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Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 29 January 2013

Attorney-General

Antisocial Behaviour: Prosecutions

Kate Green: To ask the Attorney-General how many prosecutions under section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986 for behaviour that was deemed to be insulting were conducted in each of the last five years. [140212]

The Solicitor-General: The records held by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) identify the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced and reached a first hearing in magistrates courts, rather than the number of defendants prosecuted, The following table, therefore, shows in each of the last five years the number of offences charged under section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986, using threatening words or behaviour to cause harassment, alarm or distress.

Public Order Act 1986 (5(1) and (6))
 Number

2007-08

38,048

2008-09

36,892

2009-10

34,544

2010-11

34,279

2011-12

28,549

There is no indication of the final prosecution outcome, or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is also often the case that an individual defendant is charged with more than one offence against the same victim. It is not possible to identify those cases where the behaviour was deemed solely to be insulting. To do so would require a manual exercise to review individual files which would incur a disproportionate cost.

Plants

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Attorney-General how much the Law Officers' Departments have spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since his appointment. [139936]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service does not keep a central record of its expenditure on indoor and outdoor plants and trees and such information could be obtained only at a disproportionate cost.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) spent £19,339 on grounds maintenance, plants and flowers during the period. The SFO was responsible for the cost of these items under the terms of its leases. The SFO moved to a new single site in November 2012, and is not incurring expenditure on plants or trees at the new building.

The remaining Law Officers' Departments have not spent anything on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since May 2010.

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Business, Innovation and Skills

Apprentices

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress he has made in increasing the number of science, technology, engineering and mathematics apprenticeships; and if he will make a statement. [139791]

Matthew Hancock: The Government is committed to boosting apprenticeship opportunities and to improving quality across the programme to better meet employer needs. Final data for the 2010/11 academic year show that there were 48,970 apprenticeship starts in the ‘engineering and manufacturing technologies’ sector subject area, up by 29.3% on 2009/10. Provisional data for the full 2011/12 academic year show that there were 57,000 apprenticeship starts in the 'engineering and manufacturing technologies' sector subject area.

Final data for the 2010/11 academic year show that there were 10 apprenticeship starts in the 'science and mathematics' sector subject area. Provisional data for the full 2011/12 academic year show that there were 360 apprenticeship starts in the 'science and mathematics' sector subject area.

Final data for the 2010/11 academic year show that there were 19,520 apprenticeship starts in the 'information and communications technology' sector subject area, up by 55.4% on 2009/10. Provisional data for the full 2011/12 academic year show that there were 18,190 apprenticeship starts in the 'information and communications technology' sector subject area.

We have also targeted £25 million extra funding for developing advanced and higher level apprenticeship frameworks to address skills gaps. It is estimated that around 25,000 higher apprenticeship places will be created in key sectors including engineering.

Please note that the figures for 2011/12 are provisional so they should not be compared with figures for earlier years.

Arts

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the creative industries about the Government's plan for growth for that sector; [139350]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport about a plan for growth for the creative industries; [139355]

(3) how many officials within his Department are responsible for the creative industries; and if he will make a statement. [139358]

Michael Fallon: My right hon. Friend Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, are scheduled to jointly chair the Creative Industries Council (CIC) meeting later this month. The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills recently met Nicola Mendelsohn, the new industry co-chair of the CIC to discuss the forthcoming meeting. Policy responsibility for the creative industries sits with DCMS.

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BIS officials contribute to the wider economic and regulatory environment supporting the sector through their work on matters such as skills, the intellectual property framework, company law and access to finance.

Career Development Loans

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings the Minister of State for Universities and Science has had with banks on encouraging greater lending through career development loans in the last 12 months. [140197]

Mr Willetts: Barclays and the Co-operative Bank provide professional and career development loans (PCDLs). Both banks have made available sufficient capacity to enable the current PCDL programme to meet demand. I have not met with the banks in 2012 to discuss PCDLs. At a recent roundtable meeting involving one of the banks, the current status of the PCDL programme was discussed.

Creative Industries Council

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings of the Creative Industries Council he has attended since its establishment; and if he will make a statement. [139696]

Michael Fallon: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), has attended all three meetings of the Creative Industries Council since its formation.

Education

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which subjects he considers to be strategically important and vulnerable; and if he will make a statement. [139790]

Mr Willetts: Following the introduction of the new fee and funding arrangements for higher education (HE) from autumn 2012, the Higher Education Funding Council for England's (HEFCE) revised policy for supporting Strategically Important and Vulnerable Subjects (SIVS) no longer focuses on one single list of SIVS subjects, but on risks to the future availability of any subject. This new approach will allow HEFCE to be flexible in responding to subjects that are demonstrated to be strategically important and vulnerable. HEFCE is monitoring the risks to all subjects and will target its support to subjects based on qualitative and quantitative evidence of risks.

HEFCE is continuing to support: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), modern foreign languages, and quantitative social science (which were previously classed as SIVS), and is currently making a number of interventions to address subject risks.

These include: providing additional funding for the teaching of high-cost STEM subjects; further funding for demand-raising activity in modern foreign languages; funding for most students engaging in a year of study or work abroad; further funding to enhance demand

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for, and provision of, quantitative studies across the social sciences; and additional funding for postgraduate taught and postgraduate research programmes (all subjects).

In addition government can set out to HEFCE at any time, particular subjects which are thought to be strategically important and on which it would like action to be taken.

Export Credit Guarantees: Zimbabwe

Mr Donaldson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the transformers and reactors exports which created one per cent of Zimbabwe's Sovereign debt owed to UK Export Finance were used for; when those exports were made; and whether they were to the government of Zimbabwe or to private companies. [140169]

Michael Fallon: The 1% of Zimbabwe's original sovereign debt relating to ‘transformers and reactors’ was in respect of the design, supply and delivery of transformers and reactors for use in the Matimba Insukamini Interconnector. The exports were made between 1994 and 1996, to the Government of Zimbabwe.

Exports

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to increase exports with (a) China and (b) other emerging markets. [139562]

Michael Fallon: Increasing our exports to China and emerging markets more widely is a priority for this Government.

