Wind Power

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent representations he has received from (a) the renewables industry and (b) local residents on the effect on (i) radar and (ii) low-flying aircraft of potential wind farm sites; and if he will make a statement. [152192]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is only a consultee in the wind farm planning application process.

The MOD currently receives 200 to 300 planning applications a month. Each of these applications may solicit representations from the renewables industry and local residents but these are not necessarily directed to the MOD.

Records for all representations received in response to specific wind farm planning applications are not held centrally.

The MOD assesses each application on a case-by-case basis and in determining the response takes into account a number of factors including the impact of the proposal on military radar, low flying, seismological recording equipment, communications facilities and naval operations.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Afghanistan

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what ongoing support in terms of (a) asylum and (b) other measures the Government is giving to Afghani interpreters facing possible reprisals for their support of NATO. [151623]

Alistair Burt: Afghan interpreters, and all our Afghan locally engaged staff, who work for our armed forces and civilian missions in Afghanistan make an invaluable contribution to the UK's efforts to help support the spread of security, stability and development in their country. We take our responsibility for all members of staff very seriously and have put in place measures to reduce the risks they face. Precautions are taken during recruitment and staff are fully briefed of any risks involved in their work before taking up employment. We regularly encourage staff to report any security concerns immediately. We currently follow an agreed cross-Government framework for considering cases of intimidation or injury on a case by case basis. This framework ensures that we take into account the particular

22 Apr 2013 : Column 629W

circumstances of each case and can respond appropriately to the needs of the individual. Where locally engaged staff face a threat our options include providing security advice to staff and their families, granting extended leave or transferring staff to different jobs. In serious cases we may help staff relocate within Afghanistan or, in exceptional cases, to the UK.

We are currently looking very carefully at how we are going to make appropriate provision to support locally engaged staff as we draw down and eventually end our combat mission.

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what information he holds on whether other member states of NATO have offered asylum to Afghani interpreters; and if he will make a statement. [151624]

Alistair Burt: We are working very closely with some of our key NATO partners on this issue, to understand best practice and to ensure consistency with allies with whom we work particularly closely. We are aware of two general resettlement schemes, offered by the US (on a quota basis) and our ISAF partner New Zealand (to former interpreters).

In addition, the UK is among a number of nations who already have plans in place which would, in extremis, offer resettlement in cases of extreme intimidation. We have resettled one interpreter using this scheme and have accepted asylum claims from others in different circumstances.

We are aware of a number of other nations who have not yet made any policy decisions, but who will no doubt consider this issue in more detail as we near the end of combat operations at the end of 2014.

We are currently looking very carefully at how we are going to make appropriate provision to support locally engaged staff, including interpreters, as we draw down and eventually end our combat mission.

Arms Trade

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will set out the provisions for the policing of enforcement and sanctions against states that breach the new international treaty controlling the global sale of conventional arms agreed at the United Nations in New York on 2 April 2013. [151591]

Alistair Burt: The Arms Trade treaty will require states parties to establish and maintain national control systems to regulate their international arms transfers, and to report through the Secretariat to all other states parties on the measures they have taken to implement the treaty and on all authorised or actual exports and imports. The conference of states parties will review the implementation of the treaty and it will be open to any state party to raise concerns with respect to its implementation or enforcement by any other state party. States parties will be required by the treaty to consult and, by mutual consent, to cooperate to pursue settlement of any dispute between them with regard to the interpretation or application of the treaty.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 630W

Bahrain

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations his Department has received from human rights organisations regarding human rights in Bahrain. [152509]

Mr Hague: Officials from the Arabian Peninsula and Iraq Department regularly meet human rights activists and representatives from international human rights organisations. The most recent meeting was on 18 April with representatives from Human Rights Watch.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with the Government of Bahrain about security and law enforcement at the upcoming Grand Prix in that country. [152510]

Mr Hague: Our ambassador in Bahrain meets Bahraini Government officials on a regular basis to discuss a wide range of issues, including security and law enforcement. The ambassador raised the Grand Prix with the Interior Minister last week. We have made it clear we expect the legitimate right to freedom of peaceful assembly and protest to be respected.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the human rights situation in Bahrain. [152512]

Mr Hague: We remain concerned about the human rights situation in Bahrain. The most recent assessment is available as a case study in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's annual human rights report.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the possibility that the Bahraini Grand Prix will become a focal point for protests by opposition movements in that country. [152513]

Mr Hague: We are aware of protests against the Formula One Grand Prix in Bahrain. The main opposition parties have not called for the race to be cancelled, but have indicated that they intend to exercise their right to peaceful protest to highlight their concerns. The decision on whether to host a Grand Prix in a particular country rests with the Formula One authorities and the country concerned.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations his Department has received from organisers of the Formula One Grand Prix in Bahrain regarding that event. [152635]

Mr Hague: My Department has not received any representations from the organisers of the Formula One Grand Prix.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 631W

British Overseas Territories

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 4 December 2012, Official Report, column 753W, on British Overseas Territories, which of the Overseas Territories has the service of a patrol vessel capable of enforcement against illegal and unregulated fishing to the edge of their exclusive economic zone; and, in each such territory, on how many days enforcement has taken place in each of the last five years. [151503]

Mark Simmonds: The Falklands Island Government have one such patrol vessel. Vessel deployments on enforcement operations for the last five years are as follows:

 Days

2012

294

2011

251

2010

274

2009

190

2008

204

The Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands operate one such patrol vessel. Deployments over the last five years are as follows:

 Days

2012

205

2011

227

2010

210

2009

220

2008

193

The British Indian Ocean Territory has one such vessel which patrols the marine protected area. Enforcement deployments for the previous five years are:

 Days

2012

204

2011

207

2010

259

2009

240

2008

204

The Government of Grand Cayman have three vessels capable of enforcement against illegal, unreported and unregulated vessels. Patrols are carried out daily within a limited area.

The Territories of Ascension Island, St Helena and Tristan da Cunha do not have the routine services of a patrol vessel. However, in 2010 a dedicated patrol vessel was deployed in these territories for 12 days, six days and nine days respectively.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 4 December 2012, Official Report, column 753W, on British Overseas Territories, how many at-sea inspections of fishing boats over 24 metres long to check for compliance with territorial legislation and international fishery treaty obligations have taken place within the exclusive economic zones of each Overseas Territory in each of the last five years. [151505]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 632W

Mark Simmonds: Territory governments are responsible for the protection and conservation of their natural environments and not all information related to vessel inspections is held centrally in the UK. Information gathered on the inspections undertaken in the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, British Indian Ocean Territory and Ascension Island is as follows:

Inspections
Number
 20122011201020092008

Falkland Islands

85

107

63

South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands

4

11

10

6

11

British Indian Ocean Territory

11

7

10

30

24

Ascension Island

2

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans he has to visit British Overseas Territories in the next 12 months. [151980]

Mark Simmonds: It is long-standing policy not to confirm ministerial travel plans significantly in advance. Ministers remain committed to strengthening the UK's relationships with the Overseas Territories as set out in last year's White Paper, and will travel in support of that objective.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps he is taking to promote good governance in British Overseas Territories. [151984]

Mark Simmonds: The 2012 White Paper on the Overseas Territories sets out our responsibility for the security and good governance of the Territories. We expect Territories which choose to remain British to abide by the same basic standards for democratic and accountable Government that exist in the UK.

