23 Apr 2013 : Column 859W

Post Offices

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much investment his Department has made in the Post Office network in each of the last 15 years. [152254]

Jo Swinson: This Government have committed £1.34 billion over the course of this Parliament to maintain and modernise the Post Office network. As this funding has been publicly announced, this answer provides details for the last 15 financial years (1999/2000 to 2013/14) and also the additional year 2014/15 to the end of the current spending review period.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 860W

Over the period 1999/2000 to 2014/15 the Government will have provided £3.52 billion to restructure, maintain and modernise the network. The following table sets out the payments made to Post Office Ltd for these purposes since 1999/2000. It includes compensation payments to around 5,000 sub-postmasters whose post offices were closed under the closure programmes of the previous Administration.

The ongoing Network Transformation programme introduces new operating Models—Main and Local—that will help place the Post Office network on a more financially sustainable footing for the future, and reduce its reliance on public subsidy.

£ million
 Network subsidy paymentUrban reinventionNetwork changeNetwork transformationOther

2014/15

160

585

2013/14

200

(1)

2012/13

210

(1)

2011/12

180

2010/11

150

2009/10

150

465

2008/09

150

180

(1)

2007/08

150

(1)

(1)

2006/07

150

(1)

2005/06

150

(1)

2004/05

150

(1)

2

2003/04

150

(1)

(1)

2002/03

(1)

2001/02

2000/01

1999/2000

500

Total

1,790

180

465

585

502

(1) Indicates brace

Redundancy Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible received payments under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last five years; and at what total cost in each such year. [152642]

Jo Swinson: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) was created on 5 June 2009 via a merger of the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) and the Department of Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) which ceased to exist from that date. Data on the number and cost of exits under any schemes have been provided from this date.

 2011-122010-112009-10
 No. of exitsCost (£)No. of exitsCost (£)No. of exitsCost (£)

BIS—Main Department

237

15,052,792

329

27,169,651

(1)-—

(1)-—

BIS—Agencies

67

1,700,971

470

17,257,276

(1)-—

(1)-—

BIS—NDPBs

1622

38,840,023

1264

46,798,849

(1)-—

(1)-—

Total

1926

55,593,786

2063

91,225,776

35

3,918,988

(1) Prior to 2010-11 only a single consolidated figure was collected and published so a break down of which organisations exits were from is unavailable. Source: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills Annual Report and Accounts 2011-12 Department for Business, Innovation and Skills Annual Report and Accounts 2010-11

Data for 2012-13 will be published as part of this year’s Annual Report and Accounts. The civil service compensation scheme was reformed in December 2010. Under the previous terms there could be costs extending for up to 10 years after a departure. The revised terms mean all of the costs now fall within the year of departure. The National Audit Office have estimated that the changes have reduced exit costs by around 40-50% across the whole of the scheme compared to the previous terms. The reformed scheme allows for greater distinction

23 Apr 2013 : Column 861W

between voluntary and compulsory exits and is designed to encourage voluntary rather than compulsory departures.

These exit schemes have supported restructuring both within the core Department and BIS partner organisations which will deliver long-term savings.

Regulatory Policy Committee

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Regulatory Policy Committee in the context of its lack of enforcement powers in respect of proposed legislation. [153076]

Michael Fallon: The Regulatory Policy Committee (RPC) provides external and independent challenge on the evidence and analysis presented in Impact Assessments supporting the development of new regulatory measures proposed by the Government. The RPC publishes regular reports setting out how it is fulfilling this role and the effect it is having.

Since the start of 2011, there have been nine occasions on which a Department has proceeded with a measure where the RPC has considered that the relevant Impact Assessment is not fit for purpose. Details of those measures, and the relevant opinions, can be found on the RPC website at:

http://regulatorypolicycommittee.independent.gov.uk/

Technology and Innovation Centres

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 18 January 2013, Official Report, column 993W, on technology and innovation centre, how many Catapult Technology and Innovation centres have reached stage two in their development to date. [152951]

Mr Willetts: Five Catapult centres have now reached stage 2 or 3 as set out in my previous answer. The remaining two centres have recently completed the appointment of high quality leadership teams and will reach stage 2 when the CEOs take office in June and August. The change in the timeline from my previous answer has been a result of the notice period required for the high calibre appointees identified for all Catapults.

Trade Promotion

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which hon. Members have been appointed as trade ambassadors by his Department. [153030]

Michael Fallon: The Prime Minister's Trade Envoy programme is designed to help promote trade in emerging and growth markets, beyond those already identified in the UKTI strategy. The Trade Envoys, prime focus is to showcase to SMEs in the UK foreign opportunities available in ‘their’ markets. Their role include participation in up to four UK-based activities and two overseas trips, which will enhance their credibility in the UK and deepen their knowledge of the country whose opportunities they are profiling.

The current programme includes the following individuals:

1. Baroness Bonham Carter of Yarnbury, Trade Envoy to Mexico.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 862W

2. Baroness Morris of Bolton, Trade Envoy to Jordan, Kuwait, Palestinian Territories.

3. Lord Puttnam of Queensgate, Trade Envoy to Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.

4. Lord Risby of Haverhill, Trade Envoy to Algeria.

5. Baroness Scotland of Asthal, Trade Envoy to South Africa.

6. Lord Sharman of Redlynch, Trade Envoy to Morocco.

7. Charles Hendry MP, Trade Envoy to Azerbajan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan.

8. Richard Graham MP, Trade Envoy to Indonesia.

UK Research Partnership Investment Fund

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many bids for funding have been received under the second round of the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund. [152995]

Mr Willetts: In October 2012, the Government announced additional funding of £200 million for the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund (UKRPIF), to add to £100 million provided in Budget 2012, to enable universities to lever in private sector and charity co-investment into long-term strategic research partnerships. The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), working with counterparts in the devolved Administrations, is responsible for managing the Fund, for project assessment and all decisions on project selection. HEFCE issued a second call for new and reworked proposals which closed in February. Full details are available at:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2012/201231/#d.en.76055

HEFCE will provide further details and announce a full list of successful projects in due course.

UK Trade and Investment

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many UK Trade and Investment staff were stationed in Russia in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012. [152570]

Michael Fallon: There were 28 UK Trade and Investment staff directly employed by the FCO stationed in Russia throughout both 2011 and 2012.

In addition, a portion of each Head of Mission's time in Russia is spent on UK Trade and Investment work.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many UK Trade and Investment staff were dismissed for underperformance in 2012. [152572]

Michael Fallon: UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) is not an employer in its own right; for the majority of its human resource requirements it draws on civil service staff employed by one or other of its two parent Departments—the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).

No UK-based individuals were dismissed for under- performance in 2012. If individuals are underperforming, they are helped to improve their performance through their parent Department's performance improvement measures prior to any dismissal procedures.

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Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take steps to ensure that every UK Trade and Investment staff member is vigorously scrutinised on a targets basis every quarter. [152573]

Michael Fallon: UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) is not an employer in its own right and the majority of its staff are employed by one or other of its two parent Departments—the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).

