13 Feb 2014 : Column 731W

Commonwealth

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what action he is taking to develop the UK's trading relationship with other Commonwealth countries. [187667]

Mr Swire: The UK is committed to strengthening trade across the Commonwealth. UK Trade and Investment is helping strengthen trade links with markets across the world that are key to the UK's future prosperity and is now represented in 22 Commonwealth countries. These include high growth markets such as India, Singapore, South Africa and Malaysia and others such as Canada, Australia and New Zealand, where we already have significant and well established trading relations. We are also working hard to ensure the EU signs ambitious Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with Commonwealth countries to improve the access of UK companies to these markets. The EU has a Trade, Development and Co-operation Agreement with South Africa, while negotiations on FTAs with Canada and Singapore reached a political conclusion last year. The EU/Canada Comprehensive and Economic Trade Agreement will benefit the UK economy and businesses by over £1.3 billion a year. EU negotiations are also ongoing with India and Malaysia.

Ahead of this year's Commonwealth games in Glasgow, UKTI, the Scottish Government, Scottish Enterprise and the Commonwealth Business Council are working together to deliver a business conference for 200 Commonwealth business leaders. UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) are also organising a British Business House, which will showcase UK plc to Commonwealth businesses.

As the Minister of State for the Commonwealth, I spoke at the Commonwealth Business Forum (CBF) in Colombo, which took place ahead of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Sri Lanka, to highlight the Commonwealth's potential for increased trade and investment. UKTI sent a representative to the CBF to support British businesses.

We welcome the appointment of Lord Marland of Odstock as Chair of the Commonwealth Business Council (CBC). We expect his appointment will help the CBC work towards increased trade and investment across the Commonwealth.

Equal Pay

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will investigate the reasons for the gender pay gap at senior management structures 2, 3 and 4 of his Department. [186982]

Hugh Robertson: The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) guidelines state that difference greater than 5% should be investigated and that patterns of difference of 3% or more should be looked into. We recently conducted an equal pay analysis which shows the pay gap by gender for staff at Senior Management Structure (SMS) levels 2 and 3/4 as:

GradeFemale (£)Male (£)Average Pay Gap (percentage)

SMS2

88,471

89,669

-1.35

SMS3/4

118,470

131,360

-10.88

13 Feb 2014 : Column 732W

The pay gap between men and women at Senior Management Structure 3/4 is attributable to the relatively small number of women holding SMS3 posts and no women currently holding either of the two SMS4 posts.

Libya

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assistance his Department is providing in the process of installing democratic systems in Libya. [187561]

Hugh Robertson: The UK remains firmly committed to supporting Libyan efforts to build a secure, prosperous and democratic country. In partnership with the UN Support Mission in Libya, and other international partners, we are providing a comprehensive package of support over the next three years to assist the Libyan Government in establishing accountable and human rights compliant security, justice and defence institutions. This includes training 2,000 Libyan armed forces personnel to support the Libyan Government's efforts to increase the effectiveness and capacity of its security and justice sector institutions. The establishment of such structures in Libya is essential to the democratic transition and will contribute to regional stability and security.

The UK has 19 long-term military and civilian advisers, in addition to a number of short-term experts, working with the Libyan authorities across the fields of security, justice and defence. This includes building civil service capacity; strengthening civilian oversight of their armed forces; disposal of arms and ammunition; improving access to justice; and helping to build the professionalism and capacity of the police force. All of these advisers are paid for by the British Government from the tri-departmental conflict prevention pool.

Linda Carty

Stephen Metcalfe: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to his US counterpart on Linda Carty; and if he will make a statement. [187490]

Hugh Robertson: The British Government opposes the death penalty in all circumstances and we will make representations on behalf of British nationals facing death sentences, according to the individual circumstances of each case.

The decision on Ms Carty's case is a matter for the Texan authorities. I raised Ms Carty's case with Governor Rick Perry of Texas during his visit to the UK last October. Her Majesty's Consul General Houston had two meetings with Governor Perry's General Counsel in 2013 to raise our concerns about Ms Carty's case.

We will continue to raise Ms Carty's case, and the UK's wider opposition to the death penalty, with the Texan authorities and the US Federal Government.

North Korea

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with the government of North Korea on the treatment of Christians in that country. [187054]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 733W

Mr Swire: Officials regularly raise our concerns about human rights violations in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), including with regard to the treatment of Christians. In January 2014 our ambassador in Pyongyang raised human rights with a Vice-Minister from the DPRK Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials raised it with the DPRK ambassador in London.

Supporting human rights remains one of the priorities for our policy towards the DPRK. We aim to do this in three ways: by ensuring the issue remains high on the international community's agenda; by using our policy of critical engagement to raise our concerns directly with the DPRK authorities; and by supporting small scale projects aimed at improving the lives of vulnerable groups in the DPRK.

The annual FCO Human rights report includes the DPRK as a country of concern. The full report can be found at:

www.hrdreport.fco.gov.uk

Pay

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many civil servants are on each pay grade in (a) his Department and (b) agencies and public bodies accountable to him. [187246]

Hugh Robertson: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) at 31 January 2014 employed 4,715 UK based staff at the following paybands.

Pay gradeNumber

Al (AA)

20

A2 (AO)

696

B3 (EO)

766

C4 (HEO)

1,178

C5 (SEO)

457

D6 (Grade 7)

772

D7 (Grade 6)

420

SMS1 (SCSI)

277

SMS2 (SCS2)

100

SMS3 (SCS3)

26

SMS4 (SCS4)

2

PUS (SCS4)

1

FCO Services employed 947 UK based staff at the following paybands.

Pay gradeNumber

Al (AA)

34

A2 (AO)

90

Apprentice

21

B3 (EO)

90

Technical Payband 3 (EO)

100

C4 (HEO)

132

Technical Payband 4 (HEO)

151

C5 (SEO)

67

Technical Payband 5 (SEO)

120

D6 (Grade 7)

96

D7 (Grade 6)

37

SMS1 (SCSI)

9

SMS2 (SCS2)

1

13 Feb 2014 : Column 734W

Property

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the (a) name, (b) location, (c) floor space, (d) tenure status and (e) value is of properties (i) owned and (ii) occupied by (A) his Department and (B) agencies and public bodies accountable to him. [187287]

Mr Lidington: The details requested for the United Kingdom Estate held by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) are as follows:

NameLocationFloor space (m2)Tenure statusHolder

Hanslope Park

Milton Keynes

25,932

Freehold

FCO

King Charles Street (Main Building)

London

28,751

Freehold

FCO

Old Admiralty Building

London

15,279

Freehold

FCO

1 -7 Kensington Palace Gardens

London

10,120

Leasehold

FCO

13 Kensington Palace Gardens

London

4,710

Leasehold

FCO

Northgate House

Milton Keynes

3,277

Leasehold

FCO

1 Carlton Gardens

London

2,483

Leasehold

FCO

Lancaster House

London

3,668

Leasehold

FCO

Artillery House

London

186

Leasehold

Westminster Foundation for Democracy

Belgrave Square

London

61

Leasehold

Great Britain -China Centre

Wiston House

Steyning

2,326

Leasehold

Wilton Park Conference Centre

Spring Gardens

London

5,316

Leasehold

British Council

Bridgewater House

Manchester

1,988

Leasehold

British Council

Kingsway

Cardiff

462

Leasehold

British Council

Waverly Gate

Edinburgh

456

Leasehold

British Council

The Boat

Belfast

245

Leasehold

British Council

Telford Way

London

1,100

Leasehold

British Council

We have not provided individual valuations for each of these properties as this information is commercially sensitive.

