Armed Forces: Redundancy

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what period of time after having returned from Afghanistan service personnel will be exempt from redundancy under Tranche 3. [142691]

Mr Francois [holding answer 11 February 2013]:There is no exclusion from redundancy under Tranche 3 based on a set period of time on return from Afghanistan. However, any individual who is recovering from operations in Afghanistan on 18 June 2013 will be exempt. The recovery period will vary for individual soldiers, based primarily on the length of their deployment in Afghanistan.

Armed Forces: Sexual Offences

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department has taken to implement the recommendations of its 2006 report on Quantitative and Qualitative Research into Sexual Harassment in the Armed Forces; and if he will make a statement. [129422]

Mr Francois: The information will take time to collate. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as it is available.

Substantive answer from Mark Francois to Madeleine Moon:

Thank you for meeting with me and Brigadier Warren, the Provost Marshal (Army) (PM(A)), and his officers on 8 January 2013. We were grateful for the opportunity to discuss with you the importance the Royal Military Police (RMP) rightly place on ensuring that all allegations of sexual violence are properly investigated. I hope that we were able to reassure you on the professionalism which marks their work in this area. At the conclusion of the meeting, I promised to write summing up our discussion but there have been further developments since this time and I have sought to include them in this letter.

It might be helpful if I start by reiterating the framework within which the RMP operate. Within the Service Justice System, the RMP, along with their Royal Navy and Royal Air Force counterparts, are collectively known as the Service Police. The Service Police investigate the full range of criminal offences, not least because Armed Forces personnel are often deployed to hostile and demanding operational environments where the UK civilian police may not have the jurisdiction to operate.

While the RMP do not charge offenders and are not constables, their investigative role, which is to carry out investigations in order to establish the facts, is very similar to the civilian police. In carrying out their investigations they act entirely independently from the Chain of Command and the Ministry of Defence. Many of the investigatory powers of the RMP are set out in the Armed Forces Act 2006, and its subordinate legislation, which came into force on 31 October 2009. These provisions broadly mirror the powers defined under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, and RMP investigative doctrine is also drawn from the core investigative doctrine used by the civilian police. As with the civilian police, much has been done to improve RMP training and technical oversight of how they conduct investigations into allegations of rape and sexual assault and support victims since Baroness Stern's Review into this issue was published in 2010.

As we explained during the meeting, all RMP recruits are trained to deal with alleged sexual offences as “first responders”. This starts with their foundation training, learning the basic skills required to deal with an incident until a more experienced investigator arrives to take control of an investigation. Serious incidents are dealt with by the RMP Special Investigation Branch (SIB), which is akin to the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) within

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1250W

the Home Office Police Forces (HOPF). RMP (SIB) personnel undergo a rigorous selection and training process, which includes attachments, study periods and residential courses at the Defence School of Policing and Guarding.

The basic and intermediate detective training not only teaches investigators how to identify offences and the points to prove in law but also covers areas such as psychology, forensic medical examinations and achieving best evidence. This is taught by external speakers who are carefully selected for their expertise and currency. RMP (SIB) personnel receive Continual Professional Development training at HOPF centres of excellence. Furthermore, selected Officers and Warrant Officers undertake Senior Investigating Officer (SIO) courses with a Home Department Police Force or formerly, the National Policing Improvement Agency. RMP (SIB) personnel also attend essential specialist training such as the Families Liaison Officer (FLO) Course, Crime Scene Management courses and the Sexual Offence Investigative Techniques (SOIT) course, which allows them to train alongside their civilian counterparts and to be mentored by civilian officers who have considerable experience in this field. If an RMP investigation team does not have access to appropriate trained personnel during the course of an investigation, they will seek advice and support from another RMP unit or a civilian force with the required level of expertise, as any other police force might.

As well as having similar training, doctrine and procedures to the civilian police, in the UK the RMP also use civilian facilities, such as Sexual Assault Referral Centres (SARC), ensuring victims have access to the full range of expert victim support that is available through these facilities. In Germany and elsewhere overseas, RMP investigators are able to draw on the expertise of the Joint Response Team (JRT) if required. The JRT is a specialist RMP capability for investigating offences involving children and vulnerable witnesses and it works hand-in-hand with Social Services and other organisations to ensure a multi-agency level of support afforded to victims and their families.

From the outset of any RMP investigation into a sexual offence, an appointed investigator will maintain contact with the victim during the course of the investigation and any subsequent judicial process that follows. The investigator will keep the victim informed of progress and guide them to seek specialist help, such as victim support, should the victim require professional assistance. This support is available to the victim at any stage in the investigation process and afterwards, as the RMP will ensure that the victim has appropriate contact details should they wish to seek assistance at any point in the future.

In addition, if the victim gives consent for their details to be disclosed to their Chain of Command or informs the Chain of Command themselves that they have been sexually assaulted, for example, then they would be afforded additional support in accordance with Joint Service Publication 839 - the Code of Practice on services to be provided by the Armed Forces to victims of crime. They would also have access to all the other routine welfare professionals found within an Army unit, such as the Padre, the Medical Officer and Unit Welfare Officers, all of whom can provide direct support to victims, but also have the ability to refer them on to other experts should this be appropriate.

As we also discussed, our ability to provide you with accurate data on the overall number of sexual offences reported by Armed Forces personnel is limited by jurisdictional arrangements. For England and Wales, Home Office Circular 028/2008 sets out the protocol between the Ministry of Defence Police, the Service Police and the Home Office Police Forces, and defines investigative jurisdiction. In short, primacy rests with the civilian police, although the RMP may take the lead in an investigation if both the suspect and the victim in a particular case are serving members of the Armed Forces. However, the more serious the offence, the greater the likelihood is that jurisdiction will be retained by the civilian force (if in UK). The civilian police will always retain jurisdiction in the event of a case involving a civilian suspect. Conversely, in Germany and other overseas locations, although a Status of Forces Agreement or some such understanding may allow a local police force to retain jurisdiction in certain circumstances, the RMP or another Service Police force will usually carry out the investigation.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1251W

In practice, these arrangements mean that we cannot be sure how many allegations are made by (or against) serving personnel. There is no obligation on a military victim to inform their chain of command if they have been subjected to a sexual assault unless they decide that they wish to do so themselves. In this respect, the Armed Forces are like any other employer. Similarly, by virtue of the Notifiable Occupation Scheme, the military police may be informed about civilian police investigations involving military suspects, however, it is reliant on the suspect informing the investigators that they are serving. The scheme does not require victims details to be passed on. There is, therefore, no definitive central record of all cases involving Armed Forces personnel.