Under the performance management arrangements of the parent Departments, staff are required to set objectives which are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic/relevant and time-bound (SMART). Managers hold mandatory mid and end of year performance reviews to determine whether staff are meeting their objectives, and they are encouraged to hold regular performance discussions with individuals throughout the year. If individuals are underperforming, they are helped to improve their performance through their parent Departments' performance improvement measures.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many UK Trade and Investment staff are posted in (a) Mauritania, (b) Morocco, (c) Algeria, (d) Tunisia, (e) Libya and (f) Egypt. [152574]

Michael Fallon: UK Trade and Investment full-time equivalent members of staff are posted as follows:

 FTE staff

Mauritania

0

Morocco

5

Algeria

3

Tunisia

3

Libya

8

Egypt

10.6

In addition, a portion of each Head of Mission's time is spent on UK Trade and Investment work.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what plans he has for UK Trade and Investment representation in Mauritania. [152575]

Michael Fallon: UK Trade and Investment regularly reviews the distribution of its available staff resource, but currently has no plans for representation in Mauritania.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what role performance-related pay plays in the remuneration of the chief executive of UK Trade and Investment. [152579]

Michael Fallon: UKTI is not an employer in its own right; for the majority of its human resource requirements it draws on civil service staff employed by one or other of its two parent Departments—the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).

23 Apr 2013 : Column 864W

The chief executive of UKTI is a member of the senior civil service and is part of the normal performance and pay structure for senior civil servants which has been established by the Cabinet Office. The chief executive of UKTI is eligible for base pay increases and performance awards in line with the annual recommendations of the Senior Salaries Remuneration Body.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will list the names of UK Trade and Investment staff earning more than £100,000 per annum. [153061]

Jo Swinson: UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) is committed to publishing senior staff data as part of the transparency agenda. UKTI information from these exercises is available on the following websites:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/transparency/staff

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/foreign-office-staff-and-salary-data

We also publish the salaries of our Executive Team in the UKTI Annual Report and Accounts:

http://www.ukti.gov.uk/uktihome/aboutukti/item/331780.html

Vocational Training

Caroline Dinenage: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether education and training provided through the Employer Ownership of Skills pilots will be inspected by Ofsted. [152457]

Matthew Hancock: Education and training provided through the Employer Ownership of Skills pilot is not directly part of Ofsted inspections.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress his Department has made in linking skills funding to job outcomes; and if he will make a statement. [152755]

Matthew Hancock: I am keen to encourage skills providers to offer training which will help learners into employment. Since 2012-13, the Skills Funding Agency has paid skills providers a job outcome payment instead of a qualification achievement payment when an unemployed learner leaves a course early to take up employment.

The Skills Funding Statement 2012-15, which was published in December 2012, set out a commitment to ensure there is an appropriate system for capturing information about job outcomes for unemployed learners in the months after their training finishes. Ensuring we have robust and reliable data will support any future policy development on outcome payments. This work is ongoing and we continue to work with partners to examine a range of methods and measurements.

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much funding his Department paid out in total to skills initiatives across the UK in the latest period for which figures are available; which skills initiatives received such financial assistance; and how much was given to each. [152845]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 865W

Matthew Hancock: The Skills Funding Statement 2012-15, published on 6 December 2012, sets out the funding baseline for the Adult Skills Budget for 2012-13. Details can be found in the finance table of the document, on page 15, at:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/further-education-skills/docs/s/12-p172-skills-funding-statement-2012-2015.pdf

This funding relates to England. BIS does not hold details of UK-wide funding.

Justice

Bill of Rights

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent in developing a Bill of Rights to date. [152198]

Damian Green: The only costs the Ministry of Justice can directly attribute to work on considering the case for a Bill of Rights to date are those arising from the establishment and operation of the independent Commission on a Bill of Rights. The total cost of the Commission was approximately £700,000.

Driving Offences: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what revenue has accrued to the Exchequer from motoring fines collected in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years. [152264]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. Information on the enforcement of financial penalties resulting from a conviction does not form part of the information held on the database.

Financial penalties are imposed on offenders by the criminal courts at the point of sentencing, and include fines, prosecutors' costs, compensation orders and victim surcharges. HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hold summary information on the enforcement of financial impositions (including total value of financial penalties collected), but it is not possible to separately identify the offence for which the financial impositions were originally imposed. Compiling these figures would be achieved only at disproportionate cost.

Expert Evidence

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that expert witnesses are given sufficient time with prisoners to conduct interviews; and if he will make a statement. [151170]

Jeremy Wright: Every effort will be made to accommodate the specific requirements of expert witnesses. The length of time allowed for visits is a discretionary matter for individual governors, taking into account operational constraints and security concerns.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 866W

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) psychiatric and (b) psychological interviews by expert witnesses with prisoners are conducted in the health care wing of prisons; and if he will make a statement. [151171]

Jeremy Wright: Prison staff will always try to accommodate the needs of expert witnesses, ensuring that interviews with prisoners take place in suitable surroundings; the physical layout of prison buildings, and considerations relating to the operational management of prisoners, mean that it may not always be possible to hold interviews in prison health care departments.

Fireworks: Lancashire

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many fixed penalties were issued relating to the misuse of fireworks in (a) Pendle constituency and (b) Lancashire in each of the last five years. [151243]

Jeremy Wright: The number of Penalty Notices for Disorder (PNDs) issued to offenders aged 16 and over for offences related to the misuse of fireworks, in the Lancashire police force area, in each year between 2007 and 2011 (latest available) can be viewed in the table. These data are not available at parliamentary constituency level.

Information on the use of PNDs in 2012 is planned for publication in the spring of 2013.

Number of Penalty Notices for Disorder (PNDs) issued to offenders aged 16 and over for offences related to the misuse of fireworks, in the Lancashire police force area, 2007 to 2011
 Year
Offence20072008200920102011

Throwing fireworks(1)

25

19

4

15

5

Breach of fireworks curfew(2)

1

1

0

3

0

Possession of category 4 firework(2)

2

2

0

0

0

Possession by a person under 18 of adult firework(2)

6

2

3

6

0

(1) Offences under the Explosives Act 1875, S.80: Throwing, casting or firing any fireworks in or into any highway, street, public place etc. (2) Offences under the Fireworks Regulations 2004 under s11 of the Fireworks Act 2003. Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services within the Ministry of Justice

Human Trafficking

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Banbury of 14 February 2013, Official Report, column 866W, on human trafficking, for what reasons he considers the release of the requested information by local authority area to be a threat to victim safety. [152429]

Mrs Grant: As set out in the inter-departmental ministerial group on human trafficking, published on 18 October 2012, the Government are focusing on

23 Apr 2013 : Column 867W

improving their collection of data on human trafficking victims to strengthen the UK's response to this. The safety of identified victims is of the utmost importance and publishing further information which puts their rescue in jeopardy is unacceptable.