At the Overseas Territories Joint Ministerial Council in December 2012, we agreed to work with Territory Governments on a range of priority issues, including public financial management and economic planning.

We are making progress. The Government of Anguilla signed a Framework for Fiscal Sustainability on 5 April. Framework agreements, or equivalent arrangements, have now been agreed with all the Caribbean Overseas Territories. We have also launched a Jubilee Programme to help Territory Governments to build their capacity for good governance, through an exchange of expertise between public servants.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to develop transport and communication infrastructure in British Overseas Territories. [151986]

Mr Duncan: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for International Development.

DFID presently supports safe and reliable sea access to aided overseas territories. Technical assistance is provided to public works departments in three territories

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for the improvement of roads and other essential infrastructure. Long-term access constraints are being addressed on St Helena through the construction of an airport. On Montserrat DFID is exploring options to improve sea access.

DFID is investigating the feasibility and potential benefits to be gained from providing links to proposed fibre optic cables for St Helena and for Montserrat.

China

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the government of the People's Republic of China on organ harvesting practices in that country. [152519]

Mr Swire: The British Government are aware of these claims, and our embassy in Beijing has raised this with the Chinese Government. The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs has repeatedly denied the allegations. The Chinese Government has also assured us that organs from executed prisoners will only be used for transplantation with their consent.

China has also taken significant legislative action to regulate the use of donated organs. In May 2007, the Regulation on Human Organ Transplantation came into force, banning organ trading, the removal of a person's organs without their prior written consent, and the transplantation of organs from living donors, except to blood relatives. In 2011, an amendment to China's criminal law specified, for the first time, criminal penalties for offences related to the forced removal or trafficking of human organs.

In March 2012, the Chinese Government announced plans to phase out the use of organs for transplant from executed prisoners within the next five years and to create a national organ donation system. We welcome these steps toward regulating transplantation in line with international standards.

We will continue to raise these concerns, and to urge the Chinese authorities to grant permission for the relevant UN Special Procedures Rapporteurs to visit China to make an independent assessment of the situation regarding the treatment of detainees, during bilateral talks with the Chinese Government, including during the next UK-China Human Rights Dialogue. We have proposed dates for the next Dialogue to the Chinese but have not yet received a positive response.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151336]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) operates both in the UK and across a network of over 260 overseas posts. The FCO has devolved procurement authorities and details of purchases of computers and other information technology is not centrally held. To obtain this information would incur a disproportionate cost.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 634W

Custody

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the (a) treatment in custody and (b) convictions and sentences of Ebrahim Al Muqdad and Sadeq Aziz Salman. [151778]

Alistair Burt: Ebrahim Al Muqdad and Sadeq Aziz Salman were convicted on 4 April 2013 for the attempted murder of policemen. They were sentenced to 10 years but have the option to appeal this verdict in the Court of High Appeal.

The criminal age of responsibility in Bahrain is 15-years-old and as such both were tried as adults. But we urge the Bahraini Government to ensure it adheres to international standards on the treatment of juvenile offenders. We also expect those accused of breaking the law to have the right to legal help and fair treatment in a justice system that respects their rights.

Cyprus

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his policy is on safeguarding the assets of British nationals resident in Cyprus. [151981]

Mr Lidington: Deposits in Cypriot banks are subject to the laws and regulations of the Republic of Cyprus. We recommend that British Nationals consider seeking independent advice regarding their assets overseas.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 25 March 2013, Official Report, column 908W, on Cyprus, whether the UK recognises any other state's claim to an exclusive economic zone within the limits of the areas reserved for the UK set by the four lines set out in Annex A, section 3, of the treaty concerning the establishment of the Republic of Cyprus, 19 August 1960; whether the Republic of Cyprus has requested permission to licence the extraction of oil and gas within those areas; and if he will place a copy of a map illustrating the areas delimited by the lines in the Library. [152029]

Mr Lidington: The right of the sovereign base areas to a territorial sea is clear in the treaty of establishment—an entitlement which the Republic of Cyprus has acknowledged. No other state has the legitimate right to declare an exclusive economic zone within the UK's territorial sea, nor has the Republic of Cyprus indicated a wish to exploit any mineral resources within the territorial sea of the sovereign base areas. The declaration made by the Government in 1960 makes clear the UK's intention not to develop the sovereign base areas for other than military purposes. The treaty of establishment and associated maps and schedules are available for consultation in the Library.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the implications for (a) the treaty concerning the establishment of the Republic of Cyprus and (b) the 1960 Treaty of Guarantee of the establishment by a third party of a military facility within the territory of the Republic of Cyprus. [1512007]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 635W

Mr Lidington: It is our view that the terms of the treaty of establishment and the treaty of guarantee do not prevent the Republic of Cyprus from permitting the establishment of third-party military facilities within its territory.

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether his Department has a dementia strategy. [151827]

Alistair Burt: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office does not have a dementia strategy or any plans to introduce one. Our occupational health team would advise us on how to deal with an individual case should it arise.

Ethiopia

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs for what reason Ethiopia was not designated a country of concern in his Department's annual report on human rights and democracy. [152684]

Mark Simmonds: We regularly assess the Ethiopian Government’s adherence to its human rights obligations. While there are serious human rights concerns which we raise with the Ethiopian Government, we do not assess that these concerns warrant Ethiopia being designated a country of concern. Ethiopia is included as a case study in the FCO’s Human Rights report. Ethiopia has also delivered impressive gains in social and economic rights.

Henderson Island

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the rat infestation on Henderson Island. [152027]

Mark Simmonds: Responsibility for environmental issues is devolved to the Governments of the Overseas Territories. However the UK Government are committed to working closely with Territory Governments and partner organisations to provide support and assistance in areas where they need help.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has been closely monitoring the situation on Henderson Island following the unsuccessful 2011 eradication attempt. A further research trip, funded by the Darwin Initiative, is planned for July and August. The near removal of rats from the island has allowed many of Henderson's birds to significantly increase their populations and the RSPB are in discussion with the Territory on next steps for Pitcairn and Henderson.

India

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the new Criminal Law (Amendment) Act 2013 passed by the Indian Parliament aimed at addressing sexual violence, including victims' access to health care and legal assistance. [151405]

Mr Swire: On 21 March 2013, the Indian Parliament passed the Criminal Law Bill. The Bill now needs to be approved by the President of India, Pranab Mukherjee. The Bill aims to strengthen India's laws on violent crimes against women.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 636W

We regularly discuss human rights issues with India through the EU/India human rights dialogue and other fora. Women's rights are on the agenda for the next instalment of the dialogue which we are pressing to be held soon.

