Draft Local Government (Organisation and Standards) Bill Appendices to the Minutes of Evidence - First Report


APPENDIX 37

Memorandum by New Journal Enterprises Ltd

  Please find the results of a survey carried out in the Camden New Journal between 11 and 25 March 1999 inclusive, which we feel are relevant to the committee's considerations and which we would like to submit as evidence.

  The results of the survey, which had 1,018 responses, were presented to the Mayor of Camden on May 18.

  The Camden New Journal is a weekly paper with a circulation of 54,000. The survey took the form of a printed questionnaire asking three questions:

  (1)  Whether the reader supported the changes outlined in Camden council's consultation document Make Your Mark (you have already accepted this document as evidence, it proposed a leader and cabinet system).

  (2)  Whether the council should allow more time to debate the changes.

  (3)  If the reader wanted a referendum before any changes were made.

  The raw results are:

    Ninety-seven per cent of all respondents in favour of a referendum.

    Eighteen per cent did not receive the Make Your Mark document.

    Ninety-four per cent of those who received the Make Your Mark document opposed the changes outlined in it.

    Six per cent of those who received the document supported the changes.

    Ninety-seven of all respondents wanted more time for debate.

  Percentage figures have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

  These figures are broken down from:

    Seven hundred and sixty-eight said they did not support the changes outlined in the Make Your Mark document. These respondents did not want more time for debate, and called for a referendum.

    One hundred and eighty-one had not received the consultation document, but wanted more time for debate and wanted a referendum.

    Seven people did not support the changes, they did not want more time to consider, but did want a referendum.

    Four people did not support the changes, did not want more time for debate and did not want a referendum.

    Nine people did not support the changes, did want more time for debate but did not want a referendum.

    Thirty-two did support the suggested changes. But they also wanted more time to debate and a referendum.

    Seventeen people agreed with the changes, did not want more time for discussion and did not want a referendum.

June 1999





 
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