Human Trafficking

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the total cross-Government expenditure was on combating human trafficking and modern day slavery in 2011-12; and what the estimated expenditure is for 2012-13. [150248]

Mr Harper: A number of Government Departments and agencies are involved in work to combat human trafficking. Total expenditure for this work is not recorded centrally.

Illegal Immigrants: Employment

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many employers were fined for using illegal workers in each of the last five years. [146414]

Mr Harper [holding answer 5 March 2013]: The information requested is in the following table. The figures are based on the number of civil penalties served at visited business addresses.

PeriodPenalties issued to businesses

29 February to 31 December 2008

1,169

2009

2,269

2010

2,092

2011

1,424

2012

1,215

Note: The figures provided are sourced from a UK Border Agency management information system which is not quality assured under National Statistics protocols and is subject to change due to internal data quality checking. Figures provided from this source do not constitute part of National Statistics and should be treated as provisional.

The decrease in the number of businesses served with civil penalties can be explained as follows: employers' increased awareness of the regime together with improved guidance on the UK Border Agency website; and providing clear advice on how to conduct document checks to verify a person's right to work, which has contributed to an increase in employer compliance. The Agency's work in summer 2012 under Operation Mayapple targeted enforcement activity on overstayers, including students whose leave had been curtailed. This activity drives up compliance across the board. Robust debt recovery processes have been implemented, with employers becoming increasingly aware that where penalties are not paid debt recovery enforcement action will commence against them.

Immigration

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many leave to remain applications were not processed within target in quarter 4 of 2012. [150144]

Mr Harper [holding answer 26 March 2013]: The UK Border Agency publishes figures on its performance against migration service standards on a quarterly basis

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1148W

as part of its commitment to transparency. These data are disaggregated by quarter and work stream and cover the period from April 2010 to December 2012. The latest figures are available on the UK Border Agency website at:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/aboutus/percentage-of-migration/

Based on the published figures, a total of 73,276 in-country leave to remain applications were processed in the 4th quarter of 2012. Of these, 28,135 (38%) of applications were processed within service standards, and 45,141 (62%) were processed outside service standards.

Measures have been put in place, including recruiting further casework staff, in order to return to operating within public service standards across all leave to remain application routes.

Notes:

1. The figures quoted were derived from the performance against migration service standards publication. These figures are based on management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change.

2. Figures relate to the following Temporary Migration work streams only: Family and Visiting the UK (2011-12)/Family (2012-13), Visiting the UK (2012-13), Employment, Study, and Sponsor Licensing.

3. Figures relate to postal applications as well as premium applications submitted at UKBA Public Enquiry Offices (PEO).

Immigration: Married People

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many leave to remain cases on the basis of marriage or civil partnership were pending review in Quarter 4 of 2012. [150145]

Mr Harper [holding answer 26 March 2013]: The information requested in the format required could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Information on leave to remain marriage or civil partnership applications pending review or reconsideration is held on paper case files or in the notes section of the UK Border Agency's databases.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many leave to remain cases on the basis of marriage or civil partnership were pending an initial decision in Quarter 4 of 2012. [150146]

Mr Harper [holding answer 26 March 2013]: The information requested in the format required could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Immigration: Northern Ireland

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people from other EU countries have been admitted to (a) work and (b) live permanently in Northern Ireland in each year since 2005. [150127]

Mr Harper: The number of EU nationals is measured only at a UK level and information is not captured on EU nationals’ intended location of stay or reason for entry.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1149W

The Home Office publishes data on an annual basis on the total number of EU nationals admitted to the UK, broken down by year. This information can be found in table ad.01 of the admissions tables of the Immigration Statistics October to December 2012, available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q4-2012/

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people from countries outside the EU have been granted permanent residence in Northern Ireland in each year since 2005. [150128]

Mr Harper: The Home Office publishes data on an annual basis on the number of individuals granted citizenship and settlement in the UK. Although this information is not disaggregated by the applicant's address, it is broken down by year (2004 to 2011), nationality, category of grant, and in the case of citizenship the region and local authority where the citizenship ceremony was held.

This information can be found in the Tables ‘cz.07’, ‘cz.08’, and ‘se.03’ of the release Immigration Statistics October to December 2012, available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q4-2012/

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to reply to the letter to her dated 6 February 2013, from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Ms N Ali. [148905]

Mr Harper: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 27 March 2013.

Passports

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for travel

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1150W

documents are outstanding from

(a)

April,

(b)

May and

(c)

June 2012. [145279]

Mr Harper: The information requested is shown in the following table:

Pending Travel Document applications received, April to June 2013
Month receivedOutstanding applications

Apr-12

701

May-12

1,369

June-12

1,128

Total

2,281

Notes: 1. The figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures relate to travel document and biometric travel document applications raised (received) between 1 April and 30 June 2012 that remain pending. 3. Data generated on 18 March 2013. 4. Since 29 February 2012 all Travel Document applicants have had to have or simultaneously apply for a Biometric Residence permit (BRP) confirming their current immigration status. The effect of this change was to double the work load of the Travel Document Section.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people unsuccessfully applied for a UK passport between January 2011 and January 2012. [148352]

Mr Harper: The number of unsuccessful passport applicants which the Identity and Passport Service (IPS) dealt with between January 2011 and January 2012 was 21,165, of which 14,990 were withdrawn, either by IPS or by the applicant, and 6,175 were failed.

Passports: Applications

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases for applications for travel documents are outstanding. [141050]

Mr Harper: There are a total of 15,813 travel document applications outstanding. Our current service level agreement is to process 98% of applications within 70 days; we are currently achieving 52%. The average processing time is 85 days and includes those applications that are not fully compliant on receipt and further information is required before a decision can be made.

A full breakdown of outstanding travel document applications is set out in the following table:

Pending travel document and biometric travel document applications
Year/month raisedTravel document applicationBTD (BRP) application—enrolment completeBTD (BRP) application—awaiting enrolmentTotal

November 1990 to December 1999

34

0

0

34

     

2000

25

0

0

25

2001

88

0

0

88

2002

242

0

0

242

2003

100

0

0

100

2004

88

0

0

88

2005

31

0

0

31

2006

10

0

0

10

2007

12

0

0

12

2008

13

0

0

13

2009

8

0

0

8

2010

17

0

0

17

2011

39

0

0

39

     

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1151W

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1152W

2012

    

January

17

0

2

19

February

10

3

1'

14

March

7

156

48

211

April

217

390

94

701

May

613

676

80

1,369

June

498

604

26

1,128

July

629

677

17

1,323

August

601

680

8

1,289

September

696

604

29

1,329

October

105

209

27

341

November

526

431

218

1,175

December

1,053

17

604

1,674

     

2013

    

January

1,575

25

909

2,509

February

1,308

1

715

2,024

     

Total

8,562

4,473

2,778

15,813

Notes: 1. The figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures relate to travel document and biometric travel document applications raised (received) up to at 28 February 2013 that remain pending. 3. Data generated on 18 March 2013. 4. Since 29 February 2012 all travel document applicants have had to have or simultaneously apply for a biometric residence permit(BRP) confirming their current immigration status . The effect of this change was to double the work load of the Travel Document Section.