Improving the lives of women and girls is at the heart of the Department for International Development's programme in India. The programme covers support for national and state governments and aims to help all girls to complete basic education, further reduce maternal mortality and tackle violence against women and girls.

Iraq

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether the Government has made representations to the UN on (a) humanitarian standards and (b) access to lawyers by residents in Camp Liberty in Iraq; and if he will make a statement. [152183]

Alistair Burt: We have made no formal representations to the UN on the humanitarian standards at Camp Liberty or access to lawyers for its residents, though we continue to discuss this issue with them regularly. I raised the humanitarian situation at Camp Liberty with Iraqi Minister for Foreign Affairs Zebari during my visit to Baghdad in February.

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on the situation and conditions in Camp Liberty in Iraq. [152185]

Alistair Burt: Our embassy in Baghdad receives regular updates from the UN about the situation at Camp Liberty. The UN have reported that conditions at Camp Liberty meet international humanitarian standards.

Israel

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on (a) ensuring that children in military detention who are prosecuted for alleged offences in Israel are treated in accordance with international juvenile justice standards and (b) preventing the ill-treatment of children in military detention by military officials. [151555]

Alistair Burt: In November 2012, the Attorney-General, my right hon. and learned Friend the Member for Beaconsfield (Mr Grieve) discussed the issue of child prisoners with the Israeli Attorney-General Yehuda Weinstein and other senior interlocuters. Mr Weinstein agreed to further talks between UK and British legal experts on the subject.

In the meantime we have welcomed some small steps taken by the Israeli authorities. These include a recent Israeli military order which reduces the length of time children can be held in pre-trial detention and an announcement in December by the Israeli State Attorney reducing, from April, the period a Palestinian minor falling under the jurisdiction of the West Bank military court system can be held before being brought before a judge.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 637W

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which Israeli water companies participated in the UK Israel Tech Hub mission to the UK in April 2013; and what the main objectives of the mission were. [152428]

Alistair Burt: The UK Israel Tech Hub issued a press release on 5 March listing the participating Israeli companies:

http://www.post.com/Sci-Tech/Article.aspx?id=305353

The main objectives of the mission were:

To help British infrastructure companies gain a competitive advantage by identifying water technology solutions from Israel to integrate into their UK and global projects; to position the UK as a destination of choice for Israeli companies and encourage partnerships and inward investment to the UK.

Water technology is one of the priority sectors of the UK Israel Tech Hub, a team based at the British embassy in Israel tasked with building technology partnerships between the two countries. The economic logic of a UK—Israel partnership in water is compelling. Israeli water technology can reach new markets by partnering with leading British companies who have expertise in delivering major infrastructure projects worldwide. And those British companies can gain a global competitive advantage from partnering with Israeli water companies who have world-beating expertise in overcoming water scarcity through innovation.

The fair and effective distribution of shared water resources across the middle east is of great concern to us. These resources are limited and therefore require the effective co-operation from all parties to manage them in such a manner that ensures there will be enough for all.

Although this issue transcends the Arab-Israeli conflict, it is essential that Israel and the Palestinians discuss this issue and ensure that there is a just solution on shared water resources as part of any final status agreement.

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which UK businesses participated with the visiting UK Israel Tech Hub mission in (a) discussions on global water market opportunities and (b) the workshop in pursuit of joint projects in British municipal and industrial markets; and what advice his Department gave to UK participants on the potential risks of (i) investing in and (ii) entering into partnerships with businesses that have invested in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. [152514]

Alistair Burt: A number of British businesses engaged with the visiting UK Israel Tech Hub mission, including at the World Water-Tech Investment Summit. In addition, the mission attended a day with the Arup Group Limited and a workshop together with British water professionals.

UK participants received business information about all participants of the mission and the organisers. No advice was given to UK participants regarding the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

In response to any queries from British companies, we make clear our position on the illegality of Israeli settlements under international law.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 638W

Mali

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the situation in Mali. [151983]

Mark Simmonds: As the successful French-led operations in Mali have drawn down, the African-led support mission to Mali (AFISMA) is taking a growing stabilisation role ahead of a likely transition to a UN peacekeeping operation later this year. On the political track, we are encouraged by Mali's commitment to a political roadmap towards elections in July 2013. Delivering on that roadmap, and electing a strong, credible central Government that speaks for all Malian people, will be critical.

Mobile Phones

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what initiatives his Department supports on the promotion of conflict-free resources for use in mobile telephones. [151904]

Mark Simmonds: The FCO works closely with UK companies, particularly in the diamond, gold and jewellery sectors, to encourage trade in conflict-free minerals. The FCO has contributed to the development of guidance by the OECD for companies with gold, tin, tantalum and tungsten supply chains (minerals that are used in mobile phones) and by the World Gold Council, in order to provide UK companies with the necessary tools to undertake effective due diligence checks on their supply chains to ensure that the minerals and gold they purchase does not fund conflict. The FCO encourages companies sourcing gold and minerals from the Great Lakes Region of Africa to undertake such due diligence. We also support the work done by the London Bullion Market Association to create responsible gold supply chains. The FCO is also working with the European Commission to ensure that the EU plays a more active role in encouraging companies to implement the OECD guidance.

Overseas Aid

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which projects administered by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office were Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) attributable in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012; and which projects will be ODA attributable in 2013. [152427]

Mr Lidington: We are committed to ensuring that the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) meets the standards of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI). and to making it easier for people here at home and in developing countries to find, understand and analyse data on FCO and British Council ODA spend, including at the project level.

Project level data for FCO ODA in 2010 has been published on the OECD website at:

http://www.oecd.org/dac/peer-reviews/45519815.pdf

Detailed information about FCO ODA activity in 2011-12 can be found on the FCO website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/foreign-commonwealth-office/series/overseas-development-aid-oda-information

22 Apr 2013 : Column 639W

This was published on 27 March 2013 along with our Implementation Plan to ensure the publication of FCO ODA data meets IATI standards.

Information on 2012-13 ODA projects is scheduled for publication by 30 June 2013. 2013-14 information will be published next year.

Pakistan

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will raise the issue of the use of blasphemy laws in Pakistan when he next meets Pakistani Government officials; and if he will make a statement. [150694]

Alistair Burt: The British Government regularly raise the issue of the blasphemy laws, and their misuse against both Muslims and religious minorities, with the authorities in Pakistan. We will continue to raise this subject with Pakistan’s new government following the elections in May.

The issue is covered in the FCO’s annual human rights report, published on Monday 15 April, so we will not be making a statement.