Publishing information on the local authority area to which victims have been referred could allow the trafficker to locate them. Additionally it could put the safety of any victims still being held by the trafficker at risk.

Offenders: Fines

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment his Department has made of the average cost per case of collecting fines from offenders who fail to comply with their payment plans since October 2012. [148384]

Mrs Grant: It is not possible to identify how many or which enforcement actions have been carried out on each case without carrying out a manual review on all fine accounts, which would incur disproportionate cost. Therefore, an average cost cannot be calculated.

Office of the Public Guardian: Cumbria

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many staff are employed by the Office of the Public Guardian in Cumbria; and what proportion of such staff are paid at or above the relevant level of the living wage. [152330]

Mrs Grant: The Office of the Public Guardian currently has no staff employed in Cumbria.

Prisons: Drugs

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health on measures to support recovery in the treatment of opioid dependence in prisoners. [152072]

Jeremy Wright: The Government's cross-departmental drug strategy promotes the recovery of those dependent on drugs, including offenders. There are drug recovery wings in prison which offer specific support for offenders to recover from dependence. Ministers for Justice and Health are members of the Inter-Ministerial Group (IMG) on Drugs which discusses progress on the strategy regularly.

Probation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders on supervision by the probation service had (a) mental health issues, (b) learning difficulties, (c) drug addictions or (d) alcohol dependencies in each year since 2008. [150369]

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the number of instances in each financial year since 2008-09 where a full OASys assessment undertaken for an offender at the start of a community sentence, suspended sentence or period on licence supervised by the probation service has identified mental health issues, learning difficulties or criminogenic needs linked to drug or alcohol misuse.

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In the following table “Mental Health Issues” includes offenders assessed as having current psychological problems and/or current psychiatric issues.

Information is provided on a financial year basis. The latest data available are for 2011-12.

Financial yearMental Health IssuesLearning DifficultiesDrug Misuse NeedAlcohol Misuse Need

2008-09

49,631

17,300

55,165

46,914

2009-10

40,742

14,315

41,460

38,552

2010-11

34,197

11,536

31,234

30,888

2011-12

28,862

9,441

24,881

25,153

The above figures have been produced from data on completed OASys assessments, held centrally by the National Offender Management Service.

A full OASys assessment is not required with all offenders. OASys data should not therefore be read as representative of the entire probation case load and care should be taken in generalising the results.

The data are drawn from administrative IT systems and the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale assessment and recording system. Several quality assurance procedures are in place to ensure the data produced are accurate and reliable.

Sentencing: EU Nationals

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many EU but non-UK nationals received sentences of two or more years in each of the last five years in (a) Gloucester and (b) England; and how many such nationals were (i) recommended for deportation, (ii) deported and (iii) not deported. [151153]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. This database holds information on offences provided by the statutes under which proceedings are brought but not all the specific circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify from this centrally held information the nationality of offenders given a custodial sentence following a conviction.

Prison data held centrally do include the nationality of offenders, and the following table shows the number of non-UK EU nationals received into prison under sentence in England and Wales in 2008, 2009, 2011 and January to September 2012 (full calendar year 2012 data are not yet available; 2010 data are not available). However, it is not possible to break these figures down for (a) Gloucester and (b) England as offender address information is not held in this database.

Under the Immigration Act 1971 the court retains the power to recommend deportation when conditions providing for automatic deportation specified in the UK Borders Act 2007 are not fulfilled. When the court makes a recommendation that the individual should be considered for deportation this is recorded on the relevant case management systems used in the magistrates and Crown courts. However, this information is not held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on either court proceedings or prison data.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 869W

The Ministry of Justice does not keep records on foreign national criminals who are successfully deported or who were subject to deportation orders that were not successful. This is a matter for the Home Secretary.

Sentenced receptions of EU nationals by sentence length, January 2008 to September 2012(1), England and Wales
Sentence length200820092011Jan to Sep 2012

Two years or more

669

791

831

699

(1) Data for 2010 not available.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Telephone Services

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 22 March 2013, Official Report, column 840W, on telephone services, whether a UK landline number beginning with 01, 02 or 03 is publicly available as an alternative to the 0800, 0844, 0845 and 0870 numbers in use by his Department and the agencies for which he is responsible. [151633]

Mrs Grant: As stated in the Department's answer of 22 March 2013, Official Report, column 840W, the Department's general approach is not to use 084 or 087 for non-geographic numbers and instead, wherever possible, to assign 0300 numbers, for which the tariff is similar to calling an 01 or 02 (geographic) number, whether the caller is using a fixed line or a mobile phone. The Department currently uses 41 0300 numbers.

Non-geographic numbers allow the Department to move the geographical location of enquiry-points without incurring associated telephony costs for administration, publication of new numbers, redirection from previous numbers, etc., and also avoiding possible disruption to services.

There are no 01 02 or 03 numbers publicly available as an alternative to the 0800, 0844, 0845 and 0870 numbers in use by the Department and its agencies.

Youth Custody

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what criteria he used to calculate the cost allocated to local authorities in England and Wales for the remand of youths to care and custody from youth courts; [151913]

(2) how much his Department allocated to each local authority in England and Wales to cover the cost of youth remands to care and custody by youth courts in the latest period for which figures are available. [151914]

Jeremy Wright: The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 establishes a new framework for children remanded otherwise than on bail. This includes extending looked after child status to all children remanded to youth detention accommodation. It also gives local authorities greater financial responsibility for custodial remand budgets for 12-17 year olds. The joint Ministry of Justice and Youth Justice Board response to the consultation paper on allocation of new burdens

23 Apr 2013 : Column 870W

funding to local authorities for the new remand framework for children explains how the budget to be transferred to each local authority in England and Wales has been calculated for 2013-14. This was published on 25 February 2013. Local authorities were notified of indicative budgets on the same day. These documents can both be found at:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/remand-funding/

The final budget is currently being signed off and we expect to notify local authorities of details and make payments by the end of April. The allocations will be made available alongside the consultation documents on the MoJ website.

Youth Offending Teams

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which areas in England and Wales have youth offending team gang forums. [152634]

Jeremy Wright: Regional gang forums are operating in six of the nine regions: London, the West Midlands, the East Midlands, the North West, Yorkshire and Humber (also covering the North East) and the South East. Forums in the South East, West and East Midlands are under review to see how they may be able to expand their membership and offer access to Wales, the South West and the Eastern regions. The forums generally meet quarterly focusing on improving information sharing and communication, and sharing effective practice.

International Development

Air Travel

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials in (a) her Department and (b) non-departmental public body travelled on (i) domestic and (ii) international flights in each of the last five years; in which class categories; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest airfare charges in each such year. [152536]

Mr Duncan: The total costs recorded for flights by DFID (including its non-departmental public body) over the past four years are shown in the following table:

 £

2009-10

7,291,791

2010-11

4,298,014

2011-12

5,805,827

2012-13

5,394,408

Total

22,790,041

We do not hold full details of flight costs within 2008-09, as the Department moved to a new financial system in this year, and travel costs were not fully split into detail codes to allow separation of flights from other expenses.