Overseas, the FCO runs an estate comprising more than 5,000 properties in 250 locations worldwide, and the British Council have over 220 commercial properties in 110 countries. It would not be possible to provide the information requested on these properties without incurring disproportionate cost.

Public Appointments

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which paid public appointment contracts he has (a) renewed and (b) not renewed since May 2010; and how many posts were held by (i) women and (ii) men. [187019]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 735W

Hugh Robertson: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 11 February 2014, Official Report, column 607W, by the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude).

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the titles are of the individual public appointments that have been made by his Department since May 2010; and which of those appointees were women. [187080]

Hugh Robertson: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude) on 11 February 2014, Official Report, column 607W.

Re-employment

Lilian Greenwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 4 February 2014, Official Report, column 196W, on re-employment, what the total cost was of those retirements. [187586]

Hugh Robertson: Of the 14 retirements, six of these retired on age grounds at no cost to the Department.

The remaining eight retirements were at a total cost to the FCO of £647,840.06

Individual payments are calculated in accordance with the civil service pension scheme rules in place at the time of retirement and are based on salary, years of service and age.

Religious Freedom

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when Ministers in his Department last met representatives of the All Party Parliamentary Group in International Religious Freedom. [187538]

Mr Lidington: My noble Friend, the right hon. Baroness Warsi last met representatives of the All Party Parliamentary Group on International Religious Freedom on 22 October 2013.

Sri Lanka

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of reports of discriminatory practices towards the Tamil people in Sri Lanka relating to (a) political rights, (b) education and (c) appropriation of land. [197620]

Mr Swire: We continue to monitor closely civil and political rights as well as land issues in Sri Lanka. We welcomed the Northern Provincial Council elections in Sri Lanka, which took place in September 2013. This was the first provincial council election held in the predominantly Tamil north since the 1987 establishment of provincial councils. The opposition, Tamil National Alliance, won over 80% of the vote. Local election observers noted that elections were

“relatively free from violence, though not from intimidation”.

13 Feb 2014 : Column 736W

We have expressed concerns at military involvement in civilian activities in the north and are aware of reports that the military are involved in education.

The Prime Minister raised land rights and militarisation in the north of Sri Lanka during his November meeting with the Sri Lankan President Rajapaska. He called for a meaningful political settlement with the north, including demilitarisation and full implementation of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) recommendations.

We continue to underline to the Sri Lankan authorities the need for a long-term political settlement to address these underlying grievances and will continue to monitor these issues.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking in Sri Lanka to create lasting peace and reconciliation. [197621]

Mr Swire: I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I have given to question 186379 on 6 February 2013, Official Report, column 358W.

Staff

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what proportion of staff of (a) his Department and (b) agencies and public bodies accountable to him work outside of London; and in which local authorities such staff are located. [187268]

Hugh Robertson: Working outside London, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) have staff in the following local authority areas: London borough of Croydon (less than 1%) and Milton Keynes (9%).

FCO Services have staff in Milton Keynes (68%).

Wilton Park has staff in Horsham district council (100%).

British Council have staff in Belfast city council (0.35%), Cardiff city council (0.37%), City of Edinburgh council (0.56%) and Manchester city council (2.99%).

Westminster Foundation for Democracy have no staff working outside London.

Great Britain-China Centre have no staff working outside London.

Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission do not employ staff.

Tanzania

Sir Roger Gale: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will raise the failure of the Tanzanian Government to take action in relation to the seizure of Silverdale farm by Mr Benjamin Mengi in his upcoming meeting with the President of Tanzania. [187581]

Mark Simmonds: The British Government has raised the case of Silverdale farm at the highest levels on a number of occasions. I raised the issue with the Tanzanian Agricultural Minister on 24 October last year and have done so with the Tanzanian Foreign Minister on numerous occasions. We will continue to discuss the investment climate in our conversations with the Tanzanian Government.

13 Feb 2014 : Column 737W

Ukraine

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with his Ukranian counterpart aimed at bringing to an end the recent restrictions on human rights following protests in that country. [187668]

Mr Lidington: On 10 February, the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), joined other EU Foreign Ministers in endorsing EU Council Conclusions which expressed deep concern at the continuing political crisis in Ukraine and the human rights situation, including violence, cases of missing persons, torture and intimidation. The EU deplored the deaths and injuries sustained on all sides. They urged restraint and called for the authorities to take all necessary measures to respect and protect the Ukrainian citizens' fundamental rights and to investigate duly all acts of violence in a transparent and impartial manner and bring the perpetrators to justice.

On 24 January the Foreign Secretary spoke to the Ukrainian Foreign Minister, Leonid Kozhara, to express the British Government's deep concern at the violence in Ukraine. He said that all sides had a responsibility to refrain from violence, but particular responsibility rested with the government. He also outlined his concern about legislation passed on 16 January that appeared to impinge on democratic norms. I was pleased to see that on 28 January the Ukrainian parliament voted to repeal those laws. The UK Government will continue to call on Ukraine to adhere to its obligations as a member of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and Council of Europe.

Justice

Blue Bay Support Services

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what contracts his Department has with Blue Bay Support Services; when each contract was signed; and what the value and purpose is of each such contract. [177198]

Jeremy Wright: In 2013 the Ministry of Justice had two contracts with Blue Bay Support Services Limited. One was let on 18 October 2013 to the value of £40,000.00; and the other was let on 13 November 2013 to the value of £9,600.00. These contracts provided short term support to four prisons in offender management and they came to an end in December 2013.

Blue Bay Support Services Limited provide professionally trained and qualified staff in the criminal justice field. Similar service providers have been used on occasions over a number of years (including under a different Government) to provide short term support to probation trusts and prisons.

Probation trusts are non-departmental public bodies and information on individual trust contracts is not held centrally.