The UK and China enjoy a strong commercial relationship, as “Partners for Growth”, underpinned by regular high level visits and exchanges and economic and trade dialogue mechanisms, such as the Prime Ministers' Summit, the Economic and Financial Dialogue lead by the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Joint Economic and Trade Commission, lead by the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable).

Exports to China continue to grow significantly. In 2012 goods exports to China are expected to have increased approximately 15%, while goods imports are up around 1%.

We continue to increase our resources in China. In the past year UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) has increased its presence in China. It has also funded 16 additional posts and two new offices—in Changsha and Xi'an—for its service delivery partner, the China-Britain Business Council; helping even more British companies do business with China.

To help increase exports to other high growth and emerging markets, the UKTI corporate strategy, Britain Open for Business, identifies 20 key emerging markets, including China, for particularly focused efforts. UKTI is shifting resource into these markets in response to growing demand; undertaking awareness raising outreach events throughout the UK; working with business-led partner organisations such as the China-Britain Business Council and UK-India Business Council; and tackling barriers to trade, for instance, through Government-to-Government dialogues, such as those held with India,

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Russia, UAE, and Vietnam in 2012. In addition, the December 2012 autumn statement set out an increase to UKTI's annual budget of £70 million that will help deliver services to more exporters and help to refocus UKTI activities on the highest value opportunities and emerging markets. The autumn statement also set out plans to enable UK Export Finance to provide up to £1.5 billion in loans to finance small firms' exports.

Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Eric Joyce: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether the Government plans to sign up to the London-based Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative. [140105]

Jo Swinson: The Prime Minister wrote to G8 leaders on 2 January 2013 setting out the UK's priorities for the G8 presidency. Transparency was highlighted as a key theme and as part of the transparency agenda; the Prime Minister has launched an urgent review of the UK's position on the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative(1). This review is still under way and an announcement will be made in due course.

(1) EITI is a global initiative with a Secretariat in Oslo, Norway.

Further Education: Higher Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many student places designated as being in the margin and allocated to further education colleges were not filled in the 2011-12 academic year. [140208]

Mr Willetts: The margin was not in operation in the 2011-12 academic year.

Higher Education: Finance

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will publish his Department's initial analysis of the research he commissioned on the effect of reforms of higher education ahead of the publication of the 2013-14 Grant Letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England. [140429]

Mr Willetts: The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) was asked to carry out an analysis of the impact of the higher education (HE) reforms in its 2012-13 grant letter. HEFCE has provided initial advice to Ministers and will publish a full report in spring 2013. HEFCE will continue to monitor the impact of the reforms and provide a further report in spring 2014.

Pay

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take steps to ensure that the awarding of contracts by his Department is subject to any successful contractors paying the living wage to their employees engaged on that particular contract; and if he will make a statement. [139359]

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Jo Swinson: Suppliers to the Department have independent responsibility to set the amounts that are paid to their staff and workers. All suppliers are bound by the legal requirements of the national minimum wage.

The Department does not routinely carry out checks on suppliers to ensure that they are compliant with the national minimum wage regulations but HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) officers have the right to carry out checks at any time and ask to see payment records. HMRC can also investigate employers, following a worker's complaint to them.

In respect of the living wage rather than the national minimum wage, the Government supports the living wage and encourages businesses to take it up where possible. However, the decision on what wages to set is for employers and workers.

Plants

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much his Department has spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since his appointment. [139937]

Jo Swinson: During the period May to September 2010 the Department spent £7,638.50 (exclusive of VAT) with our foliage suppliers, contracts which originally started in September 2003. The Department ended its foliage contracts with effect from 30 September 2010.

The foliage contracts were terminated from 30 September 2010 so the Department has had no spend on foliage since then.

Savings of £25,170 per annum have been made since terminating the contracts.

Regional Growth Fund

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what criteria will be used to judge applications for funding under round four of the Regional Growth Fund. [139773]

Michael Fallon: The criteria used to judge applications for funding under Round 4 of the Regional Growth Fund (RGF) are the same as for earlier rounds. To qualify for support from the RGF, projects or programmes should demonstrate that they:

create additional sustainable private sector growth;

rebalance the economy in those areas currently dependent on the public sector;

would not otherwise go ahead without support from the RGF;

offer value for money; and

are state aid compliant.

I look forward to receiving bids from around the country by the deadline of 20 March. Details on the RGF are available from:

www.gov.uk/understanding-the-regional-growth-fund

Science

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress he has made in agreeing a standard definition of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [139788]

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Mr Willetts: The Government recognises the possibility of confusion caused by having different definitions of STEM; however, these are designed for different purposes by different organisations (not all of which are Government-funded) and there are good reasons for the existence of different definitions.

A definition of STEM based on subjects studied, as in the definition used by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) based on the Joint Academic Coding System (JACS), is practical, objective and broadly consistent over time. The JACS coding frame is owned and maintained by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) and the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and is used for subject coding of provision across higher education in the UK; it can be used for international comparisons and other statistical analysis. Skill contents of courses as set out and monitored in the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) Subject Benchmark Statements provide valuable information on educational standards but have a qualitative nature that makes them unsuitable for such analysis.

The Government encourages those using definitions that are based on JACS but covering slightly different sets of JACS subjects (depending on the context) to always make explicit the precise definition that has been used (and why).

Science: Graduates

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to improve supply and demand data for graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects. [139596]

Mr Willetts: The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) already collects and publishes a substantial amount of data on the supply of graduates from UK Higher Education Institutions from different disciplines, including science subjects. For example, HESA recently published information on higher education qualifiers by subject area in Table 7 of the Statistical First Release 'Enrolments and Qualifications Obtained at UK Higher Education Institutions 2011/12', which can be found at the following link.

http://www.hesa.ac.uk/content/view/2667/393/

Subject information is collected and published by HESA using the Joint Academic Coding System (JACS); this allows for the statistics to be made available to a fine level of detail, such as aerospace engineering, microbiology or mathematical sciences, while also allowing users to group the information at the broader levels used in the publication mentioned above.