Due to our current reporting structure, it is not possible to disaggregate costs between domestic and international or between different class categories.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 871W

It is also not possible easily to extract the number of flights or top 20 costs without incurring disproportionate cost.

Developing Countries: Vaccination

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department has spent vaccinating children in the developing world since 2010; and how many vaccinations this amounts to. [152786]

Mr Duncan: DFID has spent over £500 million on direct support for vaccinating children in developing countries since 2010. This includes £122.9 million to the International Finance Facility for Immunisation; £18 million to the Measles Rubella Initiative (MRI); £120 million to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI); £182 million to the GAVI Alliance; and £62.3 million for the Pneumococcal Vaccines Advanced Market Commitment.

Through our commitment to the GAVI Alliance alone, UK funding has supported the immunisation of over 20 million children in 2010 and 2011. In 2012, MRI vaccinated 48 million children against measles, 15 million of whom were vaccinated with UK funding. In 2012, GPEI supported more than 2 billion doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) to be administered to more than 429 million children, 24 million of whom were reached through UK funding. The UK has also contributed to a number of emergency responses, for example the UK recently provided £1.8 million to the World Health Organisation appeal in order to contain the outbreak of yellow fever in Darfur, which helped 2 million people to be immunised.

Hotels

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials in her (a) Department and (b) non-departmental public body stayed in hotels in (i) the UK and (ii) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year. [152560]

Mr Duncan: The total costs recorded for hotel expenses by DFID (including its non-departmental public body) over the past four years are shown in the following table:

 £

2009-10

2,374,006

2010-11

2,152,652

2011-12

2,782,987

2012-13

3,347,391

Total

10,657,040

We do not hold full details of hotel expenditure within 2008-09, as the Department moved to a new financial system in this year, and travel costs were not fully split into detail codes to allow separation of hotel costs from other expenses.

Due to our current reporting structure, it is not possible to disaggregate costs as between the UK and non-UK.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 872W

It is also not possible to easily extract the number of hotel stays or top 20 expenses without incurring disproportionate cost.

Official Hospitality

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials in (a) her Department and (b) the non-departmental public body for which she is responsible claimed reimbursements for working lunches and official entertainment in each of the last five years; and what the total cost was in each such year. [152672]

Mr Duncan: DFID's financial records do not enable identification of the number of officials claiming reimbursement for working lunches and official entertainment, without incurring disproportionate cost.

The central finance records show the following levels of expenditure charged to entertainment and hospitality for the last five years. These include reimbursements and amounts paid directly to suppliers for costs associated with this category of expenditure.

 Amount (£)

2008-09

312,662.41

2009-10

330,641.30

2010-11

211,544.85

2011-12

226,677.27

2012-13

82,437.47

Redundancy Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials in (a) her Department and (b) the non-departmental public body for which she is responsible received payments under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last five years; and at what total cost in each such year. [152653]

Mr Duncan: The table shows the number and costs of voluntary exits within DFID over the last five years. The figures for 2012-13 will be published as part of the Annual Report and Accounts. Voluntary exits include all non-compulsory paid departures.

The compensation scheme was reformed in 2010 and all of the costs now fall within the year of departure, which differs from the previous scheme.

 Number of departuresCost (£ million)

2007-08

95

£7.315

2008-09

17

£2.218

2009-10

53

£4.479

2010-11

37

£2.668

2011-12

69

£3.486

Note: The figures do not include exits by resignation.

There have been no voluntary exits in our non-departmental public bodies over this period.

Zambia

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development under what programmes and category of expenditure UK aid to Zambia is spent. [152822]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 873W

Mr Duncan: DFID spends UK aid in Zambia on the following categories: wealth creation, governance and security, education, health, sanitation, and poverty, hunger and vulnerability. DFID's aid is delivered through a combination of commercial service providers, international organisations, non-governmental organisations and Government-related channels.

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much aid from her Department was provided to Zambia in the latest year for which figures are available. [153003]

Mr Duncan: In financial year 2011-12, DFID's expenditure on aid to Zambia was £42,668,000.

Education

Absent Parents

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to re-establish contact between absent fathers and their children. [151606]

Mr Timpson: The Government are currently taking forward legislation, via the Children and Families Bill, to strengthen the expectation that children will maintain a relationship with both their parents following separation or divorce. One of the aims of the parental involvement clause in the Bill is to send a clear signal that parents remain jointly responsible for their children when families separate.

We are also introducing a range of non-legislative measures to support separated parents in resolving disputes and reaching amicable agreements about their children's care. A package of support, which includes improved information, advice and targeted interventions such as mediation and parenting programmes, is currently being developed to help separated parents focus on the needs of their children and improve communication with their former partner. Parents will also receive support in completing a parenting agreement as part of the dispute resolution process. Parenting agreements will not be legally binding, but they will help parents to establish care arrangements which are practical, realistic and in the best interests of their children.

Academies: Homophobia

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what residual duties local authorities retain in relation to ensuring academy schools comply with the provisions of the Equality Act 2010 and the public sector equality duty in relation to addressing homophobic bullying. [144776]

Mr Timpson: The Equality Act 2010 does not place any duties on local authorities to ensure that schools comply with their responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010. There is, therefore, no role for local authorities to ensure compliance for academies. Under the Equality Act, local authorities have a duty not to discriminate when carrying out their own education functions—such as organisation of schools and arranging admissions. The Equality Act clearly sets out the responsibilities on

23 Apr 2013 : Column 874W

schools and academies in respect of the discrimination provisions and the equality duties, and they are responsible for ensuring their own compliance.

Apprentices

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to Table 3.1 of the report by the Young People's Learning Agency, Evaluation of the Young Apprenticeships Programme: Outcomes for cohort 3 (November 2010), what analysis has been undertaken on the destinations after year 11 of Young Apprenticeships participants in subsequent cohorts. [151447]

Matthew Hancock: In 2010, the Young Apprenticeships (YA) pilot was discontinued. The Department for Education and Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA) have commissioned no further quantitative evaluation of the pilot. The Cohort 3 report, published on the YPLA website in 2010, was considered a representative summary analysis of the outputs of the YA pilot over its lifetime.

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many apprentices are employed by his Department in his ministerial private office. [152292]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: One apprentice is employed in the ministerial private office of the Secretary of State.

Children in Care: Protection

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether it is a requirement that enhanced disclosure checks are carried out on any adult male who offers a home to a child in the care of a local authority; and if he will make a statement; [151637]

(2) if he will provide guidelines to chief constables on the responsibilities and assessment process of older men who offer accommodation to young girls in the care system; and if he will make a statement. [151481]

Mr Timpson: A person who looks after a child in the care of a local authority within their own home must be approved as a foster carer (unless they have parental responsibility for the child). Before a fostering service may approve a person of any sex as a foster carer, they must obtain an enhanced disclosure check with respect to that person and any of their household members aged 18 or over.