Public Expenditure

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the estimated Resource DEL underspend in financial year 2012-13 of £700 million as set out in Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book which service areas in her Department received reduced resources; what the amounts of resource reduction were; and if she will make a statement. [150197]

James Brokenshire: Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book shows the difference between Budget 2012 plans and Departments’ latest estimates of their full-year position. Table 2.5 can be found on HM Treasury website at the following link:

http://cdn.hm-treasury.gov.uk/budget2013_complete.pdf

In addition to forecast underspend against final plans, since Budget 2012 the Department surrendered £319 million of RDEL at supplementary estimates, of which £78.5 million was transferred through the Budget Exchange mechanism for future years, and £58.2 million was transferred to other Government Departments.

The Department will set out its spending for the year in detail in its annual accounts in the usual way.

Recruitment

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on advertising job vacancies in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009. [150288]

James Brokenshire: Information about how much the Department spent on advertising job vacancies in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009 is not held centrally and is available only at disproportionate cost.

Telephone Services

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) her Department and (b) the agencies for which she is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) her Department in each of the last three years. [149997]

James Brokenshire: Information on the use of these numbers by the Home Office and its agencies is set out in the following tables.

Home Office
 NumberUsage

(a)

0800

0

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

0

(e)

0870

4

UK Border Agency
 NumberUsage

(a)

0800

1

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

3

(e)

0870

3

Identity and Passport Service
 NumberUsage

(a)

0800

0

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

12

(e)

0870

0

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1153W

The Home Office does not have any revenue arrangements in place with any of its telephony providers and therefore does not retain any revenue.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which telephone lines are operated by (a) her Department and (b) the agencies for which she is responsible for public inquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller. [150020]

James Brokenshire: Information on the use of these numbers by the Home Office and its agencies is set out in the following table. The principal access numbers are provided by Level 3 via Fujitsu.

0800 numbers are listed as freephone numbers. The cost of the call, providing it is made from a landline, falls to the owner and no charge is made to the caller. However a charge is applied to calls made from mobile phones.

0844, 0845 and 0870 are all chargeable to the caller. Some can be wrapped up in inclusive call packages for landlines but are almost never included in mobile packages.

The Home Office does not have any revenue arrangements in place with any of its telephony providers and therefore does not retain any revenue.

 Number 

Home Office

  

(a)

0800

0

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

0

(e)

0870

4

   

UK Border Agency

  

(a)

0800

1

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

3

(e)

0870

3

   

Identity and Passport Service

  

(a)

0800

0

(b)

0808

0

(c)

0844

0

(d)

0845

12

(e)

0870

0

Tourists: Passenger Ships

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the security risk posed by cruise ship day visitors to the UK. [144621]

Mr Harper: Border Force carries out strategic risk assessments of the cruise ship sector, the findings of which feed into reviews of the Border Operating Mandate.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1154W

UK Border Agency

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many UK Border Agency employees worked on preventing the importation of (a) controlled drugs, (b) illegal firearms and (c) illicit (i) alcohol and (ii) tobacco in each year since 2010-11; and if she will make a statement. [150120]

Mr Harper: In 2011-12 Border Force employed an average of 7,163 staff (FTE) in operational roles. That includes work on preventing the importation of controlled drugs, illegal firearms and illicit alcohol and tobacco.

Vetting

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals were placed on the (a) children’s and (b) adults’ barred list between 1 January and 31 December 2012 for reasons of (i) sexual offences, (ii) physical abuse, (iii) psychological or emotional abuse and (iv) neglect; and how many referrals in each category were from regulated activities as defined by the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006. [149650]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The total number of individuals placed on one or both of the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) barred lists between 1 January and 31 December 2012 was 5,675. Of these, 5,358 were placed on the children’s list and 5,107 were placed on the adults list.

Discretionary cases are categorised by type of harm. The following table provides the information that is held and available for the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2012. Data for Autobar cases cannot be provided because they are not categorised in this way.

 Barred list 
Harm typeAdultsChildren’sTotal

Financial

266

2

268

Sexual

33

76

109

Physical

19

7

26

Neglect

18

7

25

Verbal

7

0

7

Emotional

1

0

1

Other

5

3

8

Total

349

95

444

Data on the number of individuals from regulated activity are not available, because the scope and definition of regulated activity was amended from 10 September 2012. People barred before this date may not fall within the definition of regulated activity.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many referrals received by the Disclosure and Barring Service between 1 January and 31 December 2012 indicating offences of criminal activity with a child did not have a corresponding notification returned to the Disclosure and Barring Service from the relevant police force indicating receipt of a complaint for the alleged offence. [149651]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) does request notifications from police forces in relation to referrals it

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1155W

has received. Information on notifications received is held within each case file, therefore providing the answer to the question would incur disproportionate cost.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were placed on (a) either the children’s and the adults’ barred list and (b) the discretionary barred list between 1 January and 31 December 2012. [149661]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The total number of individuals placed on one or both of the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) barred lists between 1 January and 31 December 2012 was 5,675. Of these, 4,790 were placed on both lists.

There is not a separate discretionary barred list.

Work and Pensions

Disability Living Allowance

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many disabled people in receipt of disability living allowance who have an indefinite or lifetime award have been re-assessed in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available. [149572]

Esther McVey: The Department does not collect data on the number of disability living allowance indefinite award claimants who have had their entitlement reviewed. Claimants in receipt of DLA indefinite awards would have their entitlement reviewed if they reported a change in their care or mobility needs, or if they were selected as part of the Right Payment Programme.

Employment and Support Allowance

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to assist people with moderate to mild learning difficulties access support when completing the forms and medical questionnaires for employment and support allowance. [149560]

Mr Hoban: Training and guidance is provided for DWP staff who have contact with claimants to identify those who may be potentially vulnerable, including people with learning difficulties. This also supports staff to establish any additional support that can be provided in completing forms. For example, where it is clear that dealing with a claim or change by telephone is not suitable, arrangements can be made for face to face contact at a Jobcentre so that a form can be completed. In some circumstances a visit may be considered for the most vulnerable claimants.

Employment and support allowance claim and review forms include general information about how to get help when completing the form. This includes information about asking friends, relatives or organisations for help, asking someone else to make the claim on behalf of the claimant, and how to contact Jobcentre Plus to get help.