Palestinians

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the effects of the economic restrictions imposed by the Israeli Government on the (a) competitiveness of the Palestinian economy, (b) productivity of the Palestinian agricultural and manufacturing sectors, (c) employability of the Palestinian workforce and (d) share of exports in the Palestinian economy. [151554]

Alistair Burt: The Government continue to assess that Israeli restrictions on movement and access in the West Bank and Gaza are the single biggest obstacle to trade and economic development, and hence one of the most important causes of the current financial difficulties of the Palestinian Authority. This is in line with the assessment of the World Bank's Economic Monitoring Report to the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee (AHLC) on 19 March 2013. An easing of these restrictions is vital for the Palestinian economy to flourish. As the International Monetary Fund's report to the AHLC noted, the failure to make more progress in reducing restrictions has led to a rise in unemployment (up to 22.9% in the last quarter of 2012 from 21.0% during the same period in 2011), a decline in public services and the halving of growth in the West Bank and Gaza (from 12.2% in 2011 to 6.0% in 2012). Exports of goods are 7% of gross domestic product—among the lowest in the world.

The result is harm to the long-term competitiveness of the Palestinian economy. We continue to lobby the Israeli Government to ease their restrictions on movement and access. We want to see increased movement of goods between the West Bank, Gaza, Israel and beyond.

Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what criteria are used in (a) his Department and (b) each public body for which he is responsible to determine which officials receive bonus payments. [151133]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 640W

Alistair Burt: I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 15 April 2013, Official Report, columns 21-24W, which contains details of the criteria used for awarding performance related payments and in-year performance awards for Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) staff.

Both FCO Services and Wilton Park operate the same performance related payment scheme and in-year performance award system as the FCO. The Westminster Foundation for Democracy, the British Council and the Great Britain-China centre only operate an annual performance award system based on the FCO model of appraisal evidence. Neither the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission, nor the Foreign Compensation Commission, operate any bonus or performance related payment schemes.

Peru

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the state of relations between the UK and Peru. [151979]

Mr Swire: We have a broad and positive relationship with Peru. Britain sent its first Consul-General to Peru in 1823, 190 years ago this year. Today the UK and Peru work closely together on a wide range of areas including economic development and trade, climate change and energy, drugs, international crime and defence. Our embassy in Lima, working with our network of honorary consuls around Peru, provides consular assistance when needed to any of the 60,000 British visitors to Peru each year. We have increased the size of our embassy in Lima over the past two years. This has been warmly welcomed by the Peruvian Government.

We are developing our economic relationship further, and for the past 10 years, Peru has enjoyed one of the fastest growing economies in the world. We look forward to helping British companies to take advantage of the provisions of the EU-Andean Free Trade agreement which came into provisional force in Peru on 1 March 2013.

In March this year, the UK and Peru signed a memorandum to facilitate cooperation in the fight against organised crime, including illegal drugs.

Pitcairn Islands

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 19 March 2013, Official Report, column 608W, on Pitcairn Islands, when he intends to announce the Government's plans for establishing a marine protected area around the Pitcairn Islands. [151547]

Mark Simmonds: We are working with the Pitcairn Island Council and interested partner organisations to explore and develop the various options for marine protection around Pitcairn. This is a complex issue requiring thorough analysis of a range of environmental and economic issues before a decision can be taken. The Government have shown a clear commitment to marine protection and is committed to working with Overseas Territories to ensure the sustainable management of their unique environmental assets.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 641W

Recruitment

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much his Department spent on advertising job vacancies in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009. [151190]

Alistair Burt: The following table shows the Department's spend on external advertising of job vacancies in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in financial years 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10.

 £

2005-06

204,021

2006-07

258,834

2007-08

201,083

2008-09

291,004.7

2009-10

121,221


The figures cover recruitment for UK-based members of staff only—figures for recruitment undertaken by overseas Posts advertising for local staff positions are not held centrally.

The FCO uses recruitment agencies to attract a wide range of applicants to ensure its work force is as diverse and highly skilled as possible. For specialist recruitment campaigns, agencies are better placed to target applicants with the most relevant skills within that sector. A competitive tendering process is run to select an agency for external recruitment campaigns. This has proven to be more cost-effective than in-house recruitment.

Since 2010, the FCO has been subject to the Whitehall-wide external recruitment ban.

Saudi Arabia

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of Saudi Arabia's compliance with the UN Convention Against Torture; and what representations he has made to the government of Saudi Arabia in support of that convention. [151164]

Alistair Burt: Saudi Arabia has ratified the Convention Against Torture (CAT). However, allegations of torture continue to be heard, in particular from political activists accused of terrorist offences. We judge the allegations, by virtue of their frequency and the variety of sources, to be credible and it would appear that the Saudi Arabian authorities attach some credence to the allegations, because the Public Prosecution Office (part of the Ministry of Interior) has been ordered to monitor and inspect prisons. Officials are currently negotiating a Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation in the Justice Sector. We are pressing for a provision to work together to implement the requirements of international obligations, in particular the implementation of human rights conventions. This would include pressing Saudi Arabia to ratify the CAT Optional Protocol, thus requiring the establishment of National Preventive Mechanism and further practical steps to eradicate torture.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what

22 Apr 2013 : Column 642W

representations he has made to the Government of Saudi Arabia since the reported sentencing of Ali al-Khawahir to forced paralysis on 4 April 2013; [151567]

(2) on how many occasions he has raised with the Saudi Arabian ambassador the issue of the sentencing of Ali al-Khawahir to forced paralysis. [151609]

Mr Hague: The British Government stated on 4 April that any such sentence is prohibited under international law and that there is no place for such grotesque sentences in any society.

Our embassy in Riyadh raised this case with the Saudi Arabian authorities. The Saudi Arabian Government publically stated on 9 April that a judge had previously revoked the sentence of paralysis.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received from non-governmental organisations on the reported sentencing of Ali al-Khawahir to forced paralysis by the Government of Saudi Arabia. [151608]

Mr Hague: Human Rights Watch raised this issue with Foreign and Commonwealth Office officials on 18 April. The British Government stated on 4 April that any such sentence is prohibited under international law and that there is no place for such grotesque sentences in any society.

Our embassy in Riyadh raised this case with the Saudi Arabian authorities. The Saudi Arabian Government publically stated on 9 April that a judge had previously revoked the sentence of paralysis.