HESA also collects and publishes information on the employment outcomes of graduates from UK Higher Education Institutions; the most recent publication of such information was in the Statistical First Release 'Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education 2010/11'. Similarly these data are available by qualifying subject and by standard occupation classification six months after graduation for those graduates who have progressed to employment. More information is available at the following link.

http://www.hesa.ac.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2541&ltemid=161

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There is no specific single data source on the demand for graduates in STEM subjects. A key issue here is that graduates in these subjects can fill a wide variety of jobs. Some of these jobs will be clearly subject-specific and STEM-related, whereas others will be less directly linked—though that does not mean that individuals in those jobs are not using their STEM skills.

However, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) does undertake forecasts of future employment in its occasional 'Working Futures' series (part-funded by BIS). The most recent report covered labour market projections for 2010-20 and was published in 2012. As well as overall employment it also contains projections by broad occupational and sectoral groups—e.g. jobs in engineering, manufacturing, construction. This is available at:

http://www.ukces.org.uk/publications/er41-working-futures-2010-2020

There have also been specific studies into the supply of and demand for STEM skills—for example, UKCES published an occasional paper on the Supply and Demand for high-level STEM skills in December 2011. This paper can be found at:

http://www.ukces.org.uk/publications/the-supply-of-and-demand-for-high-level-stem-skills

The introduction of the Key Information Set (KIS) in September 2012 was a major development in helping students to make informed course choices. KIS provides comparable information on individual undergraduate courses in the areas which students have said is most useful to them. This includes the employment destinations and salaries of previous graduates. KIS is available via each course page and via the updated national comparison website, Unistats:

http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of graduates in (a) engineering and technology, (b) physical sciences, (c) computer science, (d) mathematical sciences and (e) biological sciences which will be required over the next 10 years. [139597]

Mr Willetts: We do not have estimates of demand for each graduate subject. However, the Working Futures 2012 report, published by the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES)(1), estimates that:

(a) 723,000 science, research engineering and technology professionals will be required between 2010 and 2020; and

(b) 194,000 science, engineering and technology associate professional will be required over the same period.

(1) Working Futures 2010-20 revised August 2012: UKCES evidence report 41 by Institute for Employment Studies and Cambridge Econometrics.

Note:

The report is based on a forecast model which utilises a range of labour market data and a complex macroeconomic model. The 2012 report is the fourth in the series.

In both cases the bulk of this demand comes from people retiring who will need replacing.

These figures are broad indications of demand based on a number of complex assumptions. Previous Working Futures reports have shown similar levels of demand for these occupations.

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These occupations will be filled by people from higher education, further education, higher apprenticeships, from unemployment and inactivity, from career changes and from migration.

Science: Higher Education

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many applications were made for (a) engineering and technology, (b) physical sciences, (c) computer science, (d) mathematical sciences and (e) biological sciences undergraduate courses at UK universities in each of the last three years. [139598]

Mr Willetts: The information is given in the table.

Applications(1) via UCAS to full-time undergraduate courses for specific subject groups(2)
 Year of entry
 201020112012

Engineering

134,601

140,897

137,027

Technology

12,356

11,998

9,779

Physical sciences

91,697

99,305

98,124

Mathematical and computer sciences

136,716

145,173

Mathematical Sciences

44,224

Computer sciences

89,673

Biological sciences

215,906

228,104

217,372

(1) Each applicant can submit up to five applications. (2) Subjects are allocated to subject groups using the Joint Academic Classification of Subjects (JACS). In 2012, a new version of JACS (JACS3) was introduced, which means that direct year-on-year comparisons with previous years cannot be made for all subjects. Source: UCAS

Students: Fees and Charges

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much universities in England spent on fee waivers in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [139815]

Mr Willetts: Universities in England charging above the basic rate of tuition are required to agree access agreements with the Office for Fair Access (OFFA). OFFA collects information about the amounts spent by universities with access agreements on financial support to students from under-represented groups, and additional outreach.

In academic year 2010-11, OFFA has informed the Department that £380 million was spent by institutions with access agreements on financial support for students from under-represented groups. OFFA provisionally estimates that the amount spent in 2011-12 was £386.5 million. OFFA has advised the Department that it does not have information on how much of these amounts related to fee waivers.

OFFA will be collecting more detailed information on the financial support provided by institutions from the 2012-13 academic year onwards. This will show how much was spent on fee waivers.

UK Intellectual Property Office

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many times he has met the director general of the Intellectual Property Office in the last six months. [139375]

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Jo Swinson: There have been no formal meetings between my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, and the acting chief executive officer of the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) (Sean Dennehey) in the last six months. However, they met on 17 December 2012 at the IPO Policy Briefing event held at the Big Innovation Centre, London.

The returning chief executive officer of the IPO (John Alty), who will resume his post on 18 February 2013, met the Secretary of State on 26 July 2012 to discuss the Hargreaves report and copyright exceptions.

UK Membership of EU

Wayne David: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what contingency plans his Department (a) has made, (b) is making and (c) plans to make for UK withdrawal from the EU; whether those plans will be published; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost of implementing those contingency plans. [140297]

Michael Fallon: The Department has not made any plans for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what specific exercises his Department has undertaken in assessing the risk to UK business and inward investment of (a) renegotiation of the UK's terms of membership of the EU, (b) a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU and (c) withdrawal by the UK from the EU. [140312]

Wayne David: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on (a) inward investment from member states of the EU and (b) investment from outside of the EU as a result of uncertainty about the UK's membership of the EU. [140294]

Michael Fallon: The Government are committed to help shape the future of an open, flexible and adaptable European Union, and to work for the completion of the single market which is so important for British business.

UK Trade and Investment

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what criteria were used to decide whether Everything Everywhere and O2 should participate in the Strategic Investments Programme being promoted by UK Trade and Investment. [140116]

Michael Fallon: The Government consider the following set of criteria when considering which companies should be included in the strategic relationship management:

(1) Current and potential investment in the UK;

(2) Capacity or potential capacity to export from the UK; and

(3) The potential for the approach to add value to our relationship.

Given their status as major inward investors and their considerable importance to future economic growth, Everything Everywhere and Telefonica (O2) were judged to sufficiently meet this set of criteria. The Government recognises that there are companies sufficiently meeting

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the above set of criteria which are not covered by strategic relationship management and has committed to expanding the approach on a sector by sector basis, as described in the 2012 autumn statement.