Mrs Glindon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what payments his Department has made to Blue Bay Support Services Ltd in each of the last three years; and what services that company provides to (a) his Department and (b) the National Offender Management Service. [178757]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 738W

Jeremy Wright: Blue Bay Support Services Ltd have received the following payments from the Ministry of Justice to provide short term support to four prisons in offender management:

(i) 2011-12—No payments

(ii) 2012-13—No payments.

(iii) 2013-14—11 payments totalling £24,360 for work which was brought to a conclusion in December 2013.

Blue Bay Support Services Limited provides professionally trained and qualified staff in the criminal justice field. Similar service providers have been used on occasions over a number of years (including under a different Government) to provide short term support to probation trusts and prisons.

Probation trusts are non-departmental public bodies and information on individual trust contracts is not held centrally.

Conditions of Employment

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to balance the legal rights and responsibilities of employees and employers; and if he will make a statement. [187546]

Mr Vara: The Ministry of Justice (MOJ) aims to make working within the Department a positive experience, with employees and employer upholding their rights and responsibilities.

Our standards and procedures are built upon what is expected through Legislation, Terms and Conditions of Employment, the Civil Service Code which sets out the value and standards expected of all civil servants, and other rules governing areas including confidentiality, propriety and ethics.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills leads on the regulation of the employer and employee relationship.

Domestic Violence: Sentencing

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will list the outcomes of sentences for convictions of domestic violence offences in 2009 by local criminal justice boards. [186661]

Jeremy Wright: Domestic violence covers a very wide range of behaviour and there are many offences in England and Wales that could be relevant to cases of domestic abuse or domestic violence. These include, but are not limited to, offences against the person (such as common assault, actual bodily harm and grievous bodily harm—which are both capable of including psychiatric injury—or wounding), sexual offences, threats to kill, blackmail, false imprisonment, harassment, stalking, putting someone in fear of violence and breach of non-molestation orders.

Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the court proceedings database does not include the circumstances behind each case beyond the description provided in the statute. It is not possible to separately identify from this centrally held information convictions and sentences for domestic violence from other offences of assault. Information is not collated centrally on victims of alleged offences proceeded against, aside from the information provided by the statute under

13 Feb 2014 : Column 739W

which proceedings are brought. This detailed information may be held on the court record, but due to the size and complexity, is not reported centrally to the MOJ. As such, the information requested can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Driving Offences: Sentencing

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the Sentencing Council keeps under review the offence of causing death by disqualified or uninsured drivers. [187107]

Jeremy Wright: Guidance to the judiciary is produced independently of Government, by the Sentencing Council. This is in line with the principle that, while the Government decides what maximum penalties should be, the courts are responsible for deciding what sentence to impose within those limits.

The sentencing guideline on causing death by driving was published by the Sentencing Guidelines Council in 2008. It covers the offences of causing death by dangerous driving and causing death by careless driving as well as causing death by dangerous driving while under the influence of drink or drugs and causing death by driving unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured. Last year, the Justice Secretary wrote to the Sentencing Council (as it now is) to ask them to review the death by driving guideline and they have agreed to include this in their programme of work.

Severe maximum penalties, of 14 years imprisonment, are available for those who cause death through dangerous driving or under the influence of drink or drugs and statistics show that the overwhelming majority of those convicted for these offences receive lengthy custodial sentences. The maximum penalty for causing death by disqualified or uninsured driving is two years’ imprisonment. We are keeping the law in this area under review. If any changes are needed, we will bring forward proposals.

Driving: Licensing

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many notifications of endorsement from a court or fixed penalty office of a driver who meets the criteria of the Road Traffic (New Drivers) Act 1995 were sent to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency following the accumulation of six penalty points by a new driver within the two year probationary period in each of the last five years; [187575]

(2) how many notifications were sent by a court or fixed penalty office to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency following the accumulation of six penalty points by a new driver within the two year probationary period in each of the last five years. [187576]

Mr Vara: The data is not held by HM Courts and Tribunals Service as although HM Courts and Tribunals Service is obliged to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency where the court endorses a licence the notification mechanism is the same for all drivers. The notification to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency does not therefore expressly state that a driver is, or is not, within their probationary period.

13 Feb 2014 : Column 740W

Drugs: Sentencing

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have received the (a) maximum fine and (b) maximum prison sentence for (i) possession and (ii) trafficking of (A) Class A drugs (B) Class B drugs and (C) Class C drugs in each of the last five years. [180267]

Jeremy Wright: There are tough penalties available for drug offences, with the maximum penalties set by Parliament to deal with the worst possible cases. Trafficking Class A drugs carries a maximum prison sentence of life imprisonment and seven years minimum sentence on a third conviction. Within those limits it is for the courts to determine sentences in individual cases taking into account all the circumstances of the offence and the offender.

The number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody for offences relating to possession and trafficking of Class A, Class B and Class C drugs, including those sentenced to the maximum penalty, at magistrates courts, in England and Wales, from 2008 to 2012, can be viewed in Table 1.

The number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody for offences relating to possession and trafficking of Class A, Class B and Class C drugs, including those sentenced to the maximum penalty, at the Crown court, in England and Wales, from 2008 to 2012, can be viewed in Table 2.

The number of offenders sentenced to a fine for offences relating to possession and trafficking of Class A, Class B and Class C drugs, including those sentenced to the maximum penalty available within magistrates' powers (or above), at magistrates courts, in England and Wales, from 2008 to 2012, can be viewed in Table 3. The custody rate remains constant (at 98%-99%) for the number of offenders sentenced in the Crown court for the most serious and high volume offence of importing Class A drugs. Drug traffickers are almost always given long custodial sentences if found guilty in the Crown court of the most serious offences.

The Crown court has unlimited powers to fine, therefore there is no maximum fine in the higher court. However, the number of offenders sentenced to a fine for offences relating to possession and trafficking of Class A, Class B and Class C drugs, at the Crown court, in England and Wales, from 2008 to 2012, can be viewed in Table 4. Those convicted of drug offences may also be subject to confiscation proceedings.

The tables will be placed in the Library of the House.

Employment and Support Allowance: Appeals

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate his Department has made of the average waiting time for employment and support allowance appeals. [187112]

Mr Vara: The First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support), administered by HM Courts and Tribunals Service, hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions' decisions on a range of benefits, including employment and support allowance (ESA).

13 Feb 2014 : Column 741W

In the period 1 April to 30 September 2013 (the latest period for which data has been published) the average waiting time from receipt of an ESA appeal at the tribunal to disposal was 18.9 weeks. The average waiting time has fallen since 2010.