Somalia

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his Kenyan counterpart on the increase in violence along the Somali border. [151168]

Mark Simmonds: Britain has worked closely with the Kenyan Government to respond effectively to the threat of terrorism from extremist groups in Somalia and to support local conflict prevention efforts in the run up to Kenya's general elections in March. I raised these issues with Kenyan counterparts when I visited in October last year.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151107]

Alistair Burt: The total salary costs for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies for the past five years are as detailed in the following table:

22 Apr 2013 : Column 643W

22 Apr 2013 : Column 644W

£
]Financial year2012-132011-122010-112009-102008-09

FCO

217,456,386.19

216,543,407.10

218,501,046.26

215,284,102.67

233,204,539.88

British Council

27,320,878.00

25,094,784.00

26,596,120.00

33,539,551.00

30,405,605.00

Wilton Park

2,323,692.00

2,204,502.00

2,302,442.00

2,279,578.00

2,208,382.00

Westminster Foundation for Democracy

898,044.00

887,997.00

800,689.00

689,088.00

690,348.00

Great Britain-China Centre

284,204.00

291,585.00

258,992.00

261,379.00

243,611.00

FCO Services

42,032,633.00

41,808,000.00

43,897,000.00

44,758,000.00

41,646,000.00

Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission

(1)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a = not applicable (1 )The Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission does not pay salaries

We are unable to provide information on the number of days worked in each of the past five years without incurring disproportionate cost.

Sudan

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether his Department plans to offer support to ensure a peaceful and credible referendum under the African Union proposals for the contested region of Abyei between Sudan and South Sudan. [151261]

Mark Simmonds: We support the holding of a referendum to determine the final status of Abyei, as required by the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between Sudan and South Sudan. The UK will offer its support to ensure that process is a peaceful and credible one when it happens. We believe the proposal put forward by the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel last September provides a basis for a lasting peace by guaranteeing the rights of both settled and nomadic peoples of Abyei. whatever the result of a referendum.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent reports he has received on the bombing of civilians by the Government of Sudan; and what assessment he has made of whether any such actions would constitute war crimes. [151262]

Mark Simmonds: We receive regular reports of the use of aerial bombing by the Sudanese armed forces in the ongoing conflicts in Darfur, Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile. It is often not possible to verify these reports independently. The most recent incident reported by the United Nations was the use of air strikes in response to an attack by a rebel group on Muhajeria and Labado in Darfur on 6 April.

Reports suggest that bombings are often poorly targeted and directly affect civilians. We have also received reports of deliberate attacks on civilian targets in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile. If confirmed, such actions are likely to be violations of international humanitarian law, and require credible and independent investigation.

Syria

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to assist in protecting civilians in Aleppo City in Syria. [151315]

Alistair Burt: The Syrian Government continue to demonstrate that they are manifestly unwilling to meet their responsibility to protect their civilian population. We are continuing to work with our international partners to increase the pressure on the regime to come to the table, support the opposition as a credible alternative, and address the humanitarian impact of the crisis, including in Aleppo.

The UK has contributed £141.1 million in humanitarian aid so far. This is funding food, clean drinking water, medical assistance, blankets and shelter for many tens of thousands of people across 14 governorates, including Aleppo. The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, announced to Parliament on 6 March 2013 a further £2.7 million of practical support to the National Coalition, which includes providing new types of non-lethal equipment for the protection of civilians, bringing the total support package for FY 2012-13 to £12.1 million.

Tristan Da Cunha

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps he is taking to safeguard the flora and fauna of Tristan da Cunha. [152026]

Mark Simmonds: Responsibility for environmental issues is devolved to the Governments of the Overseas Territories. However the UK Government are committed to working closely with Overseas Territory Governments and partner organisations to provide support and assistance in areas where they need help.

Tristan da Cunha is home to a number of important and unique habitats, particularly the World Heritage listed sites of Gough and Inaccessible Islands. The Government of Tristan da Cunha take protection of the environment very seriously. Tristan cooperates with a number of environmental bodies in doing this and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has recently been awarded a £285,000 grant under the Darwin Initiative to conduct further study into the sustainable management of the marine environment and resources of Tristan da Cunha.

USA

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the forthcoming official visit of HRH Prince Henry of Wales to the US. [152028]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 645W

Alistair Burt: HRH Prince Henry of Wales will visit the United States from Thursday 9th to Wednesday 15th May 2013. His visit will include engagements on behalf of charities with which the Prince is closely associated and engagements on behalf of HM Government, with a strong central theme of supporting injured servicemen and women from both the UK and US armed forces. The Prince will visit Washington DC, Denver, Colorado Springs, New York City, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151358]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not centrally set budgets specifically for travel. Instead, the FCO sets budgets for departments and teams which are then deployed to best deliver their agreed objectives.

West Africa

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to his counterparts in Mali and Burkina Faso to help dispel tensions between those two countries. [151404]

Mark Simmonds: Building regional stability and good relations in the Sahel is central to our policy towards the region. Ministers and officials regularly raise this with regional contacts, including during the visit of the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) to Bamako on 4 March, and my visit to the African Union summit in January. Recent years have seen an improvement in relations between Mali and Burkina Faso, and Burkina Faso has made a substantial troop contribution to the African-led International Support Mission to Mali force which aims to help stabilise Mali.

Deputy Prime Minister

Business: Ethnic Groups

Mr Umunna: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what contact his Office has had with the Department for Communities and Local Government between November 2011 and March 2013 concerning the review that that Department has been conducting into the barriers faced by some black and ethnic minority entrepreneurs in accessing business finance. [152597]

The Deputy Prime Minister: The Deputy Prime Minister's Office is in regular contact with the Department for Communities and Local Government about a range of issues.

Lobbying

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister on what date the Government will produce a White Paper and draft Bill to introduce a statutory register of lobbyists. [152724]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 646W

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government are committed to introducing a statutory register of lobbyists.

We will publish details of our revised proposals in due course.

Trident

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what consultation he has had with (a) the defence industry and (b) other external experts as part of the Trident Alternatives Review. [152379]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

The review draws upon advice, including on technical, industrial and other issues, from subject matter experts within Her Majesty's Government.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether the Trident Alternatives Review has considered the options of a (a) normally continuous at-sea deterrence submarine force, (b) CASD-capable submarine force, (c) dual-capable submarine force and (d) non-deployed strategic force. [152381]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 4 February 2013, Official Report, column 45W.

Visits Abroad

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister which countries he has visited in his capacity as Deputy Prime Minister since May 2010. [152301]

The Deputy Prime Minister: Since May 2010, the Deputy Prime Minister has visited the following countries in his official capacity: Afghanistan, Belgium, Brazil, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Mozambique, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey and USA.

Cabinet Office

Baroness Thatcher

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what the total cost to public funds was of the funeral of Baroness Thatcher, by category of expenditure; [152227]

(2) what estimate he has made of the total number of (a) staff hours used by and (b) wages claimed by (i) armed forces personnel, (ii) police officers and (iii) other support staff during the preparation and duration of Baroness Thatcher's funeral; [152229]

Pamela Nash: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will estimate the total cost to the public purse of the funeral of Baroness Thatcher, taking account of the salaries of public officials attending on the day and those involved in the preparations beforehand. [152682]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 647W

Mr Maude: The Government are committed to publishing the cost to public funds of Baroness Thatcher's funeral. The costs are currently being collected and will be published in due course.

Charities

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps his Department is taking to support charities threatened with closure. [151577]

Mr Hurd: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 25 March 2013, Official Report, column 961W, to the hon. Member for Heywood and Middleton (Jim Dobbin).