UK Trade and Investment: India

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the value to UK business of UK Trade and Investment delegations to India since 5 May 2010. [139989]

Michael Fallon: UKTI measures the value to UK business of overseas visits and other export services through its independent Performance and Impact Monitoring Survey (PIMS). This shows that the average additional sales reported by business participants in overseas missions last year was £6,136,000. It is not possible to break these figures down to show results for individual visits.

Cabinet Office

Cybercrime

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent assessment his Department has made of the cyber security of mobile devices. [139921]

Miss Chloe Smith [holding answer 28 January 2013]: We have considered cyber threats in relation to mobile, smart phones, tablets and other mobile ICT equipment as outlined in our UK Cyber Security Strategy. As part of our response we sponsor Get Safe Online:

www.getsafeonline.org

which provides practical and easy to understand advice and information on mobile devices and the key threats and what people need to do to avoid them.

Directors

Jon Trickett: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what declaration of interest must be made by Government non-executives; how often any such declarations are required to be made; and if he will publish all received declarations. [139584]

Mr Maude: As set out in the Corporate Governance Code, all non-executives are asked to disclose any actual, potential or perceived conflict of interest.

According to the Financial Reporting Manual (FReM), Departments are required to disclose the details of company directorships and other significant interests held by board members which may conflict with their management responsibilities. This requirement is unchanged since before 2010.

The Cabinet Office therefore collects information from non-executives alongside other board members. As was the case under the previous Government, this is carried out twice yearly in conjunction with interim accounts and annual reports and accounts.

Copies of the Register of Board Members Interests are laid in the House of Commons Library alongside annual report and accounts.

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Copies of the register are available on request. Other Register of Members financial interest details can be found in the link specified in page 41 in the annual report and accounts 2011-12: HC56.

Procurement

Jon Trickett: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how many procurement officers are currently employed by his Department; [135681]

(2) how many civil servants in his Department regularly deal with procurement services; [135682]

(3) how many procurement officers in his Department have relevant procurement qualifications. [135683]

Miss Chloe Smith: Since May 2010 the Government has made significant progress in reforming its approach to procurement. As a result of this agenda £3 billion was saved for the taxpayer last year alone.

My Department currently employs three dedicated procurement officers within the central departmental procurement function, of whom two possess a recognised procurement qualification. There are a further seven staff within the central departmental procurement function who are involved in procurement activities, including evaluating tenders, raising purchase orders and contract management, two of whom hold relevant qualifications. Additionally, the Government Digital Service employs three staff who handle procurements on behalf of other Departments. None hold a formal procurement qualification.

In addition to these Cabinet Office staff, the Government Procurement Service also undertakes procurements for both the Department's own and pan-Government requirements. There are 225 dedicated procurement officers currently working in the GPS.

Taxis

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 17 January 2013, Official Report, column 939W, on taxis, for what reasons his Department does not maintain a central database of departmental spend on taxis. [139336]

Mr Maude: As was the case under the previous Administration, such records are categorised alongside other spend as travel charges.

UK Membership of EU

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what contingency plans his Department (a) has made, (b) is making and (c) plans to make for UK withdrawal from the EU; whether those plans will be published; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost of implementing those plans. [140293]

Mr Maude: The Department has not made any plans for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

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Communities and Local Government

Employment Agencies

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the total spending on recruitment agencies by his Department was in each month from July to December 2012. [135222]

Brandon Lewis: We have interpreted recruitment agency to mean companies (third party suppliers) that we engage in recruiting permanent staff for the Department. Our Procurement records show that we have no expenditure with the recruitment agencies from July to December 2012.

Fire Services: Finance

Mr Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what the like- for-like percentage change in formula funding has been for (a) rural and (b) urban fire authorities between 2012-13 and the provisional allocations for 2013-14; [139352]

(2) if he will estimate the level of formula funding per head in the provisional local government finance settlement for (a) rural and (b) urban fire authorities for 2013-14. [139353]

Brandon Lewis: My Department does not publish such figures by both rural classification and local government tier.

Details of the provisional settlement formula funding figures by local authority can be found at:

www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1314/settle.htm

Housing: Construction

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he plans to take to increase the level of house-building. [139594]

Mr Prisk: The Government are providing a wide range of support for new house building in England. Schemes include:

£19.5 billion of public and private money for new affordable homes in the period to 2015. This will help deliver up to 170,000 affordable homes by 2015 for rent and affordable homeownership;

£10 billion of debt guarantees to support delivery of new homes purpose built for private rent and for additional affordable housing;

£200 million equity finance for new homes purpose built for private rent, with an expert task force to support delivery of demonstration projects;

a share of £300 million to bring an extra 5,000 affordable homes back into use and to support the guarantees in delivering an additional 15,000 affordable homes; the £570 million Get Britain Building investment fund which provides development finance to unlock smaller stalled sites;

the Growing Places Fund which provides £730 million to deliver the infrastructure needed to unlock stalled schemes that will promote economic growth, create jobs and build homes;

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the New Homes Bonus scheme. The Government have made over £630 million of payments to local authorities in the first two years. This is a powerful incentive for councils to support housing and growth and to bring empty homes back into use;

the FirstBuy scheme. Over £900 million is being invested by Government and housebuilders to help 27,000 first-time buyers into home ownership;

the NewBuy Guarantee scheme helps buyers realise their aspirations for home ownership with a 5% deposit. The Government have provided the necessary guarantee to support lenders to offer 95% Loan To Value new build mortgages; and

the Custom-Homes programme, makes £30 million of government funding available to individuals to build their own home on a repayable basis.

The autumn statement on 5 December 2012 announced a new local infrastructure fund to provide up to £474 million to accelerate the delivery of large housing sites; enable the quicker disposal of surplus public land for new homes; and fund small infrastructure projects within enterprise zones. In addition, £100 million to bring forward more public sector sites for development.

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will consider making available ring-fenced and time-limited capital funds to local authorities to increase the level of house-building. [139613]

Mr Prisk: Through the Homes and Communities Agency's Affordable Homes Programme (2011 to 2015), 26 local authorities successfully bid for almost £89 million funding to provide nearly 4,000 new affordable homes.