While we are able to provide some data in relation to investigations carried out by the military police, the primary role of the RMP database, REDCAP, is to record investigative information, and it was not designed to produce statistical data per se. As a result, we can only provide you with accurate data by making manual checks on investigative records. Work is ongoing to produce more accurate statistical data in relation to the number of sexual assaults reported to the military police but as at the time of writing we are unable to provide precise details of the offences for the period you have requested. However, we are seeking to make improvements in this area as outlined later in this letter.

I recognise that your concern is not restricted to the conduct of investigations by the RMP. This brings me on to another area where I undertook to write to you in response to your question of 6 December 2012, (Official Report, column 896W) concerning the implementation of the recommendations of the 2006 report on Quantitative and Qualitative Research into Sexual Harassment in the Armed Forces.

Firstly, I can assure you that the Ministry of Defence is committed to tackling all types of harassment, including sexual harassment. The Ministry of Defence is determined to create an inclusive working environment that delivers opportunity for all, recognises and values difference, and eradicates bullying, harassment and discrimination. We have developed policies to ensure that individuals are treated fairly, and with respect. This commitment runs throughout the organisation. I also know that the new Permanent Secretary, Jon Thompson, is very engaged in this area and committed to ensuring Equality and Diversity throughout the Ministry of Defence, as are all of the Service Chiefs.

This commitment is being matched by real and tangible progress, and subsequent to the 2006 actions agreed between the Equal Opportunities Commission and MOD, the following changes have been implemented:

Raising awareness of the unacceptability of sexual harassment and how to raise concerns, including through discussions across the Services with personnel at every level. The Services have focused on leadership to ensure that Service personnel are aware of the Department's policy on this issue, and to challenge inappropriate behaviour;

A comprehensive review of equality and diversity training. The Services ensure that personnel have access to information (on policies and complaints processes) on websites, newsletters and unit notice boards. The Services have also worked on improving equality and diversity training for all ranks;

The introduction of a comprehensive complaints procedure and subsequent ongoing revision of this system;

A review of our procedures for making and dealing with complaints of harassment to make them more accessible and robust;

We have established a mechanism to better identify and share lessons;

Incorporating individuals' attitudes to equality and diversity into appraisal reporting to make them personally accountable;

Issuing guidance to encourage the consistent use of administrative action in harassment cases;

The training of Equality and Diversity Advisers on each unit, the provision of professional trained mediators, and Harassment Investigation Officers;

Implementing a tracking system for those whose behaviours have fallen below the level expected.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1252W

While there remains much work to do, I am happy to report that as a result of these changes concrete progress has been made. Taking the Army as an example, the most recent Armed Forces Continuous Attitude Survey shows an encouraging fall in those who believed they had been the subject of bullying, harassment or discrimination (from 12% in 2010 to 8% in 2012). The Army was also shortlisted for an award for the 2012 Race for Opportunity (for widening the talent pool in recruitment), and was also placed in the Top 10 Public Sector organisations for Business in the Communities Gender Diversity Survey (2012).

Nevertheless, we are not complacent, and the Department continues to work with organisations such as Stonewall, Race for Opportunity, and Opportunity Now to ensure benchmarking and good practice.

It is now of course some time since our meeting of 8 January. Although I still wanted to place on record the matters we discussed on that occasion, there have been a number of developments since then—not least the Westminster Hall debate which you secured on 31 January. That debate gave us an opportunity to explore these issues in some detail, and I did of course put on record my commitment to produce the most accurate information possible relating to sexual offences involving members of the Armed Forces. Subsequent to the debate, I met with the Provost Marshals of the three services in February to explore practical ways of doing this, and set further work in hand, in order to achieve this.

As a result of this work, we are now in the process of establishing, a new Crime Statistics and Analysis Cell (or CSAC). The CSAC is being established within the existing Service Police Crime Bureau located at Southwick Park, Hampshire. It consists of a CSAC Manager (in post with effect from 25 March 2013), supported by existing personnel from within the Royal Military Police Force Intelligence Branch. I anticipate that the CSAC will be fully up and running prior to the Summer recess (and I am minded to table a WMS, to confirm when it has achieved full operating capability).

The aim of the CSAC is to improve the quality of and speed of access to, information relating to Service Police Investigations. This will be achieved by creating a new standalone database that is based on information extracted from the REDCAP system. Initially, this will coverall sexual offences investigated by the Service Police since implementation of the Armed Forces Act 2006, and certain other offences (e.g. firearms, drugs, theft, fraud and those involving violence). Over the coming-months, the data will be updated with information provided by Service Police Units and other organisations that work within the Service Justice System. The initial focus is on sexual offences but the aim is to complete all this work (incorporating the information from other units and organisations and the additional offences as mentioned above) by April 2014. In addition to this we are conducting some parallel work to improve the REDCAP Service Police database, with a view to auditing the existing data on the system and enhancing its data search capability as well.

As you have been kind enough to acknowledge in the past, I do take this whole issue very seriously and as I said on 31 January, I will continue to update you on progress, now including on the CSAC as well. Inevitably, some of this work may do more to improve the position for the future, than it can do to repair weaknesses in our information about the past. However, my officials are working with the currently available information in order to respond to your outstanding PQs. I hope to do so shortly.

Finally, in accordance with my commitment given in the debate of 31 January, I am placing a copy of this letter in the Library of the House.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many allegations of sexual assault were made by (a) female and (b) male members of the armed forces in each year since 2005; in how many cases (i) charges were directed for trial, (ii) trials were held and (iii) trials resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement. [136186]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1253W

Mr Francois: The following table provides details of the number of allegations recorded by the service police or the Ministry of Defence police (MDP), of sexual assaults made by female and male members of the armed forces each year from 1 November 2009, the date of the implementation of the Armed Forces Act 2006, to 31 December 2012.