The work capability assessment questionnaire can be completed with the help of a relative, friend or representative. Contact details are provided if the claimant wants help from Jobcentre Plus. This includes helping the claimant to complete the questionnaire by using the transcription service. This service is available on request and can be done by phone, at the Jobcentre, or on a visit for the most vulnerable customers.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1156W

Employment: Learning Disability

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what additional support is given by his Department to those adults with moderate to mild learning difficulties when searching for employment. [149561]

Mr Hoban: DWP Jobcentre Plus advisers focus on providing a personalised, flexible service. This approach recognises that individuals may have conditions or circumstances that require different levels of support. They will discuss with the claimant how significantly they are affected by their disability in relation to employment. They will also help the individual to agree job goals and the best way forward into employment, which may include whichever ‘Get Britain Working’ measures are offered locally, or referral to contracted programmes, such as the Work programme or other non-contracted provision, if appropriate.

Anyone who requires more specialist help because of their disability will be able to see a disability employment adviser, who can identify suitable job opportunities, while acting as an advocate for the individual in approaches made to potential employers. The disability employment adviser will also aim to identify work solutions, overcoming or minimising any difficulties, relating to a claimant's disability in the work place. If they are having difficulty in identifying work solutions, they will seek help from a DWP work psychologist. They will also be aware of appropriate local support organisations, where they are available.

Disability employment advisers are also able to refer claimants to the Work programme. However, the Work programme may not always be the best option for all disabled customers. Work Choice and Residential Training sit alongside the Work programme, helping disabled people who face the most complex employment barriers to finding and staying in employment.

When the individual finds a job, the disability employment adviser can signpost them to Access to Work, a specialist disability service, which is delivered by Jobcentre Plus, providing practical advice and support to disabled people and their employers, helping them overcome work-related obstacles resulting from disability.

Habitual Residence Test

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when his review of the habitual residence test will be completed; and if he will make a statement. [149456]

Mr Hoban: The review of the habitual residence test will be completed by the end of this year.

Housing Benefit: Greater London

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what level of discretionary housing payment will be made available to each local authority in London in 2013-14. [150104]

Steve Webb: The following table shows the initial level of discretionary housing payments allocated to local authorities in London. The Government originally

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1157W

allocated £5 million to the Discretionary Housing Payment scheme towards the cost of foster carers. As legislation has now been amended to cover the cost of allowing foster carers an additional room, if appropriate, this £5 million will no longer be required by local authorities to assist this group. Revised allocations of discretionary housing payments to local authorities will be made available soon.

 £

Barking and Dagenham

1,310,802

Barnet

1,998,661

Bexley

533,858

Brent

4,815,410

Bromley

700,174

City of London

36,373

Camden

1,680,807

Croydon

1,791,425

Ealing

3,127,358

Enfield

3,246,226

Greenwich

1,136,207

Hackney

2,324,080

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,488,830

Haringey

2,422,505

Harrow

1,223,994

Havering

582,761

Hillingdon

1,245,418

Islington

1,628,508

Kensington and Chelsea

2,263,207

Lambeth

1,544,093

Lewisham

1,666,074

Hounslow

1,117,181

Kingston upon Thames

426,956

Merton

641,766

Newham

2,472,896

Redbridge

1,620,804

Richmond upon Thames

406,202

Southwark

1,119,665

Sutton

454,861

Tower Hamlets

2,237,330

Waltham Forest

1,517,954

Wandsworth

1,839,423

Westminster

5,930,283

Housing Benefit: Social Rented Housing

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will take steps to provide exemptions from housing benefit entitlement reductions on the basis of under-occupancy for registered carers who are unable to share a bedroom with their partner or spouse because of a medical condition. [149617]

Steve Webb: An extra £25 million has been allocated to the £20 million baseline discretionary housing payment funding to specifically help those who live in specially adapted homes. The baseline funding is however available for other priority groups, including those with long-term medical conditions that may create difficulties for those who would normally be expected to share a bedroom.

People living in social housing will be able to claim housing benefit for an extra bedroom if their disabilities are such that they require a non-resident carer (or team of carers) to stay overnight.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1158W

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will take steps to provide exemptions from housing benefit entitlement reductions on the basis of under-occupancy to people who are registered as disabled or with a defined medical condition, with an additional room in their property which is used exclusively for the treatment of their condition and where storage of medical equipment precludes the use of the room as a bedroom. [149618]

Steve Webb: An extra £25 million has been allocated to the £20 million baseline discretionary housing payment funding to specifically help those who live in specially adapted homes. The baseline funding is however available for other priority groups, including those with long-term medical conditions that may create difficulties for those who would normally be expected to share a bedroom.

People living in social housing will be able to claim housing benefit for an extra bedroom if their disabilities are such that they require a non-resident carer (or team of carers) to stay overnight.

Pensioners: Poverty

Jim Sheridan: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what recent estimate he has made of the number of pensioners in poverty in (a) Paisley and Renfrewshire North constituency, (b) Scotland and (c) the UK; [150313]

(2) what steps he is taking to reduce the number of pensioners in poverty in (a) Paisley and Renfrewshire North constituency, (b) Scotland and (c) the UK. [150314]

Steve Webb: The number of pensioners in households with income, after housing costs, below 60% of the median is published in Table 6.4 db on page 219 of the Households Below Average Income report, available here:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/hbai/hbai2011/pdf_files/full_hbai12.pdf

It is not possible to provide estimates of poverty at a constituency level due to insufficient sample size.

Pensioner wellbeing is a priority for the Government. The triple lock policy ensures that the basic state pension will go up by the highest of earnings, prices or 2.5%. Our latest estimates are that the average person reaching state pension age in 2013 can expect to receive an additional £12,000 in basic state pension over their retirement than under previous policies of uprating by prices. We have protected key benefits for older people including free eye tests, free prescription charges, free off peak bus travel, free television licences for those aged over 75 and winter fuel payments.

We are reforming the welfare system to improve work and saving incentives, and provide more effective support to those out of work. We have abolished the default retirement age, meaning most people can now retire when the time is right for them, enabling people to work and save for longer. Furthermore, our plans for the single-tier pension, and for automatic enrolment into workplace pensions, will provide clarity and confidence to better support saving for retirement for today's working age population and make the default decision a decision to save.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1159W

Personal Independence Payment

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 21 March 2013, Official Report, column 751W, on personal independence payment, if he will estimate the potential number of personal independence claimants who do not have a landline telephone in (a) Glasgow North West constituency, (b) Glasgow, (c) Scotland and (d) the UK. [150338]

Esther McVey: The Department has no plans to estimate the number of potential claimants to personal independence payment who do not have a landline.

