Enterprise Zones

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 20 March 2013, Official Report, columns

17 Apr 2013 : Column 415W

681-2W, on enterprise zones, if he will publish the findings from his Department's monitoring of the outputs and economic outcomes of the enterprise zones created since May 2010. [150319]

Mr Prisk: Enterprise Zones are a 25 year land and property programme set up to be delivered locally by Local economic Partnerships. Given that the Programme is only a year in, it is premature to assess their effectiveness to date. However, from April to December 2012 Zones have reported £160 million private investment secured and over 1,700 jobs created since going live.

March saw the largest number of investments in the Programme since it went live last April. Key announcements include Jaguar Land Rovers additional £500 million investment on the i54 site (Black Country), creating almost 1,400 new jobs; E.ON committing to 50 new jobs at Grimsby (Humber); a £15 million new office development at Milton Park (Science Vale UK, Oxfordshire, with the potential to create 500 jobs; and a £35 million office development at Bristol Temple Quarter, the biggest speculative development project in the city for four years.

Fire Services: Females

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment he has made of the effect on the number of female firefighters if the normal pension age for female firefighters is increased to 60. [151203]

Brandon Lewis: Dr Tony Williams, Medical Director of Working Fit, was commissioned to review the Normal Pension Age for firefighters. This report was provided to members of the Firefighters' Pension Committee, for discussion, at its last meeting on 17 January 2013. I am currently considering the Government's response to this report, and this will be published on the Department's website shortly.

Some 43% of regular female firefighter pension scheme members are in the New Firefighters' Pension Scheme 2006, which already has a Normal Pension Age of 60.

Fire Services: Older Workers

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what guidelines his Department issues on the proportion of fire fighters of age 60 and above able to be employed on normal duties before public safety is compromised. [151202]

Brandon Lewis: The Department has not issued any such guidelines. It is for individual fire and rescue authorities to determine how to manage their workforce to ensure public safety is not compromised.

Housing: Sales

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what consideration his Department has given to reforming the house purchase system; and what assessment he has made of the process in Scotland. [150191]

17 Apr 2013 : Column 416W

Mr Prisk: We have no current plans to change the current home buying and selling system in England and Wales, where properties are sold “subject to contract”.

Under the Scottish system, a legally binding conditional contract is entered into as soon as terms have been accepted, from which neither side can withdraw without legal consequences. While this may have its advantages, housing markets are generally much more active in England and Wales, where chains are more common and can be long. Consequently buyers and sellers using the Scottish system in England and Wales could find themselves bound to a contract before selling their existing home and buying a new one, with expensive implications such as bridging finance and the need to find temporary accommodation.

Sellers in England and Wales are free to choose from a range of options that can be used by those seeking more commitment and certainty that their transaction will be completed. These include ‘lock-out' agreements, ‘option to purchase', ‘conditional contracts' or ‘costs guarantee'. There is nothing to stop buyers and sellers agreeing to any of these arrangements on a voluntary basis.

This Government have cut the cost of moving home by abolishing the requirement to commission a home information pack. The red tape involved increased the cost of selling a home, deterring sellers from putting their homes on the market, and the packs were not trusted by buyers, so duplicating costs. We believe that the similar seller packs recently introduced in Scotland are another example of a more complex system.

Mortgages: Government Assistance

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether under-occupancy assessments will be made when considering applications for assistance under the proposed (a) Help to Buy and (b) Mortgage Guarantee scheme. [150251]

Mr Prisk: The Government will require (a) Purchasers under the Help to Buy Equity Loan scheme to be assessed against affordability criteria by Help to Buy Agents and (b) will provide further details on Help to Buy: mortgage guarantee later this year.

Existing social tenants are a priority group when applications are assessed as it helps free up a social housing unit.

Non-domestic Rates: Wi-fi

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the Government's policy is on the application of business rates to wireless access points. [151292]

Brandon Lewis: The assessment of rateable values for business rates is a matter for the Valuation Office Agency and it is not the role of Ministers to intervene in those decisions. The Valuation Office Agency and the Broadband Stakeholder's Group will host a meeting with the telecoms industry later in April to discuss the rating of wireless broadband network infrastructure.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 417W

Wales

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151348]

Stephen Crabb: The Wales Office has not purchased any desktops and laptops during the last two years, but has purchased one tablet device.

Public Expenditure

Mr Liddell-Grainger: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what assessment he has made of (a) the criteria by which the future financial settlement and constitutional arrangements for Wales should be determined and (b) the desirability or otherwise of replacing the funding arrangement determined by the Barnett Formula by a needs-based allocation of government finances. [151651]

Mr David Jones: The Government established the Commission on Devolution in Wales in October 2011 to review the present financial and constitutional arrangements in Wales. The Commission reported on the first part of its remit, relating to the financial accountability of the National Assembly for Wales, in November 2012, and the Government is currently considering the recommendations made in that report. The Commission is expected to report on the second part of its remit, in relation to the constitutional arrangements for Wales, in the spring of 2014.

In addition, the UK Government and the Welsh Government published a joint statement in October 2012 outlining new commitments to review relative levels of funding in England and Wales at each spending review. This statement followed discussions between the two Governments on funding reform in Wales. These discussions did not, however, cover fundamental reform of the Barnett Formula. Our Programme for Government made clear that, while we recognise the concerns that exist around the operation of the Barnett Formula, our priority is, and remains, to stabilise the public finances.

Visits Abroad

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many overseas visits have been made by Ministers of his Department to support trade and investment in each year since 2010. [150351]

Mr David Jones: Details of overseas travel by Wales Office Ministers are published in our quarterly transparency returns. All visits undertaken have been in support of UK inward investment.

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151367]

Stephen Crabb: The Wales Office did not set a budget for overseas travel in 2012-13; all overseas travel costs was met from the existing travel budget.

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Health

Alexandra Hospital Redditch

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if his Department will give the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust permission to allow the Alexandra Hospital to discuss with University Hospitals Birmingham a takeover of the hospital. [151370]

Dr Poulter: The trust does not require permission from the Department of to discuss this matter with other national health service bodies. The provision of local health services is a matter for the local NHS.

NHS commissioners in Worcestershire are currently working with the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust to review the future provision of services, subject to formal public consultation planned for this summer.

Cardiovascular System: North West

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of whether the proposed new arrangements for vascular services in Lancashire and Cumbria would breach the 60 minute distance target; what rights patients have to enforce that target; and if he will make a statement. [151664]

Anna Soubry: The Department has made no assessment of the effect of implementation of the vascular services review in Lancashire and Cumbria.

Decisions about local NHS services are a matter for the local national health service. Vascular services are being reviewed locally across England in response to robust evidence, which shows that better patient outcomes are achieved when complex procedures, such as vascular surgery, are provided by units which treat higher volumes of patients.

On 19 February 2013, Cumbria County Council Health Scrutiny Committee referred proposals for changes to vascular services in Cumbria and Lancashire to the Secretary of State for Health. Initial advice from the Independent Reconfiguration Panel has been requested no later than 19 April 2013.

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

Naomi Long: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on research into the causes and prevention of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in each of the last five years. [150603]

Dr Poulter: In the last five years, there has been no expenditure by the Department on specific research into the causes and prevention of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

The Department's National Institute for Health Research welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made.

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Consultants

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on external consultancy services in each year since 2005, broken down by consultancy firm. [151442]

Dr Poulter: Spend by individual contractor firms between 2005 to 2008 is not available given departmental reporting systems did not capture individual contractor details at that time.

However, departmental spending on management consultancy for years 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 is available showing £133 million, £205 million and £132 million respectively.

In July 2008, the Department implemented a new business management system which collects enhanced detail on the categorisation, purpose and value of orders. This has now given the Department the scope to be more specific about the nature of each of the consultancy commissions.

Information on spend by financial year from 2008-09 to 2011-12 broken down by consultancy firm has been placed in the Library.