 FemaleMaleTotal

From 1 November 2009

7

5

12

2010

42

12

54

2011

32

8

40

2012

31

9

40

Total

112

34

146

The above 146 allegations make up 139 cases as there may be more than one allegation in a case. Of the 135 cases dealt with by the service police:

14 cases were not investigated because the complaint was not pursued;

15 cases were investigated but did not result in a person being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006;

34 cases resulted in persons being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006 but did not result in court martial or other disciplinary proceedings;

24 cases which resulted in a court martial or other disciplinary proceedings resulted in a conviction;

10 cases resulted in a court martial or other disciplinary proceedings which did not result in a conviction;

15 cases resulted in a court martial or other disciplinary proceedings which resulted in a conviction for a lesser offence;

23 cases are ongoing.

Service police data are based on investigations where they have the jurisdiction and investigative lead. Investigations could involve more than one victim or suspect. Information on case outcomes for the service police has been taken from service police records or a record of proceedings provided by the unit of a suspect.

Four cases of sexual assault allegations were investigated by the MDP. In two cases the victims withdrew their complaint, one was handed over to the civil police and one was a reluctant witness and therefore no further action was taken by the MDP.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 25 June 2012, Official Report, column 4W, on armed forces: sexual offences, how many of the (a) rape and (b) sexual assault allegations were reported by (i) service personnel and (ii) civilian staff; and if he will make a statement. [137676]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence has now made manual checks on its records and the following is a breakdown of all allegations of rape and sexual assault recorded by the service police between 1 November 2009, the date of the implementation of the Armed Forces Act 2006 and 31 December 2012, where the alleged victim is a member of the armed forces and the service police have jurisdiction and the investigative lead. None of the allegations were reported by civilian staff.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1254W

Allegations reported by service personnel
 RapeSexual assault

2009

2

11

2010

8

44

2011

14

39

2012

13

35

Total

37

129

The figures differ from those quoted in the answer of 25 June 2012, Official Report, column 3W, because the earlier response listed the number of cases, which may be fewer than the number of allegations. The earlier figures also included cases investigated by civilian police, contrary to the wording of the answer, for which no breakdown is available.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 26 June 2012, Official Report, column 195W, on armed forces: sexual offences, how many of the (a) rape allegations, (b) cases where charges are directed for trial and (c) cases not directed for trial were reported by (i) service personnel and (ii) civilian staff; and if he will make a statement. [137677]

Mr Robathan: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 26 June 2012, Official Report, column 195W.

Service and civilian personnel are detailed in the following table:

  Type of personnel making allegation 
 OutcomeService personnelCivilian personnelCombined total

2010

Referrals

6

15

21

 

Not directed for trial/Non Instituted

4

8

12

 

Directed for trial

2

7

9

     

2011

Referrals

4

14

18

 

Not directed for trial/Non Instituted

2

9

11

 

Directed for trial

2

5

7

     

2012

Referrals

11

11

22

 

Not directed for trial/Non Instituted

4

4

8

 

Directed for trial

(1)7

(2)7

14

(1) Five ongoing. (2) Four ongoing.

Referrals made in one year are not necessarily directed or go to trial in the same year.

The term “Civilian personnel” may refer to a civil servant, locally employed civilian subject to military law, or a family member of the armed forces personnel or Ministry of Defence civilian.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 17 July 2012, Official Report, column 752W, on armed forces: sexual offences, how many sexual assaults were alleged to have been committed against minors; and if he will make a statement. [137678]

Mr Robathan: The number of allegations of sexual assault made against minors, which were referred to the Service Prosecuting Authority, is shown in the following table.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1255W

 Number of referrals relating to minors

2010

2

2011

2

2012

4

In this context the term ‘minor’ relates to a male or female under age 16.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many of the allegations of child sexual offences made by (a) service personnel and (b) civilian staff based in Iraq in each year since 2005 (i) were referred for prosecution and (ii) resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement; [137683]

(2) how many of the allegations of child sexual offences made against (a) service personnel and (b) civilian staff based in Iraq in each year since 2005 (i) were referred for prosecution and (ii) resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement; [137684]

(3) how many allegations of child sexual offences made by (a) service personnel based in Afghanistan and (b) civilian staff based in Afghanistan in each year since 2005 (i) were referred for prosecution and (ii) resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement; [137685]

(4) how many allegations of child sexual offences made against (a) service personnel based in Afghanistan and (b) civilian staff based in Afghanistan in each year since 2005 (i) were referred for prosecution and (ii) resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement. [137686]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has no record of any allegations of child sexual offences(1) in Iraq in the period between the implementation of the Armed Forces Act 2006 on 1 November 2009 and 31 December 2012.

The MOD holds information on one case in Afghanistan in this period. The case involves an allegation made by one member of the armed forces against another. This case is subject to ongoing reporting restrictions and is expected to be tried at court martial later this year.

(1) This includes offences as defined in sections 4-15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and other Sexual Offences where the alleged victim is under 18.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many complaints of (a) rape and (b) sexual assault were made by armed forces personnel aged below the age of 18 years at the time of the incident in each of the last 30 years; what the outcome was of each case; and if he will make a statement. [151401]

Mr Robathan: The data provided are based on information recorded by the Service police and Ministry of Defence police for the period between 1 November 2009, the date of the implementation of the Armed Forces Act 2006, and 31 December 2012.

In this period there were two complaints of rape from armed forces personnel who were below the age of 18 at the time of the incident, as recorded by the Ministry of Defence police. Both occurred in 2009. No complaints in this category were recorded by Service police. In one

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1256W

case a not guilty verdict was returned, and the other case was not pursued after the complaint was withdrawn.

There were 13 complaints of sexual assault, including two complaints of sexual assault by penetration, from armed forces personnel aged below 18 years at the time of the incident, as recorded by the Service police or Ministry of Defence police. The details of the case outcomes are shown in the following table and including the year in which the alleged offence was reported.

Outcome2009201020112012

Cases not investigated because the complaint was not pursued.

0

1

0

0

Cases investigated but did not result in a person being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006.