Employment Tribunals Service

Ian Murray: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 27 November 2013, Official Report, column 324W, on employment tribunal services, if he will publish the analysis sought in that question. [197617]

Mr Vara: Data concerning outcomes of fee remission applications made, in employment tribunal cases and in other court and tribunal jurisdictions, are not routinely published.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service is working with partners to develop appropriate system reporting tools that will enable extraction, interrogation and subsequent quality assurance of data, including the data requested. Until those system reporting tools are developed, later this year, we will not be able to provide the data requested.

The Government has previously said that it plans to publish a Post Implementation Review, assessing and reporting on the impacts of fee-charging on the employment tribunals system. The reporting tools we are developing will help us to undertake that work.

As in my previous answer, my officials are currently undertaking this work, and I will write to the hon. Member as soon as I am able.

Fines: Surcharges

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much of the victim surcharge has gone uncollected since the surcharge was introduced. [180079]

Mr Vara: The value of uncollected victim surcharge as at 31 March 2013 is £12.1 million. This amount is net of administrative cancellations.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) takes the issue of financial penalty enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority nationwide. HMCTS actively pursues all outstanding impositions until certain they cannot be collected. Collection reached an all time high at the end of 2012-13 and has continued to rise in this financial year. At the end of September 2013 total collection (all imposition types excluding confiscation orders) was higher than the same point in the previous year and the outstanding balance had reduced since the start of the financial year. On average over the last 12 month 69% of accounts have been either closed or are compliant with payment terms by 12 months after imposition.

HMCTS are actively seeking an external provider for the future delivery of compliance and enforcement services. This will bring the necessary investment and innovation to significantly improve the collection of criminal financial penalties and reduce the cost of the service to the taxpayer.

Under this Government, more money is being used to fund victims’ services than ever before. Despite a law being introduced in 1996, which allowed money to be

13 Feb 2014 : Column 742W

deducted from prisoner’s earnings to help fund support for victims, the previous Government failed to act on this, depriving victims of potentially millions of pounds of support.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much of the victim surcharge has been (a) collected and (b) uncollected in each year since 2010. [180080]

Mr Vara: Information for the financial year 2011-12, including receipts received up to 18 months after the imposition date, and financial year 2012-13 to date, is provided in the table.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) takes the issue of financial penalty enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority nationwide. HMCTS actively pursues all outstanding impositions until certain they cannot be collected. Collection reached an all time high at the end of 2012-13 and has continued to rise in this financial year. At the end of September 2013 total collection (all imposition types excluding confiscation orders) was higher than the same point in the previous year and the outstanding balance had reduced since the start of the financial year. On average over the last 12 month 69% of accounts have been either closed or are compliant with payment terms by 12 months after imposition.

HMCTS are actively seeking an external provider for the future delivery of compliance and enforcement services. This will bring the necessary investment and innovation to significantly improve the collection of criminal financial penalties and reduce the cost of the service to the taxpayer.

Under this Government, more money is being used to fund victims’ services than ever before. Despite a law being introduced in 1996, which allowed money to be deducted from prisoner’s earnings to help fund support for victims, the previous Government failed to act on this, depriving victims of potentially millions of pounds of support.

Due to limitations in accounting systems, information is not available for earlier years without disproportionate cost.

£000
 2011-122012-13

Imposed

12,293

15,715

Cancelled

1,440

1,606

Collected

8,887

10,319

Uncollected

1,966

3,791

Cancellations relate mainly to remissions and statutory declarations.

Ministers

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much was spent on ministerial salaries in the last year for which figures are available. [180104]

Mr Vara: Salaries paid to Ministers in the MOJ for the financial year 2012-13 are set out in the following table. In respect of Ministers in the House of Commons, Departments bear only the cost of the additional ministerial

13 Feb 2014 : Column 743W

remuneration, the salary for their services as an MP (£65,738 from 1 April 2010) and various allowances to which they are entitled are borne centrally. Ministers in the House of Lords do not receive a salary but rather an additional remuneration which cannot be quantified separately from their ministerial salaries.

 Salary 2012-13
MinistersPaid (£)Full year equivalent (£)

The Rt Hon Chris Grayling MP, Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice (from 5 September 2012)

39,576

68,827

   

The Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke QC MP, Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice (to 4 September 2012)

29,251

68,827

   

The Rt Hon Lord McNally*, Minister of State and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords

115,257

-

   

Jeremy Wright MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (from 5 September 2012)

13,560

23,697

   

Helen Grant MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (from 5 September 2012)

13,560

23,697

   

Crispin Blunt MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (to 4 September 2012)

10,137

23,697

   

Jonathan Djanogly MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (to 4 September 2012)

10,137

23,697

* Lord McNally receives the Lords Office Holder Allowance (LOHA) which is set at £36,366 per annum. It is available to paid Lords Ministers whose main home is outside of London and is included within the figure disclosed above.

Offenders: Risk Assessment

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offender assessments using the Offender Assessment System were outstanding on the first day of every month since May 2010. [181791]

Jeremy Wright: Information is not held centrally to allow a comparison of the number of applicable offenders in prison with those for whom a risk assessment on the Offender Assessment System (OASys) has been outstanding on the first day of every month since May 2010. Such information could be provided only at very significant and disproportionate cost.

Given the importance of the OASys tool in assessing and managing risk, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) is putting in place processes to monitor and manage outstanding OASys assessments on an ongoing basis. Such processes were absent up to May 2010.

Pay

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of (a) permanent, (b) temporary and (c) contract staff in his Department are paid the Living Wage or above. [186673]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 744W

Mr Vara: Information on the numbers of directly employed (a) permanent and, (b) fixed-term temporary staff being paid the Living Wage* or above within the Ministry of Justice HQ, HM Courts and Tribunal Service (HMCTS), National Offender Management Service (NOMS), Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) and Legal Aid Agency (LAA) is detailed in the following table.

As at 30 November 2013Number paid the Living Wage or aboveOn strength headcountProportion of staff employed paid the Living Wage or above (percentage)

MOJ (Includes HQ, HMCTS, OPG and LAA)

25,189

25,361

99.3

NOMS

38,643

38,880

99.4

Combined MOJ and NOMS total

63,832

64,241

99.4

Living wage rates were increased in November 2013 after the implementation of the 2013 pay award. As a result 0.6% of MOJ and NOMS staff are paid marginally below the increased rates. The department is committed to ensuring that all staff are paid in line with or above the living wage and will assess this position again in 2014 as part of any pay round decisions.

Information on contractors paid less than the rate defined by the ‘Living Wage Foundation’ as a living wage is not recorded centrally. We would need to approach all of our contractors and or their agencies to get them to provide the information. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

* Living Wage data cannot be split between Permanent and Temporary as per the ONS definition and so the proportion overall is all that can be provided.