There are no guidelines to chief constables on the responsibilities and assessment process of older men who accommodate young girls within the care system. This is because the assessment, approval, supervision and development of foster carers are the responsibility of fostering services, rather than the constabulary. The assessment and approval of foster carers of any age or sex in England are regulated by the Fostering Services (England) Regulations 2011. In Wales they are regulated by the Fostering Services (Wales) Regulations 2003.

Children: Day Care

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what academic advice his Department has commissioned on childcare since January 2011; and if he will place in the Library copies of any such reports. [141028]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 875W

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education has commissioned the following research studies on childcare since January 2011:

(1) Grandparents Providing Childcare—a review of research evidence and statistical data on grandparents providing childcare. This review was carried out by the Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre and a report was published in November 2011.

(2) International Comparison of Qualifications and Training Required for Entry into the Early Years Profession. This rapid review of evidence was carried out by the Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre. A copy of this report will be placed in the Library.

(3) The Costs of Childcare—analysis of the current comparative international literature and data on the affordability of childcare to parents. This review was carried out by the Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre. A copy of this report will be placed in the Library upon publication.

(4) A comparison of international childcare systems. This review was carried out by the Centre for Research in Early Childhood. A copy of the report will be placed in the Library upon publication.

(5) Parent's views and experiences of childcare—a survey of parents to inform the commission on childcare. This survey was undertaken by IPSOS MORI. A copy of this report will be placed in the Library upon publication.

(6) Childcare sufficiency and sustainability in disadvantaged areas. This research was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research and was published in December 2012.

(7) Exploring the flexibility of the free entitlement. This research was undertaken by IPSOS MORI and was published in June 2012.

(8) Childcare Provider Finances Survey. This research was undertaken by TNS-BMRB and was published in May 2012.

(9) Childcare and Early Years Survey of Parents. This research is undertaken by IPSOS MORI and the 2011 survey was published on 31st January 2013.

(10) Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey. This research is undertaken by TNS-BMRB and the latest 2011 survey was published in September 2012.

(11) Early Education Pilot for Two Year Old Children: Age Five Follow-up. This research is undertaken by the National Centre for Social Research and was published in March 2013.

(12) Evaluation of Early Education in England. This research will provide an assessment of the effectiveness of the current early education model in England, updating evidence from the highly influential Effective Provision of Pre-school Education (EPPE) study from 1997. A copy of this report will be placed in the Library upon publication.

Copies of the above research reports which have been published will be placed in the House Library. Reports not yet published will be placed in the House Library upon publication. In addition, a number of other organisations undertook activities to support and inform the work of the commission, including the National Day Nurseries Association, The Daycare Trust, 4Children, Netmums, and the National Children's Bureau.

Children: Social Services

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he still expects joint agency inspections of children's social care to begin from June 2013. [150664]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 15 April 2013]: Ofsted made an announcement on its plans for multi-agency inspections on 12 April 2013. The full text of the announcement can be found at:

23 Apr 2013 : Column 876W

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/news/single-inspection-framework-for-childrens-services?news=20671

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on the basis of what experience and qualifications Professor Julian Le Grand has been appointed to review the structure and governance arrangements of Doncaster's children's social care services. [151073]

Mr Timpson: Professor Le Grand, Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics, is an eminent social policy academic, who is independent and has a strong understanding of alternative forms of social policy delivery. He will be supported in his review by Alan Wood, Director of Children's Services for the London borough of Hackney, who has expertise in the delivery of education and children's services directly for a local authority and via an independent Trust arrangement.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the reasons were for the time taken to bring forward the measures he has announced in his recent direction to Doncaster regarding children's social care services. [151074]

Mr Timpson: The nature and extent of the failings in children's social care in Doncaster are serious and longstanding. It is more important, therefore, to take the time to get any intervention right, than to rush into measures which may have less chance of success. The Secretary of State for Education and I have therefore consulted the right hon. Member for Doncaster North (Edward Miliband), the right hon. Member for Doncaster Central (Ms Winterton), and the right hon. Member for Don Valley (Caroline Flint), in considering these steps. Departmental officials have also been in close touch with Doncaster council.

Children's Improvement Board

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when the decision was taken to end funding of the Children's Improvement Board; and for what reason the board was not told before the start of the new financial year. [152049]

Mr Timpson: The decision not to provide funding for the Children's Improvement Board (CIB) in 2013/14 was taken in early April and communicated immediately to the members of the board.

Class Sizes: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average class size was for (a) secondary and (b) primary schools in Birmingham, Selly Oak constituency in each of the last three years. [151559]

Mr Laws: The number of pupils in state-funded mainstream primary schools in England, including information on class sizes, is published as part of the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012'.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 877W

The average class size for state-funded mainstream primary and secondary schools in the Birmingham, Selly Oak constituency is given in the following table.

 201020112012

Primary

27.6

27.8

27.2

Secondary

19.9

20.0

19.3

Source: School Census, January 2010, January 2011 and January 2012

Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Children Review

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what progress his Department has made on its stocktake of implementation of the Bailey Review of the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood; and if he will make a statement; [151096]

(2) whether he will consider bringing forward legislative proposals to implement the recommendations of the Bailey Review of the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood. [151097]

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when the Government will publish their findings from the stocktake on progress on implementation of the Bailey Review of the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood; and if he will make a statement. [151578]

Mr Timpson: Good progress has been made on implementing the recommendations made in Reg Bailey's report, ‘Letting Children be Children’. The recommendations were directed mainly at businesses and regulators and they have responded positively.

We expect to publish a full report on progress shortly and to say what further action we would like to see taken to tackle the excessive commercialisation and premature sexualisation of childhood, and what action we will take.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151333]

Elizabeth Truss: During the past two financial years a total of (a) 487 desktop computers (b) 1,433 laptop computers and (c) two tablet devices have been purchased by the Department for Education. The Department is phasing out the use of desktop computers and replacing them with more cost-effective and energy efficient thin client devices. During this period a total of 702 thin client devices have also been purchased.

Curriculum

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he plans to encourage schools to introduce economics and business studies in key stage 3. [151625]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 878W

Elizabeth Truss: We have no plans to encourage maintained secondary schools actively to teach subjects that are not part of the existing statutory curriculum. As part of the current review of the national curriculum, we announced on 7 February our decision that the existing subjects at key stages 3 and 4 will continue to be statutory in future. We are, however, slimming down the national curriculum by prescribing much shorter programmes of study for subjects beyond primary English, mathematics and science. The aim is to create more freedom for schools to design their own wider curricula which best meet the needs of their students. It is, therefore, open to schools to teach economics or business studies at key stage 3 should they wish to do so.

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether additional funding for continuing professional development and classroom resources will be available to implement the new national curriculum. [152130]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The Government believe that schools are best placed to decide which teaching resources and professional development meet their needs to ensure successful implementation of the new curriculum, and to secure these accordingly. We therefore expect schools to identify their priorities for action and spending, building on current areas of strength, and to identify appropriate sources of support.