0

0

0

1

Cases resulting in persons being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006 but did not result in courts martial or other disciplinary proceedings.

1

0

0

1

Cases which resulted in courts martial or other disciplinary proceedings which resulted in a conviction.

0

0

1

0

Cases which resulted in courts martial or other disciplinary proceedings which resulted in a conviction for a lesser offence.

1

3

0

0

Cases which resulted in courts martial or other disciplinary proceedings which did not result in a conviction.

0

0

0

0

Cases ongoing.

0

0

0

4

Total

2

4

1

6

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many allegations of (a) rape, (b) sexual assault and (c) assault by penetration against members of the armed forces have been reported by civilians to the service police in each year since 2005; and if he will make a statement. [151682]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 18 January 2013, Official Report, column 963W, on Armed Forces: sexual offences, how many of the claims referred to in the answer were for (a) sexual abuse, (b) rape and (c) sexual assault; what the gender was of each claimant; what the outcome was of each claim; and if he will make a statement. [151683]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence's claims handlers do not record sexual abuse, sexual assault and rape separately so it is not possible to break down the claims

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1257W

into those categories as requested. The gender of the claimant and the outcome of each claim is shown in the following table.

 Number of claimsGender of claimantOutcome

2002

1

Female

Settled

    

2003

5

Male

Settled

  

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Repudiated

    

2004

3

Male

Settled

  

Male

Settled

  

Male

Repudiated

    

2005

2

Male

Settled

  

Male

Repudiated

    

2006

2

Male

Settled

  

Male

Repudiated

    

2007

1

Male

Repudiated

    

2008

1

Male

Repudiated

    

2009

6

Male

Settled

  

Male

Ongoing

  

Female

Settled

  

Male

Settled

  

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Repudiated

    

2010

1

Male

Ongoing

    

2011

3

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Repudiated

  

Male

Settled

    

2012

1

Female

Repudiated

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many allegations relating to the possession of indecent images have been made against (a) armed forces personnel and (b) civilian staff based in Germany in each year since 2005; how many of these have (i) been referred for prosecution and (ii) resulted in a conviction; and if he will make a statement. [152464]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1126W, on armed forces: sexual offences, if he will provide a breakdown by year for the offences of (a) rape, (b) sexual assault and (c) sexual assault by penetration of the number of (i) cases of such offences

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1258W

not investigated, (ii) cases investigated but not resulting in a person being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006, (iii) cases resulting in persons being referred to a prosecuting authority under the Armed Forces Act 2006 but which did not result in court martial or other disciplinary proceedings, (iv) cases resulting in a conviction, (v) cases which resulted in a court martial or other disciplinary proceedings which resulted in a conviction for a lesser offence, (vi) cases resulting in a court martial or other disciplinary proceedings which did not result in a conviction and (vii) cases ongoing; and if he will make a statement. [152580]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answers of 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1128W, and 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1129W, on armed forces: sexual offences, (1) whether any allegations made by service personnel relate to children placed in schools funded by the Continuity of Education Allowance; in which year any such allegations were made; and if he will make a statement; [152616]

(2) which department is responsible for investigations in lieu of local authority responsibilities under child protection legislation; what training is made available to staff in order to conduct investigations into child sexual offences; and if he will make a statement. [152618]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answers of 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1128W, and 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1129W, on armed forces: sexual offences, how many allegations (a) by and (b) against service personnel were referred to local authorities for investigation under child protection legislation in which the local authorities were notified; and if he will make a statement. [152617]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Armed Forces: Training

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what savings have been achieved by his Department in the running cost of (a) the Defence Academy at Shrivenham and (b) Royal Military Academy Sandhurst since 2000. [152788]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish the (a) exact facilities and (b) capacity of each such facility at (i) RAF Cranwell, (b) Britannia Royal Naval College, (c) RMA Sandhurst and (d) the Defence Academy, Shrivenham. [152789]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1259W

Mr Francois: The sites mentioned contain a wide variety of academic, domestic, sporting and medical rooms, buildings and equipment.

General information about the type of facilities available can be found on the relevant websites:

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/The-Fleet/Shore-Establishments/BRNC-Dartmouth

http://www.army.mod.uk/training_education/training/17057.aspx

http://www.raf.mod.uk/rafcollegecranwell/

http://www.da.mod.uk/

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many individuals underwent training at (a) Britannia Royal Naval College, (b) RMA Sandhurst, (c) the Defence Academy, Shrivenham and (d) RAF Cranwell in each year since 2000; and how many are intended to undergo training there in each year until 2020. [152793]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department plans to spend under each cost heading on facilities and training at (a) Britannia Royal Naval College Dartmouth, (b) Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, (c) the Defence Academy, Shrivenham and (d) RAF Cranwell in each year until 2020. [152955]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much under each cost heading his Department has spent on facilities and training at (a) Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, (b) Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, (c) the Defence Academy, Shrivenham and (d) RAF Cranwell in each year since 2000. [152956]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many people are currently undergoing training at (a) RAF Cranwell, (b) Britannia Royal College, Dartmouth, (c) RMA Sandhurst and (d) the Defence Academy at Shrivenham. [152970]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1130W, on armoured fighting vehicles, if he will list the full supply chain of the ASCOD SV programme; and whether each item of that supply chain is being sourced from (a) within the UK and (b) outside the UK. [152834]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1260W

Mr Dunne: The Ministry of Defence's contractual relationship is with General Dynamics UK Ltd (GD UK), the prime contractor for the Demonstration Phase of the Scout Specialist Vehicle programme. Sub-contractor arrangements to deliver this programme are a matter for the company.

