Table 4 details how much was paid to staff below the senior civil service in non-consolidated awards.

Table 4—Staff below the SCS
Performance year2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12
FY2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13(1)

Value of non consolidated awards paid (£)

47,516,913

44,231,916

43,521,423

42,025,950

28,059,302

Number of awards paid

71,940

66,585

65,504

64,944

51,829

(1) Figures for financial year 2012-13 do not include special bonus scheme awards made in March 2013.

Table 4 excludes information on staff in MOD Trading Funds as they have separate pay delegations.

With the exception of the Royal Air Force Museum and the National Museum of the Royal Navy, figures for the Department's non-departmental public bodies are included in the figures above.

Non-Consolidated Performance Awards—The Royal Air Force Museum:

Table 5 details the total value of payments made to staff by way of non-consolidated performance and special bonus scheme (SBS) awards by financial year.

Table 5—RAF Museum
Financial year2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Value of non-consolidated awards (£)

102,379

69,300

49,600

70,024

74,919

Number staff receiving non-consolidated awards

184

186

171

163

166

Payment range non-consolidated (£)

67-5,610

100-5,610

100-400

100-550

100-525

Value of SBS (£)

2,750

4,050

6,050

7,350

Number staff receiving SBS

5

11

8

17

Payment range SBS (£)

250-1,000

250-1,000

250-3,000

250-1,000

Non-Consolidated Performance Awards—The National Museum of the Royal Navy:

The National Museum of the Royal Navy is no longer a non-departmental public body as it has gained charitable status. However, details are included for financial years 2008-09 to 2012-13. Table 6 details the total value of payments made to staff by way of non consolidated performance awards. The National Museum of the Royal Navy has no special bonus scheme.

Table 6—The National Museum of the Royal Navy
Financial year2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Value of non-consolidated awards (£)

0

8,500

8,620

8,827.50

10,000

Number staff receiving non-consolidated awards

0

1

1

1

2

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what criteria are used in (a) his Department and (b) each public body for which he is responsible to determine which officials receive bonus payments. [151129]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1277W

Mr Francois: Table 1 sets out the criteria to qualify for non consolidated performance awards for 2012-13 for staff in the Ministry of Defence.

Table 1
 Criteria

Senior Civil Service (SCS)

2012-13 Performance Pay—No more than 25% of staff will receive non-consolidated pay awards. Awards will be made to staff receiving a Performance Group 1 marking following moderation by the MOD SCS Pay Committee.

MOD below SCS

2012-13 Performance Pay—No more than 25% of staff will receive non-consolidated performance pay awards. The number and level of awards is subject to consultation with trades unions. Awards will be made only to staff receiving a Box 5 (Outstanding) performance marking. In the event that more than 25% of staff in any grade receive a Box 5 marking a moderating process will be established to ensure that no more than 25% of staff receive an award.

Table 2 sets out the criteria to qualify for non-consolidated performance awards for 2012-2013 for the Department's Trading Funds and Non-Departmental Public Bodies which have delegated pay arrangements.

Table 2
 Criteria

Royal Air Force Museum

2012 Performance pay is linked to the appraisal system and a particular 'box mark' on a 5-point scale attracted a cash sum or %-based sum - ranging from £300 to £600. 2013 Performance pay will reward the top 25% of performers.

Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA)

Staff must have been in post on 1 July 2012 and have completed 6 months service with the RFA and be performing satisfactorily or above.

Defence Support Group (DSG)

DSG pays performance related bonuses to all satisfactory performers in the form of a Corporate Bonus Reward.

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

Subject to trade union consultation and pay remit approval non-consolidated performance awards for 2012-13 will be restricted to under 25% of staff.

Hydrographic Office

The top 25% of staff in each grade will be rewarded with a performance award. Values are subject to negotiation.

It continues to be a fundamental principle of Government policy that reward in the public sector should be linked to performance. The Ministry of Defence, in line with other Government Departments, rewards performance through the use of non-consolidated payments which reflect outputs, results and performance. These payments are colloquially known as a ‘bonuses', although this is a partially misleading description because the performance-related element of pay is part of the departmental pay bill, rather than being an additional cost.

The total value of non-consolidated performance awards paid to staff in the Ministry of Defence (excluding Trading Funds) has fallen by 38.4% since financial year 2009-10.

Private Finance Initiative

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which private finance initiative projects relating to his Department have been re-financed in each year since May 2010; what the value is of each such project; what the re-financing gain has been in each such instance;

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1278W

and what amount the relevant government body received from such gain through a

(a)

lump sum and

(b)

reduction in the unitary charge. [153420]

Mr Philip Hammond: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Procurement

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what checks on the financial health of potential contractors his Department carries out prior to awarding contracts; and whether such checks include a basic check to find out if monies are owed to HM Revenue and Customs. [R] [152237]

Mr Dunne: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does carry out financial health checks on potential contractors prior to contract award to ensure they have sufficient financial resources to deliver the contract. These checks include, for example, review of the last three years' audited accounts and turnover. We also ask contractors specifically about criminal activity such as convictions for tax evasion or fraud. Where justified, the MOD can eliminate suppliers who pose an unacceptable risk to public money from procurement.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish details of all (a) his Department’s and (b) its non-departmental public bodies’ existing contractual commitments with a value of (i) between £100,000 and £1 million, (ii) between £1 million and £10 million, (iii) between £10 million and £100 million and (iv) over £100 million; what the (A) duration, (B) value including annual costs to the public purse, (C) expiry date and (D) purpose of each such contract is; and whether each such contract contains (1) renewal clauses and (2) early release clauses. [153646]

Mr Dunne: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Public Expenditure

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much of his Department's budget was claimed against official development assistance funding in the last five years; and if he will make a statement. [151157]

Mr Philip Hammond: Figures are only available for calendar year 2011.

In 2011, the Ministry of Defence reported that £6.85 million was spent on activities which meet the definition of Official Development Assistance (ODA). £2 million was from the Conflict Pool and the balance of £4.85 million estimated from MOD's own budget. Details of 2012 expenditure will be published in Statistics on International Development in the autumn.