Under the reforms to council housing finance, which we initiated last year, local authorities have £2.8 billion borrowing capacity to invest in new or existing stock. This is in addition to the £1.6 billion we're investing over 2011 to 2015 in making 127,000 council homes decent. Furthermore in addition to £160 million already committed to bringing empty homes back into use, on 26 November 2012, we launched a bidding round to bring a further 5,000 empty homes back into use using a share of £300 million announced in the Housing and Growth Package. Finally the £730 million Growing Places Fund is helping to deliver key infrastructure needed to promote economic growth, create jobs and build houses in England. The fund is an important boost for local economies and provides a major opportunity for local authorities and local enterprise partnerships to work together to identify and prioritise the infrastructure they need for growth.

I would however encourage all local authorities to use what is already within their gift to increase house building; be it through use of their planning powers or the release of land in their ownership to other developers.

Local Government: Conditions of Employment

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what guidance his Department gives to local authorities on whether (a) councillors and (b) elected mayors are covered by the Part-Time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000. [136868]

Brandon Lewis: None, as councillors are not employees.

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Metropolitan Police

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much funding his Department allocated to the Metropolitan Police in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; how much he plans to allocate in future years; and if he will make a statement. [139420]

Brandon Lewis [holding answer 25 January 2013]: The following table sets out the amount of funding allocated to the Greater London Authority for policing purposes by my Department:

£ million
 2010-112011-122012-13(1)

Revenue Support Grant

115.764

211.997

16.250

Redistributed Business Rates

797.220

685.847

838.294

(1 )In 2012-13 the amount of Revenue Support Grant and Redistributed Business Rates contained an amount for the police-element in respect of council tax freeze compensation for 2011-12. In other years this payment, together with that for all other non-police elements, has been allocated to the Greater London Authority.

These figures exclude direct funding from the Home Office.

From 2013-14, following the introduction of the business rates retention scheme, funding for policing transferred to the Home Office, to be paid through the Police Grant Report.

In 2013-14, following the localisation of council tax support, provisionally, £119.3 million of Section 31 funding will be paid to police authorities to compensate for the reduction in their council tax base as a result.

Mobile Homes

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of static park homes in (a) the UK, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) Harrogate and Knaresborough constituency. [138964]

Mr Prisk: This information is not held centrally.

The Department has made no official estimate, but industry figures suggest there are approximately 85,000 park homes on 2,000 sites in England and 5,000 homes on 100 sites in Wales.

Every local authority in England, Wales and Scotland is required, under section 25 of the Caravan Sites and Control of Development Act 1960, to maintain a register of caravan (including static park home) sites in its area.

Responsibility for caravan site legislation in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland is devolved.

Mortgages: Government Assistance

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many successful applications were made to the New Buy scheme from people in (a) Don Valley constituency, (b) Doncaster borough or (c) South Yorkshire up to (i) 30 June 2012 and (ii) 31 December 2012. [139757]

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Mr Prisk: The Department does not produce data on how many successful applications were made under the NewBuy scheme from people in (a) Don Valley constituency, (b) Doncaster borough or (c) South Yorkshire up to (i) 30 June 2012 and (ii) 31 December 2012.

Official statistics were published on 27 September 2012 for the period 12 March-30 June 2012, including the number of properties sold in England under the scheme. The next official statistics, covering the third and fourth quarters of 2012 will be available on 27 March 2013.

The Home Builders Federation, one of the Government's key partners in the development and operation of NewBuy, recently announced that 3,000 reservations have been made under the scheme, and that the reservation rate in the first three weeks of 2013 is the highest since the scheme was launched last March.

Parking: Fees and Charges

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the average increase in car parking fees charged by local authorities has been in the last two years. [139337]

Brandon Lewis: The following table shows the total sales, fees and charges for parking services for local authorities in England (including off-street and on-street parking).

 £ million

2009-10

1,280

2010-11

1,248

2011-12

1,295

Thus, the change from 2009-10 to 2011-12 was an increase of just 1.2%. This is a fall in real terms.

Councils have a key role in promoting economic development, supporting local economic growth and local jobs. Making sure that car parking charges are reasonable is an important and practical way in which councils can help support their local high streets. Temporary or permanent free parking periods can provide particular boosts to local high streets and town centres.

The Government have taken steps to support local high streets. From April 2013, the local retention of business rates will mean that councils have a direct financial incentive in supporting business and retail growth in town centres. This is in contrast to the local government system we have inherited, where councils had no real incentives to support local high streets and city centres.

My Department has also tackled flawed parking rules inherited from the last Administration. In January 2011, we amended national planning guidance to:

remove Whitehall restrictions which imposed maximum numbers of parking spaces in new residential developments;

change a policy which inhibited competition between council areas to one that said parking charges should not undermine the vitality of town centres;

introduce a policy that parking enforcement should be proportionate;

remove the policy that encouraged councils to set car parking charges to discourage the use of cars.

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The National Planning Policy Framework followed through on these changes by removing restrictions which imposed maximum numbers of parking spaces in new non-residential developments. Greater provision will help relieve pressure on on-street parking and support local high streets.

As pledged in our response to the Mary Portas review, we are also taking steps to increase local transparency and accountability on the setting of municipal parking policies. Accordingly, a revised version of the ‘Code of Recommended Practice for Local Authorities on Data Transparency’, published in October, proposes that local authorities should routinely publish in an open format: revenue from off-street parking charges; revenue from on-street parking charges; the number of off-street parking places; the number of on-street parking places; the revenue from parking fines; and the number of free parking spaces available.

Procurement

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the monetary value was of contracts awarded by his Department to (a) management consultancies and (b) IT companies in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [135159]

Brandon Lewis: In November 2011, we procured a £44,230 contract for market assessment work for the sale of-the Fire Service College. This professional advice will allow us to maximise the receipts, and hence the return to the taxpayer, from the sale. No other relevant contracts were awarded.

In 2010-11, we procured £1,785,450 of contracts with IT companies, and £2,363,437 of contracts were procured in 2011-12. These figures are the total estimated value over the length of the contracts (in some cases, over a number of years). In this context, they are not comparable figures on the yearly spend on IT companies.