2012-13 consultancy information will not be available until the Department's summarised annual accounts are published later in 2013.

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will list all consultancy companies employed by his Department between 2003 and 2012; and what the (a) year and (b) period of engagement was in each case. [151590]

Dr Poulter: Consultancy information for the years 2003 to 2008 is not available centrally as previous Departmental reporting systems did not capture individual contractor details.

In July 2008, the Department implemented a new business management system (BMS) which collects enhanced detail oh the categorisation, purpose and value of orders. This has now given the Department the scope to be more specific about the nature of each of

17 Apr 2013 : Column 420W

the consultancy commissions. However, information on the period of engagement for each case is not held on BMS.

All the consultancy companies employed by the Department by financial years 2008-09 to 2011-12 are set out in the table which has been placed in the Library.

2012-13 consultancy information will not be available until the Department's summarised annual accounts are published later in 2013.

Heart Diseases: Children

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints the Care Quality Commission and its predecessor body have received concerning children's heart surgery at (a) Birmingham Children's Hospital, (b) Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, (c) Alder Hey Children's Hospital, (d) Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospital, (e) Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, (f) Leeds Teaching Hospitals, (g) University Hospitals Bristol, (h) Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, (i) Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals, (j) Southampton University Hospitals and (k) University Hospitals Leicester NHS Foundation Trust in each of the last five years. [151586]

Anna Soubry: Under the Health and Social Care Act 2008, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) does not have the responsibility for investigating specific complaints about providers. Under the NHS Complaints Procedure, formal complaints are raised with the service provider in the first instance. The CQC's predecessor, the Healthcare Commission, did have responsibility for second stage complaints, once local resolution had been unsuccessful. This responsibility ceased on 1 April 2009.

When the CQC receives information of concern from people who use services, their relatives and members of the public, it uses the information to inform its inspection programme and the quality and risk profile of the service provider.

The CQC has provided the following information:

The following table shows the number of times information of concern has been received by the CQC in each of the last five years in relation to the listed organisations.

Number of enquiries, by fiscal year
Information of concern
Organisation name2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-132013-14Total

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

3

3

2

1

1

10

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

1

4

1

1

2

9

Birmingham Children's Hospital

4

1

5

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

1

7

3

1

12

University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

2

1

2

4

4

1

14

The Newcastle-upon-Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

3

2

1

6

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust

1

6

1

8

University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust

2

3

5

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust

2

3

5

Harefield Hospital

1

1

Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust

1

1

Total

10

27

15

11

12

1

76

Notes: 1. Data taken from the CQC database at 12 April 2013. 2.The table does not differentiate between the seriousness of the concern, or the CQCs findings in relation to the issues raised.

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Herbal Medicine

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made on implementing a statutory register for herbalists; and if he will make a statement. [151283]

Dr Poulter: The legislation around this policy is complex and there are a number of issues that have arisen which we need to work through. We appreciate that the delay in going out to consult on this matter is causing concern, but it is important that any new legislation is proportionate and fit for purpose.

The Department intends to make an announcement on the progress of this policy shortly.

Horsemeat

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many horses have been slaughtered (a) in total and (b) by each abattoir in each of the last four months for which figures are available. [151295]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) records the number of solipeds (a mammal having a single hoof on each foot, including horses, hinnies, mules and asses) slaughtered in the United Kingdom, the majority of which are horses. The number of solipeds slaughtered in total for the last four months for which figures are available are as follows:

MonthNumber of solipeds slaughtered in the United Kingdom

December 2012

563

January 2013

440

February 2013

382

March 2013

600

The number of horses slaughtered in each of the abattoirs in each of the last four months for which figures are available has not been provided as the release of this information is commercially sensitive.

Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the cost was of inspections carried out by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in each of the last five years; [151091]

(2) how often his Department updates the good clinical practice regulations; [151205]

(3) how many incidents relating to safety issues have arisen in clinical trials in each of the last 10 years; [151206]

(4) what his policy is on the registration of individuals involved in clinical research with regard to EC Directive 2005/28/EC. [151209]

Norman Lamb: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is a Government trading fund and as such has to recover its costs by charging fees to those organisations or individuals that require its services. The costs of its inspections are therefore recovered from its customers. In each of the last five years the MHRA inspections income has been:

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 Inspections income (£000)

2012-13

(1)8,644

2011-12

(2)9,795

2010-11

9,535

2009-10

9,443

2008-09

8,502

(1) The figure for 2012-13 is provisional and subject to audit by the National Audit Office. (2) The figure for 2011-12 includes income from the European Medicines Agency for inspections undertaken on its behalf. Source: MHRA Annual Report and Accounts certified by the Comptroller and Auditor General except for 2012-13.

Suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs) are serious adverse events occurring in a clinical trial that are both unexpected and thought to be related to the medicine used in the trial. SUSARs are reported to the MHRA in an expedited manner and since 2005 have been recorded on a safety database. In each year since 2005 the MHRA has received the following numbers of SUSARs:

 Non-fatal SUSARs

2005

260

2006

514

2007

966

2008

1,046

2009

1,380

2010

1,467

2011

1,216

2012

1,189

Directive 2005/28/EC does not require the registration of individuals involved in clinical research.

The principles of good clinical practice are outlined in articles 2 to 5 in the EU Directive 2005/28/EC which have been transposed in The Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations as amended. In September 2012, the MHRA published the ‘Good Clinical Practice Guide’ covering the legislation, guidance and good practice that relates to the conduct of clinical trials of medicinal products for human use in the United Kingdom. This publication provides guidance on how the clinical trial regulations, and in particular GCP principles, should be implemented in practice.

NHS 111 Service

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what facilities exist to allow people to use the 111 service on behalf of other patients (a) in the same location and (b) from another location; and if he will make a statement. [151207]

Anna Soubry: NHS 111 call handlers are trained to ask if a caller is calling on behalf of someone else. For the most part NHS 111 calls are handled locally. However, every NHS 111 provider is able to handle inquiries from other parts of England.

Out of Area Treatment

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the income received by English acute trusts from Welsh health boards for the treatment of (a) all patients and (b) cancer patients in each of the last three years. [149530]

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Dr Poulter: The Department collects statutory accounting data for preparing consolidated annual accounts which includes income from operating activities and income from patients, but the returns do not separately show income from the Welsh Health Board or other countries.

Prescriptions

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS prescription exemption forms are in circulation which pre-date the Department for Work and Pensions changes and amendments to the benefits system and the name descriptor of benefits. [151539]

Norman Lamb: The introduction of universal credit by the Department for Work and Pensions will have relevance to the exemption section of the FP10 prescription form. Data are not held on the number of NHS FP10 prescription forms which are in circulation in England.

Information on how the prescription form should be completed by those receiving universal credit during the early stages of implementation has been made available at:

www.nhs.uk/uc-healthcosts

Public Expenditure

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the estimated underspend by his Department was in each year since 2007-08. [150240]

Dr Poulter: The following table summarises the final underspends, for financial years 2007-08 to 2011-12, and estimated forecast underspends, for financial year 2012-13, against the resource, capital and total departmental expenditure limits (DEL) spending controls.

£ billion
 Revenue DEL (excluding depreciation)Capital DELTotal DEL

2007-08

2.4

0.5

2.9

2008-09

1.4

0.5

1.9

2009-10

0.7

0.2

0.9

2010-11

1.2

0.7

1.9

2011-12

0.9

0.6

1.4

2012-13

1.4

0.8

2.2

Social Services

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has conducted research into the effects by region of the implementation of the cap on care costs and into the feasibility of introducing a regional cap. [151294]

Norman Lamb: The Government asked the Commission on Funding Care and Support to produce recommendations for social care funding reform. The Commission recommended a national cap after considering a variety of factors including the differential impacts by region. The Government have committed to implement in April 2016 a £72,000 cap on eligible care costs and extended state support for individuals in residential care with less than £118,000. These proposals will ensure that everyone is protected from excessive care costs regardless of where they live.