We will offer freephone lines for people to make a personal independence payment claim. Calls to the 0800 numbers are free from BT land lines and most mobiles and will only take a short time. We can call claimants back on request.

Public Expenditure

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the estimated Resource DEL underspend in financial year 2012-13 of £700 million as set out in Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book which service areas in his Department received reduced resources; what the amounts of resource reduction were; and if he will make a statement. [150195]

Mr Hoban: Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book shows the difference between Budget 2012 plans and Departments’ latest estimates of their full-year position as at February. The Department will set out in more detail its final spending for the year in its annual accounts in the usual way.

In addition to forecast underspend against final plans, since Budget 2012 the Department surrendered £389.447 million of RDEL at supplementary estimates and switched £120,513 million from its resource budget to the capital budget. It has also transferred £13.533 million to other Government Departments. Furthermore it received no reserve claims at supplementary estimates.

Social Security Benefits

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what support he is providing to the four local authorities selected for the initial implementation of the benefit cap; and if he will make a statement. [149097]

Mr Hoban: The benefit cap project team are working closely with the four local authorities involved in phased rollout to support the implementation of the cap.

A senior Jobcentre Plus Account Manager has been appointed in each of the four London boroughs to co-ordinate local engagement and support, supported by an Implementation Manager working with the four local authorities and DWP benefit cap project team members.

Jobcentre Plus staff have also been co-located in local authority premises to assist households likely to be impacted by the cap and ensure they have access to a wide range of support.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1160W

In line with the commitments we have made previously to support phased rollout, DWP has also agreed additional funding of over £2 million to be paid to the four local authorities. This funding takes account of the additional resources they are deploying to successfully implement the benefit cap in April as part of the phased rollout approach.

Staff

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much has been spent on redundancies by his Department of people resident in (a) Scotland and (b) the rest of the UK; how many such people have since been rehired elsewhere in his Department; and how many temporary posts have been created by his Department since May 2010. [149686]

Mr Hoban: Prior to a civil service role ending employees are given the opportunity for redeployment before a paid exit is considered.

The following table provides the information requested for spend on redundancies in Scotland and the rest of the UK since May 2010. This includes compensation paid through the use of voluntary exit schemes, voluntary redundancy and compulsory redundancy schemes.

£
 ScotlandOther UKTotal

Voluntary exit

3,456,120

75,420,848

78,876,968

Voluntary redundancy

505,856

6,396,496

6,903,352

Compulsory redundancy

19,903

208,653

228,556

Total

3,982,879

82,025,997

86,008,876

Three people have been rehired after leaving the DWP on exit/redundancy terms. None of the individuals rehired were in Scotland.

The following table provides the information requested for numbers of temporary roles in DWP since May 2010:

 ScotlandOther UKTotal

Temporary posts

318

2,258

2,576

Universal Credit

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 6 March 2013, Official Report, column 1001W, on universal credit, if he will provide an update to the House when his Department has the final funding instrument in place for services to be provided under the UC Framework for Local Support Services. [149218]

Mr Hoban: We are still working through the details of the final funding instrument for services to be provided under the framework but are hoping to have this agreed between DWP and the local authorities associations over the next few months.

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to encourage providers of budgeting or jamjar bank

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1161W

accounts and other card products related to the introduction of universal credit to design their products in such a way as to facilitate and encourage the accumulation of savings. [149727]

Mr Hoban: We are working closely with banking and financial product providers to ensure that suitable financial products are available for universal credit claimants. By helping claimants manage money more effectively, we will create the conditions within which claimants can make and act on decisions about their longer term finances.

Work Capability Assessment

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether his Department monitors the status of individual claimants who are found fit for work following a workplace capability assessment, are subsequently unable to claim employment and support allowance, but then do not go on to claim jobseekers' allowance. [149596]

Mr Hoban: The Department does not routinely collect information on people once they have left benefit.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many claimants of employment and support allowance experiencing mental ill health have been placed in the support group in each year since the workplace capability assessment was introduced. [149599]

Mr Hoban: The following table shows, for new employment and support allowance (ESA) claims, the number of claimants placed in the support group at initial work capability assessments (WCAs) carried out between October 2008 and August 2012 (the latest data available), whose primary condition is a mental health condition, by the year that the WCA was completed. This does not include claimants who may be experiencing some form of mental ill health but have a physical primary health condition as data are only available on the primary health condition of a claimant at the start of their claim.

Number of claimants placed in the support group at initial WCAs carried out between October 2008 and August 2012 with a primary mental health condition, by the year that the WCA was completed
WCA completion dateMental health: support group outcomes

October 2008 to December 2008

(1)

January 2009 to December 2009

7,700

January 2010 to December 2010

13,000

January 2011 to December 2011

26,500

January 2012 to August 2012

29,700

To date

77,000

(1) Indicates a nil or negligible value. Note: Rounding: All volumes are rounded to the nearest 100. Hence total does not sum exactly. Source: Department for Work and Pensions benefit administration datasets.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what training mental function champions offer healthcare professionals regarding workplace capability assessments; and how often any such training takes place. [149600]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1162W

Mr Hoban: Mental function champions do not provide formal training. The role requires them to promote awareness on mental health topics and provide ad hoc advice to their health care professional colleagues when required. They are always available by phone to offer advice to all health care professionals and as part of their role, regularly visit other centres to promote best practice and spread current learning and knowledge. Additionally, they input into continuous medical education (CME) in relation to mental health.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what performance measures are in place to evaluate the effectiveness of mental function champions on workplace capability assessments; [149602]

(2) what data his Department collects, maintains and holds on the performance of mental function champions. [149603]

Mr Hoban: All Atos healthcare professionals are fully trained and approved to assess people with mental health conditions. Professor Harrington recommended that Atos Healthcare introduced champions in mental, intellectual and cognitive disabilities, who have undergone further specific training in these conditions and are able to spread best practice and knowledge, and help other Atos Healthcare professionals with difficult assessments involving mental, intellectual or cognitive disabilities. In this role mental function champions will assist and advise colleagues on how to deal with any aspect of a case involving mental function or learning disability.

There are no formal performance measures around the role of the mental function champion and no separate data are held on the specific performance of mental function champions but routine monitoring of the quality of assessments and customer satisfaction takes place as part of the contractual arrangements between DWP and Atos Healthcare. In addition, Professor Harrington's second review noted that the mental function champion role is being well-utilised and that health care professionals have welcomed the advice and support.

Work Programme: North East

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent assessment he has made of the performance of (a) Igneus and (b) Avanta under the Work programme contracts for the North East of England. [150345]

Mr Hoban: Performance information for all Work programme providers including Ingeus and Avanta was published on 27 November 2012 and can be accessed via the following link:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=wp

The next release of Work programme statistics will be in May 2013.