Army: Length of Service

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the average length of service is for an infantry soldier who enlists (a) aged 18 or above and (b) below the age of 18; [152248]

(2) what the average length of service is for a soldier who enlists (a) aged 18 or above and (b) below the age of 18 in each (i) regiment and (ii) corps in the Army. [152133]

Mr Francois: The information requested is shown in the following table:

 Mean length of service in years
Corps and RegimentUnder 18Over 18

Grenadier Guards

8.0

4.4

Coldstream Guards

7.4

4.4

Scots Guards

7.5

4.8

Irish Guards

8.8

5.1

Welsh Guards

7.6

4.2

The Royal Regiment of Scotland

8.8

5.9

The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment

7.1

4.4

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

7.1

4.9

The Royal Anglian Regiment

7.8

4.4

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

7.1

4.9

The Royal Anglian Regiment

7.8

4.4

The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

6.8

4.6

The Yorkshire Regiment

7.2

4.3

The Mercian Regiment

6.9

4.1

The Royal Welsh

7.7

4.3

The Rifles

7.9

4.5

The Royal Irish Regiment

9.3

5.3

The Parachute Regiment

8.3

4.9

Unspecified

2.1

6.4

The Royal Tank Regiment

10.5

9.9

9(th)/12(th) Lancers

10.8

10.8

Unspecified

0.4

0.2

The Blues and Royals

12.7

6.3

The Kings Royal Hussars

10.2

9.5

The Life Guards

13.6

6.6

The Light Dragoons

12.8

6.8

The Queen's Dragoon Guards

8.6

9.2

The Queen's Royal Hussars

8.8

8.9

The Queen's Royal Lancers

9.7

10.1

The Royal Dragoon Guards

9.1

7.8

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards

10.5

9.4

The Royal Artillery

9.5

7.1

The Royal Engineers

10.1

6.1

The Royal Signals

11.9

7.3

The Army Air Corps

12.0

8.8

The Royal Logistic Corps

10.0

7.4

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1261W

The Royal Army Medical Corps

9.6

8.1

The Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

10.9

10.4

The Adjutant General's Corps

16.3

10.8

The Royal Army Veterinary Corps

13.1

7.5

Small Arms School Corps

23.7

21.6

The Royal Army Dental Corps

13.2

10.6

Intelligence Corps

20.9

11.4

The Royal Army Physical Training Corps

21.6

20.1

Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps

13.1

10.4

Corps of Army Music

20.7

10.7

Senior Soldier Continuity Post

34.5

30.6

Unknown

1.8

2.7

Note: The figures are for trained and untrained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Territorial Army and all known problems with the entry date information extracted from the Joint Personnel Administration system which is supposed to reflect their 'current entry date' but if personnel have transferred to the Army from another service, served under an alternative assignment type (e.g. reserve forces), are re-entrants or have transferred from other ranks to officers, their entry date may correspond to any of these events. The resulting length of service may reflect their current period of service, include previous service, or it may be the time that has elapsed since they first joined the armed forces, irrespective of any break in service. The average (mean) length of service on outflow has been calculated using outflow information of trained and untrained soldiers for financial years 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12. Mean length of service in years is a decimal figure. For example, 4.5 years length of service represents four years and six months rather than four years and five months.

Army: Qualifications

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what proportion of commissioned soldiers attained nationally recognised educational qualifications after joining the trained strength; in what subject areas such qualifications were gained; and how many and what proportion of those achieving qualifications were minors when they enlisted in the Army in the latest period for which figures are available. [151784]

Mr Francois: The Army provides internally run courses which are required to ensure suitably qualified personnel at all ranks. Some of these courses enable a solider to achieve a nationally recognised qualification.

Approximately 95% of soldiers enrol on a trade related apprenticeship during phase two training and continue these qualifications into their chosen Regiments. At any one time there are approximately 15,000 soldiers undertaking an apprenticeship, many of which last more than 24 months depending on the level. Approximately 90% of all soldiers undertaking these qualifications are successful which is 18% higher than the national average.

The number and proportion of soldiers attaining these qualifications against the Army's fully trained strength of 79,034, and the skill areas which they fall

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1262W

within, for the period October 2012 to March 2013 are shown in the following table:

QualificationNumbers attainedProportion (percentage)

L2 Apprenticeship

2,182

2.8

L3 Apprenticeship

1,069

1.4

LI Literacy Functional Skill

183

0.2

LI Numeracy Functional Skill

1,203

1.5

L2 Literacy Functional Skill

274

0.4

L2 Numeracy Functional Skill

1,374

1.7

LI Literacy Basic Skill

101

0.1

LI Numeracy Basic Skill

94

0.1

L2 Literacy Basic Skill

429

0.5

L2 Numeracy Basic Skill

395

0.5

Total

7,304

9.2

The information on how many were minors when they enlisted is not held. However, there were 1,037 of the above soldiers who joined the Army through the junior entry route.

Army: Recruitment

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what proportion of recruits who enlisted as minors in (a) the armed forces and (b) the Army have completed a nationally recognised apprenticeship qualification (i) during Phase One training, (ii) during Phase Two training and (iii) within six years of enlistment; and in what subject areas. [151783]

Mr Francois: Initial military training is divided into phases. Phase one is broad militarization training and phase two consists of specialist and trade related training. Infantry complete a combined phase one and two course at the Infantry Training Centre. No one can join the trained strength of the armed forces unless they have completed both phases. Apprenticeship schemes in the armed forces are completed predominantly during phase two training but many require elements to be completed in the workplace once an individual has joined the trained strength.

All recruits who enlist as minors and do not hold full level three qualifications are enrolled on an apprenticeship scheme unless their trade training attracts higher level qualifications. The time taken to complete the apprenticeship varies according to the programme being followed but completion rates are high. Total apprenticeship completions by sector skill area for the last academic year are given below but data are not held on the age at enlistment of all these personnel. There are two levels of apprenticeship, intermediate, which is equivalent to GCSEs at grades A to C, or advanced which is the equivalent to A-level.