We recognise that some priorities will be common to many schools. To assist with this we are working with subject experts, publishers, educational suppliers and others to identify what support for schools is already in place and any gaps that need to be filled, and how that might be done.

We are also ensuring that existing opportunities funded by Government meet the needs of the new national curriculum. For example, the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM) has recently released free video training materials focused on calculation. Matched funding of £3,000 for phonics materials and training has been extended until October 2013. In March we announced £150 million per year of ring-fenced funding for primary school sport.

Education: Assessments

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effect that his proposed changes to examinations may have on children with autism who struggle with phraseology or the interpretation of questions in formal written examinations; and if he will provide guidance to (a) further and higher education institutions and (b) prospective employers on what considerations and adaptations should be made for such people whose educational qualifications may have been particularly affected by that type of assessment. [149701]

Mr Timpson: The Government's aim is for all children and young people with SEN or disabilities to reach their full potential in school and make a successful transition into adulthood, whether into employment, further or higher education or training.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 879W

The independent regulator for qualifications and assessment, Ofqual, is progressing qualifications reform as part of its regulatory responsibilities. In doing so, it is conducting equality impact assessments on new qualifications at 16 for children with disabilities (including autism).

It is a matter for Ofqual, in conjunction with awarding organisations, exam centres and employers, to consider the most appropriate way in which new qualifications and assessment objectives are designed so that the needs of disabled pupils are met.

Education: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much capital expenditure there has been in the education sector in Birmingham in each year since 2010. [151560]

Mr Laws: Capital support provided to Birmingham and its schools since 2010-11 is set out in the following table. These figures exclude capital investment worth approximately £50 million that was delivered through private finance initiatives during this period.

Financial yearCapital funding (£ million)(1)

2010-11

127.9

2011-12

187.4

2012-13

126.9

(1) Excludes investment through private finance initiatives.

Food Technology

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what provision is made in the national curriculum at (a) primary and (b) secondary school for teaching children how to cook or eat healthily. [142922]

Elizabeth Truss: As announced by the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), to the House of Commons on 7 February 2013, Official Report, columns 441-3, we are proposing that from 2014, the design and technology requirements for schools should be strengthened, so that all pupils in primary schools will learn the principles of healthy eating and where food comes from as part of the design and technology curriculum. As long as their school has access to a kitchen, they will also be taught basic cooking techniques and how to cook a variety of savoury dishes.

In secondary schools, we are proposing that food should be compulsory as part of design and technology for all pupils at key stage 3 for the first time. Pupils will be taught about the importance of nutrition, a balanced diet, and about the characteristics of a broad range of ingredients. As long as their school has access to a kitchen, they will also be taught to cook a repertoire of savoury meals and become confident in a range of cooking techniques

Pupils currently learn about the principles of a balanced diet and healthy eating in science, and this teaching can be extended through personal, social, health and economic education where pupils learn about how a balanced diet and making choices for being healthy contribute to their personal well-being.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 880W

Food technology is currently an element of design and technology, and can also include healthy eating and practical cookery. In primary schools pupils are taught how to follow safe procedures for food safety and hygiene and design and make assignments using a range of materials, including food and textiles. Secondary schools must teach design and technology, but can choose whether to teach textiles or cookery.

Foster Care

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has issued any guidance to local authorities regarding the advising of residents to become foster carers as a way of avoiding being disadvantaged by the effect of changes in housing benefit; and whether he has had any discussions with Ministers at the Department for Work and Pensions about the extent of such practice. [152045]

Mr Timpson: Guidance has not been issued to local authorities about advising residents to become foster carers as a way of avoiding being disadvantaged by the effect of changes in housing benefit.

Regular meetings, at both ministerial and official level, are held with the Department for Work and Pensions to discuss a range of issues, including the housing benefit reforms.

There are robust requirements for the approval of foster carers, including an assessment, carried out by a qualified social worker, of the suitability of the applicant to become a foster carer, and the suitability of their household. The assessment and recommendation must then be presented to a fostering panel for approval.

GCE AS-level

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 12 March 2013, Official Report, column 143W, on GCE: AS level, what assessment he has made of the number of universities who use AS levels to assess applications; and which universities do not use AS levels as part of the application process. [149658]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 March 2013]: We know that universities use a range of information and evidence about applicants for admissions purposes. Even within individual universities, there may be different approaches between subjects. Changes to the AS and A levels may mean that some universities may need to make changes to admissions processes. However, the impact assessment of A level reforms commissioned by Ofqual and published in November 2012 found that around three quarters of the higher education institutions with whom the researchers spoke based their selection decisions on predicted A level grades. The research is available on the Ofqual website.

Head Teachers

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many head teachers had the National Professional Qualification for Headship in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012 and (d) 2013. [151454]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 881W

Mr Laws [holding answer 17 April 2013]: The information is as follows.

Head teachers of maintained schools held NPQH in:NumberPercentage

2011

13,270

61

2010

12,492

58

2009

9,679

44

The figures are not yet available for 2012 (they require the data from the 2012 School Workforce Census which will be available in May 2013) nor yet for 2013 (they require data from the 2013 School Workforce Census which will be collected from schools in autumn 2013 and available in May 2014).

History: Curriculum

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which definition and measurement of progression his Department used to construct the proposed orders for history for key stages 1 to 3. [152126]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: In accordance with the remit for the review of the national curriculum in England, the proposed programmes of study for history set out, by key stage, the essential knowledge and skills that should be taught to all pupils attending maintained schools.

In order to address weaknesses that have been highlighted in pupils' chronological understanding, not least by Ofsted, the programmes of study suggest that subject content should be taught as a coherent chronological narrative, particularly at key stage 2 and key stage 3. They also include a clearly stated expectation that, by the end of those key stages, pupils should know, apply and understand the content specified therein.

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education who wrote the final draft of the orders for the new history curriculum. [152129]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The draft programmes of study for history published for consultation on 7 February 2013 were authored by officials working in the Department's National Curriculum Review Division following discussion with a number of subject experts. Details of all those individuals and organisations consulted during that process have been published on the Department's website(1).

(1)Note:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/l/lists%20of%20commentators%20-%20final.pdf

Literacy: Primary Education

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his plans are for the future of the Every Child a Reader programme. [151408]

Elizabeth Truss: The Every Child a Reader programme is being taken forward by the Institute of Education which owns the licensing rights. The Department is funding the management of the Reading Support intervention programme, a literacy catch-up programme that, like Every Child a Reader, aims to improve the

23 Apr 2013 : Column 882W

teaching of reading in schools and enable the lowest attaining children to achieve age-related expectations in reading at the end of key stage 1. We are committed to supporting this programme to the end of July 2014.