As part of the Government's Transparency agenda, the Department is publishing all contracts awarded over the value of £10,000 (from January 2011) on the Contracts Finder website at:

www.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk.

Moreover, as part of my Department's broader transparency agenda, we are publishing online new contracts over £500.

Retail Trade: Non-domestic Rates

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what recent assessment he has made of the effects of business rate increases on retailers; [139524]

(2) what assistance his Department has made available to retailers and small shops to pay business rates. [139535]

Brandon Lewis: The Government keep all taxes under review and as part of that listens to the views of the business community. Business rates are linked to inflation. There has been no increase in business rates in real terms.

At the autumn statement, 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-82, we announced that the temporary

29 Jan 2013 : Column 700W

doubling of small business rate relief would continue for a further year. That makes three and a half years in total and means the higher level of relief will apply throughout 2013-14. Many local retailers are benefiting from that including some who are paying no rates at all.

We have also given local authorities a wide-ranging, discretionary power to grant business rates discounts which they can use to support local retailers on the high street. The Localism Act has. also made it easier for small firms to claim small business rate relief.

Provisions in the Growth and Infrastructure Bill will also protect shops from business rate hikes that would have occurred because of the business rates revaluation. The Valuation Office Agency has estimated that the 2015 revaluation would result in "significant tax increases" for the food retail sector in particular.

Social Rented Housing

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) which local authorities are currently not participating in the recording of data on new social housing lets; and what steps he will take to ensure future participation; [R] [134132]

(2) in what proportion of local authority new social housing lets made in London for the financial year 2011-12 the nationality of the tenant has been recorded; [134134]

(3) for what reason the question on the nationality of the new tenant in the CORE survey on social housing lets is optional; and if he will make that question compulsory. [R] [134135]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 17 December 2012]: In 2011-12, there were six local authorities who were not participating in recording data on new social housing lettings. These were: Birmingham city council, Portsmouth city council, London borough of Hackney, London borough of Newham, London borough of Lambeth and the London borough of Greenwich. The previous Minister for Housing, my right hon. Friend the Member for Welwyn Hatfield (Grant Shapps), wrote to the Leaders in May to highlight the importance of participation, and five of these local authorities are now actively providing, or finalising internal and database systems to provide, data. Importantly, this means that all London local authorities should be providing data from April 2013. Portsmouth city council is the remaining non-participating local authority. We will continue to monitor local authorities and provide continued practical support to Portsmouth and others to enable them to participate effectively.

Within the Continuous Recording of Lettings (CORE) data, tenant nationality data was recorded for 68% of reported social lettings in London in 2011-12. A further 19 % responded to this question but refused to give their nationality.

The question on tenant nationality is voluntary. Local authorities may not be able to obtain this information about the tenant as they may not carry out tenant interviews to complete CORE and, when asked, some tenants do not wish to divulge their nationality. We are open to representations on this matter.

29 Jan 2013 : Column 701W

Most foreign nationals who have recently come to England are not eligible for an allocation of social housing. Broadly speaking, European economic area nationals are eligible if they are working, self-sufficient, or have a permanent right of residence in the UK (after five years lawful residence in the UK). Other foreign nationals are not eligible for social housing unless they have been granted leave to enter or remain in the UK with recourse to public funds (for example, people granted refugee status or humanitarian protection).

Where foreign nationals are eligible, they will have their housing needs considered on the same basis as other applicants in accordance with the local authority's allocation scheme.

In this context, the Localism Act gives back to councils the freedom to manage their own waiting list. They will be able to decide who should qualify for social housing in their area, and to develop solutions which make best use of limited social housing stock.

Social Rented Housing: South Yorkshire

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many successful home swaps had taken place under the Government's Home Swap Scheme involving a property in (a) Don Valley constituency, (b) Doncaster Borough or (c) South Yorkshire up to (i) 30 June 2012 and (ii) 31 December 2012. [139756]

Mr Prisk: “HomeSwap” Direct, the national home swap scheme, was launched in October 2011 to increase opportunities for tenants who wish to move home through a mutual exchange by allowing them to see details of every available property. Since the launch tenants have carried out over 2.8 million searches of the property data held on “HomeSwap” Direct.

Details of the number of moves that have taken place under the “HomeSwap” Direct scheme in (a) Don Valley constituency, (b) Doncaster borough or (c) South Yorkshire are not held centrally.

Written Questions: Government Responses

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when he plans to answer PQ 135404, tabled on 19 December 2012 for answer on 7 January 2013. [137752]

Brandon Lewis: PQ 135404 was answered on 22 January 2013, Official Report, column 207W.

Culture, Media and Sport

Football

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps she is taking to encourage local football clubs to offer their facilities for the use of (a) community sports groups and (b) schools. [138983]

Hugh Robertson: Many football clubs already do this through their own community programmes. However, Sport England provides funding to the Football Foundation to improve and develop community sports facilities.

29 Jan 2013 : Column 702W

This includes the provision of 3G surfaces. All these facilities are available for community sport use. In addition, as part of the Youth and Community Sport Strategy, Sport England is providing funding to the Football Association to develop 2,000 new multi-sport satellite clubs in secondary schools.

Olympic Games 2012: Touting

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) on what dates (a) she, (b) Ministers in her Department and (c) officials in her Department have met officers from Operation Podium to discuss ticket fraud and the secondary ticket market since the formation of Operation Podium; and what the outcomes of those meetings were; [140412]

(2) if she will place in the Library of a copy of any reports prepared for her Department by Operation Podium on ticket fraud and the secondary ticketing market. [140410]

Hugh Robertson: A range of assessments of threats to the Olympic and Paralympic Games were provided to Government to inform the Olympic security strategy and its successful delivery. This included reporting from the Operation Podium team in the Metropolitan police, and from other police forces and law enforcement agencies, regarding serious and organised crime. These reports contain sensitive information which cannot be published, even though the games are over. I am unable, therefore, to place the reports in the House Library. DCMS Ministers and officials met regularly with senior members of the Metropolitan police over several years running up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games, and daily during the games themselves.