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The Government will be consulting upon the details of implementation of these reform over the summer including any differential impacts.

Northern Ireland

Bombings: Omagh

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what investigations are ongoing into the Omagh bombing in 1998. [150677]

Mrs Villiers: The Investigation into the Omagh bombing is an operational matter for the Chief Constable.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many detectives have been in involved in any investigations into the Omagh bombing in 1998 in the last three years. [150678]

Mrs Villiers: The allocation of police resources is an operational matter for the Chief Constable.

Conflict Resolution

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what steps her Department has taken, jointly with the Department for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and the Department for International Development, to enable lessons from the post-conflict progress in Northern Ireland to be learned in other conflict regions across the world; and if she will make a statement. [151585]

Mrs Villiers: My Department receives requests from time to time to discuss the lessons the Northern Ireland peace process has to offer regions across the world that have suffered from terrorism, and Ministers and officials regularly meet delegations for this purpose.

These requests sometimes originate from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office passing on requests from different countries or directly from high commissions, embassies and interested third party organisations.

Economic Growth

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when she last met the Northern Ireland Minister for Trade and Investment; and what initiatives she has recommended to assist growth in Northern Ireland. [150274]

Mrs Villiers: I last met the Northern Ireland Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Investment on 14 February 2013 when we discussed, among other issues, how to promote lending to businesses in Northern Ireland. The Prime Minister has proposed to the Northern Ireland Executive a wide-ranging package of measures to boost the private sector and we will be taking this work forward with the First and Deputy First Ministers, the Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Investment and others over the coming months.

G8

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what discussions she has had on gaining additional finances to assist the policing of the G8 in Fermanagh. [150275]

17 Apr 2013 : Column 425W

Mrs Villiers: The Government are committed to ensuring that the PSNI has sufficient resources to deliver a safe and secure G8 summit and I have had a number of discussions on this matter.

Culture, Media and Sport

Broadband

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent assessment she has made of the economic impact of the new 4G mobile telephone networks. [150628]

Mr Vaizey: I have not made an assessment of the economic impact of the deployment of 4G mobile services in the UK. Ofcom, however, has estimated that the economic benefits will be £20 billion over 10 years. This figure is based on the report that Analysys Mason produced for my Department and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), which included a figure for consumer surplus for mobile telecoms:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/impact-of-radio-spectrum-on-the-uk-economy-and-factors-influencing-future-spectrum-demand

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether her Department has a dementia strategy. [151821]

Hugh Robertson: While the Department does not have a dementia-specific strategy, it has a Carers' Network, which aims to support our staff whose lives are affected by dementia and other illnesses, offering support to staff with caring responsibilities and the opportunity to share their experiences. The Department also has an Employee Assistance Provider who staff can contact for confidential advice on all health and wellbeing matters.

Direct Selling

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether she has given consideration to consolidating the responsibility for dealing with nuisance calls entirely in either Ofcom or the Information Commissioner's Office. [151615]

Mr Vaizey: As the Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries, I have considered the possibility of allocating responsibility for nuisance calls, texts and e-mails, to either Ofcom or to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO). However, this is unlikely to make much difference unless enforcement of the existing regulations is carried out effectively.

The Government are working closely with both regulators to deliver significant improvements in terms of taking robust action where necessary. For example, the ICO issued its first monetary penalty of £90,000 to a company on 18 March 2013 and has also published on its website a list of the most complained about companies that make calls to Telephone Preference Service (TPS) registered consumers:

http://www.ico.gov.uk/enforcement/action/calls.aspx

17 Apr 2013 : Column 426W

If the companies fail to remedy their actions, then they could face further enforcement action and the ICO is also currently considering issuing penalties to two other companies for breaching the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) 2003.

Improvements have been made to website pages of both organisations, including whom to contact when making a complaint. Also, Ofcom has in the last year issued monetary penalties totalling £810,000 and improved and clarified information that is provided to consumers online at:

http://consumers.ofcom.org.uk/tell-us/telecoms/privacy

and their Consumer Guide signposts the correct place to make a complaint about a range of nuisance calls:

http://consumers.ofcom.org.uk/2012/10/tackling-nuisance-calls-and-messages

Football: Israel

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on England's participation in a European football tournament to be staged in Israel. [152039]

Hugh Robertson: I have had no recent discussions on this issue. This is a matter for the Israeli Football Association and UEFA. The UK Government and the Football Association support UEFA's decision to award the Under 21 Championships to Israel.

Football: Racial Discrimination

Yasmin Qureshi: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent discussions she has had with the Football Association and the Professional Footballer's Association concerning racism in football; and if she will make a statement. [151063]

Hugh Robertson: The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), and I continue to meet with, and support the football authorities in their attempts to make progress in this area.

We have welcomed the 92 point action plan from the football authorities, published in December, setting out a way forward to tackle discrimination within the game. While we have made significant progress in this area over the last two decades, recent incidents have shown a need for concerted action. We want to see this action plan implemented and the football authorities to show strong leadership on anti-discrimination, at both the professional and grassroots levels of the game.

Gun Sports

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much has been contributed to fund shooting sports in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland in the last five years. [150904]

Hugh Robertson: UK Sport invested £2,461,866 into elite Shooting for the London 2012 funding cycle (2009-13) and will invest £2,992,493 for the Rio 2016 cycle (2013-17).

17 Apr 2013 : Column 427W

For Paralympic shooting, they invested £2,085,000 in the London 2012 funding cycle and will invest £3,333,806 for Rio 2016 cycle. In relation to target shooting Sport England invested, in England only, £750,000 during the London 2012 funding cycle and will invest £l million during the Rio 2016 cycle. The Department does not hold any information about the amounts invested by Sport Scotland, Sport Wales or Sport Northern Ireland, which are the responsibility of the respective Devolved Administration.

Museums and Galleries

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of overseas interest in oil paintings in UK public collections; and if she will urge the owners of those works to capitalise on such interest by putting them on public display if they have not recently been exhibited. [150589]

Mr Vaizey [holding answer 15 April 2013]: The Government have not carried out such an assessment. It would not be appropriate for the Government to intervene in the display decisions of individual galleries, though we recognise that overseas visitors make up a significant proportion of those visiting galleries. Information on public display can be found at this web address:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/

Overseas Aid

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport which projects administered by her Department were Overseas Development Assistance attributable in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012 and (d) 2013. [151520]

Hugh Robertson: The only Overseas Development Assistance project that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) administers, is the funding to the London 2012 International Inspiration programme. This started in 2007, and has committed funding from DCMS and DFID (which DCMS administers) until March 2014.

The figures relating to this are set out as follows:

2010-11: £1,600,000 paid in 2010

2011-12: £4,050,000 paid in 2011

2012-13: £2,000,000 paid in 2012

2013-14: £700,000 is due to be paid in 2013

Public Expenditure

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport with reference to paragraph 1.95 on page 38 of Budget 2013 Red Book, what further financial incentives will be introduced to ensure more efficient use and management of public sector spectrum holdings. [149947]

Mr Vaizey [holding answer 25 April 2013]: The Treasury is working alongside Ofcom, DCMS and other Government Departments, who hold and use spectrum to consider appropriate further financial incentives to ensure efficient use and management of spectrum holdings. Further details will be announced in due course.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 428W

Public Lending Right

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport with reference to the Government response to the public consultation on the proposed transfer of the public lending right functions from the existing public body and the associated impact assessment, what assessment she has made of the potential benefits of basing the Head of Public Lending Right in Boston Spa rather than in Stockton-on-Tees. [151471]

Mr Vaizey: The Government response to the consultation on the proposed transfer of the Public Lending Right (PLR) functions set out that, after a transition period, a new Head of PLR would assume responsibility for the management of PLR, and is likely to be based in the British Library's site at Boston Spa in Yorkshire. It is for the British Library to consider operational matters relating to its activities, including the management of the PLR scheme and how PLR will be represented within the British Library management team.