Communities and Local Government

Green Belt

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what planning guidance his Department issues to local authorities in relation to the conversion of existing buildings into residential dwellings situated in green-belt land. [148930]

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Nick Boles: A planning application for change of use of an existing building in green belt to a dwelling should be assessed in the light of all material considerations, including green belt policy in the national planning policy framework. This says that reuse of permanent, substantial buildings in green belt may not be inappropriate if the development preserves the green belt’s openness and does not conflict with the purposes of the designation. This is intended to allow redundant and empty buildings to be brought back into productive use, increasing rural housing for local people and promoting regeneration. The Government recently announced at Budget their intention to consult on allowing further flexibilities between use classes to support change of use from certain agricultural and retail uses to residential use.

Homelessness

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of all homelessness (a) applications and (b) acceptances were from black, Asian and minority ethnic households in (i) 2001-02 and (ii) 2011-12 in each English region. [144144]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 25 February 2013]: As I indicated in my answer to the hon. Member on 25 February 2013, Official Report, column 76W, the Department does not collect information on numbers of homelessness applications. Although it collects figures on the numbers of decisions, which are closely related to numbers of applications, they are not broken down by ethnic group.

My Department does, however, collect information on the numbers of homelessness acceptances broken down by ethnic group. As outlined in the written ministerial statement of 18 September 2012, Official Report, column 32WS, my Department no longer publishes statistics by Government office region.

Nevertheless, regional totals for 2011-12 are included within Live Table 784 at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-homelessness

No published regional figures are available for 2001-02, but I have placed a table in the Library of the House that sets out the figures reported by individual local authorities.

Housing: Taxation

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what account officials of his Department are taking of the level set for the affordable housing levy in determining the proposed level for the community infrastructure levy. [149570]

Nick Boles: Community infrastructure levy rates are proposed locally based on local economic viability and evidence, and are subject to public consultation and independent examination before they can be adopted.

The Government published revised statutory guidance on the community infrastructure levy in December 2012 which included guidance on the rate setting process for the levy and the interaction between the levy and section 106 agreements, to provide clarity and help prevent any double charging. The guidance is clear that proposed levy rates need to take account of policies on section 106 planning obligations, including those relating to affordable housing. This was a crucial matter recently

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1164W

at an independent examination of the Mid Devon draft levy charging schedule, where the proposed levy rates were rejected due to inconsistencies over affordable housing figures.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what definition his Department uses for determining self-build housing under the community infrastructure and affordable housing levies. [149966]

Nick Boles: Section 106 and community infrastructure levy legislation, regulations and guidance do not currently distinguish between self-build and other forms of housing. But we are currently reviewing what further steps can be taken to ensure that self-build and genuine small-scale development is not adversely affected by the introduction of the levy.

Local Government: Surveillance

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) how many cases where his Department believes that a local authority has broken the law relating to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 have been referred to the police in the last five years; [149894]

(2) how many prosecutions there have been of local authorities who have used private investigators without authorisation from a magistrate in breach of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 in the last five years. [149895]

Brandon Lewis [holding answer 25 March 2013]: Since their introduction under the last Administration, there has been significant public concern about the abuse and over-use of surveillance powers by local authorities under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000.

Reflecting commitments made in the coalition agreement, further to the passage of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, local authorities are now required to obtain judicial approval before using covert surveillance in connection with their public enforcement responsibilities. In addition, local authority use of directed surveillance is now limited to the investigation of criminal offences which attract a maximum six month or more custodial sentence, or of a criminal offence relating to the underage sale of alcohol and tobacco.

Guidance to local authorities on the new regime is published by the Home Office and is available at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/counter-terrorism/ripa-forms/local-authority-ripa-guidance/

My Department does not collate statistics on the local authority use of covert surveillance. However, broad trends are given each year in the Chief Surveillance Commissioner's independent report which is laid in Parliament and which is available in the Library of the House.

As the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), recently commented in response to the recent research by Big Brother Watch, it is totally unacceptable if councils are trying to sidestep these important new checks and they should be held to account for acting outside the law.

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Pedestrian Areas

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will clarify the advice issued in the guiding document by his Department for streets stating that there should not be footpaths in future residential developments; and if he will make a statement. [149035]

Nick Boles: My hon. Friend may be referring to ‘Manual for Streets’ published by the last Administration in 2007.

The document states:

“Highway authorities would be expected to adopt street layouts complying with their Design Guide which have been constructed in accordance with the highway authority's specification of works. They would normally be expected to adopt: residential streets, combined footways and cycle tracks; footways adjacent to carriageways and main footpaths serving residential areas” (para 11.8.6).

However, the document is in need of review as it is a reflection of the last Government's planning policies, and its advice (such as on parking and density) is now out of date in many areas.

Regional Planning and Development: West Midlands

Peter Luff: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when the West Midlands Regional Spatial Strategy will be abolished; and if he will make a statement. [150061]

Nick Boles: I am pleased to report that the Government announced their decision to revoke the regional strategy for the west midlands, alongside the regional strategies for the north-west and south-west in the written ministerial statement of 27 March 2013, Official Report, columns 109-10WS.

Subject to parliamentary ratification, this paves the way to complete the abolition of every regional strategy in England, fulfilling our coalition agreement commitment to return decision-making powers on planning and housing to local councils.

Orders to revoke these three regional strategies will be laid in Parliament after the Easter recess.

Right to Buy Scheme: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the statement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 20 March 2013, how many people in London will benefit from the announced changes to the Right to buy scheme. [149939]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 25 March 2013]: Right to buy is a demand-led scheme but the announced changes are designed to ensure that those tenants who do wish to take up their right to buy their home are not prevented from doing so by artificial barriers. All eligible social tenants in London are able to benefit from the increase in the maximum cash discount to £100,000, where applicable. They will also benefit from our proposal to reduce the eligibility threshold period from five years to three. We will legislate for this change as soon as parliamentary time allows.

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Senior Civil Servants

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 9 January 2013, Official Report, columns 278-79W, on senior civil servants, how much his Department spent on employing senior staff in each year since 2010. [137380]

Brandon Lewis [holding answer 15 January 2013]: Further to the steps that my Department has taken, as I outlined to the hon. Member in my answer to him of 9 January 2013, Official Report, columns 278-79W, the Department’s senior pay bill has fallen by 26% in cash terms since 2008-09.

Senior civil service payroll
 £ million

2008-09

14.4

2009-10

13.9

2010-11

12.8

2011-12

10.7

This illustrates the scope for sensible savings in the public sector.