(a) ONS Definition-Permanent employees are those that have a contract with no agreed expiry date or a fixed term contract of more than 12 months (regardless of the amount of time remaining on the contract).

(b) ONS Definition-Temporary/casual employees are those that have a fixed term contract of 12 months or less or are employed on a casual basis.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many employees of his Department or any of its agencies received bonus payments in each year between 2010 and 2013; [187040]

(2) how much was paid in bonuses to employees of his Department and its agencies in each year between 2010 and 2013. [187066]

Mr Vara: Details of the number of employees within the Department and its agencies receiving performance related payments together with the overall cost for each of the financial years since 2010-11 can be found in the following table.

Details provided relate to staff employed within the Ministry of Justice HQ (MOJ), HM Courts and Tribunal Service (HMCTS), National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG).

The total amount paid in non-consolidated performance awards to staff has fallen from £7.89 million in the final year of the previous administration.

13 Feb 2014 : Column 745W

Performance yearTotal cost of in-year/end-year non-consolidated performance-related payments (bonuses) for each performance year (£)Number of officials awarded a non-consolidated performance related payment (bonus) in each performance year

2010-11

6,201,581

13,918

2011-12

5,311,421

11,057

2012-13

5,117,836

10,407


Probation

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he has taken to ensure that there will be sufficient experienced probation officers allocated to the 21 community rehabilitation companies to assess risk escalation of offenders who are supervised by those companies. [187389]

Jeremy Wright: The 30 bidders who passed the first stage of the competition to win the regional rehabilitation contracts were announced in mid December and all have experience in working with offenders or across the wider Criminal Justice System. Providers bidding to run Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will need to demonstrate in their bids how they will deliver high quality services and how they will maintain a workforce with appropriate levels of competence and training to deliver these services. CRCs will be free to use the Probation Qualifications Framework (PQF) to ensure this. Existing probation staff have been assigned to posts in the new structures according to their experience and case load.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) if he will publish the three probation level input indicators due to be published in autumn 2012; [187569]

(2) what the average full apportioned cost to probation of delivering a community order or suspended sentence order to the service definition in the National Offender Management Service specification was for the last period for which figures are available. [187570]

Jeremy Wright: The three probation unit cost input indicators, including the fully apportioned cost to NOMS of delivering a community order or suspended sentence order, are published on an annual basis by the Ministry of Justice. These were first published on 25 October 2012 in respect of 2011-12. Costs for 2012-13, the latest available, were published on 31 October 2013.

These are published as part of the prison and probation trusts performance statistics through the following page of the Gov.uk website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/prison-and-probation-trusts-performance-statistics

Procurement

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many officials at each grade in his Department have the authority to execute a purchase; what proportion of those officials have professional procurement qualifications; and what the key indicators used in his Department to assess procurement officer's performance are. [183361]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 746W

Mr Vara: Authority to execute a purchase is delegated to heads of business units across the Department and subject to strict controls and budgetary limits. Unit heads are then able to sub delegate to individuals within business units, again subject to strict controls. Details of numbers of individuals and grades with delegated authority to purchase are not held centrally. To determine the exact number would incur disproportionate cost as an approach to over 1,000 individual business units would be required.

Authority to execute contracts for goods services and works is restricted to personnel within the Department’s procurement directorate and Legal Aid Agency for contracts pertaining to legal aid. In the procurement directorate, 142 officials have delegated authority to execute contracts of which 71 have the graduate diploma from the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply with a further 50 in the process of completing the diploma. A breakdown by grade is shown as follows.

GradeNumber of officials with delegated authorityNumber of officials with a full or part professional procurement qualification

SCS

13

3

Band A

37

32

Band B

57

65

Band C

2

2

Band D

28

18

Band E

5

1

Total

142

121

In the case of Band B officials more are qualified than have delegated authority.

Performance is assessed annually based on commercial objectives derived from the Civil Service Competency Framework.

Public Appointments

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) which paid public appointment contracts he has (a) renewed and (b) not renewed since May 2010; and how many posts were held by (i) women and (ii) men; [187024]

(2) what the titles are of the individual public appointments that have been made by his Department since May 2010; and which of those appointees were women. [187085]

Mr Vara: I refer the hon. Lady to the answer provided by the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), on 11 February 2014, Official Report, column 607W.

Railways: Trespass

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many convictions have been secured for trespassing on the railway in each of the last 10 years. [187529]

Jeremy Wright: Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database does not include the circumstances behind each case beyond the description provided in the statute. Offences relating to trespassing on the railway system are reported

13 Feb 2014 : Column 747W

as part of a miscellaneous group of offences, and it is not possible, therefore, to separately identify prosecutions for these specific offences from other offences.

Rape: Victim Support Schemes

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans his Department has to expand the number of rape support centres across the country. [187111]

Damian Green: In response to the Ministry of Justice's consultation and response paper “Getting it right for victims and witnesses” which outlined the Government's intention on the future commissioning of victim's services, the MOJ launched the Rape Support Fund (2011 to 2014). The Rape Support Fund has provided around £4.4 million per year, which currently supports 77 rape support centres, including 13 new and emerging centres in areas of need.

The current Rape Support Fund will end on 31 March 2014 and to ensure there is no gap in service provision, a new two-year £4.1 million Rape Support Fund (with the option to extend for a further year) will commence from April 2014, the commissioning process for which has already concluded with announcements due later in February.

The Ministry of Justice is also working with experts from the sector and are due to engage Police and Crime Commissioners, to establish potential locations for two new centres during 2014 and £300,000 has been set aside to establish these new centres.

Witnesses

Ann Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) active and (b) inactive registered intermediaries there were in each year since 2010. [184186]

Damian Green: Registered Intermediaries help to make the justice process accessible to some of the most vulnerable people in our society. In some cases they will be the difference between a witness being able to testify or not.

The use of registered intermediaries has increased in recent years (from 1,206 requests in 2010 to 1,796 in 2013). Numbers of active and inactive registered intermediaries vary on a daily basis because of other demands on their time, and they fluctuate over time due to natural wastage and the 2012 review of long-term inactive intermediaries which removed a large number from the register. Statistics at 31 December of each respective year indicate:

2010—Separate figures were not available until 31 March 2011. At this date, there were 112 active and 36 inactive, total 148;

2011—active 102, inactive 42, total 144 ;

2012—active 88, inactive 19, total 107; and

2013—active 74, inactive 20, total 94.

During the winter of 2013, the Ministry of Justice ran a recruitment campaign for new registered intermediaries. From this, 30 candidates were selected for initial accreditation training courses scheduled during January, February and March 2014.

13 Feb 2014 : Column 748W

Ann Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) matched and (b) unmatched registered intermediaries there were for each age group of vulnerable witnesses in each year since 2010. [184189]

Damian Green: Registered intermediaries help to make the justice process accessible to some of the most vulnerable people in our society. In some cases they will be the difference between a witness being able to testify or not. The data in the following table provides the requested information.