Telephone Preference Service

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Telephone Preference Service in preventing unsolicited commercial telephone calls; and if she will make a statement. [151596]

Mr Vaizey: The Telephone Preference Service (TPS) provides protection to consumers from unsolicited marketing calls. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has enforcement responsibility for the TPS and can issue a monetary penalty of up to £500,000 for the most serious breaches.

I am pressing for more action in this area, with the ICO, Office of Communications (Ofcom) and TPS working together to make improvements. The ICO has increased the resources devoted to enforcement of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) 2003 and on 18 March 2013 served its first monetary penalty of £90,000 to a company that was making unsolicited marketing calls. The ICO has also published on its website, a list of the most complained about companies that make calls to TPS registered consumers. If the companies fail to remedy their actions, then they could face further enforcement action and ICO is also currently considering issuing penalties to two other companies for breaching the PECR:

http://www.ico.org.uk/enforcement/action/calls

In addition, Ofcom has improved information available to consumers online at:

http://consumers.ofcom.org.uk/tell-us/telecoms/privacy

which provides clearer advice on how to avoid unsolicited calls, texts and e-mails and a new Consumer Guide, signposts the correct place to make a complaint:

http://consumers.ofcom.org.uk/2012/10/tackling-nuisance-calls-and-messages

I welcome this kind of robust action from the ICO and expect them to continue with similar measures against other companies as well.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 429W

Work and Pensions

Housing Benefit: Newcastle Upon Tyne

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the availability of single-bedroom accommodation in Newcastle upon Tyne in the (a) social housing and (b) private rented sector; and if he will estimate the number of people who will be rehoused from two to one-bedroom accommodation as a result of the reduction in housing benefit for under-occupancy. [151231]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

This measure is not about forcing people to move. There are a number of options available to meet the shortfalls in housing benefit resulting from the removal of the spare room subsidy. For example, this could include moving into work, increasing working hours, taking in a lodger, getting help from family or friends or making up small shortfalls from savings without needing to move. It is for individual claimants to determine what the best approach is for them.

Housing Benefit: Social Rented Housing

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what plans he has to amend the definition of supported exempt accommodation to include housing association tenancies where care or support is provided or commissioned by a third party rather than by the landlord; and if he will make a statement; [151465]

(2) when he plans to publish proposals for a localised system of support for housing costs for claimants living in supported exempt accommodation; and if he will make a statement. [151466]

Steve Webb: As we announced in September 2012, we are exploring the feasibility of a localised scheme for supported exempt accommodation and will make announcements in due course. Until then, as we announced at the same time, we have no plans to change the existing definition set out in housing benefit and universal credit regulations but the Department is working closely with stakeholders to protect providers from unintended consequences if much of the existing provision does not meet the precise definition in the regulations.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 274W, on housing benefit: social rented sector, how much, on average (a) in Bristol and (b) nationally a tenant with two children of the same sex aged under 16 will have to pay for an additional bedroom if they do not have a bedroom large enough for two children to share. [151509]

Steve Webb: Information at local authority level is not available. Average shortfalls at regional level can be found in the impact assessment:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) if he will make an estimate of (a) the number of men born after 5 October 1951 but before

17 Apr 2013 : Column 430W

31 October 1953 who are now subject to the under-occupancy rule in relation to housing benefit provided for social housing,

(b)

when such men would become exempt from the scope of the rule in each grouping according to date of birth and

(c)

how many men are in each such category; [151621]

(2) if he will make an estimate of (a) the number of women born after 5 October 1951 but before 31 October 1953 who are now subject to the under-occupancy rule in relation to housing benefit provided for social housing, (b) when such women would become exempt from the scope of the rule in each grouping according to date of birth and (c) how many women are in each such category. [151622]

Steve Webb: Due to small sample sizes this information is not available.

People over the qualifying age for state pension credit, or with a partner over that age, will be exempt from the removal of the spare room subsidy. When this measure was introduced on 1 April 2013, the qualifying age was 61 years and six months.

Jobcentre Plus

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the success of job centres in placing their clients in jobs with Saga Healthcare Ltd. [151460]

Mr Hoban: Jobcentre Plus does not track the number of people recruited by specific employers. Saga Healthcare Ltd works with Jobcentre Plus to support people who are furthest from the labour market to compete in the labour market and secure employment in the care sector.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the practice of job centres sending their clients for job interviews with care companies paying below the minimum wage. [151461]

Mr Hoban: All employers who use Universal Jobmatch are required to sign up to our terms and conditions. These include an agreement that vacancies will meet all legal requirements including national minimum wage. Checks are made to ensure there is compliance with this condition and Jobseekers would not be expected to apply to a vacancy that didn't meet national minimum wage. If a jobseeker complains that this is not the case, and is proved correct, we would remove the vacancy from our service. Employers who breach our terms and conditions can have the use of our services revoked.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) whether he has made an estimate of additional time that will be taken by jobcentre staff in order to assist claimants to apply for universal credit online; [151582]

(2) whether he plans to allocate additional funding to jobcentres to cover the staffing costs of assisting claimants in applying for universal credit online. [151583]

Mr Hoban: Universal credit is being rolled out on an incremental basis, beginning with a Pathfinder which starts later this month. The level of resources required

17 Apr 2013 : Column 431W

in jobcentres will be informed by the experience of running the Pathfinder operation. This will include resources required to support claimants in the on-line application process.

Materials Handling Equipment

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he plans to issue guidance to the construction sector on obligations in respect of tower cranes and notification of the presence of cranes to relevant bodies following revocation of the Notification of Tower Cranes Regulations 2010 and the Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes (Amendment) Regulations 2010; and if he will make a statement. [151587]

Mr Hoban: Guidance in relation to requirements placed on employers to ensure the safe erection, use and dismantling of tower cranes is already in place. This is unaffected by the revocation of the Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes Regulations 2010 and the associated Amendment Regulations. There is also existing guidance from the Civil Aviation Authority recommending that any proposed development of sufficient height to constitute a potential air navigation obstacle should be notified to them.

Personal Independence Payment

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what discussions his Department has had with (a) Atos and (b) Capita regarding training in (i) autism, (ii) mental health conditions and (iii) learning disability for health professionals carrying out the assessment for personal independence payment; [151434]

(2) what plans his Department has to assess the adequacy of training made available by (a) Atos and (b) Capita in (i) autism, (ii) mental health conditions and (iii) learning disabilities for health professionals who will be carrying out the assessment for personal independence payment; [151435]

(3) what recent assessment his Department has made of the training made available by (a) Atos and (b) Capita in (i) autism, (ii) mental health and (iii) learning disability for health professionals who will be carrying out the assessment for the personal independence payment. [151646]

Esther McVey: The contracts between the Department for Work and Pensions and the personal independence payment assessment providers, Atos and Capita, stipulate that their training for health professionals must meet the Department's requirements. The Department requires health professionals to have a broad training in disability analysis, as well as training in specific conditions. This training will include autism, mental health conditions and learning disability. The Department has reviewed Atos' training materials and is content with them. The Department is currently reviewing Capita's training materials.

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what discussions his Department has had with (a) Atos and (b) Capita regarding (i) the appointment and (ii) the training of

17 Apr 2013 : Column 432W

condition-specific champions to assist in the assessment for personal independence payment; [151436]

(2) what discussions his Department has had with (a) Atos and (b) Capita regarding condition-specific training for health professionals carrying out the assessment for personal independence payments. [151589]

Esther McVey: The contracts between the Department for Work and Pensions and the personal independence payment assessment providers, Atos and Capita, stipulate that they must provide mental function champions to give advice and support to health professionals on health conditions and disabilities affecting mental, cognitive, intellectual and behavioural function. Assessment providers are also obliged to provide other condition-specific champions when requested and in agreement with the Department for Work and Pensions.

