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MR KANI YILMAZ

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Blatch: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Lord Avebury from the Director General of the Prison Service, Mr. Derek Lewis, dated 19 January 1995:



    Lady Blatch has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the security categorisation of Mr. Kani Yilmaz.


    Mr. Yilmaz is an unconvicted prisoner who was reported to Prison Service Headquarters as a potential category A inmate. After

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consideration it was decided that he should be provisionally placed in category A.


    The guidance in Annex E to Circular Instruction 7/1988 deals with the categorisation and allocation of sentenced adult male prisoners in categories B, C and D, other than those for whom the responsibility lies with Prison Service Headquarters. It does not apply to category A prisoners and is not therefore applicable to Mr. Yilmaz's case

ASYLUM APPLICATIONS

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will give the number of applications for asylum in the United Kingdom received in each of the years 1990 to 1994 respectively, from citizens of Afghanistan, Indonesia, Iran, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, and Turkey respectively.

Baroness Blatch: The information is given in the table.

Applications(1)(1) received for asylum in the United Kingdom from nationals of Afghanistan, Indonesia, Iran, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, and Turkey, excluding dependants, 1990 to 1994
number of principal applicants

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
Afghanistan 205 200 260 280 325
Indonesia * * *
Iran 455 530 405 365 520
Kenya 50 70 95 630 1,130
Nigeria 135 335 615 1,665 4,340
Sudan 340 1,150 560 300 330
Turkey 1,590 2,110 1,865 1,480 2,045

(1) Provisional figures rounded to the nearest 5, with * = 1 or 2.

(1) Figures exclude information on applications made overseas.


HOME OFFICE: LEGAL ADVISERS' QUALIFICATIONS

Earl Russell asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many lawyers qualified in (a) English law, (b) Scots law, (c) European law, are employed by the Home Office and at what grades.

Baroness Blatch: The Legal Adviser's Branch comprises 17 lawyers (1 at Grade 2, 2 at Grade 3, 5 at Grade 5, 5 at Grade 6, 3 at Grade 7 and 1 Legal Officer). All of them are either barristers or solicitors qualified in England and Wales. They advise on questions of English law and European law. They consult others, as

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the need arises, on questions of Scots law. The branch also employs a consultant, who undertakes certain drafting work. He too is qualified in England and Wales.

ANNE-MARIE BATE v CHIEF ADJUDICATION OFFICER

Earl Russell asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether the case of Bate v Chief Adjudication Officer (Court of Appeal, 3rd November 1993) remains sub judice.

The Minister of State, Department of Social Security (Lord Mackay of Ardbrecknish): The case of Anne-Marie Bate v Chief Adjudication Officer was heard by the Court of Appeal on 27–28 October and 4 November 1994. The court gave its decision orally on 30 November 1994 and written judgment on 5 December. The Chief Adjudication Officer and the Secretary of State for Social Security have jointly petitioned this House seeking leave to appeal.

PREMATURE BABIES: GESTATION

Lord Braine of Wheatley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What information they have concerning the number of premature babies born in each of the last five years for which figures are available which have survived at



    (a) 23 weeks' gestation;


    (b) 24 weeks' gestation;


    (c) 25 weeks' gestation;


    (d) 26 weeks' gestation;


    (e) 27 weeks' gestation; and


    (f) 28 weeks' gestation.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Baroness Cumberlege): Information on gestation is not collected at live birth registration in the United Kingdom. In England, information on gestational age is collected as part of the Maternity Hospital Episodes Statistics system. Due to incomplete coverage and inconsistencies in coding, no reliable estimates of numbers are yet available. The table shows Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales live birth information by gestation for the latest five years for which figures are available.

Live born premature babies by estimated gestation in Scotland, 1989–1993
Gestation (weeks)

23 24 25 26 27 28 Total livebirths
Year
1989 15 28 41 56 55 83 63,480
1990 10 30 39 58 55 78 65,973
1991 5 33 43 70 81 71 67,024
1992 14 25 54 57 71 76 65,789
1993* 12 30 36 54 51 72 63,337

* Provisional gestation figures.