Looking ahead, a joint MOD and DFID study is investigating in the round the contribution, cost and funding mechanisms for Defence capabilities which support HMG upstream conflict prevention, development and humanitarian objectives. This will ensure that the MOD's important contributions are recognised and appropriately scored as Official Development Assistance.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1279W

RAF Cranwell

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the (a) Army and (b) Royal Navy currently undergo training at RAF Cranwell. [152790]

Mr Robathan: There are 37 Royal Navy personnel and 22 Army personnel currently undergoing training at RAF Cranwell.

RAF Leuchars

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Quick Reaction Alert flights from RAF Leuchars have required air-to-air refuelling in each of the last five years. [153414]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1280W

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Redundancy Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible received payments under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last five years; and at what total cost in each such year. [152646]

Mr Robathan: The following table shows the number of Ministry of Defence (MOD) civil servants who have, over the last five financial years, left the Department under voluntary release and redundancy schemes and, since 30 September 2011, under the MOD Voluntary Early Release Scheme.

Number
  Financial year
OrganisationScheme2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13(1)

Department

Voluntary release or redundancy

460

400

180

40

30

Department

Voluntary Early Release Scheme

n/a

n/a

n/a

5,950

2,930

MOD Trading Funds

Voluntary release or redundancy

40

80

150

470

20

n/a = not applicable. (1) To 31 January 2013. Notes: 1. The figures include all permanent, casual and Trading Fund civilian personnel, but exclude Royal Fleet Auxiliary and locally-engaged civilian personnel. 2 Statistical convention: figures have been rounded to the nearest 10; numbers ending in 5 have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias.

Rescue Services

Sir Alan Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the total cost to public funds of the tender process for the SAR-H contract, which was abandoned in December 2011, was; and what the cost of the Ministry of Defence Police inquiry was into the events leading up to its abandonment. [152914]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence and the Department for Transport combined spent circa £10.7 million in support of the joint Search and Rescue Helicopter project. The Criminal Investigation Department of the Ministry of Defence police do not as a matter of routine record the cost of individual investigations.

Rescue Services: Cumbria

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence on how many occasions RAF Search and Rescue helicopters were used in operations in Cumbria in the last year; and from which bases those helicopters came in each instance. [150998]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 16 April 2013]: The information for callouts in Cumbria in 2012, broken down by RAF unit, is shown in the following table:

 Number of callouts

RAF Boulmer

36

RAF Valley

9

RAF Leconfield

4

Total

49

There were also 13 Royal Navy Search and Rescue callouts attended by helicopters from HMS Gannet and five Mountain Rescue Team callouts in Cumbria in 2012. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency will also have responded to callouts.

The 2012 annual report on Military Search and Rescue Statistics, published by the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA), contains further information on callouts. A spreadsheet containing the latitude and longitude of every individual callout in 2012 is available to view on the DASA website at the following link:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=48&pubType=l&thiscontent=400&PublishTime =09:30:00&date=2013-01-31

Reserve Forces

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel are in each unit of the (a) Territorial Army, (b) Royal Air Force Reserve, (c) Royal Navy Reserve and (d) Royal Marine Reserve. [153341]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1281W

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel received their bounty in each unit of the (a) Territorial Army, (b) Royal Air Force Reserve, (c) Royal Navy Reserve and (d) Royal Marine Reserve in each of the last three years. [153342]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many reserve units are currently based in (a) Scotland, (b) Northern Ireland, (c) Wales and (d) England; and what the location is of each such unit. [153343]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Royal Military Academy

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the (a) Royal Navy and (b) Royal Air Force currently undergo training at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. [152791]

Mr Robathan: No members of the Royal Navy or Royal Air Force currently undergo training at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst.

Scotland

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what (a) external organisations and (b) individuals his Department engaged with as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153291]

(2) how many members of his Department's staff have been allocated to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; and at what cost to the public purse; [153292]

(3) what meetings he or his officials have had with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Alistair Darling) as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153293]

(4) what work his Department has commissioned by external consultants in relation to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; which consultants were used; and at what cost to the public purse. [153294]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Service Complaints Commissioner

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if he will take steps to ensure that information about the Service Complaints Commissioner is provided to every new recruit in each of the three services; and if he will make a statement; [153123]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1282W

(2) if he will ensure that a question regarding awareness of the Service Complaints Commissioner is included in the annual Recruit Trainee Survey; and if he will make a statement; [153124]

(3) what consideration he has given to establishing a provision for whistleblowers to make service complaints; and if he will make a statement. [153125]

Mr Francois: These issues were the subject of recommendations in the Service Complaints Commissioner's Annual Report 2012. The Ministry of Defence is considering the report carefully and will be responding shortly.

Stabilisation Unit

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which of his Department's sponsored activities are conducted by the Stabilisation Unit. [152734]

Mr Robathan: The Stabilisation Unit (SU) is jointly owned by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Ministry of Defence (MOD) and Department for International Development and is fully funded by the Conflict Pool, and can be tasked by any of these three Departments.

Consequently, the SU undertakes a wide range of activity where the MOD is the lead commissioning agency. Such activity has included scoping studies of the International Military Advisory Training Team in Sierra Leone, strategic defence reviews abroad and strategic security assessments.

In addition, the SU delivers an ongoing series of inputs to MOD exercises as well as contributing advisory assistance to the development of stabilisation doctrine. Stabilisation Unit personnel have also participated in various Defence staff talks, are engaged in current military operations and have offered advice to a number of countries on security and justice.

Staff

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which private companies are contractually employed by his Department for work relating to the nuclear deterrent and the Vanguard Successor Class submarine programme; and how many people are (a) directly and (b) indirectly employed as a result of each contract with each such company. [152957]

Mr Dunne: The information relating to which suppliers are contractually employed is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost due to the number of suppliers involved in these programmes.

In addition, the Ministry of Defence does not compile employment numbers on the defence equipment supply chain.

Telephone Services

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 18 March 2013, Official Report, columns 443-4W, on telephone services, whether a UK landline number beginning with 01, 02 or 03 is publicly available as an alternative to the 0800, 0808, 0845 and 0870 numbers in use by his Department and the agencies for which he is responsible. [151628]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1283W

Mr Robathan: For the majority of 0800, 0808, 0845 and 0870 telephone numbers provided to the Department through the Defence Fixed Telecommunications Service contract with British Telecom, there is an alternative Public Switch Telephone Network (PSTN) 01 or 02 number. There are no alternatives beginning with 03.