The Department is reviewing the condition-specific training material, in the same way as it reviews training materials for all personal independence payment health professionals. The Department has reviewed and is content with Atos' training materials, and is currently reviewing Capita's training materials.

State Retirement Pensions: Females

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many women are due to reach state pension entitlement age between 1 January 2016 and 31 March 2016 by constituency. [151198]

Steve Webb: Around 60,000 women, born between 6 February 1953 and 5 April 1953, will reach state pension age in the United Kingdom between 1 January and 31 March 2016.

In most constituencies there will be around 100 women in this position, but it is not possible to provide a precise constituency level breakdown of this relatively small group.

They will reach state pension age at between 62 years 10 months and 63 years old, and will be able to claim their state pension under the current system a little over two years before a man born on the same day, who will reach state pension age at 65, under the new single-tier system. For a woman with a typical level of state pension this will amount to around £13,000 of pension claimed before the age of 65, meaning that most women in this position will have a higher retirement income under the current system and their currently legislated state pension age than they would if they received a single-tier pension but had to wait until they were 65 to claim it.

For more details of pension outcomes for women who reach state pension age shortly before the introduction of the single-tier pension, see the note recently published on the DWP website at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/note-on-women-cohort-1951-53.pdf

Universal Credit

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what his most recent estimate is of the number of full-time equivalent staff needed to apply conditionality to recipients of universal credit who are in employment. [151464]

17 Apr 2013 : Column 433W

Mr Hoban: Universal credit is being rolled out on an incremental basis, with each phase informing the development and delivery of the next. This includes processing times and staffing levels for each elements of the service, including conditionality.

Work Capability Assessment

Mr Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to implement Professor Harrington's recommendations on the work capability assessment and improve such assessments for those on the autistic spectrum. [149787]

Mr Hoban: The Department is taking a range of steps to implement the recommendations from the three independent reviews that Professor Harrington has conducted on the work capability assessment. To date we have accepted and implemented or are implementing more than 50 recommendations made by Professor Harrington.

Following his second independent review in November 2011 Professor Harrington commissioned two groups of charities, to provide recommendations to refine descriptors respectively for (a) mental, cognitive and intellectual functioning and (b) fluctuating conditions.

Charitable groups reviewed the descriptors; one group focused on the mental, cognitive and intellectual functioning descriptors while the other looked at the fluctuating conditions, both provided recommendations for changes to the Professor Harrington.

The Department has worked extensively with the charities to agree a single assessment that combines recommendations from both the mental functioning and fluctuating conditions groups, and that the descriptors are suitable for testing. This ‘alternative’ assessment was approved by the charities at the end of August 2012.

Since early summer 2012, the Department has been working to put together an evidence based review to test the alternative assessment, including developing the training necessary for the Atos healthcare professionals conducting the alternative assessments, further work with the charities concerning the practicalities of the test, and the evaluation strategy.

We intend to begin the testing phase of the evidence based review in the spring with a final report published later in the year.

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he has received reports that previous incapacity benefit recipients with advanced Parkinson's disease have been designated by Atos without examination as being potentially eligible for work and that, even when re-classified within the employment and support allowance support group, are being put on a three-year review. [149852]

Mr Hoban: The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions is not aware of any such reports. However, it is important to note that not all claimants are required to attend a face to face assessment as part of the work capability assessment (WCA) process.

Where possible, the healthcare professional will provide advice to a decision maker on whether the claimant has limited capability for work or limited capability for

17 Apr 2013 : Column 434W

work related activity based on all the available evidence, without the need for a face to face assessment. This includes those incapacity benefits claimants undergoing reassessment. These claimants therefore could be placed directly in the work-related activity group (WRAG) of employment and support allowance (ESA) using paper based evidence.

The WCA is based on the functional effects of a condition rather than the condition itself. All healthcare professionals who carry out the assessments receive comprehensive training which includes an evidence based protocol on Parkinson's disease. They are also trained to inquire about variability, both day to day and in the longer term. Those Parkinson’s sufferers assessed as having limited capability for work will be placed in the WRAG, while those assessed as having limited capability for work related activity will be placed in the support group.

Everyone who ESA will undergo periodic WCAs to ascertain whether they still meet the conditions for the benefit, including those placed in the support group.

When an assessment takes place the healthcare professional will make a recommendation on when the claimant should next be reassessed. A claimant for whom a return to work is considered unlikely within two years will be reassessed after two years. Those in the support group will be assessed as a minimum every three years. This is because, even for claimants who are unlikely to see an improvement in their health, it is important that we do not write them off completely.

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to his answer of 4 March 2013, Official Report, column 888W, on work capability assessment, how many claimants have undergone an assessment using logic integrated medical assessment (a) nationally and (b) in the Wigan borough council area. [151588]

Mr Hoban: Atos Healthcare do not undertake computerised assessments, but Atos healthcare professionals use a bespoke clinical application (Logic Integrated Medical Assessment—LiMA) which incorporates the latest clinical research on mental health, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory conditions to accurately and consistently record assessments.

Although the healthcare professional will capture information on the computer during the assessment, it serves as a guide only and the practitioners are required to use their own clinical judgment to justify the medical opinion contained in the report.

Information around the geographical area served by a council is not routinely reported by Atos Healthcare to Department for Work and Pensions. However, information has been provided for the three months ending February 2013 of claimants who have undergone a face to face assessment using LiMA in Wigan Medical Assessment Centre and Nationally.

 December 2012January 2013February 2013
Benefit typeWiganNationalWiganNationalWiganNational

Employment support allowance

434

38,330

521

46,339

350

46,811

17 Apr 2013 : Column 435W

Incapacity benefit reassessment

182

19,002

253

19,341

176

19,006

Total

616

57,332

774

65,680

526

65,817

Work Programme

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the reasons for the low level of employment and support allowance claimants securing sustained job outcomes through the Work Programme; and if he will make a statement. [151467]

Mr Hoban: Employment and support allowance is a relatively new benefit, which was designed to help those people who had previously been parked on incapacity benefits, and essentially left without Government support. The Department's previous attempt to help these claimants—Pathways to Work—was not successful.

Both the Government and the welfare to work industry have more to learn in working with this group. We are working with providers to identify and build on best practice in working with these claimants.

Work Programme: Kilmarnock

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the total amount paid to Work programme providers was as a result of residents in Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency being placed in employment which generated a job outcome from the inception of the programme to the latest date for which figures are available. [151196]

Mr Hoban: The total paid to Work programme providers in the UK is £377.9 million from the start of the programme through to 30 July 2012, ie the period covered by the Statistical Release.

This amount differs from the £337.9 million reported in the replies provided to questions: PQ 134617 on 20 December 2012, Official Report, column 939W, PQ 135098 on 8 January 2013, Official Report, column 205W, PQ 134998 on 9 January 2013, Official Report, column 331W, PQ 133262 on 10 January 2013, Official Report, column 459W, where an administrative error has been found.

Due to commercial in confidence considerations we are not able to release financial data below the national level at this time.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of residents in Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency who have been referred to the work programme since its inception have been placed in employment which generated a job outcome. [151199]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on how many and what proportion of residents in Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency who have been referred to the Work programme (since

17 Apr 2013 : Column 436W

its inception to 31 July 2012) who have been placed in employment which generated a job outcome can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Population estimates for Scotland are published by the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS) and can be found at:

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/theme/population/estimates/mid-year/index.html

Written Questions: Government Responses

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he plans to answer question 145615 on child support cases, tabled on 26 February 2013 for answer on 28 February 2013. [151197]

Steve Webb: I apologise for the delay in answering the hon. Member's question. Departmental records recorded that that the reply had been dispatched on 5 March 2013, but due to an administrative error, the reply was not issued. I therefore replied to the hon. Member's question on 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 228W.