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps his Department is taking to encourage charities to bid for Government contracts. [151607]

Mr Hurd: As outlined in the Cabinet Office publication, 'Making it easier for civil society to work with the state', this Government are fully committed to opening up public-service contracts to new bidders, including from civil society organisations such as charities.

In the first instance, we are encouraging charities to bid for Government contracts through providing them with better information.. For example, through the Cabinet Office's Procurement Pipelines we have published £84 billion worth of Government contracts since November 2011.

We are also making commissioning more sensitive to the needs and strengths of charities through the Cabinet Office's reforms of Government procurement processes, as well as through its Commissioning Academy.

We are supporting charities to improve their readiness to bid for and win Government contracts. We are currently running a series of national master-classes on the commercial skills key to successful contract bids. We are also running a £10 million Investment and Contract Readiness Fund which provides professional support for organisations looking to gain more income from contracts.

Civil Servants

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of the effect of the threat of job losses and relocation on the morale of the civil service. [151300]

Mr Maude: At the time of the last general election this Government inherited what was among the largest budget deficits in the developed world. This Government are taking the difficult, painful decisions to get Britain back on the rise. The civil service must play its part in helping reduce spending.

Our 2012 People Survey—which listened to the views of almost 300,000 civil servants—shows that, despite the difficult economic circumstances and a tough operating environment, morale has held up. Overall engagement scores are as they were in 2009, and nine-tenths of staff find their work interesting.

Civil servants should be empowered to deliver the best for Britain. Our Reform Plan—which is based heavily on feedback from civil servants themselves—

22 Apr 2013 : Column 648W

provides for this with its vision for a more skilled, less bureaucratic, more unified civil service. We will make sure that civil servants have the right skills for tomorrow's world. Despite reforms, employment terms will remain among the best available and we will improve workplaces and IT to make it easier for civil servants to do their job. This will not only make the civil service a better place to work, it will also improve the services we deliver to the public.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151328]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office IT services are provided under a HM Treasury legacy contract signed by the previous Administration in 2009. The contract is for five years and includes the provision and maintenance of desktop computers and laptop computers.

Staff can be provided with a tablet device when there is an appropriate business need. As at 1 March 2013, 18 iPads have been provided.

Conditions of Employment: North West

John Woodcock: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate he has made of the number of people employed on zero-hours contracts in (a) Barrow and Furness constituency, (b) Cumbria and (c) North West England. [152631]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate has been made of the number of people employed on zero-hours contracts in (a) Barrow and Furness constituency, (b) Cumbria and (c) North West England. 152631

Information regarding people working on zero-hours contracts is available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). A zero-hours contract is defined as an open-ended contract with no guarantee for a fixed number of hours.

It is estimated that for the period October to December 2012 there were 15,000 people aged 16 and over employed on a zero-hours contract in the North West of England. This is 0.5 per cent of the total employment in this region. Estimates for Barrow and Furness and Cumbria are not of a sufficient quality to provide from the LFS.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. It is estimated that the true value is likely to lie between 8,000 and 22,000 for the North West of England.

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether his Department has a dementia strategy. [151819]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office considers Dementia to be a priority for Government. That is why the Cabinet Office and the Department of Health are supporting the Dementia Friends campaign with a grant of £2.4 million. This is being delivered in partnership with the Alzheimer's Society.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 649W

The Dementia Friends campaign aims to train over 6,000 dementia friends champions who will each recruit and train at least 150 people, resulting in one million dementia friends by 2015. More information can be found here:

http://www.dementiafriends.org.uk/

This campaign complements the Prime Minister's challenge to create more ‘Dementia Friendly Communities', which is part of the Alzheimer's Society's five-year strategy, 'Delivering on Dementia'. More information can be found at:

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=1843

Electronic Government

John Robertson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 25 March 2013, Official Report, column 964W, on internet, what steps his Department took to assess the quality and timeliness of the work done by the Government Digital Service. [151770]

Mr Hurd: The Government are redesigning its digital services to make them simpler, clearer and faster for users, making them so good that people prefer to use them.

In April 2012, the Digital Advisory Board was set up to support the Government to deliver their commitment to provide high-quality public services online by default. The Board, led by the UK Digital Champion, includes digital experts from industry, business and academia. It role is to work with the Government Digital Service and challenge the Government to deliver better services for users.

Employment: Crawley

Henry Smith: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of people in Crawley constituency were employed in (a) public sector, (b) private sector and (c) third sector organisations in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [152178]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking, what proportion of people in Crawley constituency were employed in (a) public sector, (b) private sector and (c) third sector organisations in each of the last five years for which figures are available. (152178)

Employment statistics for local areas are calculated from the Annual Population Survey (APS). Estimates of people employed in the third sector are currently not available from APS. Individuals employed in voluntary organisations, charities and trusts are included in private sector estimates.

Individuals in the APS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses to the survey. In the APS the distinction between public and private sector is based on respondents' views about the organisation for which they work. The public sector estimates provided do not correspond to official Public Sector Employment estimates. Those are derived directly from employers and are based on a National Accounts' definition and are not available for areas smaller than regions.

The tables show the number and percentage of people aged 16 to 64 years, who were employed in the public or private sector along with those who were unemployed or inactive, resident in

22 Apr 2013 : Column 650W

Crawley constituency. These estimates are compiled from APS interviews held during the period January 2012 to December 2012, the latest period available, and the 12 month periods ending in December from 2008 to 2011. It should also be noted that the estimates also include people who were employed but have not provided enough information to be accurately included in either the public or private sectors.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates is given in the table.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Table 1: Percentage of people aged 16 to 64 years employed in the public and private sectors(1), resident in Crawley constituency
Percentage
 Employed 
12 months ending:PublicPrivateUnknown(2)Unemployed or inactive

December 2008

12.7

64.2

22.5

December 2009

15.3

57.4

26.7

December 2010

9.9

65.5

24.7

December 2011

9.9

67.2

22.2

December 2012

12.4

60.6

25.9

‘—’ = Not available (1) Individuals in the APS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses to the survey. (2) People who were employed but have not provided enough information to be accurately included in either the public or private sectors Note: Components may not add to 100% due to rounding and suppression of unavailable estimates. Source: Annual Population Survey
Table 2: Number of people aged 16 to 64 years employed in the public and private sectors(1), resident in Crawley constituency
Thousand
12 months ending:PublicPrivateUnknown(2)Unemployed or inactive

December 2008

9

44

15

December 2009

11

40

19

December 2010

7

48

18

December 2011

7

48

16

December 2012(3)

***9

***45

****—

***19

‘—’ = Not available (1 )Individuals in the APS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses to the survey. (2) People who were employed but have not provided-enough information to be accurately included in either the public or private sectors. (3) Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality below. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: * 0 = CV<5%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered precise ** 5 = CV <10%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered reasonably precise *** 10 = CV <20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered acceptable **** CV ? 20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes CV = Coefficient of Variation Source: Annual Population Survey

Government Departments: Cost Effectiveness

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when he last met the Scottish Government to discuss the cost-effectiveness of (a) Government Departments and (b) non-departmental bodies; and when he next plans to do so. [151785]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 651W

Mr Maude: In line with the practice of previous Administrations, details of such discussions are not normally disclosed.