Parents: Marriage

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether his Department has commissioned or conducted research into whether children are more successful in (a) education and (b) other areas of life if they are raised by parents who are married; [152124]

(2) whether his Department has commissioned or conducted research into whether parents are more likely to stay together if they are married. [152125]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The Department has not commissioned or conducted research into child outcomes for children raised by parents who are married or into whether parents are more likely to stay together if they are married. There is, however, significant existing research and evidence in this area.

From existing research we know that the children of married parents do better than the children of cohabiting parents, particularly on measures of social and emotional development at the ages of three and five(1). However, these differences could be due to the fact that those who choose to marry and remain married often have other characteristics, such as greater wealth and a higher level of education, which support them in their parenting.

We also know from existing studies that relationship stability is stronger among married couples(2) and that married adults have better physical and emotional wellbeing than those who are divorced(3). The evidence also shows, however, that relationships must be of high quality to result in positive health outcomes. Health outcomes for single people are for instance more positive than for those reporting unhappy marriages. Studies show that good couple relationships of any kind lead to better mental and physical health for all involved(4).

(1) Crawford C., Goodman A., Greaves E. and Joyce R. (2011) Cohabitation, marriage, relationship stability and child outcomes; an update. London. Institute for Fiscal Studies.

(2) Benson H. (2010) Family breakdown in the UK: it's NOT about divorce. Bristol: Bristol Community Family Trust.

(3) Lynas, P, Trend, M, Ashcroft, J, and Caroe, P (2008) When Relationships Go Wrong—Counting the cost of family failure. Relationships Foundation.

(4) Coleman, L, and Glenn, F., 2009. When Couples part: understanding the consequences for adults and children. London: One Plus One.

Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what criteria are used in (a) his Department and (b) each public body for which he is responsible to determine which officials receive bonus payments. [151130]

Elizabeth Truss: The senior civil service are assessed against their objectives and against Cabinet Office definitions. In identifying exceptional and top performers we will be paying particular attention to the following:

active contribution to the DFE review;

the efforts made to identify and implement improvements to processes and/or policies across the Department;

23 Apr 2013 : Column 883W

evidence of being highly effective in managing, championing and dealing with change;

the difficulty and size of job;

evidence of consistently high levels of delivery and a sustained and demonstrable commitment to getting the basics right (including proper attention to detail);

evidence of creative approaches to problem-solving/breaking down barriers to delivery;

whether the individual commands the absolute confidence of Ministers and the board;

whether they have delivered within budget and managed/mitigated risk effectively;

the engagement and performance of the individual's staff; and

implementing the performance management system to support the identification of talent and rigorous management of poor performers, with the expectation that top performers must demonstrate excellence in management.

Staff below SCS will be assessed based on the guidance for the ratings. Exceptional and top performers will have consistently exceeded their objectives and demonstrated that:

they have actively engaged with the DFE review;

they have made efforts to identify and implement improvements to processes and/or policies across the Department;

they are fully engaged in dealing with change (for managers this includes understanding and explaining the need for change);

they can work effectively and independently and without support to exceed expectations when delivering ministerial business (demonstrating a creative and imaginative approach, actively seeking opportunities and rising to the challenge);

they have a strong, corporate commitment and are prepared to go above and beyond the call of duty when necessary to ensure departmental priorities are met successfully;

they deploy resources to maximum effect ensuring attention to detail, mitigating and managing risks effectively and are proactive in overcoming obstacles that could not be foreseen;

they demonstrate a commitment to and excellence in people and relationship management, acting as an exemplar for others through their work, behaviour and relationships, with a strong commitment to equality and diversity (achieving a high level of performance from a wide range of people, e.g. staff, colleagues, partners);

they demonstrate competence above expectations in all the skill areas required for their post and exemplifying the civil service ‘4 Ps’ of Pride, Passion, Pace and Professionalism;

they demonstrate a strong commitment to improving their own performance and to continuous personal development; and

they are implementing the performance management system to support the identification of talent and rigorous management of poor performers, with the expectation that top performers must demonstrate excellence in management.

Plants

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since his appointment. [139941]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education has not purchased any indoor or outdoor plants or trees since May 2010.

However, between April 2005 and March 2010, the Department spent the following amount on pot plants:

 Spend (£000)

2005/06

53.7

2006/07

42.6

2007/08

42.8

23 Apr 2013 : Column 884W

2008/09

33.0

2009/10

5.8

Recruitment

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has spent on advertising job vacancies since May 2010. [139971]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department has spent £71,973.30 on advertising vacancies since May 2010.

School Meals

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to reports of pork DNA in the food supply chain, what assessment his Department has made of the halal meat served in schools. [151500]

Elizabeth Truss: Food contamination of this sort represents a serious breach of consumer trust. Food business operators are responsible for ensuring the food that they supply meets food law requirements.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) leads the Government response to contaminated food and the Department for Education has been in regular contact with the FSA as investigations have continued. The FSA provides advice to local authorities and publishes the results of industry testing. Where cases of pork DNA in halal meat have been identified, local authorities have worked with schools to advise consumers and withdraw products.

If schools have any concerns about their meat products, they should contact their caterers, suppliers or local authority for further information.

Schools: Finance

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many maintained schools completed and submitted the Schools Financial Value Standard to their local authority as of 31 March 2012. [151252]

Mr Laws: 1,440 maintained schools in England completed and submitted the Schools Financial Value Standard (SFVS) to their local authority as of 31 March 2012. Only schools that had failed to complete the former standard, the Financial Management Standard in Schools, were required to complete the SFVS in March 2012.

Schools: Leadership

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) national and (b) local leaders of education were in the education system in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012 and (iv) 2013. [151409]

Mr Laws: The number of NLEs and LLEs in the years 2010 to 2013 are as follows:

 NLELLE

2010

424

1,191

23 Apr 2013 : Column 885W

2011

586

2,096

2012

721

2,182

2013

812

2,078

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many specialist leaders of education were in post on 1 January 2013. [151453]

Mr Laws [holding answer 17 April 2013]:The number of specialist leaders of education designated on 1 January 2013 was 1,955.

Social Networking

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department's (a) computers or (b) mobile telephones have been used to (i) update and (ii) maintain the @toryeducation education Twitter account. [151438]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department does not routinely monitor Twitter usage beyond its official account (@educationgov). The Observer has made unsubstantiated allegations that employees of the Department contribute to or control the @toryeducation Twitter feed. Despite repeated requests for evidence to substantiate these allegations (from the Permanent Secretary, from the Cabinet Secretary, and from the Secretary of State), no evidence has been provided. If it were to be provided, we would of course look at it and decide on the appropriate next steps.