 0 to 45 to 1112 - 1718+65+

2010

     

Matched

85

174

226

627

49

Unmatched

0

2

2

2

2

Cancelled

1

3

6

24

3

Total

86

179

234

653

54

      

2011

     

Matched

84

150

226

652

56

Unmatched

0

1

5

16

6

Cancelled

5

4

6

14

5

Total

89

155

237

682

67

      

2012

     

Matched

124

262

237

683

75

Unmatched

0

0

2

13

5

Cancelled

4

2

4

19

2

Total

128

264

243

715

82

      

2013

     

Matched

208

364

308

778

62

Unmatched

2

3

5

25

2

Cancelled

3

7

7

20

2

Total

213

374

320

823

66

Ann Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many sexual offences were prosecuted which involved a person aged under 18 years old where that person was (a) matched and (b) unmatched with a registered intermediary since 2010. [184190]

Damian Green: Registered intermediaries help to make the justice process accessible to some of the most vulnerable people in our society. In some cases they will be the difference between a witness being able to testify or not.

Data is not collated for reporting purposes on whether the request for a registered intermediary by a user group is for an initial assessment, an achieving best evidence interview, for a trial or any other purpose. However, the data in the following table provides information on requests for cases involving sexual offences and involving all other types of offences.

2010
  Non-sexual offencesSexual offences
  0-1718+0-1718+

Police

Matched

100

211

286

310

 

Unmatched

1

1

1

2

 

Cancelled

3

14

4

7

CPS

Matched

22

61

61

63

 

Unmatched

1

1

1

0

13 Feb 2014 : Column 749W

 

Cancelled

1

5

1

0

Courts

Matched

1

1

1

1

 

Unmatched

0

0

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

0

0

1

Solicitor

Matched

11

17

3

12

 

Unmatched

0

0

0

0

 

Cancelled

1

0

0

0

Total

 

141

311

358

396

Grand total

 

1,206

2011
  Non-sexual offencesSexual offences
  0-1718+0-1718+

Police

Matched

94

217

277

298

 

Unmatched

1

4

2

2

 

Cancelled

4

8

8

5

CPS

Matched

24

78

55

77

 

Unmatched

1

4

0

4

 

Cancelled

0

3

2

0

Courts

Matched

0

3

1

2

 

Unmatched

0

0

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

0

0

1

Solicitor

Matched

2

19

7

14

 

Unmatched

0

6

2

2

 

Cancelled

1

1

0

1

Total

 

127

343

354

406

Grand total

 

1,230

2012
  Non-sexual offencesSexual offences
  0-1718+0-1718+

Police

Matched

163

254

355

323

 

Unmatched

0

7

0

4

 

Cancelled

4

10

4

3

CPS

Matched

34

107

70

72

 

Unmatched

0

4

2

2

 

Cancelled

1

5

1

2

Courts

Matched

0

1

0

0

 

Unmatched

0

1

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

1

0

0

Solicitor

Matched

1

1

0

0

 

Unmatched

0

0

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

0

0

0

Total

 

203

391

432

406

Grand total

 

1,432

2013
  Non-sexual offencesSexual offences
  0-1718+0-1718+

Police

Matched

155

211

512

383

 

Unmatched

3

12

5

4

 

Cancelled

6

5

7

5

CPS

Matched

39

107

174

136

 

Unmatched

1

6

1

4

13 Feb 2014 : Column 750W

 

Cancelled

4

8

0

4

Courts

Matched

0

0

0

0

 

Unmatched

0

0

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

0

0

0

Solicitor

Matched

0

2

0

1

 

Unmatched

0

1

0

0

 

Cancelled

0

0

0

0

Total

 

208

352

699

537

Grand total

 

1,796

Written Questions: Government Responses

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 9 December 2013, Official Report, column 61W, on procurement, when the information sought by the original question will be provided. [187523]

Jeremy Wright: The answer to the question tabled by the right hon. Member for Tooting (Sadiq Khan) will be answered as soon as possible.

Young Offenders

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department is taking to equip young offenders with the skills, qualifications and self-discipline they need to lead law-abiding lives in the community. [187110]

Jeremy Wright: We have recently set out our plans to transform youth custody and put education at the heart of youth detention. All young people should have access to a high quality education which will allow them to fulfil their potential. This is all the more important if a young person has set out on the wrong path in life, and needs help to get back onto the straight and narrow.

We will be introducing a pathfinder Secure College, a new form of secure educational establishment for young offenders, in the East Midlands in 2017. Secure Colleges will deliver an innovative and integrated regime focused on educating and rehabilitating young offenders, m addition, we are enhancing education provision within Young Offender Institutions by seeking to more than double the number of hours young people spend in education each week, and by bringing the head teacher overseeing education delivery into the senior management team of the establishment.

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of a link between the consumption of highly alcoholic beverages and anti-social and criminal behaviour; and if she will make a statement. [187178]

13 Feb 2014 : Column 751W

Norman Baker: While no formal assessment has been made, we know that there are certain high strength products that are overly associated with alcohol harms. Evidence from Suffolk Police stated there had been a 49% reduction in anti-social “incidents of concern” in Ipswich during the first six months of the Reducing the Strength campaign, where retailers voluntarily stopped selling high-strength alcohol. That is why we are challenging industry to raise its game to help tackle alcohol-related crime and disorder including taking action to reduce the size and strength of products associated with problem drinking.

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will bring forward legislative proposals to enable minimum pricing for alcohol. [187693]

Norman Baker: Minimum Unit Pricing remains a policy under consideration but is not being taken forward

13 Feb 2014 : Column 752W

at the moment, while we assess the response of industry to our Alcohol Strategy. In the meantime we are introducing a ban on alcohol sales below the cost of duty plus VAT from April 2014. This fulfils the Coalition Government's commitment and will stop the worst cases of very cheap and harmful alcohol sales.