Government Departments: Procurement

John Woodcock: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether any projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio have failed to provide the required three-monthly reports to the Major Projects Authority in the last three years. [152628]

Miss Chloe Smith: There are no projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio that have failed to provide the required three-monthly reports to the Major Projects Authority in the last three years.

John Woodcock: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will publish the current Government Major Projects Portfolio. [152629]

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government will publish the list of projects on their Major Projects Portfolio in May 2013.

Government Departments: Standards

Keith Vaz: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when he expects to publish a revised Capabilities Review; and for what reasons publication of this review has been delayed. [151204]

Mr Maude [holding answer 17 April 2013]: The Capabilities Plan will be published imminently.

This is the first time we have published a Capabilities Plan for the whole of the civil service. It focuses on how the whole of the civil service will be structured and managed to work together to realise its potential and address skills deficiencies in four key areas—commercial skills, project and programme management, leading and managing change, and digital service delivery.

Publication was unfortunately delayed beyond the date committed to in the Civil Service Reform Plan. The delay was in part caused by the time taken to staff the project and the complexity of the work involved.

Government Departments: Subscriptions

Ann McKechin: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much the Government have spent on subscriptions to academic journals published by (a) Reed-Elsevier, (b) Wiley-Blackwell, (c) Springer and (d) other academic publishers in each of the last five years. [152499]

Mr Maude: My Department does not hold this information.

Each Government Department makes its own arrangements for subscriptions to academic journals.

Infant Mortality: Greater London

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will publish infant mortality statistics for (a) Lewisham, Deptford constituency, (b) Lewisham East constituency, (c) Lewisham West constituency, (d) Penge constituency and (e) London for each year since 1987. [152511]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 652W

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking if the Secretary of State for Health will publish infant mortality statistics for (a) Lewisham, Deptford constituency, (b) Lewisham East constituency, (c) Lewisham West constituency, (d) Penge constituency and (e) London for each year since 1987. [152511].

Due to the sensitive nature of infant deaths and the risk of identifying individuals, ONS does not publish infant mortality figures for individual parliamentary constituencies. Consequently, figures for the parliamentary constituencies named above cannot be provided.

Table 1 provides the number of infant deaths in Bromley and Lewisham local authorities (which encompass the parliamentary constituencies for which figures were requested) and London, for deaths registered between 1987 and 2011 (the latest year available).

Figures for infant mortality in England and Wales are published annually on the ONS website at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/child-mortality-statistics--childhood--infant-and-perinatal/index.html

Table 1: Number of infant deaths in Bromley and Lewisham local authorities and the London region, deaths registered between 1987 and 2011(1,2)
Deaths
Registration yearBromleyLewishamLondon

1987

29

44

965

1988

33

34

924

1989

16

37

895

1990

24

28

838

1991

23

31

744

1992

18

34

755

1993

22

25

676

1994

29

34

664

1995

13

33

659

1996

17

41

673

1997

19

30

615

1998

16

45

624

1999

13

25

636

2000

16

27

570

2001

11

31

633

2002

14

20

594

2003

17

20

600

2004

18

17

588

2005

10

22

587

2006

13

22

593

2007

10

18

571

2008

12

32

545

2009

12

25

579

2010

12

24

623

2011

8

22

551

(1) Figures for Bromley and Lewisham local authorities and for the London region exclude deaths of non-residents and are based on boundaries as of February 2013. (2 )Figures are based on deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring in the years 1987 to 2011. Further information on registration delays for a range of causes can be found on the ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/user-guidance/health-and-life-events/impact-of-registration-delays-on-mortality-statistics/index.html

Ministers: Official Residences

John Mann: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of each residence used by Cabinet Ministers in each of the last three financial years. [151672]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 653W

Mr Maude: Chequers, Chevening and Dorneywood are not owned by the Government and are run and managed by independent trustees. As was the case under the previous Administration, the Government pay an annual grant in aid to the Chequers Trust, details of which are set out in the Cabinet Office Annual Report. Details on running costs for Downing Street flats are also set out in the Cabinet Office Annual Report.

No. 1 Carlton Gardens is a matter for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Hillsborough Castle for the Northern Ireland Office.

Official Hospitality

Priti Patel: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible claimed reimbursements for working lunches and official entertainment in each of the last five years; and what the total cost was in each such year. [152662]

Mr Maude: The information is not available in the format requested.

Any expenditure on hospitality is made in accordance with published departmental guidance on financial procedures and propriety, based on the principles set out in “Managing Public Money” and the Treasury handbook on “Regularity & Propriety”.

Oral Questions

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office with reference to the announcement on 28 March 2013 that the right hon. Member for South Holland and The Deepings had been appointed as Minister without Portfolio, whether the Minister will be answering oral questions in the House. [151522]

Mr Maude [holding answer 17 April 2013]: Oral questions to Ministers within the Cabinet Office can be put to Cabinet Office Ministers including at Cabinet Office orals.

Procurement: Department for Work and Pensions

Robert Halfon: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if his Department will carry out a value-for-money assessment of the (a) clauses encouraging the hiring of apprentices and (b) other aspects of the Department for Work and Pensions' standard contract introduced in July 2011; and if he will make a statement. [151571]

Mr Maude: The Government's prime concern is to drive value for money through its procurement.

As yet there has been no formal assessment of the apprenticeship clauses in the Department for Work and Pension's (DWP) standard contract. The DWP is currently giving consideration to the use and potential cost of a pan-Government single supplier registration and data gathering tool, which would support the monitoring and evaluation of this schedule.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 654W

Public Appointments

Ms Harman: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many public appointments at (a) Chair, (b) Director and (c) Chief Executive Officer level have been made to people identified as (i) Conservative, (ii) Labour and (iii) Liberal Democrat supporters since May 2010. [151469]

Mr Maude [holding answer 18 April 2013]: The Commissioner for Public Appointments collects and publishes data annually on the public appointments within his regulatory remit.

As was the case under the previous Administration, the Commissioner's reports include information on political activity for the minority of appointees who declare this.