Travellers: Caravan Sites

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he has made an estimate of the number of illegal Travellers' sites in the UK. [142696]

Brandon Lewis [holding answer 11 February 2013]: My Department collects data on the number of unauthorised caravans in England. These include those on unauthorised developments (on land owned by Travellers) and those on unauthorised encampments (on land not owned by the Travellers).

The following table shows the recorded counts on both types, in July 2000 (coinciding with the introduction of the Human Rights Act), following the 2010 general election and the most recent figures.

Caravans on unauthorised sites
 On unauthorised developmentsOn unauthorised encampments

July 2000

803

2,513

July 2010

2,199

1,437

July 2012

1,792

1,366

This illustrates that unauthorised developments increased significantly following the introduction of the Human Rights Act. There has been widespread public concern about the planning regime been sidelined.

The number of unauthorised caravans has fallen in the last two years. However, we believe that further action is needed to ensure fair play in the planning system.

The Localism Act 2011 has given councils stronger powers to tackle the abuse of retrospective planning permission, and last August my Department published clear guidance to councils on the range of legal powers they have to tackle unauthorised sites. My Department has also been consulting on giving councils stronger powers to use Temporary Stop Notices to tackle such unauthorised sites.

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Justice

Chris Huhne and Vicky Pryce

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the cost to the prison system of incarcerating (a) Chris Huhne and (b) Vicky Pryce. [149506]

Jeremy Wright: We are unable to provide costs for individual prisoners.

Average annual costs per prisoner and costs per prison place, based on actual net resource expenditure, are published on the Justice website at the following location:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/prisons-and-probation/prison-probation-performance-info

In addition, average prisoner costs are published for each prison establishment and grouped by prison function on the basis of the major use of each prison. The calculations do not analyse costs by type of sentence or prisoner, and a prisoner may be held in establishments of different functions during the course of their sentence.

Costs for 2012-13 will be published later in the year after the publication of the NOMS annual report and accounts.

Crime Prevention: Wales

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which organisations in the South Wales police force area received funds from the Youth Justice Board effective practice grant in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2011-12; and how much each such organisation received in each such year. [148310]

Jeremy Wright: Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) are multi-agency partnerships funded primarily by the local authority and local statutory partners, including the police, probation, health authorities and where relevant the Welsh Assembly Government. The Ministry of Justice contributes funding through the Youth Justice Board (YJB) in the form of youth justice good practice grants provided to each YOT for the purpose of effective practice.

The following table has been provided by the YJB and relates to the funding provided under the youth justice good practice grant for the seven Youth Offending Teams in the South Wales police force area for 2011-12 and 2012-13.

£
Youth Offending Team in South Wales2011-12: YJB youth justice good practice grant per YOT2012-13: YJB youth justice good practice grant per YOT

Bridgend

322,123.00

304,209

Cardiff

800,149.00

755,651

Merthyr Tydfil

354,352.00

334,646

Neath Port Talbot

362,724.00

342,552

Rhondda Cynon Taff

654,597.00

618,194

Swansea

639,995.00

604,404

Vale of Glamorgan

238,407.00

225,149

Total

3,372,347.00

3,184,805.00

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Cycling: Pedestrian Areas

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were convicted under section 72 of the Highways Act 1835 for riding a bicycle on the pavement in England and Wales in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [148248]

Jeremy Wright: The number of offenders found guilty at all courts for the offence of riding a pedal cycle on a footpath, in England and Wales, from 2010 to 2011 (latest available), can be viewed in the table.

Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

The offence is more commonly dealt with by the police and police community support officers issuing a fixed penalty notice.

Offenders found guilty at all courts for the offence of riding a pedal cycle on a footpath(1), England and Wales, 2010-11(2,3)
 20102011

Pedal cycles—riding on footpath

288

314

(1) An offence under section 72 of the Highway Act 1835. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Knives: Crime

Bob Blackman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what proportion of those repeat offenders charged or cautioned for the possession of a knife or an offensive weapon and who received non-custodial sentences in 2012 were juveniles; [148677]

(2) what proportion of those repeat offenders charged or cautioned for the possession of a knife or an offensive weapon in 2012 were juveniles. [148678]

Jeremy Wright: We are clear that cautions are not generally suitable for serious offences or those involving possession of a knife. In most circumstances, such offenders should be prosecuted and we are currently reviewing the use of cautions more generally.

The following tables show that the number of juveniles receiving a further conviction or caution for these offences is at its lowest level for at least five years. Table 1 shows the number and proportion of juvenile offenders receiving a non-custodial sentence for possession of a knife or offensive weapon in England and Wales, who had already received a previous conviction or caution for these offences for the period 2008-12.

Table 1: Number and proportion of juvenile offenders sentenced to a non-custodial sentence for possession of a knife or an offensive weapon possession in England and Wales who had already received a conviction or caution for these offences, 2008-12
 All offenders(all ages)Juvenile (ages 10-17)Juvenile proportion (%) of all offenders

2008

3,371

428

13

2009

3,023

319

11

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1169W

2010

2,613

299

11

2011

2,677

309

12

2012

2,807

258

9

Source: Ministry of Justice

Table 2 shows the number and proportion of juvenile offenders convicted or cautioned for possession of a knife or an offensive weapon in England and Wales, who had already received a previous conviction or caution for these offences, 2008-12.

Table 2: Number and proportion of Juvenile offenders convicted or cautioned for possession of a knife or an offensive weapon in England and Wales, who had already received a previous conviction or caution for these offences, 2008-12
 All offenders (all ages)Juvenile (ages 10-17)Juvenile proportion (%) of all offenders

2008

5,724

571

10

2009

5,232

443

8

2010

4,496

404

9

2011

4,860

446

9

2012

4,356

338

8

Source: Ministry of Justice

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

The data are based on sentenced occasions and not sentenced individuals which means an individual may appear more than once in each year in the data.

Legal Aid Scheme

Natascha Engel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the savings to accrue to his Department's budget as a result of changes to eligibility for legal aid in 2013-14. [149645]

Jeremy Wright: At around £2 billion per year we have one of the most expensive legal aid systems in the world. While it is absolutely right that legal aid is provided to those who most need it, going to court is not always the right answer. We estimate that the savings accrued from the reduction in scope of civil legal aid, as a result of implementation of the reforms in part 1 of Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, will total £100 million in 2013-14. We will still be spending approximately £1.7 billion a year on legal aid after the savings from these reforms have reached a steady state.

Prisoners: Basic Skills

Julie Elliott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that all prisoners in need of literacy and numeracy skills acquire such skills before leaving prison. [149451]

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Jeremy Wright: Prisoners receive a basic screen for literacy and numeracy needs during prison induction. Where a need is identified they will be referred to the learning and skills provider for a fuller assessment and offered teaching and support as a matter of priority. This can take place in classrooms, through peer mentoring, in libraries, at work and during other prison activities.