Confiscation Orders

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many confiscation orders have been recorded by each force on (a) the Joint-Asset Recovery Database and (b) other databases for (i) below £100, (ii) between £100 and £50,000 and (iii) above £50,000 in each year for which figures are available. [186898]

Karen Bradley [holding answer 10 February 2014]: Under this Government more assets have been recovered from criminals than ever before. The figures of confiscation orders obtained by police forces in England and Wales from the Joint Asset Recovery Database are provided in the following table:

Number of confiscation orders
Police forces 2003-042004-052005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13
 

Below £100

4

1

9

3

4

11

21

8

14

14

 

Between £100-£50,000

1

23

75

69

90

115

108

140

167

165

 

Above £50,000

16

8

4

4

5

11

3

10

12

6

Avon and Somerset Constabulary

Total

21

32

88

76

99

137

132

158

193

185

 

Below £100

1

0

0

5

7

11

9

21

7

11

 

Between £100-£50,000

9

12

15

28

48

55

46

75

82

58

 

Above £50,000

2

1

2

1

4

2

4

4

10

7

Bedfordshire police

Total

12

13

17

34

59

68

59

100

99

76

 

Below £100

0

0

0

0

2

4

2

9

3

15

 

Between £100-£50,000

2

5

5

8

11

24

10

18

19

16

 

Above £50,000

2

1

1

2

0

3

2

2

5

4

British Transport Police

Total

4

6

6

10

13

31

14

29

27

35

 

Below £100

8

0

1

1

2

5

4

19

49

30

 

Between £100-£50,000

28

15

12

41

58

64

59

66

51

90

 

Above £50,000

2

8

1

6

6

4

0

4

4

7

Cambridgeshire Constabulary

Total

38

23

14

48

66

73

63

89

104

127

 

Below £100

0

0

4

3

15

28

13

18

10

19

 

Between £100-£50,000

9

15

26

23

27

69

60

75

84

88

 

Above £50,000

1

1

1

6

4

7

6

3

6

8

Cheshire Constabulary

Total

10

16

31

32

46

104

79

96

100

115

 

Below £100

0

2

1

5

6

8

1

4

7

9

 

Between £100-£50,000

9

16

11

12

18

10

18

17

13

25

13 Feb 2014 : Column 753W

13 Feb 2014 : Column 754W

 

Above £50,000

3

4

4

4

7

5

1

13

8

9

City of London Police

Total

12

22

16

21

31

23

20

34

28

43

 

Below £100

0

1

11

4

4

0

17

20

7

32

 

Between £100-£50,000

0

15

41

26

21

30

49

77

54

51

 

Above £50,000

0

0

2

3

3

2

9

4

0

8

Cleveland police

Total

0

16

54

33

28

32

75

101

61

91

 

Below £100

0

2

1

6

6

13

12

15

20

14

 

Between £100-£50,000

17

12

15

26

58

63

53

52

61

61

 

Above £50,000

1

0

0

2

2

8

2

1

6

4

Cumbria Constabulary

Total

18

14

16

34

66

84

67

68

87

79

 

Below £100

3

21

22

21

37

30

23

32

21

19

 

Between £100-£50,000

13

62

57

75

65

85

71

81

43

37

 

Above £50,000

2

4

1

3

7

3

2

6

1

8

Derbyshire Constabulary

Total

18

87

80

99

109

118

96

119

65

64

 

Below £100

1

1

0

0

6

2

8

11

4

11

 

Between £100-£50,000

14

14

22

20

35

31

24

35

43

43

 

Above £50,000

1

2

2

2

6

6

9

11

4

4

Devon and Cornwall Constabulary

Total

16

17

24

22

47

39

41

57

51

58

 

Below £100

0

2

3

4

6

6

11

17

10

6

 

Between £100-£50,000

10

26

32

18

21

51

46

41

35

28

 

Above £50,000

1

1

2

9

7

2

5

2

5

6

Dorset police

Total

11

29

37

31

34

59

62

60

50

40

 

Below £100

0

2

1

1

2

1

6

2

3

7

 

Between £100-£50,000

6

10

20

25

31

30

37

63

28

25

 

Above £50,000

1

1

2

1

6

2

4

0

1

1

Durham Constabulary

Total

7

13

23

27

39

33

47

65

32

33

 

Below £100

1

2

6

16

21

13

11

15

20

18

 

Between £100-£50,000

7

13

19

16

31

29

26

28

34

40

 

Above £50,000

1

2

0

1

2

0

2

1

2

0

Dyfed-Powys police

Total

9

17

25

33

54

42

39

44

56

58

 

Below £100

0

2

5

4

3

26

38

43

26

20

 

Between £100-£50,000

8

15

39

35

36

54

76

106

94

76

 

Above £50,000

3

1

4

4

1

6

7

5

11

9

Essex police

Total

11

18

48

43

40

86

121

154

131

105

 

Below £100

0

8

7

6

9

17

6

15

5

13

 

Between £100-£50,000

6

11

24

33

57

73

39

36

29

36

13 Feb 2014 : Column 755W

13 Feb 2014 : Column 756W

 

Above £50,000

3

4

4

0

9

3

5

2

1

2

Gloucestershire Constabulary

Total

9

23

35

39

75

93

50

53

35

51

 

Below £100

26

126

93

99

158

124

78

49

28

45

 

Between £100-£50,000

136

252

213

209

260

241

224

259

243

226

 

Above £50,000

10

9

17

12

14

21

18

10

15

14

Greater Manchester police

Total

172

387

323

320

432

386

320

318

286

285

 

Below £100

2

19

9

7

11

15

8

9

5

7

 

Between £100-£50,000

20

27

18

26

29

31

33

31

38

49

 

Above £50,000

0

3

2

4

3

2

4

3

1

1

Gwent police

Total

22

49

29

37

43

48

45

43

44

57

 

Below £100

0

2

6

14

12

17

13

37

65

56

 

Between £100-£50,000

22

30

38

44

34

26

19

46

118

113

 

Above £50,000

3

1

4

2

10

8

4

13

3

2

Hampshire Constabulary

Total

25

33

48

60

56

51

36

96

186

171

 

Below £100

0

1

0

10

13

30

32

31

32

29

 

Between £100-£50,000

1

6

17

29

31

63

63

69

61

57

 

Above £50,000

1

2

5

3

11

8

7

7

8

6

Hertfordshire Constabulary

Total

2

9

22

42

55

101

102

107

101

92

 

Below £100

2

3

4

3

5

9

10

8

3

5

 

Between £100-£50,000

17

24

30

42

33

37

63

64

50

42

 

Above £50,000

1

2

1

5

1

11

6

8

7

6

Humberside police

Total

20

29

35

50

39

57

79

80

60

53

 

Below £100

7

8

26

14

44

50

59

55

52

35

 

Between £100-£50,000

29

19

42

44

66

66

98

100

87

89

 

Above £50,000

8

6

4

15

6

6

15

7

15

8

Kent police

Total

44

33

72

73

116

122

172

162

154

132

 

Below £100

0

0

3

4

15

12

7

24

16

11

 

Between £100-£50,000

13

22

32

48

46

45

59

95

87

91

 

Above £50,000

0

5

8

6

10

13

10

6

10

11

Lancashire Constabulary

Total

13

27

43

58

71

70

76

125

113

113

 

Below £100

4

6

9

21

18

26

33

35

44

43

 