Plants

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much her Department has spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since her appointment. [139939]

Hugh Robertson: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has not incurred any expenditure on indoor and outdoor plants and trees in the period since the Secretary of State was appointed. The comparable figure for the period 2005 to 2010 was £84,412.59.

Sports: West Midlands

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of voluntary sports coaches in (a) the west midlands and (b) Dudley. [139678]

Hugh Robertson: Sport England is providing £1.5 million to Sports Coach UK to support the development of both the paid and voluntary coaching workforce nationally. Sport England also provides £40,000 per year for Country Sports Partnerships (CSPs) specifically to support the development of their local community sport coaching workforce, of which around 75% are volunteers. This funding will directly benefit the five CSPs in the west midlands, with Dudley covered by the Black Country CSP.

29 Jan 2013 : Column 703W

UK Trade and Investment

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport which Ministers and officials in her Department are participating in the Strategic Investments Programme being promoted by UK Trade and Investment; and with which companies they are paired. [140114]

Hugh Robertson: Each company covered by strategic relationship management has an assigned Contact Minister, who is responsible for ensuring that issues raised by companies are shared across relevant Departments. The Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries, my hon. Friend the Member for Wantage (Mr Vaizey), is assigned as the Contact Minister for Everything Everywhere and Telefónica.

Contact Ministers are supported by appointed senior officials who are responsible for leading cross-Government co-ordination of the strategic relationship. The senior official appointed to lead cross-Government engagement with Facebook and Google is Jon Zeff, DCMS director, (Lord Green is the Contact Minister for Facebook and Google). The senior official appointed to lead cross-Government engagement with BT, Everything Everywhere, Telefónica and Vodafone is Simon Towler, head of telecommunications policy, (Lord Green is the Contact Minister for BT and Vodafone).

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what consideration she has given to potential conflicts of interest arising from participation by Ministers in her Department in the Strategic Investments Programme being promoted by UK Trade and Investment. [140115]

Hugh Robertson: The Contact Minister role complements existing relationships between departments and business by ensuring clear two-way communication and that Government's position is joined-up, coherent and long-term. The normal rules governing potential conflicts of interest and the presence of officials at meetings between Ministers and companies apply. Ministers interacting with companies on the strategic relationship management list continue to be guided by the Ministerial Code.

Energy and Climate Change

Affordable Warmth Programme

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the Affordable Warmth scheme on the number of households in fuel poverty in (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15. [139496]

Gregory Barker: Quantifying the impact of any specific policy in a specific year on levels of fuel poverty is extremely challenging, given uncertainty around changes in the level and distribution of incomes across households, changes to the housing stock and energy prices. For this reason, we have not made an assessment of the short-term impact of ECO Affordable Warmth in any given individual year.

29 Jan 2013 : Column 704W

We anticipate the ECO Affordable Warmth obligation will assist around 130,000 low income, vulnerable households each scheme year. Coupled with the Carbon Saving Communities obligation around 230,000 households on low incomes or in low income areas will be assisted through ECO each scheme year, greatly alleviating pressure on fuel bills.

Carbon Emissions Reduction Target

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he expects Ofgem to publish its final update on the (a) community energy saving programme and (b) carbon emission reduction target. [139455]

Gregory Barker: The CERT (carbon emission reduction target) and CESP (community energy saving programme) legislation requires Ofgem to provide a final report to me by 30 April and 1 May 2013 respectively, which I would expect to be published.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent estimate he has made of (a) the level of emission reduction achieved and (b) the number of households that have received assistance under the Carbon Emission Reduction Target (CERT); and what proportion of the overall CERT target has been met. [139456]

Gregory Barker: It is Ofgem's role, as administrator of the Carbon Emission Reduction Target (CERT), to estimate and report company progress.

Their most recent publication reported that 265 MtCO2 of the 293 MtCO2 (lifetime) target, approximately 90%, had been met by obligated energy companies by the end of September 2012.

CERT has been responsible for the delivery of a wide range of energy efficiency measures. Ofgem do not track the total number of households who have benefitted. However, my Department estimates that nearly 8 million households have benefited from a major insulation measure as a result of both CERT and CESP (community energy saving programme).

Community Energy Saving Programme

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent estimate he has made of (a) the level of emission reductions achieved and (b) the number of households that have received assistance under the Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP); and what proportion of the overall CESP target has been met. [139457]

Gregory Barker: It is Ofgem's role, as administrator of the Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP), to estimate and report company progress.

Ofgem report on CESP progress every six months, and their latest report covers activity to end of June 2012. At that point, 6.1 MtCO2 of the 19.25 MtCO2 target (lifetime, including adjustments), which is approximately 31.6%, had been met by obligated energy companies, and 66,977 dwellings had been treated. These numbers will have increased greatly over the final six months of

29 Jan 2013 : Column 705W

the scheme, and we expect Ofgem to provide a report on final delivery by the 31 December 2012 deadline in May 2013.

Deloitte

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many people have worked for the Department on (a) a paid and (b) an unpaid basis who have been seconded from Deloitte in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011 and (iii) 2012. [140207]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has had one person on secondment from Deloitte. That person was on secondment to DECC from July 2010 to April 2012 with their salary costs fully met by the Department.

Energy: Job Creation

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that will be created in (a) the city of Birmingham, (b) the West Midlands and (c) England as a result of the measures contained in the Energy Bill. [140100]

Mr Hayes: It is estimated that measures contained in the Energy Bill could support as many as 250,000 jobs across the UK energy sector. While there is potential for these jobs to be spread throughout the UK, it is difficult to predict the precise location of fixture investments in new generating infrastructure. Therefore, these estimated job figures have not been disaggregated further, either to a regional or a city level.

Insulation

Nick Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the number of jobs in the insulation industry which have been lost (a) in total and (b) in Wales since the ending of the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target and Community Energy Saving Programme on 31 December 2012. [139659]

Gregory Barker: The insulation industry is undergoing a period of transition as we enter a new phase of energy efficiency delivery with the Green Deal and the new energy company obligation (ECO).

Given that two-thirds of lofts are now fully insulated (and only very few have no insulation at all), and only 0.9m easy to treat cavity walls remain, it is inevitable that jobs in the loft and standard cavity wall insulation sector will decline.