International Development

Burma

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to ensure that access to adequate food and water is provided to refugee camps in Burma ahead of and throughout the rainy season in that country. [151395]

Mr Duncan: DFID humanitarian assistance in Rakhine State is focused on water, sanitation, hygiene and nutritional assistance to 58,000 internally displaced people (IDPs). This month we deployed a humanitarian adviser to Rakhine State to assess the priority needs of the IDPs there, and to assess any gaps in current programmes of assistance and preparedness in advance of the approaching rainy season. We continue to work with Government and the United Nations to ensure that adequate resources are devoted to addressing these needs.

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what reports she has received on whether ration cuts are forcing women from Burma in refugee camps in Thailand to leave those camps to work illegally in Thailand. [151397]

Mr Duncan: DFID has not received any such reports.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to provide adequate healthcare for unregistered internally displaced people in Rakhine State in Burma; and what reports she has received of internally displaced people in the region not receiving the assistance that is delivered to official camps. [151398]

Mr Duncan: We continue to press for all internally displaced people (IDPs) and vulnerable populations to receive adequate humanitarian assistance. The United

17 Apr 2013 : Column 437W

Nations now recognise a caseload of 140,000 IDPs in Rakhine State, which includes the previous caseload of 125,000 as well as a number of people not hitherto officially recognised as IDPs. The UK's humanitarian assistance in Rakhine State is focused on water, sanitation, hygiene and nutritional assistance to IDPs.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to facilitate the safe passage of humanitarian assistance to internally displaced people's camps in Rakhine State, Burma. [151556]

Mr Duncan: DFID staff conduct regular visits to camps for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Rakhine State to assess the delivery of humanitarian assistance, and are in daily contact with humanitarian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the United Nations agencies on the ground. Senior DFID and Foreign Office officials, including the ambassador, meet the Burmese Government on a regular basis to stress the importance of humanitarian assistance reaching those who need it most.

The UK has provided £2 million of humanitarian assistance through NGO partners, delivering improved water, sanitation, hygiene and nutritional assistance to IDPs.

Kenya

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what representations she has made to her Kenyan counterparts on maintaining service provision to refugees and asylum seekers in cities compliant with the UN Refugee Agency's 2009 global urban refugee policy, the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and Kenya's Refugee Act 2006 following the directive by the Kenyan Government on the relocation of refugees from the urban centres to the refugee camps in December 2012. [151579]

Lynne Featherstone: The British Government have raised concerns over the proposed Kenyan Government refugee directive with the Kenyan Ministers, and encouraged them to work closely with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to ensure the policy and any implementation are consistent with the rights of refugees and asylum seekers.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment she has made of the effects of the directive by the Kenyan government in December 2012 on the relocation of refugees from the urban centres to the refugee camps on (a) the registration of refugees in urban areas in Kenya and (b) the provision of assistance to urban refugees in Kenya. [151580]

Lynne Featherstone: Registration of new urban refugees has been suspended since the announcement of the Kenyan Government's directive in December 2012 to relocate refugees from urban centres to the refugee camps. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reports that assistance to remaining registered urban refugees is continuing uninterrupted.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 438W

Mali

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to provide humanitarian assistance specifically targeted to female Malian refugees. [151427]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK Government's humanitarian response in the Sahel, as with all responses, is based on need alone, in line with the humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence.

None of our humanitarian assistance to the region is therefore specifically targeted at female refugees. However, the rights, needs and vulnerabilities of women and girls are often overlooked in emergencies. The UK Government are working closely with all our aid partners to ensure the most vulnerable, specifically women and children, receive the assistance they need.

In direct response to the Mali conflict, UK aid is supporting the work of the United Nations' Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme, to provide a comprehensive package of aid including food, health care, protection, and clean water, to over 135,000 refugees in Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment she has made of the increase in food prices in Northern Mali following recent military intervention in the region. [151429]

Lynne Featherstone: According to the United Nations, the recent interventions in northern Mali have severely disrupted trading supply routes from Algeria, resulting in rising food prices in the area. As a result, a significant proportion of traders have reportedly left the Kidal area of northern Mali, increasing the risk of serious food shortages in the region in the coming months.

In direct response to this crisis, UK aid is currently providing support to the International Committee of the Red Cross and World Food Programme's emergency operations in northern Mali. These programmes aim to provide food assistance to conflict-affected and internally displaced people in northern Mali.

The UK will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that needs are being met as effectively and efficiently as possible by the international community.

Overseas Aid

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what proportion of her Department's budget contributed to UK Overseas Development Assistance in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, and (d) 2013 to date; and how much her Department expects to contribute in this fashion by the end of 2013. [151524]

Justine Greening: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 4 February 2013, Official Report, column 39W, to the hon. Member for Cardiff South and Penarth (Stephen Doughty).

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department contributed to total UK Overseas Development

17 Apr 2013 : Column 439W

Assistance in

(a)

2010,

(b)

2011,

(c)

2012 and

(d)

2013 to date; and how much her Department expects to contribute in this fashion by the end of 2013. [151525]

Justine Greening: The value of official development assistance (ODA) provided by the UK that was spent by DFID for 2010-12 is given in the following table. Please note that the figure provided for 2012 is provisional. Final 2012 ODA figures will be available following the publication of the 2013 edition of ‘Statistics on International Development’ (SID) in autumn 2013.

 £ million

2010

7,386

2011

7,722

2012

7,537

In 2013, we estimate the Department will spend over £10.04 billion of the total UK ODA budget.

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what proportion of total UK Overseas Development Assistance her Department's contribution accounted for in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013 to date; and how much her Department expects to contribute in this fashion by the end of 2013. [151526]

Justine Greening: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 4 February 2013, Official Report, column 39W, to the hon. Member for Cardiff South and Penarth (Stephen Doughty).

Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what criteria are used in (a) her Department and (b) each public body for which she is responsible to determine which officials receive bonus payments. [151136]

Mr Duncan: Senior civil servants (SCS) in the DFID are eligible to be considered for a year end non-consolidated performance award. Only the top 25% of performers are eligible for an award.

In considering the performance of SCS members, line managers take into account:

performance against agreed priority business objectives or targets;

the leadership behaviours exhibited in the achievement of objectives;

total delivery record over the year;

management of resources;

the challenge of the job compared to that of others;

response to unforeseen events that affected the performance agreement.

Awards are funded within existing pay bill controls, have to be re-earned each year against the pre-determined criteria above and, as such, do not add to future pay bill costs.

Staff in grades below the SCS are eligible to be considered for a year end non-consolidated performance award. Awards are intended to reward both the delivery of personal business objectives during the reporting year and demonstration of DFID's values. Awards are restricted to those performing to a satisfactory or better level and have to be re-earned each year.

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Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) her Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151110]

Mr Duncan: The following table provides the information requested for the DFID in each of the last five years. DFID's has two non-departmental public bodies: (1) the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission which has no staff; and (2) the Independent Commission for Aid Impact established in 2010 has five or fewer staff so the numbers not reported separately. DFID has no agencies.

 Pay bill (£000)Days worked(1)

2007-08

85,414

354,667

2008-09

90,829

352,044

2009-10

92,876

346,082

2010-11

92,465

344,828

2011-12

93,478

363,462

(1) Days worked is based on the number of full time equivalent staff in post as at 31 March in each of the financial years.

Syria

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much financial or other aid her Department has promised in respect of the situation in Syria. [150277]

Justine Greening: DFID receives its funding from the Treasury as allocated in the spending review. The UK's total humanitarian funding for Syria and the region to date is £139.5 million.