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will hold discussions with his special advisers to ensure they are not responsible for the (a) updating and (b) maintenance of the @toryeducation Twitter account. [151439]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 April 2013]:The Observer has made unsubstantiated allegations that employees of the Department contribute to or control the @toryeducation Twitter feed. Despite repeated requests for evidence to substantiate these allegations (from the Permanent Secretary, from the Cabinet Secretary and from the Secretary of State), no evidence has been provided. If it were to be provided, we would of course look at it and decide on the appropriate next steps.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether he has authorised the giving of information to the Twitter account @toryeducation; and whether he is aware of (a) his special advisers and (b) officials in his Department doing so; [151534]

(2) whether his Department has held any inquiries on information being passed from his Department to the author of the @toryeducation Twitter account. [151535]

Elizabeth Truss: The Observer has made unsubstantiated allegations that employees of the Department contribute to or control the @toryeducation Twitter feed. Despite repeated requests for evidence to substantiate these allegations (from the Permanent Secretary, from the Cabinet Secretary, and from the Secretary of State), no

23 Apr 2013 : Column 886W

evidence has been provided. If it were to be provided, we would of course look at it and decide on the appropriate next steps.

Special Educational Needs

Sir Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what provisions will be made under the Children and Families Bill for children who currently have School Action or School Action Plus provision; [146007]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to ensure that there are sufficient educational psychologists and speech and language therapists to support education, health and care plans; [146008]

(3) what provision he will make in future for children with a disability who do not qualify for an education, health and care plan; [146009]

(4) how schools will plan their special educational needs provisions when parents assume responsibility for budgets; [146010]

(5) who will be responsible for ensuring that parents understand how the assessment process for education, heath and care plans works; and which agencies are involved in that process; [146011]

(6) what steps his Department is taking to ensure that classroom teachers are trained to teach children with autism; [146012]

(7) what steps his Department is taking to ensure a consistent approach to special educational needs across local education authorities; [146017]

(8) what steps his Department is taking to improve selection and training of special educational needs co-ordinators in schools. [146018]

Mr Timpson: The hon. Member for Banbury asked similar questions at Second Reading of the Children and Families Bill, on 25 February 2013, Official Report, column 104. I wrote to the hon. Member on 27 February to provide detailed answers to the questions asked and have placed a copy of my letter in the Library.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the effects of reductions in local authority budgets on the ability to deliver services included in local offers; [151311]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to ensure schools deliver better outcomes for children with special educational needs who will not be entitled to an education, health and care plan; [151312]

(3) what estimate his Department has made of the number of families with disabled children who cannot access the services they need locally. [151313]

Mr Timpson: On the questions about local authority budgets and better outcomes for children without an education, health and care plan, I refer the hon. Member to the replies given to similar questions from the hon. Member for Stretford and Urmston (Kate Green), on 25 February 2013, Official Report, column 64W and the hon. Member for South Swindon (Mr Buckland), on 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 807W.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 887W

With regard to the third question, the Department has not made such an assessment. Under the provisions in the Children and Families Bill, the local offer will set out the range of services available locally for children with special educational needs and local authorities will be required to work with children, young people and parents in drawing up and reviewing their local offers.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151104]

Elizabeth Truss: The table estimates the number of days of work carried out and takes account of weekends, annual leave and the average number of days lost each year for sick absence. Total pay costs are as given in the Annual Accounts and include costs of employers' NI and pension costs. Due to changes in reporting structures over these years the information for 2010/11 and 2011/12 covers the Department, its agencies and its non-departmental public bodies, while information for the previous two years covers only the core Department (the then Department for Children, Schools and Families).

Information for the 2012/13 financial year is not yet available.

 2008/092009/102010/112011/12

Staff numbers as at the end of each financial year

(1)2,701

(1)2,550

(2)7,819

(2)7,341

Working days for the Department and its agencies

579,364

546,975

1,677,176

1,574,645

Total pay costs (£ million)

135

145

347

337

(1 )Figures based on staff in post as listed in the 2010/11 Annual Report and Accounts. (2) Figures based on full-time equivalent staff numbers as listed in the 2011/12 Annual Report and Accounts.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many full-time equivalent officials in his Department are working on (a) children in care and (b) adoption (i) currently and (ii) in May 2010. [152048]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 April 2013]: In May 2010 the Department had one division covering both children in care and adoption. That division had 34.52 full-time equivalent officials. In March 2013 the Department had 21.73 full-time equivalent officials working on children in care and 23.26 full-time equivalent officials working on adoption.

After departmental restructuring, staff will be deployed flexibly across a portfolio of roles that will include work on children in care and adoption.

Training

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what training courses (a) he and (b) staff in his ministerial private office have undertaken in the last 12 months. [152294]

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Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: Details about which training courses the Secretary of State for Education and staff in his ministerial private office have undertaken in the last 12 months are not held centrally.

Health

Accident and Emergency Departments

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients had to wait longer than four hours in accident and emergency at (a) Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and (b) Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust in (i) the most recent week for which figures are available and (ii) the same week in the previous year. [152321]

Anna Soubry: The following table shows the number of patients who waited more than four hours in accident and emergency departments at the Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust within the time scales stipulated.

Patients who waited more than four hours in Accident and Emergency
TrustWeek ending 14 April 2013Week ending 15 April 2012

Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

266

75

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

259

440

Clinical Commissioning Groups

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the 2013-14 funding allocations to clinical commissioning groups are on a per capita basis by (a) parliamentary constituency, (b) administrative county and (c) region. [153040]

Dr Poulter: Per capita figures on clinical commissioning group allocations are not available by parliamentary constituency because the boundaries are different from those of clinical commissioning groups. A document showing per capita allocations for 2013-14 for those upper tier and unitary local authorities which are coterminous with a clinical commissioning group has been placed in the Library. Clinical commissioning group 2013-14 per capita allocations by region are shown in the following table:

Clinical commissioning group per capita allocations by region 2013-14
 2013-14 clinical commissioning group allocations per capita (£)

North East

1,315

North West

1,244

Yorkshire and Humberside

1,190

West Midlands

1,113

East Midlands

1,077

East of England

1,055

London

1,119

South East

1,074

South West

1,132

  

England

1,135

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Notes: 1. Regions do not fully correspond to Government office regions or Office for National Statistics regions due to different boundaries. 2. Allocations are made to CCGs. The regional figures are the average for the CCG in each region. 3. Per capita figures are based on the number of patients registered with general practitioner practices in each CCG. 4. CCG allocations are not comparable to primary care trust allocations due to different commissioning responsibilities. 5. CCG allocations were published on 18 December 2012. They may be subject to revision due to baseline changes. 6. CCG allocations published on 18 December 2012 exclude running cost allowances which were calculated on a different basis. Source: NHS England

Coeliac Disease

Kwasi Kwarteng: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to introduce early coeliac screening blood tests. [152253]

Norman Lamb: The UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) advises Ministers and the national health service in all four countries about all aspects of screening policy and supports implementation. Using research evidence, pilot programmes and economic evaluation, the Committee assesses the evidence for programmes against a set of internationally recognised criteria.

The UK NSC reviewed the evidence for screening for coeliac disease in 2008 and concluded that it does not meet the criteria for a national screening programme. There was a lack of knowledge of the natural history of the undetected cases and it was unclear whether patients detected through screening would adhere to a gluten free diet, therefore the real benefit of screening was questionable.

The policy is due to be reviewed later in the year.