Apprenticeship completions, at intermediate or advanced level, by sector skills areas: 1 August 2011-31 July 2012 are shown in the following table:

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1263W

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1264W

Sector skills areaIntermediate apprenticeshipsAdvanced apprenticeships
 Royal NavyArmyRoyal Air ForceTotalRoyal NavyArmyRoyal Air ForceTotal

Agriculture (includes animal care)

193

193

3

3

Business Administration and Law

36

35

71

62

62

Construction

36

36

Engineering (including ICT)

1031

2041

125

3197

284

1076

641

2001

Health, Public Services and Social Care

1042

743

188

1973

55

1

56

Hospitality (including catering and food services)

39

39

Management and Professional

14

14

Retailing and Customer Services

73

1494

1567

540

540

Transportation (including warehousing and storage)

377

377

Totals

2182

4507

764

7453

339

1682

655

2676

Assets

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what (a) assets and (b) liabilities are held by (i) his Department and (ii) its non-departmental public bodies with a value of (A) between £100,000 and £1 million, (B) between £1 million and £10 million, (C) between £10 million and £100 million and (D) over £100 million; what the value is of each item; and what assets are scheduled for disposal. [153627]

Mr Philip Hammond: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Baroness Thatcher

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the costs to his Department were for the rehearsals and preparations for the funeral of the late Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven, by category of expenditure; [152885]

(2) what the costs were of deploying armed forces personnel to oversee security operations for the funeral of the late Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven, by category of expenditure. [152886]

Mr Francois: The Government are committed to publishing the cost to public funds of Baroness Thatcher's funeral. The costs are currently being collated and will be published in due course by the Cabinet Office.

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many armed forces personnel were deployed to oversee security operations for the funeral of the late Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven, by regiment or unit. [152889]

Mr Francois: We do not comment on what, if any, support is provided by the Ministry of Defence to the security arrangements for events of this nature. Security arrangements for the funeral of Baroness Thatcher were primarily the responsibility of the metropolitan police.

Chile

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much of his Department's support offered after the 2010 earthquake in Chile was marked against the UK's Overseas Development Assistance target. [153502]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Climate Assessments

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many climate assessments in relation to equality and diversity have been conducted by each of the three services since 2010; if he will place a copy of each such assessment in the Library; and if he will make a statement. [151924]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Community Covenant Grant Scheme

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which local authorities have signed the community covenant. [153017]

Mr Robathan: As at 25 April 2013, a total of 290 local authorities have signed the Community Covenant; The Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans, my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois), will write to you with more details and will place a copy in the Library of the House.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151331]

Mr Dunne: Defence Information Infrastructure (DII) is the principle information communication technology (ICT) system used throughout the Ministry of Defence and provides the vast majority of defence users with their integrated ICT network needs. The following table

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1265W

shows the number of DII devices purchased since 2008 as part of the 10 year DII contract let in 2005:

 DII desktop computersDII laptop devicesDII tablet devices

April 2011 to April 2013

53,070

5,140

0

April 2008 to March 2011

103,130

8,760

0

There are other standalone user access devices and local networks for which information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Conflict Pool

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much of his Department's contribution to the Conflict Pool was claimed against the UK's Official Development Aid target in the latest period for which figures are available. [152733]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) makes no financial contribution to the Conflict Pool. The MOD does, however, have access to Conflict Pool funds. The latest available Official Development Assistance figures are for 2011. In 2011, the MOD reported that approximately £2 million was spent on Defence-led Conflict Pool activities which meet the definition of Official Development Assistance (ODA). Details of 2012 expenditure will be published in Statistics on International Development in the autumn.

Cost Effectiveness

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library (a) his Department's response to HM Treasury's requests for information on the value of departmental spending in terms of cost-effectiveness per unit cost in advance of the 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review and (b) the data disclosed to HM Treasury on net present value per pound for resource spending. [153608]

Mr Philip Hammond: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Daniel Nightingale

Dr Julian Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the total cost has been to his Department of legal proceedings in respect of Sergeant Danny Nightingale until the end of March 2013; what the anticipated costs of current proceedings against Sergeant Nightingale are estimated to be; and if he will make a statement. [152521]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Defence

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the oral statement of 18 July 2011, Official Report, column 644, on defence transformation, what assessment his Department made of the likely

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1266W

effects of its proposed changes on local communities; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the results of this assessment. [150089]

Mr Robathan: I am withholding the information as it relates to the formulation of Government policy.

Defence Support Group

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which Defence Support Group sites have been subject to contamination surveys over the last five years; how many such sites have been found to contain asbestos; what estimates have been made of the costs of decommissioning such sites; and if he will make a statement. [152700]

Mr Francois: As part of the Ministry of Defence's ongoing commitment to undertaking land quality assessments, 13 Defence Support Group Sites have been surveyed. These along with details of any asbestos found are shown in the following table:

Name of siteDetails of asbestos found

DSG Bicester

No fibres found

DSG Bovington

No fibres found

DSG Catterick

Fibres found at two locations

DSG Colchester

No fibres found

DSG Donnington

No fibres found

DSG Lulworth

No fibres found

DSG Sealand

No fibres found

DSG Sennybridge

No fibres found

DSG Stafford

Fragment and fibres identified at one location

DSG Stirling

No fibres found

DSG Warminster

Fibre found at one location

Longmoor MPV

Fibre found at one location

Catterick MPV

No fibres found

No estimates have yet been made of the cost of decommissioning these sites, however they are all considered to be suitable for their current and ongoing use.

On those sites where asbestos containing materials or fibres were identified, the risk to site users is low and there is no effect on day to day operations.

Defence: Procurement

Sir Alan Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what conclusion the Ministry of Defence Police's inquiry has reached about how commercially sensitive information from the Ministry of Defence and Department for Transport project team came into the possession of a member of the Soteria consortium during the bidding process for the SAR-H competition in 2010; whether the Ministry of Defence Police consulted the Crown Prosecution Service on that matter; and whether any disciplinary action has been taken. [152456]

Mr Dunne [holding answer 23 April 2013]:After a full and wide-ranging investigation the Ministry of Defence police concluded that there was insufficient evidence to warrant further police action. Therefore no submission

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1267W

to the Crown Prosecution Service was required. To date no disciplinary action has been taken within the Department.

Chris White: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department has taken to support the development of social enterprise within the defence supply chain. [153506]

Mr Dunne: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

European Fighter Aircraft

Penny Mordaunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the average annual running cost of a squadron of Typhoon jets. [147865]

Mr Robathan: The Air Command average running cost attributable to a front line Typhoon Squadron for financial year 2011-12 was some £19 million. This figure excludes associated infrastructure costs and contracts relating to availability and support which are integral to the running of a squadron and availability of aircraft. Support contracts are let on a whole fleet basis to achieve efficiencies of scale. For example, the Typhoon Availability Service contract, which is a partnering arrangement with BAE Systems to maintain and support the Typhoon fleet, costs some £105 million in FY 2011-12 and the Partnered Support Operation Phase contract with Rolls Royce, which supports the Typhoon engines, costs some £68 million in FY 2011-12.