Information about the public availability of these alternative 01 or 02 telephone numbers is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Minister for Defence, Personnel, Welfare and Veterans, my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois), on 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1135W, to the right hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne (John Healey) regarding the number of premium rate numbers provided through the Defence Fixed Telecommunications Service contract which are free to the caller and those which may incur a charge to the caller.

Territorial Army

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the current operational strength of each unit of the Territorial Army is. [145081]

Mr Robathan: The current trained strength of the Territorial Army (Group A) is around 19,000. All of these individuals have a liability to be deployed.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1284W

Figures at unit level are not collated and validated on a routine basis at present, so to provide the information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans, my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois), is in discussion with officials about whether it is both practical and necessary for trained strength figures at unit level to be part of the regularly produced statistics necessary to monitor progress in the Army's programme to increase the trained strength of the Territorial Army. It is necessary to consider whether it would be practical and cost-effective to produce this information to the level of data quality required of official statistics, as opposed to those used for internal management information.

Ultra Electronics

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 61W, on Ultra Electronics, for which Ministry of Defence contracts Ultra Electronics is currently bidding. [153045]

Mr Dunne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 61W. Ultra Electronics has recently been successful in its bids for a further four contracts. The details of these are shown in the following table:

Contract numberContract titleContract value (£)Contract end date

NBC/00070

Engineering study to review environmental hazard detection system at Royal Naval Armaments Depot Coulport

19,082

30 April 2013

MCS/1012

Modify in-service Submarine Acoustic Warfare Control System (SAWCS)

3,577,380

24 April 2016

MCS/1008

SAWCS hardware in-service support

482,815

31 December 2016

CBRN/00169

Support to Naval Fleet Radiation Capability

361,682

4 December 2017

According to Ministry of Defence records, there is no indication that Ultra Electronics has currently bid for other MOD contracts.

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 61W, on Ultra Electronics, which contracts with Ultra Electronics are held with his Department's trading funds. [153046]

Mr Dunne: The following three contracts with Ultra Electronics are held by Ministry of Defence trading funds:

Contract numberContract titleTrading fund

LSBU5/0045

Procurement of Warrior push switch

Defence Support Group

DS&TE/019/B

Post design services, procurement, modifications, repair and calibration of fuel system test sets, kits and parts for Tornado, Harrier, Chinook and other aircraft platforms

Defence Support Group

DSTLX 1000073537

Provision of spares in support of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Team

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl)

Two further contracts are held with Dstl but I am withholding the details as disclosure would or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces.

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 61W, on Ultra Electronics, if he will place in the Library a copy of the minutes from the three introductory meetings held since May 2010 between Ministers from his Department and Ultra Electronics. [153047]

Mr Dunne: I have written to the hon. Member today.

Vacant Land

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the amount of surplus

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1285W

land held in the UK by his Department which could be released for economic development; and if he will make a statement. [141593]

Mr Francois: Information on surplus Ministry of Defence land which could be released for economic development and new homes has been published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/33229/interim_disposals_database_house_of_commons_nov2012.csv

A copy has also been placed in the Library of the House.

Veterans: Employment

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how his Department calculates the number of service-leavers who find employment; [138168]

(2) how many of those who completed the Career Transition Partnership in each of the last five years found long-term employment. [138169]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 January 2013]: The majority of eligible service leavers make use of the services of the Career Transition Partnership (CTP—a partnering arrangement between MOD and Right Management Limited). For service leavers that have been assisted by CTP, an estimate of the employment rate is calculated at the six month point post discharge. This is achieved through a sampling exercise. The employment rate defines individuals who were actively seeking employment. The following table shows the results of this analysis:

Financial year(1)Estimated employment rate at six month point post-discharge (percentage)

2008-09

93

2009-10

93

2010-11

94

2011-12

92

(1) 2012-13 data are not yet available.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent steps he has taken to ensure adequate support for ex-service personnel in finding new employment on their return to civilian life. [151997]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151354]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not set a specific budget for overseas travel. All Defence Ministers and officials must travel in the most cost-effective way possible. For example, neither the Defence Ministers nor officials travel first class by air.

Information on overseas travel by the Defence Ministers is published quarterly and can be accessed by using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministers-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1286W

Information on overseas travel by the MOD's most senior officials is also published quarterly and can also be found using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/senior-staff-business-expenses

We are currently updating these data sets.

Warships

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the annual cost of (a) fuel, (b) spares, (c) maintenance and (d) training and other running costs, excluding crew costs of (i) a Type 45 destroyer, (ii) a Type 23 frigate, (iii) a Hunt-class mine countermeasures vessel, (iv) a Sandown-class mine countermeasures vessel, (v) a River-class offshore patrol vessel, (vi) an Archer-class patrol vessel and (vii) a Scimitar-class patrol vessel. [149385]

Mr Dunne: The current estimates of the annual cost for the various classes of vessel are shown in the following table, rounded to the nearest £100,000, except for figures under £100,000, which have been rounded to the nearest £5,000.

It should be noted that the costs shown are average figures per ship, calculated across all ships in each class. Those costs are therefore not necessarily reflective of the costs of an individual ship of that class.