Public Sector: Procurement

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate he has made of the total value of (a) public service contracts and (b) grants that have been awarded by (i) central Government and (ii) local authorities to voluntary sector organisations in each financial year since 2008-09. [152438]

Mr Hurd: Information on central Government spend with the voluntary and charitable sector (including both grants and contracts) is available through Departmental Business Plan Quarterly Data Summaries, published at:

http://www.number10.gov.uk/transparency/how-your-money-is-spent/

The Cabinet Office does not hold information on equivalent spend from local authorities.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151100]

Mr Maude: Within the Cabinet Office and our agencies and non-departmental public bodies the average number of days (excluding weekends, public holidays, and annual leave) worked by officials over the past five years is:

 Days

Cabinet Office

219.5

Agencies

222

Non-departmental public bodies

219

Annual salary costs are published in the annual accounts of the Cabinet Office, its agencies and NDPBs, and these can be found here:

http://www.official-documents.gov.uk/

Suicide: Males

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will request the Office for National Statistics to cross-classify male suicides in England and Wales by the calendar-year quarter of (a) their occurrence and (b) the date of their registration (registration-date) for the most recent 12 months for which figures are available. [151957]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 655W

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office the Office for National Statistics to cross-classify male suicides in England and Wales by the calendar-year quarter of (a) their occurrence and (b) the date of their registration (registration-date) for the most recent 12 months for which figures are available. [151957]

Table 1 provides the number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide, by quarter of death occurrence and quarter of death registration, in England and Wales, for deaths which occurred in 2011 and were registered by 31 December 2011 (the latest available period).

22 Apr 2013 : Column 656W

Due to the length of time it takes to hold an inquest, it can take months for a suicide to be registered. The latest statistical bulletin showed that the median registration delay for suicides was 158 days in England and Wales in 2011.

More information on registration delays for other causes can be found on the ONS website:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/user-guidance/health-and-life-events/impact-of-registration-delays-on-mortality-statistics/index.html

Figures for suicides in the United Kingdom, England and Wales, and regions of England, by age and sex, are published annually on the ONS website. The latest statistical bulletin also includes analysis of the impact of registration delays on UK suicide statistics:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-29400

Table 1. Number of male deaths where the underlying cause was suicide, by quarter of death occurrence and quarter of death registration, England and Wales, for deaths which occurred and were registered in 2011(1,2,3,4)
Suicides (males)
 Quarter of registration
Quarter of occurrenceJanuary to MarchApril to JuneJuly to SeptemberOctober to December

January to March

52

354

284

118

April to June

0

56

371

288

July to September

0

0

38

366

October to December

0

0

0

41

(1) Suicide was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes X60-X84 (Intentional self-harm) and Y10-Y34 (Events of undetermined intent). (2) Figures are for males aged 15 years and over. (3) Figures for England and Wales include deaths of non-residents, (4) Figures are for deaths which occurred in 2011, and were registered by 31 December 2011. Further information on registration delays for a range of causes can be found on the ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/user-guidance/health-and-life-events/impact-of-registration-delays-on-mortality-statistics/index.html

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151352]

Mr Maude: The Cabinet Office does not record overseas travel separately in its budgeting. Details of overseas travel by ministers in my Department are published quarterly.

Young People

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether his Department has assessed the factors determining the higher proportion of young men relative to women who live with their parents. [152592]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to respond to your question, asking the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether the Department has assessed the factors determining the higher proportion of young men relative to young women who live with their parents. (152592)

The Office for National Statistics published a report in May 2012 about young adults aged 20 to 34 living with their parents in the UK, including differences by sex. This was based on data from the Labour Force Survey.

Analysis of where all young men and women were living showed that young women were more likely to be living as part of a couple in their own household (as they tend to form relationships with men older than themselves on average) and were more likely to be a lone parent in their own household. In addition the proportion of women going on to higher education is higher than for men, so young women may be more likely to move away from the parental home to do so. All of these factors contribute to a higher proportion of young men relative to women living with their parents.

The full report can be found here:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/family-demography/young-adults-living-with-parents/2011/young-adults-rpt.html

Attorney-General

Crime: Disability

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General (1) on how many occasions the Crown Prosecution Service has taken no further action with regard to a suspect whose file had been marked with a disability hate crime flag in each of the last five years; [151873]

(2) if he will publish a breakdown by Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) business area of (a) the number of suspects with a disability hate crime flag on their files referred to the CPS for a charging decision, (b) the number of occasions that the CPS took no further action and (c) the conviction rate in each of the last five years. [151877]

The Attorney-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has maintained a central record of the numbers of suspects and defendants in cases flagged as disability hate crime since April 2007.

The CPS defines disability hate crime as any incident which is perceived, by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice towards a person

22 Apr 2013 : Column 657W

because of their disability or perceived disability. The data are accurate only to the extent that the flag has been correctly applied.

The following tables show, in each of the last five years for each CPS business area, (a) the number of disability hate crime cases referred to the CPS for a pre-charge decision, (b) the number of these pre-charge decisions in which the CPS decided to take no further action and (c) the conviction rate of defendants prosecuted for disability hate crimes.

(a) Total pre-charge decisions
Number
 2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Total

444

720

690

643

579

      

Cymru Wales

42

63

39

46

45

Eastern

16

50

43

15

33

East Midlands

43

47

70

29

34

London

67

103

75

55

48

Merseyside and Cheshire

16

48

64

44

61

North East

16

34

48

43

26

North West

47

93

103

135

112

South East

32

42

50

51

47

South West

27

34

26

36

17

Thames and Chiltern

9

28

37

37

18

Wessex

28

.30

24

21

18

West Midlands

66

82

57

74

70

Yorkshire and Humberside

35

66

54

57

50

(b) Total no further action
Number
 2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Total

109

157

134

136

127

      

Cymru Wales

11

13

14

12

9

Eastern

2

7

8

5

7

East Midlands

11

6

16

3

7

London

16

34

17

11

8

Merseyside and Cheshire

6

12

16

8

13

North East

2

9

4

5

7

North West

18

26

25

39

33

South East

8

7

8

6

8

South West

8

3

1

4

1

Thames and Chiltern

2

11

3

3

6

Wessex

5

5

4

3

6

West Midlands

15

16

10

29

10

Yorkshire and Humberside

5

8

8

8

12

(c) Conviction rate
Percentage
 2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Total

76.1

75.7

79.8

77.3

77.2

      

Cymru Wales

72.0

78.3

81.3

82.1

77.6

Eastern

94.1

79.5

77.1

86.7

71.4

East Midlands

74.1

75.5

86.2

75.0

88.0

22 Apr 2013 : Column 658W

London

60.5

60.7

71.4

71.2

55.0

North East

78.6

65.7

73.2

76.1

79.2

North West

78.3

75.0

87.5

84.1

72.2

South East

84.4

84.4

87.6

73.6

80.4

South West

82.9

72.5

73.7

80.0

64.1

Thames and Chiltern

58.3

83.7

83.0

77.8

83.3

Wessex

71.4

79.2

86.7

76.0

67.9

West Midlands

87.0

81.1

76.0

76.2

83.3

Merseyside and Cheshire

73.8

75.6

77.6

76.5

80.6

Yorkshire and Humberside

89.3

83.3

77.0

78.3

92.7