51 54 57
Females
Untried prisoners 2,434 2,534 2,686 2,633 2,695 2,867 3,081 2,704 2,679 2,368 2,647
Received under sentence 847 906 996 989 1,005 1,000 904 703 723 686 661
Other outcome 1,587 1,628 1,690 1,644 1,690 1,867 2,177 2,001 1,956 1,682 1,986
Convicted unsentenced prisoners 1,304 1,235 1,163 1,065 1,066 1,058 1,056 1,181 1,099 1,199 1,505
Received under sentence 433 413 426 432 377 383 345 332 391 414 587
Other outcome 871 822 737 633 689 675 711 849 708 785 918
All remand prisoners 3,290 3,300 3,392 3,222 3,250 3,380 3,635 3,207 3,182 2,937 3,322
Received under sentence 1,096 1,127 1,225 1,192 1,159 1,158 1,053 836 869 819 879
Other outcome 2,194 2,173 2,167 2,030 2,091 2,222 2,582 2,371 2,313 2,118 2,443
Proportion of remand prisoners subsequently received under sentence
All remand 33 34 36 37 36 34 29 26 27 28 27
Untried 35 36 37 38 37 35 29 26 27 29 25
Convicted unsentenced 33 33 37 41 35 36 33 28 36 35 39

(i) The figures for "all remand" record once only a person received as an untried prisoner who is subsequently received also as a convicted unsentenced prisoner. Figures relate to all remand receptions during the calendar year, whether or not disposed of during the year.

(ii) The numbers shown with disposal "other outcome" include disposal not recorded the great majority of whom will not have received a custodial sentence. Includes a small number sentenced to custody but released from court because of length of time served on remand.


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Table 2.6 Final court outcome for persons remanded in custody at some stage in magistrates' court proceedings(i) 1991, 1992 and 1993 England and Wales Estimated percentages

Final court outcomes(ii) Males Females
1991 1992 1993 1991 1992 1993
Acquitted not proceeded with etc 19 21 22 22 20 21
Non-custodial sentence 38 38 36 52 54 53
Community sentence(iii) 18 18 20 21 23 26
Fine 8 8 7 10 9 10
Absolute or conditional discharge 5 6 6 12 14 12
Other non-custodial sentence 7 6 3 10 9 5
Custodial sentence(iv) 43 41 42 26 26 26
Total 100 100 100 100 100 100

Source: Criminal Statistics England and Wales, 1993.

(i) Includes persons remanded in custody by magistrates during proceedings or on committal.

(ii) Includes estimated outcome at the Crown Court for those committed for trial or sentence.

(iii) Includes CSO, probation, supervision orders, attendance centre orders.

(iv) Proportion differs slightly from more reliable estimate in Table 2.5, see paragraph 2.7.




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