Class of vesselFuel costsEngineering support costsTraining costs and other running costs (excluding crew costs)(1)

Type 45 Destroyer

2,600,000

(2)33,400,000

500,000

Type 23 Frigate

1,700,000

19,200.000

600,000

Hunt Class Mine Countermeasures Vessel

200,000

3,900,000

300,000

Sandown Class Mine Countermeasures Vessel

200,000

2,600,000

300,000

River Class Offshore Patrol Vessel

800,000

(3)1,900.000

200,000

Archer Class Patrol Vessel

25,000

200,000

n/a

Scimitar Class Patrol Vessel

(4)

100,000

n/a

n/a = Not available. (1) Training costs are not broken down to platform level so this information is not held in the format requested. Other running costs included in this column are for items such as medical treatment, consumables and travel and subsistence. (2) Type 45 Engineering Support is done under a Contracting for Availability arrangement. Under this arrangement, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) is not able to separately identify the costs of spares and other maintenance activity. The figure quoted therefore covers both spares and maintenance work, and associated costs. It is the average for HMS Daring, HMS Dauntless and HMS Diamond as these are the only three of the Class for which there is a full year cost. (3) The MOD pays for the Availability of the River Class vessel rather than spares and maintenance. The cost of spares is included in contract daily rates, which cannot be broken down any further. This is based on the Contractor Logistic Support strategy, in which the contractor delivers both the maintenance and the management of the maintenance activity. (4) It is not possible to break down the costs of fuel for the Scimitar Class Patrol vessel as this information is not held in the format requested.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1287W

Watts Andrews Report

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place a copy of the Watts Andrews Report in the Library. [136160]

Mr Francois: I am happy to consider placing a copy of the report in the Library of the House. A review of the information requested is being conducted with regard to its suitability for release. I will write to the hon. Member shortly, once this assessment is complete.

Written Questions: Government Responses

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) pursuant to the answer of 6 December 2012, Official Report, column 896W, on armed forces: sexual offences, when he intends to write to the hon. Member for Bridgend; [150455]

(2) pursuant to the answer of 6 December 2012, Official Report, column 897W, on armed forces: sexual offences, when he intends to write to the hon. Member for Bridgend. [152581]

Mr Francois: I replied to the hon. Member today.

Justice

Alternatives to Prison

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of alternatives to short-term prison sentences. [151564]

Jeremy Wright: Community sentences are available for offences which are not serious enough to merit a custodial sentence. The public should have confidence in community punishment and that is why we are strengthening community sentences to include a strong punitive element.

Prison is the right place for serious offenders. Of those sent to prison, 76% have already received a community sentence, and have persisted to reoffend, leading to a prison sentence.

Currently, offenders with sentences of less than 12 months have the highest reoffending rates but receive no support after leaving prison. The MOJ is proposing changes that will guarantee support and rehabilitation for these offenders to stop the cycle of crime and reduce reoffending.

Assets

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what (a) assets and (b) liabilities are held by (i) his Department and (ii) its non-departmental public bodies with a value of (A) between £100,000 and £1 million, (B) between £1 million and £10 million, (C) between £10 million and £100 million and (D) over £100 million; what the value is of each item; and what assets are scheduled for disposal. [153635]

Mrs Grant: Information on ‘assets and liabilities’ and ‘assets held for sale' for the year ended 31 March 2013 will be available in our annual report and accounts, which are yet to be finalised.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1288W

To provide a break down of assets and liabilities with value of each item would incur disproportionate cost.

A consolidated Statement of Financial Position as at 31 March 2012 showing assets and liabilities is available on page 70 of the departmental annual report and accounts 2011-12. In addition, page 114, table 11 gives details of property, plant and equipment. The link is given as follows:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministry-of-justice-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-12

Community Orders: Greater London

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many serious further offences have been carried out by offenders being supervised on Community Payback in London since 31 October 2012. [151679]

Jeremy Wright: In the period 31 October 2012 to 28 March 2013, 10 serious further offences were committed by offenders who were subject to an unpaid work requirement. However, the National Offender Management Service has not recorded any change in SFO numbers since the contract began.

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what measures are available under the Community Payback in London contract to ensure that the contractor is involved in the investigation of any serious further offences carried out by offenders under the contractor's supervision. [151701]

Jeremy Wright: London Probation Trust undertakes all serious further offence investigations, with the participation of the contractor. The National Offender Management Service monitors both organisations through contract management arrangements, to ensure that recommendations are implemented.

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders have been placed by the London Probation Trust on London Community Payback in each week since October 2012. [151702]

Jeremy Wright: All offenders in London on whom the courts impose an unpaid work requirement are managed by the London Probation Trust. In the period from 31 October 2012, when the contract with Serco came into effect, to 31 March 2013, a total of 4605 offenders commenced Community Payback placements in London.

The monthly totals, provided by Serco, are shown in the following table:

 Total

November 2012

1,056

December 2012

733

January 2013

925

February 2013

953

March 2013

938

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what comparative assessment he has made of the number of placements on the London Community Payback contract and the projected placement numbers prior to the contract being let. [151703]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1289W

Jeremy Wright: The contractor is required to provide a placement for any offender whom the courts make subject to an unpaid work requirement. The new Community Payback contract made two important changes to the delivery of the service: a longer working day and a four-day week. Delivery under the new contract is meeting demand from the courts.

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will conduct a value for money assessment of the London Community Payback contract. [151704]

Jeremy Wright: The cost of the contract and the quality of service provision is assessed by the National Offender Management Service at quarterly contract management meetings.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151342]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice leases desktop, laptop and tablet devices in use across the Ministry from IT service providers, rather than purchasing them.

While it is possible that IT equipment is purchased locally, figures for this can be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, in 2012, the MOJ total IT spend was down £50 million from 2007.

Coroners

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) which police authorities (a) provide and (b) do not provide coroners' officers and other staff; [152759]

(2) how many support staff were available to coroners in each coroner district in each year since May 2010. [152768]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice does not have operational responsibility for coroners and this information is not held centrally.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time coroners there are in each coroner district. [152764]

Mrs Grant: There are currently 110 coroner districts, served by 97 coroners. 46 districts are served by a full-time coroner and 64 districts by a part-time coroner. A number of coroners are coroners in more than one district.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many complaints were made relating to coroners, coroners offices or inquests in each coroner district in each year since May 2010. [152766]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to his Department's consultation CP2/2013, on coroner reforms, which local authorities will be

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1290W

considered the relevant authority for each coroner area which spans more than one local authority. [152837]

Mrs Grant: This will be for the local authorities to decide, but the relevant authority will normally be the larger area by population or number of deaths reported to the coroner. We anticipate that those authorities that are currently ‘lead authorities’ under the Coroners Act 1988 will automatically become the ‘relevant authorities’ under the 2009 Act.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to his Department's consultation paper CP2/2013, on coroner reforms, what the fee paid to assistant coroners will be. [152839]