Source: Information and Statistics Division National Health Service in Scotland


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Live born premature babies by estimated gestation in Northern Ireland, 1991–93

Gestation (weeks)
23 24 25 26 27 28 Total livebirths
Year
1991 6 10 20 18 24 40 26,265
1992 7 9 14 16 30 24 25,572
1993 10 21 14 12 24 34 24,909

Complete figures are unavailable for the years prior to 1991.

Source: Department of Health & Social Services (Northern Ireland).


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Live born premature babies by estimated gestation in Wales, 1989–1993

Gestation (weeks)
23 24 25 26 27 28 Total livebirths
Year
1989 9 20 14 37 30 54 38,019
1990 11 13 16 38 32 41 38,866
1991 10 23 21 28 27 56 38,079
1992 14 24 20 31 25 66 37,523
1993 4 16 19 39 32 52 36,578

Source: Welsh Health Common Services Authority.


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CIVIL SERVANT NUMBERS

Lord Monkswell asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will list the number of civil servants and ancillary staff employed by each government department, together with the numbers of those whose duties relate wholly or mainly to the London area (defined by the boundaries of the former Greater London Council).

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Henley): The number of civil servants employed by each government department at 1 April 1994 and 1 October 1994 is contained in the Civil Service staff in post summary tables, copies of which are in the Library. The number of civil servants employed in the London area by Principal departments at 1 April 1994 is contained in the Civil Service Statistics 1994 Edition (Table 3) a copy of which is also in the Library.

The number of civil servants employed on duties relating wholly or mainly to the London area is not held centrally.

CHURCHES AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS: VAT ON REPAIRS

The Lord Bishop of Norwich asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What was the total amount of VAT paid in 1993 in respect of (a) repairs to parish churches in England and (b) repairs to historic buildings in England, other than parish churches.

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Lord Henley: This information is not available.

Repairs to all buildings have been liable to the standard rate of VAT since 1973. The VAT paid on repairs is charged by registered builders, who periodically declare to Customs the total VAT charged by them to all their customers without further analysis.

PARLIAMENTARY COSTS: COMPARISONS

Lord Finsberg asked Her Majesty's Government: What are the costs of maintaining the European Parliament, the House of Commons and the House of Lords, including: (a) salaries, pensions travelling allowances, secretarial expenses and other expenses for Members; (b) salaries, allowances and pensions, etc. of support staff: (c) accommodation, including rent, operating costs and security; and (d) all other administrative costs such as stationery, office equipment, publications, payments to parliamentary bodies and any other relevant outgoings.

    and whether they will indicate the per capita cost per Member as well as the average number of sitting days for each institution over the past five years.

Lord Henley: Precise comparisons between the costs of the European Parliament and the Houses of Parliament are difficult. The information my noble friend has requested, however, is as follows:

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Total costs£ million

1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95(1)
House of Lords 29.4 31.2 32.2 36.3 41.8
House of Commons 124.8 142.3 154.2 165.3 181.7
European Parliament(1) 306.9 342.1 425.8 486.3 516.6
Per capita cost per member £'000
1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95(1)
House of Lords(1) 31 32 31 35 41
House of Commons(1) 192 219 237 254 279
European Parliament(1) (1) 592 660 822 939 911
Number of sitting days
1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95(1)
House of Lords 149 144 121 142 150
House of Commons 170 142 155 162 163
European Parliament(1) 60 60 60 60 60

Notes:

(1) Estimates.

(1) Based on average £/ecu exchange rates for the relevant year.

(1) Per capita costs based on number of peers eligible to sit in the House of Lords each year.

(1) The number of Parliamentary seats increased from 650 to 651 in 1992–93.

(1) The number of European Parliament seats increased from 518 to 567 on 9 June 1994.

(1) It is not possible to give an exact figure for the number of European Parliament sittings. The European Parliament generally holds a five-day plenary session every month but there have been occasions when those plenaries have been held over a longer period.


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