In addition to humanitarian assistance, DFID is also providing non-lethal equipment and practical assistance for the Syrian opposition, as well as supporting civil society through human rights, transitional justice programmes and local council capacity building projects. The funding for this support is met from the Conflict Pool budget. The Conflict Pool budget for Syria in financial years 2012-13 and 2013-14 is £10 million per year.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to mitigate the effects of attacks against humanitarian staff, aid buildings and supply routes, hospitals and medical units in Syria. [151169]

Justine Greening: The UK has provided humanitarian agencies with armoured four-wheel drive vehicles to mitigate the effects of attacks against humanitarian workers in their delivery of aid. The UK continues to call on all parties to the violence in Syria to reach an agreement to allow humanitarian operations to be carried out without interference or threat of violence, in line with international humanitarian law, so that humanitarian agencies are able to deliver sustained humanitarian aid to all those in need, no matter where they are in the country.

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Tibet

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment her Department has made of the effects of climate change and glacier meltdown in Tibet and the surrounding region. [151281]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID has funded two assessments on glacial melt in the Himalayan region.

The first assessment modelled the long-term effects of deglaciation on rivers originating from the Hindu-Kush Himalayas. The second assessment reviewed 52 published studies on glacier shrinkage across the Himalayan region. These reports are available on the DFID's Research for Development website, and both contain findings relevant to the Tibetan region.

DFID is also supporting work in the Mount Kailash area, which covers parts of Tibet, and aims to help about 1 million people adapt to the effects of changing river flows as a result of glacier melt. A new central research programme will also deliver new knowledge on how to adapt to climate change across all the Himalayan river basins.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Administration of Justice: Females

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to increase women’s and girls' access to justice processes in conflict areas that (a) meet their specific needs and (b) ensure the perpetrators of sexual violence are brought to justice. [150283]

Mark Simmonds: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) continues to support action to increase women's and girls' access to justice processes in conflict areas through its Government Action Plan on UN Security Council Resolution 1325 Women, Peace and Security. For example, the FCO is providing financial support to a UN Development Programme project in Nepal which aims to strengthen the Capacity of the National Human Rights Commission to develop a responsive and accessible justice system to promote gender equality, social inclusion and the rule of law. Conflict Pool funds have also been used to support the work of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission to help it act to protect human rights defenders, investigate and catalogue violence towards women, and support those seeking justice.

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague)'s Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative (PSVJ), launched last May, is intended to support and complement work which is under way across the UK Government on the Women, Peace and Security agenda. One of the key aims is to tackle the culture of impunity for sexual violence committed in conflict and to ensure that perpetrators are held accountable for their actions. At their meeting on 11 April, G8 Foreign Ministers agreed a Declaration on Preventing Sexual Violence which contains a set of practical commitments to overcome the barriers that impede the implementation of the

17 Apr 2013 : Column 442W

existing international legal framework and prevent successful investigations and prosecutions. The G8 also endorsed a new, non-legally binding, international protocol on the investigation and documentation of sexual violence in conflict. The UK is currently taking forward work on developing the protocol. This protocol will help improve the evidence base from which prosecutions for sexual violence in conflict can be drawn. The G8 has collectively pledged £23 million in new funding to address sexual violence in conflict.

The FCO has also established a specialist team of UK experts to deploy to conflict areas to support the UN and civil society to help build national capacity to investigate allegations of sexual violence and gather evidence. A number of deployments have already taken place. For example in March a legal and a psychosocial expert were deployed to Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). They worked alongside local experts and in cooperation with the Judicial and Prosecutorial Training Centre of the Federation of BiH and the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe to train judges and prosecutors to strengthen their capacity to effectively prosecute and adjudicate wartime sexual violence crimes in accordance with international standards.

The Secretary of State announced UK support to furthering justice and accountability in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) during his visit there in March this year. The UK will aim to deploy two UK experts to Panzi Hospital in the DRC for three months to collaborate with the NGO Physicians for Human Rights and local experts to train and mentor doctors, lawyers, police and judges on their response to specific current cases of sexual violence. The experts will focus on building capacity among local health, legal and law enforcement professionals. They will acquire essential skills that will make a lasting contribution to justice and accountability initiatives in DRC.

Afghanistan

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to his Afghan counterpart on the adequate representation of women in all peace and reconciliation talks and compliance with UN Security Council Resolution 1325. [150285]

Alistair Burt: Ministers continue to make clear to the Government of Afghanistan that the Afghan-led peace process should be inclusive and address the concerns of all Afghan citizens, including women. Human rights considerations and the protection of women's rights must be embedded in the transition process and gains made must be protected. The Joint Statement agreed by UK, Pakistan and Afghanistan issued after the Chequers Trilateral Summit on 4 February this year makes clear that the Afghan-led peace process should be one in which all of Afghanistan's people can participate peacefully in the country's political future.

Human rights, particularly women's rights, were a key priority for the Senior Minister of State, my noble Friend the right hon. Baroness Warsi, during her visit to Afghanistan on 4-6 March. The Minister discussed women's vital contribution to building peace, security and prosperity in Afghanistan with Foreign Minister Rassoul, leading female parliamentarians and other

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government and civil society representatives. Baroness Warsi had the opportunity to further emphasise our support for women's rights in Afghanistan at a reception at the Afghan embassy on International Women's Day.

We were pleased that in his statement at the 22nd Session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on 25 February, Minister Rassoul made clear Afghanistan's support to the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 women, peace and security and confirmed that the Afghan National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 will be launched in early 2014.

We will continue to work closely with the Government of Afghanistan and wider Afghan authorities, international partners and local and international civil society organisations to improve the status of women in Afghanistan, so that they can play a full role in a future, peaceful Afghanistan and fulfil their commitments under UNSCR 1325.

Burma

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the EU Foreign Affairs Council will next meet; and whether the suspension of sanctions on Burma will be discussed at that meeting. [151492]

Mr Swire: The EU Foreign Affairs Council will next meet on 22 April 2013. The dates for all upcoming EU Council meetings are published on the Europa website at the following address:

http://europa.eu/newsroom/calendar/

On 22 April, EU Foreign Ministers will discuss the situation in Burma in the context of reviewing the EU’s restrictive measures, most of which were suspended on 23 April 2012. The arms embargo and restrictions on the supply of equipment which could be used for internal repression remain in place.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to his Burmese counterparts to encourage local authorities in Rakhine State to prevent the harassment of humanitarian staff. [151552]

Mr Swire: The British Government remain extremely concerned by the humanitarian situation in Rakhine State. We have received reports from international n on-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the UN regarding humanitarian access and the operating environment for those providing much needed assistance. The chargé d’affaires at our embassy in Rangoon joined representatives from the UN, EU, US and Australia to meet with the Burmese Minister with responsibility for Rakhine State, Khin Yi, on 8 April and raised our concerns about the situation, including restrictions affecting NGOs.

Capital Punishment

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many countries have (a) abolished and (b) a moratorium on the use of the death penalty. [151163]

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Mr Lidington: The latest figures published by Amnesty International indicate there are 140 states which are abolitionist in law or practice, which includes any country observing a moratorium for over 10 years. We do not have figures for the number of countries observing a moratorium for less than 10 years. 58 states retain the death penalty.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will provide an update on progress on the Government's strategy for the abolition of the death penalty. [151165]

Mr Lidington: We continue to seek the global abolition of the death penalty through the implementation of our 2011-15 strategy. We regularly raise the issue in bilateral discussions with countries of concern and fund projects throughout the world in support of abolition. We also regularly raise the death penalty in multilateral forums and worked intensively to help ensure that the UN General Assembly Resolution against the death penalty last year was supported by more countries than ever. We are confident that this work has contributed to the increasing trend towards global abolition reported by Amnesty International in its most recent report. We are determined that our work in implementing the strategy must continue to meet the challenges also highlighted in that report.

India

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with his Indian counterpart on the number of outstanding rape cases in that country. [150641]

Mr Swire: Where a case involves violence against a British national, we liaise with the Indian authorities to urge a swift resolution to the case. I raised the delays affecting consular cases involving British nationals with my Indian counterpart, Deputy Foreign Minister, Preneet Kaur, during my recent visit to India in March. During my visit, I also discussed the broader issue of sexual violence and discrimination with Indian human rights organisations. The Government regularly raise human rights concerns with India, including cases of sexual violence and discrimination, both bilaterally and through the EU-India Human Rights Dialogue.