Mrs Grant: This is a matter for local authorities and assistant coroners to determine between them.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to his Department's consultation paper CP2/2013, on coroner reforms, how many (a) senior coroners, (b) area coroners and (c) assistant coroners will be required for each coroner area. [152840]

Mrs Grant: The Coroners and Justice Act 2009 requires one senior coroner per coroner area. The Ministry of Justice does not intend to specify a minimum number of area coroners and this will be a matter for each local authority to determine, based on local considerations. The Lord Chancellor will require there to be a minimum of one assistant coroner per coroner area.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how much his Department has spent on (a) new coroners' offices and courts and (b) renovating existing coroners' offices and courts in each year since 2006; [152852]

(2) how many closures of coroners' offices and courts there were in each year since 2006. [152853]

Mrs Grant: The coroner service in each district, including court and office accommodation, is locally provided and funded by the relevant local authority or authorities. Information on closures of coroners' offices and courts is not centrally held.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent on the provision of training for (a) coroners and (b) coroner's office staff in each year since 2006. [152854]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to the hon. Member in due course.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the cost of each coroner district has been since May 2010; [152881]

(2) what the budget of each coroner district was in each year since May 2010; [152763]

(3) how much each local authority has spent on providing coroners' services and inquests in each year since May 2010. [152802]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1291W

Mrs Grant: This information is not held centrally. However, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy's annual Administration of Justice Statistics include details of local authority expenditure on the coroner service by coroner district.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what expert medical assistance the Chief Coroner will have available to him when providing support, training and guidance to other coroners. [152974]

Mrs Grant: It is anticipated that regulations made under section 21 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 will provide for medical advice to be given to the Chief Coroner by the National Medical Examiner, once appointed.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many complaints the Office for Judicial Complaints has received in relation to coroners in each category of complaint in each year since 2006. [152975]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment he has made of the quality and quantity of training provided for coroners and their office staff. [152976]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to the hon. Member in due course.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) in what proportion of cases an inquest was opened or resumed following the acquittal of those charged with the deceased's death in each year since 2005; [152977]

(2) what the longest waiting time was in each coroner's district for an inquest held in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and what the reasons were for the time taken in each case; [152979]

(3) how many (a) inquests into deaths in custody and (b) other inquests requiring a jury are outstanding in each coroner's district; and what the reasons are for the time taken to hold the inquests. [152980]

Mrs Grant: The information requested in the above PQs is not held by the MOJ.

Information held by MOJ in relation to coroners is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coroners-statistics-ns

The next publication will cover the year 2012 and will be available on 16 May 2013.

Cost Effectiveness

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will place in the Library (a) his Department's response to HM Treasury's requests for information on the value of departmental spending in terms of cost-effectiveness per unit cost in advance of the 2010

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1292W

Comprehensive Spending Review and

(b)

the data disclosed to HM Treasury on net present value per pound for resource spending. [153616]

Mrs Grant: My officials have checked the records and found that information in the form my hon. Friend requested is not available.

Courts: Fines

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment his Department has made of the relationship between court-imposed fines and payday loans since August 2012. [153338]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Crime: Victims

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what arrangements are in place for communication and co-operation between his Department and the Department of Health regarding victims of crime. [152973]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to the hon. Member in due course.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the long-term mental health needs of victims of crime are met. [153213]

Mrs Grant: The Government are committed to providing targeted support to those who have suffered the greatest impact from crime. In the consultation "Getting it right for victims and witnesses" the Government committed to funding support services that aimed to achieve two outcomes: helping victims to cope with the immediate impact of crime, and subsequently to recover from the harm they have experienced. The Ministry of Justice has committed £50 million of annual funding since 2010 to victims' services and, through our recent reforms to the Victim Surcharge and increases to financial penalties, we intend to raise up to an additional £50 million for victims' services paid for by offenders.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were victims of crime in the UK, by category of crime, in each of the last five years. [153215]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking for the number of people who have been victims of crime in the UK, by category of crime, in each of the last five years [153215]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1293W

The table below provides the number of victims of crime, as estimated by the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), for each of the main offence types over the last five financial years (April to March) for England and Wales.

Table 1. Trends in the number of households/adults who were victims of crime once or more, 2007-08 to 2011-12, England and Wales
Crime category2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

Number of household victims

     

All household crime

3,907,281

4,096,644

3,802,695

3,825,605

3,843,431

Vandalism

1,662,684

1,747,998

1,555,720

1,431,668

1,376,043

Burglary

550,829

569,194

520,755

610,219

569,397

Vehicle-related theft

1,158,579

1,168,593

1,011,270

985,739

996,445

Bicycle theft

372,415

444,684

411,615

445,929

403,323

Other household theft

790,647

857,226

887,017

968,279

1,066,264

      

Number of adult victims aged 16 and over

     

All personal crime

2,664,429

2,799,881

2,536,678

2,650,644

2,671,434

Theft from the person

541,862

641,864

490,316

494,188

588,621

Other theft of personal property

860,445

942,952

888,000

865,325

928,955

All violence

1,421,082

1,419,034

1,331,429

1,392,711

1,358,356

Notes: 1. Figures for all violence, theft from the person and other theft of personal property are based on adults. Figures for vandalism, burglary, vehicle-related theft, bicycle theft and other household theft are based on households. 2. The sum of the individual crimes will not add up to the totals for household and personal crime, as a household/adult can be a victim of more than one type of crime. Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales and mid-year population estimates. Office for National Statistics.

An additional table has also been provided which shows the proportion of victims for each crime type in England and Wales for 2007-08 to 2011-12.

Table 2: Trends in the percentage of households/adults who were victims of crime once or more, 2007-08 to 2011-12, England and Wales
Crime category2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

Percentage of household victims

     

All household crime

17.1

17.8

16.4

16.3

16.2

Vandalism

7.3

7.6

6.7

6.1

5.8

Burglary

2.4

2.5

2.2

2.6

2.4

Vehicle-related theft

5.1

5.1

4.4

4.2

4.2

Bicycle theft

1.6

1.9

1.8

1.9

1.7

Other household theft

3.5

3.7

3.8

4.1

4.5

      

Percentage of adult victims aged 16 and over

     

All personal crime

6.1

6.3

5.7

5.9

5.9

Theft from the person

1.2

1.5

1.1

1.1

1.3

Other theft of personal property

2.0

2.1

2.0

1.9

2.1

All violence

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.1

3.0

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1294W

Note: Percentages for all violence, theft from the person and other theft of personal property are based on adults. Percentages for vandalism, burglary, vehicle-related theft, bicycle theft and other household theft are based on households. Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales, Office for National Statistics.