Germany

Bob Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what financial reimbursement he has agreed with the German Government for breaking the contract which retained British armed forces stationed in Germany until 2030. [151450]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 17 April 2013]: There is no contract with the German Government. Therefore no contract is being broken and no financial settlement is required.

The requirement for resolution of any issues relating to the estate vacated by the British forces in Germany (BFG) is detailed in the Supplementary Agreement to the NATO Status of Forces Agreement and the Department is committed to adhering to this in consultation with the German authorities. Negotiations are well under way with the German authorities for the final, one-time settlement of all financial claims arising from the release of accommodation, the treatment of property procured from funds made available to the UK by Germany in the 40s and 50s, and the residual value of sterling-funded investments in the estate.

Previous settlements were conducted on either an annual or, more latterly, an ad hoc basis and have hitherto always amounted in a net payment to the UK.

Hotels

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officials in his (a) Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies stayed in hotels in

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1268W

(i) the UK and (ii) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year. [152551]

Mr Francois: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Information Officers

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many press officers there are at each defence base (a) in the UK and (b) overseas. [150488]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 15 April 2013]:The information will take time to collate. I will write to the right hon. Member as soon as it is available.

Insolvency

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which firms went into liquidation whilst contracted by his Department in each of the last three years; and how much his Department had to write off as a result of such liquidations in each of the last three years. [R] [152236]

Mr Dunne: For the last five years, Defence Business Services records confirm that the following 20 firms went into liquidation while contracted by the Department and this resulted in write-offs.

£
Financial yearEntityWrite off amountTotal

2008-09

Pioneer Designs Technical Services Ltd

800.00

 
 

Gateway IT Services Limited

12,057.42

 
 

Rail Freight Ltd

3,195.69

 
 

Cork International

30.00

 
 

Integrated Photo Optics Limited

1,000.00

 
 

Radix Micro Devices PLC

37.00

 
 

Fragonset Railways Limited

55,120.92

72,241.03

    

2009-10

De Baer PLC

1,582.47

 
 

Darlington Crystal Limited

49.95

 
 

Lancashire Embroidery and Insignia Ltd

19.60

 
 

Wright Hygiene Services Ltd

459.60

 
 

Elonex Public Limited Company (ELX)

1,602.14

 
 

DDHE Services Limited

199.40

 
 

PPI Learning Services Ltd

530.00

 
 

European Business Jets PLC

16,569.66

21,012.82

    

2010-11

TRL Compliance Services Limited

250.00

 

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1269W

 

Swiss Eagle Limited

405.86

 
 

Trade Sport Limited

702.95

 
 

Paige Personnel LLP

241.57

 
 

Argyll Bagpipes and Kilts Limited

26,950.45

28,550.83

    

2011-12

Airtime Aviation Limited

324.11

 
 

Bennetts of Sheffield Limited

137.62

 
 

Craven Publishing Limited

4,420.09

 
 

Propstar Limited

340.88

 
 

Simdan Branding Limited

654.90

 
 

West Midlands International Airport Limited

67.01

 
 

Virgin Vie at Home Limited

61.60

 
 

Club 328 Limited

6,562.59

 
 

SRS (Scotland) Limited

17,800.00

30,368.80

    

2012-13

Portsmouth City Football Club

933.42

 
 

Comtel Air Luftverkehrs GmbH

704.49

 
 

Popco Entertainment (UK) Limited

11,107.58

 
 

Sterling Helicopters Limited

51.81

 
 

Bennetts transport (Ravenswood) Limited

2,918.68

 
 

Ambeo Plc

561.24

16,277.32

Libya

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his policy is on the collection of small and large weapons systems from the general population in Libya; what steps he is taking to that end; and if he will make a statement. [152736]

Dr Murrison: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1270W

Military Aid

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the total cost was of his Department's operations that were claimable against the UK's overseas development assistance commitment in the last five years. [151390]

Mr Philip Hammond: The Ministry of Defence has contributed to a range of humanitarian, stabilisation and conflict prevention operations during the last five years, such as providing assistance following the Haiti earthquake in 2010.

The costs of these contributions were initially paid in full by the MOD. Additional costs to MOD such as fuel, not including costs that MOD has already been resourced for such as salaries, were routinely recovered from the lead Department (in the above example, this would have been the Department for International Development). The lead Department also reports on ODA eligible activity, rather than MOD.

MOD and DFID are investigating in the round the contribution, cost and funding mechanisms for Defence capabilities which support HMG upstream conflict prevention, development and humanitarian objectives.

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if his Department's financial systems record any spending on Overseas Development Assistance. [153509]

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Military Alliances

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the cost to his Department was of military naval collaboration projects with the US in each of the five years prior to 2011; [152018]

(2) what the cost to his Department was of military naval collaboration projects with non-EU countries other than the US in each of the five years prior to 2011; [152019]

(3) what the cost to his Department was of military naval collaboration projects in the EU in each of the five years prior to 2011. [152020]

Mr Dunne: Ministry of Defence expenditure on military naval collaboration projects for each of the five years prior to 2011 is shown in the following table. The expenditure covers post initial gate expenditure only and excludes weapons for naval platforms and naval aviation projects.

Naval collaboration projects
 Expenditure per financial year (£ million)
 2005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

EU and Non-EU

1.765

2.755

1.492

2.372

1.310

2.308

US

40.927

118.110

18.889

The one project that involves collaboration within EU also involves collaboration with non-EU countries.

Military Corrective Training Centre Colchester

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the annual cost to the public purse has been of the Military Corrective Training Centre in each of the last five years. [148325]

Mr Robathan: It is not possible to provide the total annual cost to the public purse, as the costs for things such as cleaning, catering, property management and

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1271W

utilities are not managed from a single budget. Those costs which are attributable solely to the Military Corrective Training Centre could not be accurately identified therefore and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

MOD Ashchurch

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department plans to withdraw military personnel from MoD Ashchurch; and if he will make a statement. [150938]

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of the staff employed by his Department at Ashchurch will be considered for redeployment following the closure notice; and if he will make a statement. [150722]

Mr Dunne [holding answer 15 April 2013]: I refer the hon. Members to the answer I gave on 16 April 2013, Official Report, column 285W.

It is too early at this time to provide further details of any withdrawal of staff, civilian or military, for the Ashchurch site.

When decisions are taken over the future of Ashchurch we will follow standard Ministry of Defence personnel practice for staff relocation or reposting.

Navy: Decommissioning

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish a list of all the elements of maritime capability which have been decommissioned since 2010. [152394]

Mr Dunne: I have interpreted “decommissioned” to mean withdrawn from service in which case the following ships have been decommissioned, since 2010: the helicopter carriers HMS Ark Royal and HMS Invincible (having been in extended readiness since 2005); the Type 22 frigates HMS Cornwall, HMS Chatham, HMS Campbell and HMS Cumberland; the Type 42 destroyers HMS Gloucester, HMS Liverpool, HMS Manchester, HMS Nottingham and HMS York; the minehunter HMS Walney; the survey vessel HMS Roebuck; the landing ship RFA Largs Bay; the fleet replenishment ship RFA Fort George; and the support tanker RFA Bayleaf.

It would not be accurate to say HMS Sceptre and HMS Turbulent have been decommissioned, as the term has a specific meaning relating to nuclear submarines, but both vessels have been withdrawn from service.

In some cases, for example for the Type 42 destroyers, this is because they have been replaced by more modern ships—the Type 45 destroyers. In others, they reflect the requirements for Future Force 2020 as set out in the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review.

Nuclear Weapons

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what role would be played by the (a) Supreme Allied Commander Europe and (b) Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic in the decision-making process to deploy any UK nuclear missiles. [153510]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1272W

Mr Robathan: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Official Hospitality

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible claimed reimbursements for working lunches and official entertainment in each of the last five years; and what the total cost was in each such year. [152665]

Mr Francois: The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Expenditure on hospitality and entertainment is published in the Ministry of Defence's annual report and accounts.

Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much was paid to officials in (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies in bonuses and other payments in addition to salary in each of the last five years; how many officials received such payments; and what the monetary value was of the 20 largest payments made in each year. [148022][Official Report, 25 November 2013, Vol. 571, c. 1-10MC.]

Mr Robathan: It continues to be a fundamental principle of Government policy that reward in the public sector should be linked to performance. The Ministry of Defence (MOD), in line with other Government Departments, rewards performance through the use of non-consolidated payments which reflect outputs, results and performance. These payments are colloquially known as 'bonuses', although this is a misleading description because the performance-related element of pay is part of the Departmental pay bill rather than being an additional cost. In addition, the MOD operates a special bonus scheme (SBS) to reward civilian staff below the senior civil service (SCS) for exceptional performance in a specific task or for the achievement of professional qualifications which benefit the MOD and the individual. Both types of payments are non-pensionable and are a cost effective way of rewarding performance since they do not count towards pension costs, and so reduce the overall cost of employing civil servants.

Since 2010-11, the Government have restricted performance related payments for the SCS to the top 25% of performers (from 65% in previous years), saving the taxpayer around £15 million. They are only paid to reward excellence, for example to recognise and incentivise those responsible for delivering high quality public services and savings to the taxpayer. Pay decisions for non-senior staff are delegated to individual departments, enabling them to tailor reward packages that meet their own work force and business needs. Payments made since 1 April 2011 are detailed in Departmental transparency data which are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/non-consolidated-performance-awards--2

Details of how much has been paid in non-consolidated awards in financial years 2008-09 to 2012-13 are reproduced in the following tables.

Table 1: Details how much was paid to permanent members of the SCS in non-consolidated awards.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1273W

Table 1—SCS permanent staff
Performance year2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12
Financial year (FY)2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Value of awards paid (£)

1,501,700

1,594,500

995,500

505,500

362,000

Number of awards paid

187

195

169

62

58

Table 2 details how much was paid to senior staff on fixed term appointments in non-consolidated awards.

Table 2—SCS Fixed Term Appointees
Performance year2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12
FY2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Value of awards paid (£)

333,915

838,393

557,293

616,916

(1)320,026

Number of awards paid

16

27

23

21

13

(1) There are still two awards outstanding that have not yet been paid.

Table 3 shows the monetary values of the largest non-consolidated payments to the combined SCS population of permanent staff and fixed term appointees.

Table 3—Top 20 highest non-consolidated awards for combined SCS population
 £

FY 2008-09

88,296

 

61,250

 

50,000

 

48,000

 

37,675

 

31,703

 

30,780

 

30,000

 

30,000

 

30,000

 

27,600

 

24,000

 

23,085

 

22,085

 

22,000

 

21,546

 

20,480

 

19,000

 

17,163

 

17,091

  

FY 2009-10

84,563

 

75,000

 

72,540

 

55,350

 

50,000

 

50,000

 

48,720

 

48,000

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1274W

 

31,470

 

30,750

 

30,000

 

30,000

 

25,765

 

24,101

 

22,888

 

21,337

 

21,033

 

16,200

 

15,000

 

15,000

  

FY 2010-11

73,080

 

49,937

 

49,900

 

48,720

 

35,113

 

31,668

 

26,715

 

25,755

 

22,888

 

22,153

 

17,000

 

16,100

 

15,750

 

15,605

 

15,000

 

15,000

 

13,800

 

12,500

 

12,500

 

12,500

  

FY 2011-12

85,831

 

69,459

 

49,950

 

49,500

 

48,720

 

33,833

 

25,578

 

20,554

 

19,492

 

19,184

 

17,637

 

15,415

 

12,500

 

12,180

 

11,250

 

10,000

 

9,000

 

9,000

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1275W

 

9,000

 

9,000

  

FY 2012-13

60,000

 

48,720

 

48,720

 

36,541

 

35,729

 

27,087

 

14,559

 

13,015

 

10,842

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1276W

 

8,000

 

8,000

 

7,813

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

7,000