Prisoners: Clothing

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost was of prison-issued clothing per inmate in the latest period for which figures are available; and what the total cost was for all prison inmates in each of the last five years. [147922]

Jeremy Wright: For the 11-month period between 1 April 2012 and 28 February 2013, the latest period for which figures are available, the total value of general items of prison uniform clothing and footwear issued to public sector prisons in England and Wales was approximately £3 million.

There are no summary cost data available for previous periods and data on a per-prisoner basis are not held, but information held does suggest that the usage of general items of prison uniform clothing and footwear has reduced by between 20% and 30% over the last five years(1).

(1) Approximately—the product range does vary across the years.

Prisons: Food

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many prisoners have been affected by the supply of contaminated halal meat to prisons; [143027]

(2) with reference to the identification of contaminated halal meat in prison food, whether he is investigating the possible contamination of the supply of other religious foods to the Prison Service; [143028]

(3) whether the company which supplied contaminated halal meat to prisons knows for how long such contamination has been occurring; [143029]

(4) which prisons have received contaminated halal meat; [143030]

(5) whether any halal food supplied to prisons other than pasties and pies has been contaminated. [142911]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice (MOJ) and its contracted food supplier cannot confirm how many prisoners may have received the contaminated halal beef pastry products from the batches that tested positive for traces of porcine DNA. There is no evidence that any of the halal beef pastry products other than in those batches tested were contaminated.

Following the Food Safety Authority of Ireland's announcement of the discovery of horse DNA traces within consumer beef products the MOJ instigated a product review through its primary supplier. This led to the testing of a small number of halal beef pastry products which were immediately quarantined. The initial result of these qualitative tests confirmed the presence of porcine DNA within some batch samples of halal beef pies, pasties and sausage rolls.

The MOJ, working with the National Offender Management Service, commissioned through its contracted supplier further testing of additional products to ascertain any further contamination. Any additional tests are to

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1171W

ensure the complete integrity across the MOJ product range to enable it to meet the religious needs of all prisoners.

The MOJ only purchases halal food products from suppliers that are certified by halal certification authorities and in the case of the contaminated food the Halal Food Authority. Once aware of a potential risk of contamination in its supply chain, the MOJ responded rapidly and robustly by immediately quarantining the products identified and instructing its supplier to perform precautionary tests. The MOJ also instructed its contracted food supplier to stop supply of products from the sub-contractor responsible for supplying the halal products at issue and to remove those products from the supply chain to the Prison Service.

The current contracts for the provision of food to prisons began in October 2012. The first known halal beef products contaminated with pork were supplied to prisons in England and Wales in October 2012, with the last delivery made in January 2013. The MOJ was first made aware of the contamination on 18 January and the products were immediately quarantined. 95 prisons have received halal savoury products from the range of potentially contaminated products via the national food contract.

These products were produced in batches. However, it has not yet been confirmed how many batches were produced between the period October 2012 and January 2013 and of these which batches were contaminated and subsequently supplied into prisons.

Until this information is known, the MOJ cannot confirm the number of prison sites which may have been affected. The information available to the MOJ from our supplier will not determine which sites actually received contaminated products with complete certainty as the goods will have been consumed and the packaging discarded.

During its initial investigation of halal beef pastry products the MOJ quarantined beef pies, pasties and sausage rolls. Initial test results identified porcine DNA contamination in halal beef pies and pasties and it was later identified in sausage rolls. These were all quarantined immediately following the review and remained in quarantine until receipt and analysis of test results.

The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling), has instructed that further random testing take place. 33 products were tested and three tested positive for turkey contamination. Of the three positive tests, two were halal.

Once the results of the turkey contamination were received by NOMS/MOJ, immediate action was taken to quarantine the products to prevent further usage within prisons.

Our supplier has given categorical assurance that the very low level of turkey contamination is from halal turkey and from an appropriately certificated halal processing plant.

Concurrently, NOMS/MOJ are carrying out independent testing on two minced beef products (one halal, one non-halal) to test for the presence of horsemeat following an alert by 3663 on 8 March. These products have already been quarantined and will not re-enter the supply chain. The test results are due in early April.

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Reoffenders

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offences were committed by people who had previously received sentences of (a) less than 12 months, (b) up to two years, (c) between two and four years and (d) more than four years in the last year for which figures are available. [144223]

Jeremy Wright: It is not possible to accurately count the number of offences committed by offenders who have previously received a custodial sentence as not all offences are reported to the police and result in an offender being sanctioned. The following figures are therefore based on the number of cautions or convictions given to these offenders over the last year.

The number of convictions and cautions given to offenders in England and Wales in the 12-month period July 2011 to June 2012 who had previously received various custodial sentence lengths are:

(a) 222,993 convictions/cautions were given to offenders who had previously received a custodial sentence of ‘less than 12 months’.

(b) 237,255 convictions/cautions were given to offenders who had previously received a custodial sentence of ‘up to two years’. Includes offences in part (a) above.

(c) 61,974 convictions/cautions were given to offenders who had previously received a custodial sentence ‘between two and four years’.

(d) 24,755 convictions/cautions were given to offenders who had previously received a custodial sentence of ‘more than four years’.

These figures have been drawn from the police’s administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

It should be noted that there are some overlaps between the figures presented as some offenders have received previous custodial sentences in more than one custodial sentence length group.

Road Traffic Offences

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what progress has been made with his Department’s plan to conduct a review of how the criminal justice system operates when people are injured or killed on the road; and what liaison his Department has conducted with the Department for Transport on setting up a cross-stakeholder group in respect of that review. [144060]

Jeremy Wright: A range of offences with severe maximum penalties are in place for those who cause death or serious injury on the roads through bad driving. On 3 December 2012, the Government introduced a new offence of causing serious injury through dangerous driving punishable by a maximum of five years imprisonment. The Ministry of Justice is not planning a review of how the criminal justice system operates when people are killed or injured on the roads. We do of course closely monitor how offences and penalties work in practice, and as part of that, we maintain dialogue with other Government Departments and we engage with stakeholders to help us understand their concerns; in this context, officials are involved in the Department for Transport-led ‘justice for vulnerable road users’

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forum, which met for the first time at the end of February. The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling), has asked the Sentencing Council to review the sentencing guideline for death by driving.

Trials: Vulnerable Adults

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what his Department's policy is on ensuring access to a fair trial for vulnerable defendants and people with communication difficulties, learning disabilities and mental health problems; [148530]

(2) what steps courts take to identify vulnerable defendants in order to provide measures to meet their support needs; [148531]

(3) if he will estimate the average number of trials per year in England and Wales where the defendant has a learning disability; [148532]

(4) if he will publish the evidence available to his Department on the extent to which the system of discretionary measures provided by the courts to meet the needs of vulnerable defendants ensures that all such defendants receive a fair trial. [148533]

Mrs Grant: The Government are committed to ensuring that all defendants receive a fair trial, and a variety of measures are available to courts to secure this basic right for vulnerable defendants. There is no evidence to suggest that the available measures, which include giving evidence by live link and, where necessary, the assistance of an intermediary, fail to achieve that objective. Courts have a responsibility to check throughout a case that the defendant understands what is going on. Vulnerable defendants should always be represented, as one of the criteria in the Interests of Justice test is that the defendant may not otherwise be able to understand the court proceedings. It is generally through the defence that courts are alerted to the fact that a defendant may be vulnerable and may need support.

The Ministry of Justice does not record centrally the number of cases in which the defendant has a learning disability.

Treasury

Children: Day Care

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to the written ministerial statement of 19 March 2013, Official Report, columns 37-38WS, on child care, if he will estimate how many households containing (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four and (e) five or more children in (i) the UK, (ii) each nation and region of the UK and (iii) each parliamentary constituency in the UK will benefit through the announced changes in tax relief to support child care costs from 2015; and how many such households have a combined income of (A) £20,000 to £30,000, (B) £30,000 to £40,000, (C) £40,000 to £50,000, (D) £50,000 to £60,000, (E) £60,000 to £70,000, (F) £70,000 to £80,000, (G) £80,000 to £90,000, (H) £90,000 to £100,000, (I) £100,000 to £110,000, (J) £110,000 to £120,000, (K) £120,000 to £130,000, (L) £130,000 to £140,000, (M) £140,000 to £150,000, (N) £150,000 to £160,000, (O) £160,000 to £170,000, (P) £170,000 to £180,000, (Q) £180,000 to £190,000, (R) £190,000 to

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£200,000, (S) £200,000 to £210,000, (T) £210,000 to £220,000, (U) £220,000 to £230,000, (V) £230,000 to £240,000, (W) £240,000 to £250,000, (X) £250,000 to £260,000, (Y) £260,000 to £270,000, (Z) £270,000 to £280,000, (aa) £280,000 to £290,000 and (bb) £290,000 to £300,000 per annum. [149504]

Sajid Javid: On 19 March, the Government announced a new scheme for tax-free child care for working families, which will ultimately be open to around 2.5 million families with children under 12. The details of the scheme, including eligibility requirements and how it interacts with universal credit, will be determined as part of a consultation on tax-free child care which will be published in due course. Information on the number of households expected to benefit will not be available until the consultation is complete and the policy details have been fully defined.

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the number of households containing one or more children in (a) the UK, (b) each nation and region of the UK, (c) each parliamentary constituency in the UK that will benefit as a result of the changes in universal credit to support child care costs from April 2016. [149549]

Steve Webb: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

The child care element of tax credits is at present a key route for support with the cost of child care to be provided to low and middle income working families. Around 450,000 families currently receive this child care element. Within universal credit, support for child care is expected to help 100,000 additional families because those working less than 16 hours per week will be eligible to receive child care support.

On 19 March, the Government announced further funding for child care. The detail of the two proposed schemes (extra support through universal credit offer and tax-free child care for those outside universal credit) as well as how the two schemes will interact, will be determined as part of a wider consultation on tax-free child care which will be published in due course. Information on the number of households that are expected to benefit from additional child care support will not be available until the consultation is complete and the policy details have been fully defined.

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the distributional effects of (a) the changes in tax relief on child care from 2015 and (b) the support for child care costs provided through universal credit from 2016 on persons in each decile on the income scale in each nation and region of the UK. [149575]

Sajid Javid: The Government will consider the distributional impacts of the additional child care support as this policy is developed in detail. The Government continue to assess the cumulative impacts of all their measures within the “Impacts on Households” annex, which is published at each fiscal event.

Kate Green: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many households he estimates will be eligible for the higher rate of child care support under universal credit announced in Budget 2013. [149974]

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Steve Webb: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

The child care element of tax credits is at present a key route for support with the cost of child care to be provided to low and middle income working families. Around 450,000 families currently receive this child care element. Within universal credit, support for child care is expected to help 100,000 additional families because those working less than 16 hours per week will be eligible to receive child care support.

On 19 March, the Government announced further funding for child care. The detail of the two proposed schemes (extra support through universal credit offer and tax-free child care for those outside universal credit) as well as how the two schemes will interact, will be determined as part of a wider consultation on tax-free child care which will be published in due course. Information on the number of households that are expected to benefit from additional child care support will not be available until the consultation is complete and the policy details have been fully defined.

Kate Green: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the additional child care support announced as part of Budget 2013 is expected to have an effect on measured child poverty rates. [149975]

Steve Webb: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

The coalition Government remain committed to eradicating child poverty. They are taking a new approach by tackling the root causes including worklessness, educational failure and family breakdown. Universal credit will improve work incentives, as well as refocusing entitlements towards lower income in-work households. Also, opportunities and structures that let people realise their own potential are essential to reducing child poverty.

On 19 March, the Government announced further funding for child care. The detail of the two proposed schemes (extra support through universal credit offer and tax-free child care for those outside universal credit), as well as how the two schemes will interact, will be determined as part of a wider consultation on tax-free child care which will be published in due course. Information on the impact on child poverty as defined by the Child Poverty Act is therefore not available.

The Government strongly believe that looking at relative income in isolation is not a helpful measure to track progress towards our target of eradicating child poverty. We have consulted on better measures of child poverty that help identify the causes of poverty, and will publish our response to that consultation in the summer.

Kate Green: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the distribution by income decile of additional gains to families arising from additional childcare support announced in Budget 2013. [149976]

Sajid Javid: The Government will consider the distributional impacts of the additional child care support as this policy is developed in detail. The Government continue to assess the cumulative impacts of all their measures within the “Impacts on Households” annex, which is published at each fiscal event.

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Mr Andrew Turner: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the minimum working time is which must be served before people are eligible for child care support. [150008]

Sajid Javid: Lone parents, or both parents in a couple, must work 16 hours or more a week to claim help with child care costs through working tax credit, with some exceptions. Under universal credit, this support will be extended so that families can access support for child care costs from the first hour of work.

All families with a three to four-year-old, regardless of work status, can access 15 hours a week free early education, and from 2014-15 this will be extended to 260,000 two-year-olds.

Employer supported child care has no rules regarding number of working hours.

From autumn 2015, a new tax-free child care scheme will be introduced for families where both parents are in work. The details of this offer will be set out following consultation.