Between £100-£50,000

18

56

70

73

100

74

114

109

133

148

 

Above £50,000

5

5

6

3

18

9

10

17

9

2

Leicestershire Constabulary

Total

27

67

85

97

136

109

157

161

186

193

 

Below £100

1

4

6

15

15

26

27

11

19

22

 

Between £100-£50,000

12

23

35

46

32

49

44

73

52

39

13 Feb 2014 : Column 757W

13 Feb 2014 : Column 758W

 

Above £50,000

1

1

8

1

0

3

4

1

3

1

Lincolnshire police

Total

14

28

49

62

47

78

75

85

74

62

 

Below £100

7

15

50

45

51

57

50

56

49

71

 

Between £100-£50,000

41

70

119

108

89

137

143

123

157

156

 

Above £50,000

12

7

8

11

8

18

12

4

8

8

Merseyside police

Total

60

92

177

164

148

212

205

183

214

235

 

Below £100

11

24

41

33

65

91

69

43

56

44

 

Between £100-£50,000

113

169

251

227

260

311

286

337

315

265

 

Above £50,000

40

34

53

52

77

69

60

86

81

89

Metropolitan Police Service

Total

164

227

345

312

402

471

415

466

452

398

 

Below £100

0

3

1

2

2

3

1

3

8

15

 

Between £100-£50,000

7

7

16

23

48

58

77

85

84

69

 

Above £50,000

0

3

8

2

9

4

5

4

6

1

Norfolk Constabulary

Total

7

13

25

27

59

65

83

92

98

85

 

Below £100

0

0

0

2

9

22

19

15

19

12

 

Between £100-£50,000

7

4

4

14

38

52

66

52

65

46

 

Above £50,000

0

0

4

1

3

2

4

4

2

4

North Wales police

Total

7

4

8

17

50

76

89

71

86

62

 

Below £100

0

1

4

6

15

16

12

15

9

10

 

Between £100-£50,000

0

16

23

25

28

41

46

40

30

36

 

Above £50,000

0

1

3

1

3

3

1

5

2

4

North Yorkshire police

Total

0

18

30

32

46

60

59

60

41

50

 

Below £100

2

3

1

7

2

17

29

28

14

11

 

Between £100-£50,000

12

14

32

26

28

34

33

36

42

38

 

Above £50,000

4

2

3

3

8

3

3

7

2

6

Northamptonshire police

Total

18

19

36

36

38

54

65

71

58

55

 

Below £100

0

0

1

1

11

5

22

36

12

27

 

Between £100-£50,000

2

17

26

34

43

69

84

110

79

66

 

Above £50,000

1

3

3

3

6

1

8

8

5

6

Northumbria police

Total

3

20

30

38

60

75

114

154

96

99

 

Below £100

3

5

10

14

17

46

58

58

51

37

 

Between £100-£50,000

14

41

71

64

78

105

94

139

129

135

 

Above £50,000

4

4

2

8

5

8

2

8

5

3

Nottinghamshire police

Total

21

50

83

86

100

159

154

205

185

175

 

Below £100

11

40

51

51

46

48

30

34

26

21

13 Feb 2014 : Column 759W

13 Feb 2014 : Column 760W

 

Between £100-£50,000

26

57

97

108

98

147

131

152

125

134

 

Above £50,000

0

0

2

3

2

7

5

3

2

4

South Wales police

Total

37

97

150

162

146

202

166

189

153

159

 

Below £100

1

7

7

4

3

12

17

18

14

17

 

Between £100-£50,000

17

53

52

57

48

61

75

86

121

114

 

Above £50,000

4

7

7

6

9

13

10

4

17

9

South Yorkshire police

Total

22

67

66

67

60

86

102

108

152

140

 

Below £100

0

1

1

3

13

15

12

31

37

41

 

Between £100-£50,000

13

13

18

38

56

74

81

99

112

101

 

Above £50,000

0

1

5

4

10

11

4

10

5

10

Staffordshire police

Total

13

15

24

45

79

100

97

140

154

152

 

Below £100

2

4

0

7

6

12

16

21

8

11

 

Between £100-£50,000

4

28

46

55

74

78

65

54

65

64

 

Above £50,000

2

2

3

2

4

5

1

6

2

4

Suffolk Constabulary

Total

8

34

49

64

84

95

82

81

75

79

 

Below £100

0

1

1

6

5

3

7

23

10

17

 

Between £100-£50,000

4

13

16

19

13

23

24

31

30

30

 

Above £50,000

3

6

3

6

5

6

10

5

5

7

Surrey police

Total

7

20

20

31

23

32

41

59

45

54

 

Below £100

3

2

13

15

15

24

23

29

20

27

 

Between £100-£50,000

26

28

37

66

74

103

138

126

122

98

 

Above £50,000

3

3

3

3

5

7

10

15

8

6

Sussex police

Total

32

33

53

84

94

134

171

170

150

131

 

Below £100

1

3

6

23

25

78

70

88

39

35

 

Between £100-£50,000

21

33

84

95

105

133

113

138

138

100

 

Above £50,000

4

2

6

6

11

15

10

6

18

16

Thames Valley police

Total

26

38

96

124

141

226

193

232

195

151

 

Below £100

0

1

0

9

8

9

7

16

9

17

 

Between £100-£50,000

6

5

8

12

22

26

17

27

25

43

 

Above £50,000

0

0

0

0

3

1

3

2

2

3

Warwickshire police

Total

6

6

8

21

33

36

27

45

36

63

 

Below £100

5

12

14

4

15

15

18

15

37

21

 

Between £100-£50,000

32

36

38

26

55

63

58

70

76

47

 

Above £50,000

5

4

3

0

4

7

4

5

5

6

West Mercia Constabulary

Total

42

52

55

30

74

85

80

90

118

74

 

Below £100

0

17

27

67

65

60

75

53

57

36

13 Feb 2014 : Column 761W

13 Feb 2014 : Column 762W

 

Between £100-£50,000

34

81

94

125

125

117

114

103

93

119

 

Above £50,000

3

3

6

15

8

20

17

14

14

18

West Midlands police

Total

37

101

127

207

198

197

206

170

164

173

 

Below £100

0

4

8

9

16

23

27

44

78

98

 

Between £100-£50,000

12

34

144

224

202

163

199

263

289

330

 

Above £50,000

13

4

13

8

8

19

12

26

37

35

West Yorkshire police

Total

25

42

165

241

226

205

238

333

404

463

 

Below £100

0

0

3

6

4

17

7

5

3

5

 

Between £100-£50,000

9

15

19

20

35

39

30

31

27

34

 

Above £50,000

0

2

2

1

3

2

6

1

4

1

Wiltshire Constabulary

Total

9

17

24

27

42

58

43

37

34

40