These figures have been published by ONS and are available in Table A3 accompanying the quarterly crime statistics, year ending March 2012. This statistical bulletin is available on the ONS website here:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/crime-stats/crime-statistics/period-ending-march-2012/index.html

Crime statistics for Scotland and Northern Ireland are collected and published separately, and can be downloaded from:

Scotland:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/TrendCrimeVic

Northern Ireland:

http://www.dojni.gov.uk/index/statistics-research/stats-research-publications/northern-ireland-crime-survey-s-r/r--s-bulletin-1-2013-experience-of-crime-findings-from-the-2011-12-northern-ireland-crime-survey.htm

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what provisions are in place to inform victims of violent crime of decisions concerning the perpetrator's probation status, where the perpetrator has been in prison for more than (a) five years, (b) 10 years and (c) 20 years. [153237]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of compatibility of the Victims' Code with (a) guidance issued by the Youth Justice Board and (b) the requirements of the courts system. [153339]

Jeremy Wright: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Criminal Proceedings

Stella Creasy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 19 February 2013 on delays in the criminal justice system, if he will publish citations for the research quoted in that speech. [153335]

Damian Green: On 19 February 2013, I gave a speech on delays in the criminal justice system. The statistics I quoted in that speech came from the following source:

Court Statistics Quarterly Bulletin (Criminal Matters—Tables 3.1-3.14):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/court-statistics-quarterly--2

An Overview of Sexual Offending in England and Wales (Duration from Offence to Completion in Criminal Courts—Table 5)

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/an-overview-of-sexual-offending-in-england-and-wales

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1295W

Annual Judicial and Court Statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/judicial-and-court-statistics-annual

Crime in England and Wales:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/taxonomy/index.html?nscl=Crime+and+Justice

HMCTS Management Information

In November last year, the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling), announced as one of his priorities a real drive for a criminal justice and court system that works effectively and puts victims first. Work is under way to increase both the effectiveness and efficiency of the criminal justice system. It will look at the whole of the system to drive performance and tackle some of the perennial weaknesses so it is quicker, less erratic and more efficient.

Criminal Proceedings: Legal Aid Scheme

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what his policy is on the competitive tendering of criminal legal aid contracts; [150071]

(2) what the Government's policy is on a single fee system Crown Court representation; [150074]

(3) what percentage saving to the legal aid budget is expected from the introduction of competitive tendering for criminal legal aid contracts; [150106]

(4) whether London will be a competition area in the first round of bids in competitive tendering for criminal legal aid contracts; [150107]

(5) what steps he plans to take to ensure that competitive tendering for criminal legal aid will offer fair opportunities to small, medium-sized and large companies; [150109]

(6) how many alternative business structures applied for accreditation to undertake criminal defence contracts. [150105]

Jeremy Wright: The Secretary of State’s proposals for further reforms to legal aid, including proposals to introduce price competition in criminal legal aid, were published on 9 April 2013 in Consultation Paper CP 14/2013 entitled ‘Transforming legal aid: delivering a more credible and efficient system’. This consultation is available at:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/transforming-legal-aid

No alternative business structures applied for accreditation to undertake criminal defence contracts in 2010.

Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press Inquiry

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps the Government are taking to give effect to the recommendations on regulatory and statutory frameworks relating to the Data Protection Act 1998 in paragraphs 48 to 57 of the summary of recommendations of Lord Justice Leveson's report into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press. [153070]

Mrs Grant: Given the potentially far-reaching nature of Lord Justice's recommendations in relation to data protection, in particular for the conduct of responsible investigative journalism, it is the Government's view

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1296W

that the recommendations relating to data protection require careful consideration by a wide audience. It is therefore our intention to conduct a public consultation on the full range of data protection proposals, which will seek views on their impact and how they might be approached.

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what steps the Government are taking to give effect to the recommendations on regulatory and statutory frameworks relating to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 in paragraphs 67 and 68 of the summary of recommendations of Lord Justice Leveson's report into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press; [153071]

(2) what steps the Government are taking to give effect to the recommendations on regulatory and statutory frameworks relating to the civil procedure rules in paragraphs 67 and 68 of the summary of recommendations of Lord Justice Leveson's report into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press. [153072]

Jeremy Wright: Paragraph 67 of Lord Justice Leveson's summary of recommendations is contingent on further secondary legislation being made to give effect to the provisions of sections 77-78 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 (CJIA). It is the Government's intention to conduct a public consultation on the full range of Lord Justice Leveson's data protection proposals, including on sections 77-78 of the CJIA, which will seek views on their impact and how they might be approached.

It is also the Government's intention to conduct a public consultation on the recommendations contained in paragraph 68 concerning possible amendments to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984. A consultation on these recommendations will be launched in due course.

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps the Government are taking to give effect to the recommendations on regulatory and statutory frameworks relating to civil law in paragraphs 69 to 74 of the summary of recommendations of Lord Justice Leveson's report into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press. [153073]

Jeremy Wright: Provisions in the Crime and Courts Bill, which is currently before Parliament, give effect to the recommendations made by Lord Justice Leveson relating to aggravated and exemplary damages (Recommendations 71 and 72) and the awards of costs (Recommendation 73). These provisions will introduce strong and effective incentives for relevant publishers to join a recognised independent self-regulator.

The Government have recently received advice from the Civil Justice Council in relation to Recommendation 74 (costs protection). The Government will consider how that should be taken forward before setting out the next steps.

Recommendations 69 and 70 relate to the level of damages awarded for certain media torts. The Civil Justice Council is to consider this area as recommended by Lord Justice Leveson following its work on costs protection. As Lord Justice Leveson indicated, how this is then taken forward will ultimately be a matter for the courts to consider.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1297W

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps the Government are taking to give effect to the recommendations on regulatory and statutory frameworks relating to the recommendations of the Information Commissioner in paragraphs 58 to 66 of the summary of recommendations of Lord Justice Leveson's report into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press. [153074]

Jeremy Wright: The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is the independent regulatory body responsible for enforcing the Data Protection Act 1998.

On 7 January 2013, the ICO published its formal response to a series of recommendations specifically directed at the ICO by Lord Justice Leveson's report. The response and a progress report can be found on the ICO's website at the following link:

http://www.ico.org.uk/news/current_topics

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether his Department has a dementia strategy. [151831]

Jeremy Wright: The MOJ recognises the importance of dementia as an issue, particularly with an ageing population in the UK. Given this, we are taking action across our policy and operational arms to ensure that dementia and the needs of dementia sufferers are taken into account.

We are taking proactive steps in a number of areas:

The Office of the Public Guardian is working with the financial services industry to make the sector more dementia friendly, including publication of guidance developed with the British Banking Association and Building Societies Association which will ensure staff recognise and understand Lasting Powers of Attorney and court-appointed deputies. A cross-industry charter on working with customers who are living with dementia will be published in the coming months.

For prisoners, the Government's upcoming Care Bill will introduce provisions that clarify the responsibilities in assessing need and providing support, including dementia care.

Where our staff take on caring responsibilities, flexible or part-time working policies and special leave, such as career breaks, can support them. Staff directly affected are supported by line managers and through our Occupational Health Service, and assisted by our Reasonable Adjustment Support Service, to identify adjustments that can support the individual to remain and progress at work.

Disclosure of Information

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many civil servants in his Department have been subject to non-disclosure agreements in each year since 2010. [150038]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to him in due course.

Domestic Violence: Prosecutions

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many victimless prosecutions in cases of domestic violence have been conducted by each police force in each year since 2005; and if he will make a statement. [152169]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1298W

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Lady in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to her in due course.

Driving Under Influence

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been convicted of offences of drink driving in each of the last five years. [152013]

Jeremy Wright: The number of persons found guilty at all courts for drink driving offences, in England and Wales, for the period 2007 to 2011, can be viewed in the table.

Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Persons proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for drink driving offences(1) (with conviction ratio(2)), England and Wales, 2007-11(3,4)
Outcome20072008(5)200920102011

Proceeded against

74,495

66,417

63,352

54,097

50,622

Found guilty

71,799

64,357

61,437

52,069

48,883

      

Conviction ratio (%)

96.4

96.9

97.0

96.3

96.6

(1) Includes the following offences: Road Traffic Act 1988, s.4(1)—Driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink Road Traffic Act 1988, s.4(2)—Being in charge of mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink Road Traffic Act 1988, s.5(1)(a)—Driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit Road Traffic Act 1988, s.5(1)(b)—In charge of a motor vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit Road Traffic Act 1988, s.6(6)—Failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen of breath for a preliminary test (2) Conviction ratio is calculated as the number of convictions as a proportion of the number of proceedings. (3) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure that data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Drugs: Police Cautions and Convictions

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many cautions have been issued for (a) all drug possession offences and (b) possession of cannabis under sections 5(1) and (2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 in each year since 1983; [150855]

(2) how many convictions have been made for (a) all drug possession offences and (b) possession of cannabis under sections 5(1) and (2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 in each year since 1983. [150856]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1299W

Jeremy Wright: On 3 April 2013 we launched a review into the use of cautions, which will focus on the use of cautions for serious offences and persistent offenders. Among other things, the review will examine whether there are some offences for which the use of simple cautions is generally inappropriate, the reasons why multiple cautions are given to some criminals and the difference in the use of cautions by police force areas. The review is a significant step to ensuring that cautions are used correctly, in the interests of justice, and command the confidence of the public. The review will be completed by the end of May 2013.

Those guilty of drug possession offences are more likely to face court than they were five years ago. The number of offenders cautioned for and found guilty of possession of drugs offences, with cannabis possession

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1300W

offences shown separately, in England and Wales, from 1984 to 2011 (latest data available), can be viewed in the tables.

It is not possible to separately identify from centrally held information the number of offenders cautioned for and found guilty of possession of cannabis prior to 1993 and the number of offenders cautioned for and found guilty of all possession of drug offences prior to 1984. Further, it is not possible to separately identify from centrally held information the number of offenders cautioned for possession of drug offences in the years 1987 and 1988, as all drug-related offences were recorded under a single offence category for those two years.

Court proceedings and cautions data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Offenders cautioned for possession of drugs offences, England and Wales, 1983 to 2011(1,2,3)
Offence19831984198519861987(4)1988(4)1989199019911992

All drug possession offences

n/a

1,863

3,427

4,209

n/a

n/a

12,517

17,959

20,381

26,142

Of which:

          

Possession of cannabis(5)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Offence1993199419951996199719981999200020012002

All drug possession offences

33,113

41,740

45,215

44,732

53,451

56,370

47,342

39,468

38,065

43,377

Of which:

          

Possession of cannabis(5)

30,015

38,172

39,871

37,323

44,458

47,490

39,565

32,899

31,797

36,933

Offence200320042005200620072008200920102011

All drug possession offences

43,927

30,553

32,194

34,715

39,667

43,582

39,652

36,007

37,320

Of which:

         

Possession of cannabis(5)

37,128

21,357

21,117

20,370

21,247

22,823

20,609

18,870

19,255

n/a = Not available (1) The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence. (2) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure that data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) For 1987 and 1988, all drug-related offences were recorded under a single offence category, hence it is not possible to separately identify possession of drug offences for these two years. (5) Data include s.5(2) and sch. 4 Misuse of Drugs Act 1971—“Having possession of a controlled drug—Cannabis or cannabis resin”. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice
Offenders found guilty at all courts of possession of drugs offences, England and Wales, 1983 to 2011(1,2,3)
Offence1983198419851986198719881989199019911992
           

All drug possession offences

n/a

13,732

13,373

11,179

11,106

13,337

16,404

17,963

16,762

15,162

Of which:

          

Possession of cannabis(4)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1301W

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1302W

Offence1993199419951996199719981999200020012002

All drug possession offences

14,160

18,867

20,733

22,261

27,577

35,782

36,616

33,845

34,958

38,134

Of which:

          

Possession of cannabis(4)

8,823

12,619

13,322

13,555

17,276

22,643

22,623

20,726

20,752

23,655

Offence200320042005200620072008 (4)200920102011

All drug possession offences

39,633

27,802

27,320

28,040

31,722

38,087

41,342

43,406

42,247

Of which:

         

Possession of cannabis(4)

25,714

13,320

12,095

12,536

14,073

17,855

21,457

25,188

26,215

n/a = Not available (1) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure that data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (4) Data include s.5(2) and sch. 4 Misuse of Drugs Act 1971—“Having possession of a controlled drug—Cannabis or cannabis resin” Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Employment and Support Allowance: Appeals

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of time was for the Tribunals Service to administer a First-tier Tribunal-Social Security and Child Support appeal in respect of employment and support allowance in Coventry in (a) each quarter in 2012 and (b) the latest period for which figures are available. [152474]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the right hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Expert Evidence

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) if he will take steps to ensure that expert witnesses have access to prisoners to conduct interviews in line with filing dates ordered by the court; and if he will make a statement; [151901]

(2) if he will take steps to ensure that (a) psychiatric and (b) psychological interviews conducted by expert witnesses with prisoners are held on a confidential basis; and if he will make a statement; [151922]

(3) what assessment he has made of the effect on prisoners of (a) psychiatric and (b) psychological interviews by expert witnesses with prisoners being conducted under the auspices of legal visits; and if he will make a statement. [151923]

Jeremy Wright: Prisons will always try and accommodate the requirements of expert witnesses. However, operational constraints, including the limited availability of the expert witness or requests for interviews made at short notice, may mean this is not always possible.

Fines: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the total value of court fines and confiscation orders (a) paid and (b) remaining unpaid in London was in (i) 2011-12 and (ii) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [153066]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to him in due course.

Funeral Payments: Advisory Services

Iain Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will ensure that all advice and information being provided to the public is amended to remove all errors to which his attention has been drawn by Teresa Evans of Milton Keynes and the Alice Barker Trust through their submissions to him on legal references and related information. [153255]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice (MOJ) has not knowingly provided erroneous advice or information to the public. Mrs Evans and the Alice Barker Trust have over an extended period raised numerous issues about coroner and burial law and policy, which have been answered in full.

Homicide: Convictions

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were convicted of murder or manslaughter in 2012. [152847]

Jeremy Wright: Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1303W

Hotels

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many officials in his (a) Department and (b) non-departmental public bodies stayed in hotels in (i) the UK and (ii) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year. [152561]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Legal Aid Scheme

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much of the legal aid budget in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12 was used to pay VAT on solicitors' bills. [149707]

Jeremy Wright: It will take time for the Legal Aid Agency (LAA) to produce this information, which is held in a number of different systems. I will write to the hon. Gentleman when the information is available.

Note that the LAA can only produce this information in relation to those parts of the legal aid budget directly under LAA's administration. This does not include amounts administered by HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) on behalf of the LAA as non-recoverable VAT is not recorded separately on HMCTS systems.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people who have experienced domestic violence have claimed legal aid to fund divorce proceedings in the latest period for which figures are available; [151673]

(2) how many grants of legal aid to individuals in divorce proceedings made on the basis of a claim of domestic violence have subsequently been revoked following a rating that the claim was false in the latest period for which figures are available. [151674]

Jeremy Wright: The Legal Aid Agency does not hold records indicating how many people who have experienced domestic violence have claimed legal aid to fund divorce proceedings.

The changes under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO), that restricted legal aid funding for divorce cases to clients who have evidence of domestic violence, took effect on 1 April 2013, and information is not yet available on the numbers of clients who have experienced domestic violence and obtained legal aid.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to his Department's consultation entitled “Transforming Legal Aid: delivering a more credible and efficient system”, how much his Department expects to save each year as a result of (a) price competitive tendering of criminal legal aid, (b) preventing prisoners from accessing legal aid and (c) preventing foreign migrants from accessing legal aid for their first 12 months in the country in each of the next three financial years. [152334]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1304W

Jeremy Wright: The Government cannot ignore that we have one of the most expensive legal aid systems in the world, spending more than £l billion of taxpayer's money on criminal legal aid each year. We must ensure we get the very best value for every penny spent. The Government are tackling areas which are eroding public confidence—such as wealthy defendants who can afford to pay their own costs routinely receiving legal aid, prisoners being given legal aid for issues better dealt with via the prisoner complaints system, a small amount of high-cost cases swallowing up many millions in public money, and those who do not have a strong connection to this country qualifying for civil legal aid.

The anticipated savings the Ministry of Justice aims to achieve in relation to the three specific areas you have raised are as follows:

Estimate in £ million
 (a) Price competition for Criminal Legal Aid(b) Prison Law(c) Civil Residence Test

2013-14

0

-1

n/a

2014-15

-73

-3

n/a

2015-16

-112

-3

n/a

2016-17

-118

-4

n/a

(A) Competition:

The purpose of the proposed tendering exercise is for lawyers to compete to offer the taxpayer the best value price for a quality service. Therefore the extent of any savings is dependent upon the outcome of that exercise. In order to ensure the price competition delivers a saving to the legal aid fund, we are proposing to set a price cap at 17.5% below the rates paid in 2012-13 for each class of work in each procurement area, which is expected to ensure savings of £118 million per annum. The figures in the table above reflect the 17.5% reduction.

(B) Prison Law:

As stated in the table above, from 2016-17 this proposal is estimated to save taxpayers approximately £4 million and reduce by around 11,000 the number of criminal legally-aided cases brought by prisoners a year.

(C) Residence Test:

We do not currently collect data on the nationality or immigration status of civil legal aid recipients, so it is not possible to quantify how many people will be affected by this proposal or any associated cost savings. This proposal aims to improve public confidence in the legal aid scheme and to focus our limited resources for civil legal aid on those who have a strong connection to the UK. This is in line with the approach taken across Government to provision of public services.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the cost of legal aid in each of the next 10 years. [153209]

Jeremy Wright: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how his proposed new rota system for solicitors will operate under legal aid. [153223]