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions his Department has had with the Indian Government about the increased visa charge for British visitors to India; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect of that increase on the number of such visitors. [151309]

Mr Swire: I am aware that visa fees for India have recently increased. Officials at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have raised this with the Indian high commission in London and have been given assurances that the increase in the Indian visa fees is not exclusive to British applicants, but that visa fees have been revised globally. The Indian Government's immigration policies and procedures, including fees and the impact on the number of visitors to India, are purely a matter for them.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 445W

Lebanon

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on the prospects for the planned elections in Lebanon. [151023]

Alistair Burt: Parliamentary elections are scheduled to take place in June of this year. In order for elections to take place as planned, confessional leaders must come to an agreement over a new elections law. Following the recent resignation of Prime Minister Mikati, it is now imperative that a political consensus is reached. We call on all parties in Lebanon to work together to ensure that elections take place on a consensual basis within the legal and constitutional framework.

Middle East

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the EU Heads of Mission Jerusalem Report for 2012; what steps he plans to take in light of this Report; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the report. [151443]

Alistair Burt: It would not be appropriate to comment in detail on the contents of an internal report that was leaked to the press. We have made clear our position that we believe that a lasting peace between Palestinians and Israelis will mean, among other things, the creation of a Palestinian state based on 1967 borders and with East Jerusalem as its capital. We are strongly opposed to any attempts to change the facts on the ground in East Jerusalem by excluding Palestinians from the city and by increasing the number of settlers living there. Such acts raise tensions and undermine prospects for peace. We have made these concerns known to the Israelis both in private and in public.

Middle East and Africa

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps he is taking to defend Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the Middle East and Africa. [151379]

Mr Lidington: We are clear with governments in the region that it is important for universal human rights to underpin their political systems and societies. Just last week the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my hon. Friend the Member for North East Bedfordshire (Alistair Burt), strongly condemned the violent clashes that occurred on 7 April outside St Mark's Coptic Cathedral in Cairo. He also said that freedom of religion or belief is a vital component of a democratic society that individuals should be able to visit their places of worship safely and peacefully, and that security forces must act effectively to protect them.

In the long-term, I believe that the Arab Spring presents an historic opportunity for a more democratic, inclusive middle east and north Africa, based on respect for the rights of all. Through the Arab Partnership Initiative we are supporting long-term reform in the region. We are working to strengthen the rule of law and local institutions, including parliaments, the media, justice systems and civil society. And we are supporting

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more inclusive, accountable governance structures that support economic and political participation for all, regardless of background, gender or faith.

New Zealand

Bob Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what financial assistance his Department provided to the government of New Zealand following the Christchurch earthquake. [151462]

Mr Swire: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has not provided any financial assistance to New Zealand following the Christchurch earthquake, nor was it asked to do so by the Government of New Zealand. However, the New Zealand Government did ask their international partners, including the British Government, for practical assistance. This assistance included sending emergency and rescue teams as well as specialists in disaster victim identification.

Sexual Offences

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will use the UK's Presidency of the G8 to secure commitments to address gaps in essential services required by victims of sexual violence. [150331]

Mark Simmonds: Yes. Preventing sexual violence in conflict is the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague)’s personal priority for the G8 Foreign Ministers meeting on the 10-11 April. The Foreign Secretary secured a major declaration on preventing sexual violence in conflict, the first-of its kind. The G8 collectively pledged £23 million in new funding towards this.

One of the barriers to more effective action on this issue that we have identified is the gap in funding, resources and services for survivors of sexual violence. The G8 agreed that the provision of appropriate and accessible services, including health, psychosocial, legal and economic support is essential to support the rehabilitation and reintegration of victims of sexual violence in armed conflict and to empower them to pursue justice. The UK position is that all service provision for survivors must be in compliance with the principle of “do no harm” and in accordance with UN Guidelines for gender-based violence interventions in humanitarian settings.

Syria

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 781W, on Syria, when the training referred to in his answer will (a) begin and (b) end. [151693]

Mr Hague: The next phase of training is scheduled to begin on 29 April and should be completed within two months.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 781W, on Syria, how many training providers are conducting training for opposition forces in Syria; and how many British nationals are employed by each such provider. [151694]

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Mr Hague: We have used two training providers for training Syrian opposition forces. One employs no British nationals and the other employs between six and 10 British nationals, depending on work flows.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 781W, on Syria, what categories of training are being provided through the training providers referred to in that answer. [151695]

Mr Hague: The training we are providing covers human rights and the law of armed conflict. It is specifically designed lo provide the participants with a clear idea of their responsibility to ensure international standards of human rights and humanitarian law.

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 781W, on Syria, what previous funding has been given by his Department to the training providers referred to in that answer. [151705]

Mr Hague: We have used two training providers to date. We have no history of previous funding with one provider. We have previously funded the second training provider to provide training courses, capacity-building and equipment to a value of £3.4 million.

Justice

Alternatives to Prosecution: Yorkshire and the Humber

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) conditional cautions, (b) simple cautions, (c) penalty notices for disorder and (d) other out-of-court disposals have been issued for offences of

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(i) murder, (ii) rape, (iii) unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor, (iv) robbery, (v) burglary, (vi) arson and criminal damage, (vii) section 18 offences under the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, (viii) section 20 offences under the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 and (ix) sexual assaults there were in the Humberside local police authority area from 2009 to date. [146035]

Jeremy Wright: The use of cautions is at its lowest level for more than five years, as is the number of cautions issued to those who have a previous criminal record. The public and victims have a right to expect that people who commit serious crimes should be brought before a court. On 3 April 2013 we launched a review into the use of cautions which will focus on the use of cautions for serious offences and persistent offenders.

Among other things, the review will examine whether there are some offences for which the use of simple cautions is generally inappropriate, the reasons why multiple cautions are given to some criminals and the difference in the use of cautions by police force areas. The review is a significant step to ensuring that cautions are used correctly, in the interests of justice, and command the confidence of the public. The review will be completed by the end of May 2013.

The number of offenders cautioned (which includes conditional and simple cautions) for the selected offences in the Humberside police force area, from 2004 to 2011 (latest data available), can be viewed in table 1.

The number of Penalty Notices for Disorder (PNDs) issued to offenders aged 16 and over for criminal damage, in the Humberside police force area, from 2004 to 2011 (latest data available), can be viewed in table 2.

Please note that PNDs came in to effect in November 2004, and that they are not available for the offences requested except for Criminal Damage.

Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Table 1: Offenders cautioned(1,2) for selected offences in Humberside police force area, 2004-11(3)
Humberside police force area20042005200620072008200920102011

Rape(4)

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

1

Sexual activity(5)

5

8

13

11

1

7

8

10

Robbery(6)

4

1

8

1

0

0

2

1

Burglary(7)

120

99

139

140

107

73

84

62

Arson and Criminal damage(8)

603

786

767

776

808

593

447

405

Offences Against the Person Act 1861, S18

1

2

3

1

0

0

2

1

Offences Against  the Person Act 1861, S20

6

8

10

15

4

1

1

0

Sexual Assault(9)

1

9

12

16

4

11

13

12

(1) The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence. (2) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) Sexual Offences Act 2003, s1 and s5 (5) Sexual Offences Act 2003, s8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13 (6) Theft Act 1968, s8 (7) Theft Act 1968, s9 and s10 (8) Criminal Damage Act 1971 s1 - s3, Malicious Damage Act 1861 SS.35,36, 47 & 48, Explosive Substances Act 1883 s2 - s4, Offences against the Person Act 1861 s64 and Allotments Act 1922 s19 (9) Sexual Offences Act 2003, s2,3,6 and 7 Note: Figures may not match previously published information following further validation of available data. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice