Independent Living Fund: Wales

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in each local authority in Wales have received payments from the Independent Living Fund to date. [148227]

Esther McVey: The total number of people in each local authority in Wales to have received payments from the ILF since it was created in 1988 are set out in the following table:

Number of people who have received ILF funding since 1988 in each local authority in Wales.
Local authorityTotal per local authority

Anglesey county

57

Blaenau Gwent county borough

47

Bridgend county borough

115

Caerphilly county borough

98

Cardiff county council

210

Carmarthenshire county

270

Ceredigion county

54

Clwyd social services

6

Conwy county borough council

119

Denbighshire county

79

Dyfed social services

1

Flintshire county

151

Gwent social services

1

Gwynedd social services

159

Merthyr Tydfil borough council

60

Monmouthshire county

44

Neath and Port Talbot county borough

113

Newport City social services

100

Pembrokeshire county

119

Powys county

97

Rhondda/Cynon/Taff county borough

219

South Glamorgan

1

Swansea county

146

Torfaen county borough

112

Vale of Glamorgan borough council

84

Wrexham county borough

164

Overall total

2,626

Source: Independent Living Fund administrative data

Jobcentre Plus

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what penalties are imposed on a person who (a) misses (i) one and (ii) two adviser appointments at a jobcentre and (b) refuses to accept the offer of a job. [147165]

18 Mar 2013 : Column 489W

Mr Hoban: The penalty imposed on a JSA claimant who fails to attend an adviser interview without good reason will be a sanction of four weeks for the first failure and 13 weeks for a second or subsequent failures. For a JSA claimant refusing the offer of a job without good reason, the penalty is a sanction of 13 weeks for the first failure, followed by 26 weeks for a second failure within a year of the first, followed by 156 weeks for a third (or more) such failure(s) within a year of any previous failures.

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 11 March 2013, Official Report, column 102W, on Jobcentre Plus, in his discussions with Jobcentre Plus staff, what concerns were expressed by staff regarding the Government's changes to the welfare system; and what steps his Department is taking to address those concerns. [148124]

Mr Hoban: What our staff tell us is that they want to deliver an excellent service to the public and the current complex benefit system fails to support them in this. Universal credit will simplify the benefits system, making sure that people are always better off working than on benefits. A simpler benefit system will enable staff to deliver the excellent service to which they strive. In developing universal credit we have received helpful comments and suggestions from DWP staff which have enabled us to develop the rules, based on the experience of people who deal with customers and claimants every day.

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 11 March 2013, Official Report, column 102W, on Jobcentre Plus, how much his Department has spent on specialists in the run-up to the welfare reforms coming into force in April 2013. [148125]

Mr Hoban: As part of the roll-out of universal credit we have created the role of universal credit ambassadors. Universal credit ambassadors support colleagues with the culture and business change resulting from universal credit. The role is undertaken in addition to normal duties, and as such is covered through existing staffing allocations.

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) if he will establish for Jobcentre Plus a contact telephone number that is a UK landline number beginning 01, 02 or 03; [148364]

(2) if he will establish for the Disability Living Allowance Unit and the Attendance Allowance Unit a contact telephone number that is a UK landline number beginning 01, 02 or 03. [148366]

Mr Hoban: The reason DWP uses non-geographical numbers (08) rather than geographical 01, 02 numbers is because DWP operates a virtual telephony network. Using non-geographical numbers enables calls to be routed to the next available advisor with the appropriate skills to answer the enquiry and best places DWP to meet customer demand. Moving to geographic numbers would undermine the ability of the business to effectively manage the significant volume of calls received each year.

18 Mar 2013 : Column 490W

With regards to 03 numbers, DWP numbering policy is kept under review, taking account of any changes to the costs of calling non-geographic numbers. Depending on the service provider and the specific contract or call plan in place, many customers would currently pay more to contact DWP, if 0845 services were replaced with 03 numbers. As a result, any change to the policy will need careful consideration. DWP has responded to Ofcom's proposals for the 0845 number range and we await their final report in March 2013. Their proposals do not include any requirement for organisations to replace 0845 numbers. More information on this consultation, including the DWP response, is freely available via the Ofcom website.

Jobseeker’s Allowance

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will publish a table showing the sanctions imposed by each benefit office on jobseeker's allowance claimants in each month since 2010. [148371]

Mr Hoban: This information is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Statistics showing the sanctions imposed on jobseeker's allowance claimants by each Jobcentre Plus Group area in each month since 2010 can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/quidance.pdf

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average time taken is between the suspension of jobseeker's allowance and the determination of an appeal against that suspension in each (a) region and (b) constituent part of the UK. [148372]

Mr Hoban: This information is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Pensioners

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate his Department has made of the number of pensioners in each of the last 10 years; and what estimate his Department has made of the number of pensioners in each of the next 15 years. [148500]

Steve Webb: Caseload statistics and forecasts for Great Britain by individual benefit, including state pension, are published and can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/autumn_2012_211212.xls

Table 1c provides historic caseloads and forecasts up to 2017-18, based on autumn statement forecasts.

Projections of caseloads for United Kingdom to 2061-62, consistent with the autumn statement forecasts, can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/adhoc_analysis/2013/ltp_pensioners_tables.xls

18 Mar 2013 : Column 491W

Poverty

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) part-time and (b) full-time work were living in poverty in each region of the UK in each year for which figures are available. [148501]

18 Mar 2013 : Column 492W

Mr Hoban: The following figures are provided from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) dataset and provide data on part time and full time workers by region. Figures are presented as three-year averages to overcome volatility in estimates. Estimates are presented both Before and After Housing Costs.

Table 1: Number of individuals working part time living in households with less than 60% of contemporary median income, by region and country, United Kingdom. Before Housing Costs
Million
 Part time work
 1994-95 to 1996-971995-96 to 1997-981996-97 to 1998-991997-98 to 1999-20001998-99 to 2000-011999-2000 to 2001-022000-01 to 2002-032001-02 to 2003-04

North East

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

. 0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

South East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

Million
 Part time work
 2002-03 to 2004-052003-04 to 2005-062004-05 to 2006-072005-06 to 2007-082006-07 to 2008-092007-08 to 2009-102008-09 to 2010-11

North East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

South East

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Table 2: Number of individuals working full time living in households with less than 60% of contemporary median income, by region and country, United Kingdom. Before Housing Costs
Million
 Full time work
 1994-95 to 1996-971995-96 to 1997-981996-97 to 1998-991997-98 to 1999-20001998-99 to 2000-011999-2000 to 2001-022000-01 to 2002-032001-02 to 2003-04

North East

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Scotland

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

18 Mar 2013 : Column 493W

18 Mar 2013 : Column 494W

Million
 Full time work
 2002-03 to 2004-052003-04 to 2005-062004-05 to 2006-072005-06 to 2007-082006-07 to 2008-092007-08 to 2009-102008-09 to 2010-11

North East

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0.

0.0

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1 .

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Table 3: Number of individuals working part time living in households with less than 60% of contemporary median income, by region and country, United Kingdom. After Housing Costs
Million
 Part time work
 1994-95 to 1996-971995-96 to 1997-981996-97 to 1998-991997-98 to 1999-20001998-99 to 2000-011999-2000 to 2001-022000-01 to 2002-032001-02 to 2003-04

North East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

North West and Merseyside

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

South East

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

South West

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.1

Wales

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

Million
 Part time work
 2002-03 to 2004-052003-04 to 2005-062004-05 to 2006-072005-06 to 2007-082006-07 to 2008-092007-08 to 2009-102008-09 to 2010-11

North East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

North West and Merseyside

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Eastern

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

London

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.4

0.4

South East

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

South West

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Wales

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.0

Table 4: Number of individuals working full time living in households with less than 60% of contemporary median income, by region and country, United Kingdom. After Housing Cost
Million
 Full time work
 1994-95 to 1996-971995-96 to 1997-981996-97 to 1998-991997-98 to 1999-20001998-99 to 2000-011999-2000 to 2001-022000-01 to 2002-032001-02 to 2003-04

North East

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

18 Mar 2013 : Column 495W

18 Mar 2013 : Column 496W

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

Million
 Full time work
 2002-03 to 2004-052003-04 to 2005-062004-05 to 2006-072005-06 to 2007-082006-07 to 2008-092007-08 to 2009-102008-09 to 2010-11

North East

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

North West and Merseyside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Yorks and Humberside

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

East Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

West Midlands

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Eastern

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

London

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

South East

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

South West

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Wales

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Scotland

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Northern Ireland

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Notes: 1. These statistics are based on Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data sourced from the 2010-11 Family Resources Survey (FRS). This uses disposable household income, adjusted using modified OECD equalisation factors for household size and composition, as an income measure as a proxy for standard of living. 2. Net disposable incomes have been used to answer the question. This includes earnings from employment and self-employment, state support, income from occupational and private pensions, investment income and other sources. Income tax payments, national insurance contributions, council tax/domestic rates and some other payments are deducted from incomes. 3. Figures have been presented on a Before Housing Cost and an After Housing Cost basis. For Before Housing Costs, housing costs are not deducted from income, while for After Housing Costs they are. 4. All estimates are based on survey data and are therefore subject to a degree of uncertainty. Small differences should be treated with caution as these will be affected by sampling error and variability in non-response. 5. The reference period for HBAI figures is the financial year, three year averages have been sued to overcome volatility. 6. Numbers of individuals in each group have been rounded to the nearest 100,000. 7. Figures may not sum due to rounding. 8. Data for Northern Ireland has only been collected since 2002-03. Source: HBAI 1994-95 to 2010-11

Remploy

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many bids were received for the Remploy factory in Wigan; and what rent is now being paid by the Red Rock document scanning company; [147384]

(2) how many premises have been transferred to new social enterprises established by former Remploy workers; [147387]

(3) how many former Remploy staff have been transferred to other businesses under Transfer of Undertaking regulations to date. [147388]

Esther McVey: The information requested is not held by the Department, and the right hon. Member is advised that she should request this information from Remploy's company secretary. They can be contacted at:

[email protected]

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many former Remploy workers are currently (a) in training, (b) in employment and (c) unemployed. [147385]

Esther McVey: 1,049 disabled former Remploy workers are choosing to work with our personal case workers to find another job. 287 jobs have been found for disabled former employees since they were made redundant. Currently 239 people are in work, including 90 who are participating in the Work Choice programme. A further

18 Mar 2013 : Column 497W

292 disabled former Remploy workers are on Work Choice undertaking training and other activities aimed at moving them closer to employment.

Of the remaining 810 former Remploy workers, 608 are claiming jobseeker's allowance and 202 are claiming employment support allowance.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many former Remploy workers have received more than £10,000 to assist with the business planning for a new social enterprise. [147386]

Esther McVey: Remploy employees who submitted an Expression of Interest in Stage 1 were able to apply for up to £10,000 worth of expert advice and support to help them further develop their proposal.

This offer of support recognises that employees may need some additional help in formulating their initial proposals and £10,000 is seen as a sufficient amount of money to support bidders in bringing in the necessary expertise to further develop their proposals.

To date there have been nine successful applications for this support with spend totalling £50,000, though none of these have resulted in the development of social enterprises.

Social Fund: Greater Manchester

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in Denton and Reddish constituency took out loans using the Social Fund in each of the last five years. [147834]

Steve Webb: The following table gives the number of people receiving loans from the Social Fund in the Chorlton Social Fund Budget Area in each of the financial years from 2007-08 to 2011-12. This is the Social Fund Budget Area covering the Denton and Reddish constituency. The information requested is not available at constituency level.

Loans made in the Chorlton Social Fund Budget Area from 2007-08 to 2011-12
 Number of people receiving Social Fund Loans

2007-08

131,230

2008-09

228,030

2009-10

279,930

2010-11

262,330

2011-12

222,040

Notes: 1. The information provided is Management Information. Our preference is to answer all parliamentary questions using Official/National Statistics but in this case we only have Management Information available. It is not quality assured to the same extent as Official/National statistics and there are some issues with the data, for example, it does not include applications which were processed clerically and have not yet been entered on to the Social Fund Computer System. 2. Data on Social Fund loans is not held by parliamentary constituency but by Jobcentre Plus Social Fund Budget Area. The figures for the Chorlton Social Fund Budget Area cover areas other than Denton and Reddish. 3. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 4. These figures are the number of people who got at least one Crisis Loan or Budgeting Loan award from the Social Fund, not the number of applications or awards. Some people receive more than one award.

18 Mar 2013 : Column 498W

Social Security Benefits

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the total spend on benefits for working-age people has been in each local authority area in each year since 1997. [148226]

Mr Hoban: The available expenditure for working-age benefits in each local authority area can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/index.php?page=expenditure

Information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Even if this information could have been provided, it could not be used for comparisons over time due to different data sources not being consistent with the data above.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he plans to put in place transitional arrangements in the case of a non-working family in receipt of benefits whose income is below the benefit cap, whose income is taken above the benefit cap on the birth of a child. [148655]

Mr Hoban: We are not making any specific arrangements for the situation where the cap applies for the first time because benefit levels have increased as a result of the birth of a child. However we are providing additional funds for discretionary housing payments to provide short-term relief for families affected by the benefit cap who may face a variety of challenges. The Government are providing up to £65 million for this purpose in 2013-14 and a further £35 million in 2014-15.

Social Security Benefits: Disability

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will publish a table showing the proportion of claimants who have been subject to benefit sanctions who are disabled between October 2011 and the latest date for which figures are available. [148375]

Mr Hoban: Statistics showing the proportion of jobseeker's allowance claimants who have been subject to benefit sanctions who are disabled between October 2011 and October 2012 can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Information is not available for employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants. The sanctions regime for people on ESA in the Work Related Activity Group changed from the beginning of December 2012. As a result of the changes to the regime, the Department for Work and Pensions has reviewed its methodology for publishing ESA sanctions official statistics with a view to ensuring the publication remains relevant while also seeking to maintain a consistent time series.

In comparing methodologies, an error was discovered in the current official statistics measure leading to double counting of some sanctions. For this reason, statisticians at the DWP have decided to suspend publication of ESA sanctions statistics based on the current method. The DWP will publish the first set of statistics for the

18 Mar 2013 : Column 499W

new ESA sanctions regime in May 2013 alongside a revised historical series and a working paper explaining the differences between the methodologies.

Information is not readily available for income support claimants.

Social Security Benefits: Mental Illness

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will give the most recent data for the numbers of recipients of disability benefits on grounds of mental disorder by prevalence of mental disorder amongst them. [142469]

Esther McVey: The information requested is provided in the following tables:

Incapacity benefit/severe disablement allowance recipients by mental and behavioural disorder as at February 2012
 Number

All mental and behavioural disorders

701,170

Mood (affective disorders)

302,890

Neurotic, stress related and somatoform disorders

146,410

Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders

57,190

Mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use

56,400

Disorders of psychological development

51,310

Mental retardation

47,230

Unspecified mental disorder

33,520

Behaviour syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors

2,930

Disorders of adult personality and behaviour

2,900

Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders

390

Employment support allowance recipients by mental and behavioural disorder as at February 2012
 Number

All mental and behavioural disorders

425,840

Mood (affective disorders)

215,510

Neurotic, stress related and somatoform disorders

99,490

Mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use

40,440

Unspecified mental disorder

25,860

Disorders of psychological development

20,060

Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders

18,750

Behaviour syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors

2,210

Disorders of adult personality and behaviour

2,150

Mental retardation

930

Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders

440

Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Totals may not sum due to rounding. 2. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment support allowance (ESA) from October 2008. 3. Causes of incapacity are based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, published by the World Health Organisation. 4. To qualify for incapacity benefit (IB), claimants have to undertake an assessment of incapacity for work called a personal capability assessment. Under the employment support allowance regime, new claimants have to undergo the work capability assessment. From April 2011 incapacity benefit recipients began also to undertake this assessment. The medical condition recorded on the claim form does not itself confer entitlement to incapacity benefit or employment support allowance. So, for example, a decision on entitlement for a customer claiming incapacity benefit on the basis of mental and behavioural disorders would be based on their ability to carry out the range of activities assessed by the personal/work capability assessment; or on the effects of any associated mental health problems. 5. Medical condition is based on evidence provided at the start of the claim, this in itself does not confer entitlement to IB/SDA or ESA and may not represent a claimant’s most recent medical condition. Please also note that where someone has more than one diagnosis or disabling condition, only the predominant one is currently recorded. Source: Information, Governance and Security Directorate, 100% WPLS

18 Mar 2013 : Column 500W

Attendance allowance recipients (cases in payment) by mental and behavioural disorder as at August 2011
 Number

All mental and behavioural disorders

1,980

Learning difficulties

1,670

Behavioural disorder

300

Severely mentally impaired

10

Disability living allowance recipients (cases in payment) by mental and behavioural disorder as at February 2012
 Number

All mental and behavioural disorders

456,110

Learning difficulties

398,660

Behavioural disorder

40,070

Severely mentally impaired

17,380

Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Totals may not sum due to rounding. 2. Figures show the number of people in receipt of an allowance, and excludes people with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital. 3. A diagnosed medical condition does not mean that someone is automatically entitled to AA or DLA. Entitlement is dependent on an assessment of how much help someone needs with personal care and/or mobility because of their disability. These statistics are only collected for administrative purposes. 4. Where more than one disability is present only the main disabling condition is recorded. 5. August 2011 are the latest data available for attendance allowance (cases in payment). Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate, 100% WPLS

Unemployment: Young People

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department has spent on marketing the wage incentive element of the Youth Contract to date. [148621]

Mr Hoban: To date, in financial year 2012-13, the Department has spent £82,182.85 (excluding VAT) on a pilot regional marketing campaign to promote all Youth Contract measures. The campaign encourages small employers to give young people an opportunity and includes information about the wage incentive. The marketing campaign includes regional radio and press advertising, e-mail marketing and local events.

This expenditure supplements no-cost communications techniques which allowed us to extend the reach of our message, such as social media and working with partners such as the British Chambers of Commerce to disseminate our messages.

The Department has spent £4,542 (excluding VAT) on marketing products which specifically promote the wage incentive and are distributed through Jobcentre Plus advisers. This comprises:

a flyer for employers which highlights key messages and directs employers to a local contact.

a self-marketing card for eligible 18 to 24-year-olds to promote the wage incentive to prospective employers. They will, for example, be encouraged to attach the card to a CV or leave it with an employer after an interview.

Universal Credit

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what work has been undertaken by his Department to assess the implications of the introduction of universal credit on (a) the two current statutory child maintenance schemes and (b) the newly-introduced statutory child maintenance scheme. [147811]

18 Mar 2013 : Column 501W

Steve Webb: There are two main implications:

(i) The first which affects all three schemes is the collection of maintenance by direct deduction from state benefits. This will remain the case in the 2012 scheme and work is ongoing to align regulations, IT systems and procedures to allow this to continue to happen under universal credit.

Once charging is introduced to the 2012 scheme, non- resident parents on benefits will be given the opportunity to make scheduled direct payments themselves, and only those parents who are unwilling to do so will have their payments deducted direct from benefits. This is an important part of the Government approach to encouraging parental responsibility. We are currently working on the detail of deductions from universal credit.

(ii) The second affects only the 2003 and 2012 schemes. Receipt of certain benefits, that universal credit will replace, leads to maintenance being set at the flat rate in these schemes. We cannot simply put all universal credit recipients onto the flat rate as entitlement will extend to non-resident parents in work. We are currently developing the details of how to distinguish those universal credit recipients who should pay the flat rate from those who should be assessed on their income.

Child maintenance payments are currently disregarded when calculating benefit entitlements, and the Government have no plans to change this.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what his most recent estimate is of the number of people who will be in receipt of universal credit on (a) 1 January 2014, (b) 1 July 2014, (c) 1 January 2015 and (d) 1 July 2015; [148215]

(2) whether he expects to commence new claims for (a) jobseekers' allowance and (b) working tax credit in (i) 2014, (ii) 2015, (iii) 2016 and (iv) 2017; [148218]

(3) whether he has a planned timescale for the introduction of universal credit; and from what date all new claims for benefits will be handled as universal credit applications from (a) applicants who are in work and (b) applicants who are out of work. [148219]

Mr Hoban: Claims to universal credit start in our Pathfinder from 29 April 2013. Pathfinder will focus on new single, unemployed people, with or without rented housing costs and will replace means tested jobseeker's allowance for this group of claimants. If these claimants then move into work, they will be eligible to claim universal credit, not working tax credit.

Universal credit will then progressively roll-out in a managed way across the country from October 2013. This will ultimately include all claims from people both in and out of work, with everyone eventually claiming the new benefit by 2017.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many project assessment reviews have been conducted for the universal credit programme to date; and if he will place a copy of the most recent such review in the Library. [148216]

Mr Hoban: An integrated assurance and approvals plan (IAAP) is in place for universal credit. The IAAP determines the frequency of programme assessment reviews. Assurance reports are not routinely published. The next review point is planned for mid May.

18 Mar 2013 : Column 502W

Work Capability Assessment

Michael Ellis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of adults who have undertaken work capability assessments in (a) the UK and (b) Northamptonshire have been found to be capable of work. [147648]

Mr Hoban: Information on new employment and support allowance (ESA) claims in Great Britain is already published and can be found at:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/workingage/index.php?page=esa_wca

Table 2a of the above report presents the outcomes of initial functional assessments completed between October 2008 and August 2012, the latest data available, and table 2b presents the outcomes of repeat functional assessments completed during the same period.

For initial functional assessments completed in Northamptonshire between October 2008 and August 2012 (the latest data available), 53% of claimants were assessed as fit for work. For repeat functional assessments completed in Northamptonshire during the same period, 27% of claimants were assessed as fit for work.

Information on the reassessment of incapacity benefits claimants for ESA at a national and local authority level is already published and can be found at:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/workingage/index.php?page =esa_ibr

Table 1 of the above report presents monthly and quarterly breakdowns of outcomes in Great Britain, adjusted to account for the outcome of appeals that have been heard. Table 2 of the above report gives a breakdown by local authority for all incapacity benefits claimants that were referred for reassessment before the end of May 2012 (the latest data available). Please note that date of referral is used in the above report, whereas result date is used for initial and repeat WCAs for new ESA claims.

Work Programme

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the report from the Gingerbread charity into the Work programme and single parents; and if he will change the operation of the Work programme in response to the findings of this report. [148628]

Mr Hoban: The Gingerbread charity report made broad statements on the basis of a survey which interviewed only nine people who took part in the Work programme which is not a statistically significant sample size upon which to make such statements and therefore no firm conclusions can be drawn.

We will continue to monitor how effective the Work programme is at supporting lone parents into employment and will consider the findings in due course.


Business, Innovation and Skills

Automation

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effects of automation on employment levels in the economy in the last 20 years. [148180]

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Jo Swinson: The UK labour market is open and flexible with vacancies being created all the time. As certain sectors in the economy have evolved to make greater use of technology, the labour market has responded by diverting labour away from traditional sectors of the economy, such as manufacturing, into other areas such as services. This has allowed the growth and development of new economic sectors and an overall increase in both the productivity of the economy and employment. Employment, despite the difficult economic situation, is at its highest ever level.

In order to benefit from technology and not damage employment we need to develop a market framework that enables opportunities to create growth and employment to be maximised.

18 Mar 2013 : Column 504W

Business

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the business activity index rates were for (a) the UK and (b) Wales in each of the last eight quarters. [148505]

Michael Fallon: Available private sector business output quarterly growth rates are given in the table for the UK and Wales for each of the last eight quarters.

Real quarterly growth rate
Percentage
 ProductionConstructionMarket services
 UKWalesUKWalesUKWales

2010 Q4

0.1

0.3

-2.1

-4.5

-0.4

0.2

2011 Q1

-0.1

1.9

0.1

3.9

0.7

0.9

2011 Q2

-1.2

-3.3

1.3

1.2

0.3

1.9

2011 Q3

-0.2

0.0

-0.1

1.5

1.0

1.7

2011 Q4

-1.3

-3.7

0.2

-9.6

-0.4

-1.2

2012 Q1

-0.3

3.8

-6.4

-9.8

0.3

2.7

2012 Q2

-0.9

2.7

-2.8

2.8

-0.3

-0.5

2012 Q3

0.7

2.1

-2.6

8.9

1.5

0.2

Source: Welsh government output indicators produced by ONS

Business: North East

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of companies with their registered office address in the north east which were (a) newly incorporated and (b) dissolved in each year since 2001. [148623]

Michael Fallon: Companies House estimates that the numbers of companies with their registered office address in the north-east which were (a) newly incorporated and (b) dissolved in each year since 2001 were as follows.

 IncorporatedDissolved

2001

4,089

2,906

2002

5,884

2,974

2003

7,861

2,945

2004

6,215

3,420

2005

6,491

3,139

2006

7,210

3,456

2007

9,250

4,303

2008

7,855

3,599

2009

8,549

8,889

2010

8,935

7,022

2011

10,394

6,574

2012

10,705

6,574

2013 (To 14 March)

2,450

1,937

These figures are estimates because Companies House derives its figures from postcode areas, which can cross regional boundaries.

Community Development Finance Institutions

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding he has allocated to increase the level of lending to small and medium-sized enterprises by community development finance institutions; and if he will make a statement. [148411]

Michael Fallon: The Government are supporting the community development finance institutions (CDFI) sector though the Regional Growth Fund. Among other bids, they are making a contribution of £30 million to facilitate £60 million of onward lending by CDFIs into small and medium-sized enterprises.

In addition, changes to the Community Investment Tax Relief (CITR) scheme are due to come into effect from 1 April 2013. These changes will streamline the reporting and accreditation requirements for CDFIs, making it easier to use the scheme to raise further investment into the sector. Currently the scheme has raised £94.5 million of investment, enabling £95.3 million onward lending to small and medium-sized enterprises.

Construction: ICT

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of opportunities for the export of Building Information Management software. [147904]

Michael Fallon: In November 2012, the Government published the ‘Building Information Modelling—Industrial Strategy’ which outlines a number of growth opportunities generated from the success of the Government's programme

18 Mar 2013 : Column 505W

to embed the use of Building Information Management (BIM) in all centrally procured public construction projects by 2016. The strategy underlines the need to put in place a clear approach to exploiting the UK's expertise on BIM to develop our international construction competitiveness. The strategy identifies ICT technology development and service provision as BIM-related opportunities for UK industry. BIS officials are working closely with the BIM Task Group and the BIM Technology Alliance on how best to assist with new market opportunities; in liaison with UKTI—which sees BIM as a central part of the UK sustainable construction offer.

Employment: Qualifications

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of working age adults who have no qualifications. [148228]

Matthew Hancock: In Quarter 4(1) 2010 2.4 million working age adults(2) (8.1%) in England held no qualifications. This estimate is derived with a methodology using a combination of Labour Force Survey data and administrative datasets.

(1) Quarter 4 covers the period October to December

(2) People aged 19 to 64 for men and 59 for women

Film: Festivals and Special Occasions

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much UK Trade and Industry has budgeted to fund film makers and businessmen to visit the Cannes Film Festival in 2013. [148244]

Michael Fallon: Although UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) is not supporting a national group of companies, some UKTI regional teams are planning to take small groups of businesses to the festival. Participating SMEs may be eligible for a financial grant of £200 through the Market Visit Support (MVS) facility. MVS support may also be available for individual SMEs visiting the festival on an independent basis.

MVS is a trade development facility aimed at SMEs who are new to export or new to a particular market. The facility provides advice and financial assistance to companies visiting an overseas market either as part of an organised group, or independently.

Companies new to exporting and signed up to UKTI's Passport to Export training and development programme can get up to £3,000 to support their international programme. They can use some of this to help with their visit to a trade fair such as the Cannes Film Festival.

Graduates: Equal Pay

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the recent work of the Higher Education Careers Service Unit, what assessment his Department has made of the reasons behind an apparent pay gap between male and female graduates. [148398]

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Mr Willetts: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has recently received the analysis of the Higher Education Careers Service Unit (HECSU) Futuretrack data referred to in the question, and is examining the findings. Our initial assessment is that while it does indeed suggest that there is a pay gap between recent male and female graduates, the reasons behind this will be complex, and are not all explored fully in the HECSU analysis. For example, males and females tend to enter certain occupations and sectors in different proportions to each other and this can influence the level of earnings. Also, the subject breakdown used in the analysis is at quite a broad level; exploring pay differences by subjects/courses studied at a more detailed level may help to explain the observed differences.

Job Creation: Northamptonshire

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent discussions Ministers or officials of his Department have had with Northamptonshire county council on job creation in Corby constituency and East Northamptonshire. [148291]

Michael Fallon: Officials have regular discussions with Northamptonshire Enterprise Partnership, Northamptonshire's economic development company about issues in the area. The county council is a member and funder of the partnership.

Annual Leave

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials. [147730]

Jo Swinson: BIS has 3,036 employees (full-time equivalent as at 31 January 2013).

All BIS employees are currently entitled to two and a half privilege days in addition to bank holidays and annual leave. The two and a half day entitlement is prorated for part-time employees.

Privilege days are part of an individual's terms and conditions in the same way as annual leave. We do not employ additional people on those days and therefore there is no additional payroll cost.

As part of Civil Service Reform BIS is looking at changing some terms and conditions, including privilege leave.

Information regarding the Department's non-departmental public bodies is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

I have approached the chief executives of the Department's Executive Agencies (Insolvency Service, Companies House, National Measurement Office, Intellectual Property Office, UK Space Agency, Ordnance Survey, Met Office, Land Registry and the Skills Funding Agency) and they will respond to my hon. Friend directly.

18 Mar 2013 : Column 507W

Letter from Peter Mason, dated 15 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 11 March 2013, asking the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills about the number of officials who qualify for privilege days; and the total cost to the public purse of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials.

For the financial year 2010/11 the NMO employed an average of 68 FTE members of staff, all of whom were entitled to 2.5 privilege days a year, of which 1 is the Queen's birthday. The total cost of the privilege days was £22,407, of which £8,962.81 would be for the Queen's birthday.

For the financial year 2011/12 the NMO employed an average of 66 FTE members of staff, all of whom were entitled to 2.5 privilege days a year, of which 1 is the Queen's birthday. The total cost of the privilege days was £21,834, of which £8,734 would be for the Queen's birthday.

For the current financial year 2012/13 the forecast is that NMO will have employed an average of 63 FTE members of staff, all of whom were entitled to 2.5 privilege days a year, of which 1 is the Queen's birthday. The total cost of the privilege days is expected to be £21,959, of which £8,785 would be for the Queen's birthday.

Note:

This has been worked out based on the annual staff costs divided by the average number of staff, with costs attributable to 365 days a year. Costs include employer National Insurance and Pension costs.

Letter from Ann Lewis, dated 7 March 2013:

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 11 March 2013, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, UIN 147730.

The number of full time equivalent officials in Companies House who qualify for privilege days is 852. As Companies House is a Trading Fund all of its costs, including the total cost of privilege days, are met through the fees charged for its services. Therefore, there is no cost to the public purse.

Letter from John Hirst, dated 13 March 2013:

I am replying on behalf of the Met Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 11 March 2013, UIN 147730 to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

All Met Office staff qualify for privilege days as part of their terms and conditions of service. Full-time staff qualify for privilege days totalling 2.5 days per year, to be taken on specified days during the year. For part-time workers, privilege days are calculated as a proportion of their weekly hours worked.

The cost of privilege days to which Met Office staff were entitled was in the order of £478k in 2010-11 and £469k in 2011-12, based on the total cost of remuneration during these periods.

I hope this helps.

Letter from John Alty, dated 13 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled 11th March 2013, to the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Intellectual Property Office is an Executive Agency of BIS.

All permanent staff qualify for privilege days and these figures are based on an assumption that all staff took all of them during the 5 year period, so are maximum values. As a trading fund, the IPO receives all its income from customers of the IP system.

2008—(a) 1002 (b) £397,606

2009—(a) 962 (b) £395,053

2010—(a) 906 (b) £356,111

2011—(a) 895 (b) 397,609

2012—(a) 907 (b) 411,189

18 Mar 2013 : Column 508W

Letter from Dr Vanessa Lawrence CB, dated 13 March 2013:

As Director General and Chief Executive of Ordnance Survey, I have been asked to reply to you in response to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills “how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials?”

All Ordnance Survey's permanent staff qualify for privilege days, which are taken between Christmas and New Year when Ordnance Survey's offices are closed. Last year 1105 staff qualified and the value of days taken is estimated at £675,000.

I hope this information is of use.

Letter from Dr Richard Judge, dated 15 March 2013:

The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has asked me to reply to your question asking how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials.

For the 2010 calendar year, 2,826 staff in The Insolvency Service qualified for privilege days. It is estimated that the total cost of the number of privilege days utilised by officials during the year, excluding the Queen's birthday, was £355,948. The Queen's birthday privilege day is estimated to have cost £237,299.

For the 2011 calendar year, 2,668 staff qualified for privilege days at an estimated cost, excluding the Queen's birthday, of £307,673. The Queen's birthday privilege day is estimated to have cost £205,115.

For the 2012 calendar year, 2,167 staff qualified for privilege days at an estimated cost, excluding the Queen's birthday, of £281,591. The Queen's birthday privilege day is estimated to have cost £187,727.

Privilege days are in addition to staff holiday entitlements.

Letter from Malcolm Dawson, dated 13 March 2013:

I write on behalf of Land Registry in response to Parliamentary Question 147730 tabled on 11 March 2013 which asked the following:

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials.

Land Registry no longer has separate leave designated as privilege days; they have been incorporated into employees’ overall annual leave allowance.

I hope you find this information useful.

Letter from David Parker, dated 13 March 2013:

Thank you for your question addressed to the Secretary of State for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills asking how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials.

The UK Space Agency became an Executive Agency of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills on the 1st April 2011.

In 2011-12, there were 31 members of staff employed during the year who would have been entitled to Privilege Days (depending on their start date). The total cost to the Agency was £15,079 (72 days were utilised).

In 2012-13, there were 46 members of staff employed during the year who would have been entitled to Privilege Days (depending on their start and/or leave date). The total cost to the Agency was £20,151 (95 days were utilised).

18 Mar 2013 : Column 509W

Letter from Kim Thorneywork, dated 18 March 2013:

Thank you for your question to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its Agencies qualify for privilege days; and the total cost to the public purse of those days.

I have been asked to reply as the Chief Executive of Skills Funding.

The Skills Funding Agency does not operate privilege days; therefore there are no numbers or costs involved.