However, while the Department has not made an estimate of any changes in employment in the insulation industry over the first few weeks of this year, we estimate that overall GB insulation industry jobs will increase from about 26,000 in 2011, to up to 60,000 by 2015. This is largely because of the move to promoting solid wall insulation, which is more labour intensive than treating lofts and standard cavities.

Plants

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department has spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees since his appointment. [139942]

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Gregory Barker: DECC have not spent any money on plants or trees since the appointment of the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change.

Through our Facilities Management contractor (‘Interserve’), a Christmas tree was provided in the main reception areas of 3 Whitehall Place and 55 Whitehall. However, no separate cost was attributed to this within the contract to DECC.

UK Membership of EU

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what contingency plans his Department (a) has made, (b) is making and (c) plans to make for UK withdrawal from the EU; whether those plans will be published; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost of implementing those plans. [140291]

Gregory Barker: The Department has not made any plans for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Wind Power

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department has set any targets for the number of wind turbines in the UK. [138912]

Mr Hayes: The 2009 Renewable Energy Directive sets a target for the UK to achieve 15% of its energy consumption for heat, electricity and transport from renewable sources by 2020. There are no targets, for specific renewable energy technologies in the UK.

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 18 January 2013, Official Report, column 956W, on energy, what information was submitted to his Department in support of the Brechfa wind farm application. [140179]

Mr Hayes: The Planning Inspectorate submitted to the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change on 12 December 2012 the Examining Authority's report and recommendation for the development consent application made in respect of the Brechfa Forest West wind farm. The Planning Inspectorate also submitted a number of representations from interested parties which were received after the close of the formal examination period. In addition, the Secretary of State has received representations about the application directly.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

British Indian Ocean Territory

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 17 January 2013, Official Report, column 909W, on British Indian Ocean Territory, if he will commission an independent study to re-evaluate the science and practicalities of resettlement of the British Indian Ocean Territory. [139652]

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Mark Simmonds: Following the end of the European Convention on Human Rights litigation in December, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, said the Government will now take stock of our policy towards the resettlement of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). as we have always said we would. There are fundamental difficulties with resettlement in BIOT, but we will be as positive as possible in our engagement with Chagossian groups and all interested parties. No decision has yet been taken on whether to commission a further study of the issues raised by resettlement. While climate change and sea levels are of concern because the islands are low-lying, it is important to note that science is only one of a very large number of factors influencing the practicalities and costs of different forms of resettlement.

Central African Republic

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to work with the United Nations towards lasting peace in the Central African Republic. [140018]

Mark Simmonds: The UK has been active in UN Security Council discussions on the recent crisis in the Central African Republic (CAR). We worked particularly closely with France on the drafting of Resolution 2088, agreed on 24 January. The resolution sends a strong message on the need for speedy implementation of the Libreville peace agreement, and extends the mandate of the UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in the CAR (BINUCA), for 12 months. We will remain engaged with the UN, including in March when the Secretary General reports on the latest situation in CAR and on BlNUCA's priorities.

Iran

Mr Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to the Iranian Government over the prosecution of Christians in Iran and the cases of Pastor Saeed Abedini, Farshid Fathi and Vruir Avanessian. [139334]

Alistair Burt: The UK has frequently condemned Iran’s persecution of its Christian religious minority. In my statement of 3 January, I highlighted the harassment of Christians over the Christmas period, including the re-arrest of Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani on Christmas day. Furthermore, I called on Iran to release immediately any citizens who remained in prison in Iran on the basis of their faith or belief, including Reverend Avanessian. We condemn the imprisonment of these three individuals, which appears to be on the grounds of their Christian faith. The UK continues to call on Iran to cease its persecution of Iranian citizens based on their religion or belief.

Mr Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent reports he has received of the persecution of those professing a minority religious faith in Iran. [139335]

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Alistair Burt: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office has received reports describing persecution in Iran on the basis of faith from Christians. Baha is and Dervishes in recent weeks. The UK remains greatly concerned about the persecution of religious minorities in Iran and continues to call on Iran to comply with its international obligations regarding its citizens’ rights to freedom of religion and belief.

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs in which fora and under whose auspices the Government take part in negotiations with Iran; and on what matters. [139560]

Alistair Burt: Following the regime-sponsored attack on our embassy in Tehran in November 2011, the UK's diplomatic relations with Iran were reduced to the lowest possible level. The UK and Iran nominated Sweden and Oman respectively, to act as protecting powers. This is the channel for bilateral business.

The UK participates actively in multilateral forums, such as the United Nations, of which Iran is also a member.

The UK is a member of the E3+3, which negotiates with Iran. These negotiations aim to find a diplomatic solution to the issue of Iran's nuclear programme.

Libya

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent reports he has received on the export of weapons from Libya following the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime. [139356]

Alistair Burt: We are aware that weapons would have moved over the borders as pro-Gaddafi fighters fled south during and after the fighting in Libya in 2011.

The Libyan Government realises the challenge of policing its long and porous borders. In December 2012 it ordered the temporary closure of Libya's land borders with Chad, Niger, Sudan and Algeria in order to limit weapons smuggling and illegal cross-border migration.

Border security is consequently a major part of the international community's offer of assistance to the new Libyan Government, including a UK-funded Border security—adviser who will be deploying to Libya in February. Border security was a key focus at a UK-hosted senior official’s meeting in London in December 2012, at which representatives of the new Libyan Government discussed with the US, France , UN, EU and other partner countries how best to deliver relevant international assistance to the Libyan authorities.

Mali

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Newark of 22 January 2013, Official Report, columns 171-2W, on Mali, whether the technical personnel to whom he makes reference are armed; and whether there are any other personnel accountable to his Department currently deployed in Mali. [140028]

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Mark Simmonds: I can confirm that the RAF technical personnel supporting the C17 plane, to which I referred on 22 January, are armed with side arms for personnel protection. This is based on a force protection assessment which is continually evaluated. The Government of Mali have been informed through diplomatic channels.

As for personnel accountable to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office deployed in Mali I can confirm that there is a small team of diplomatic staff supported by local staff in administrative and logistical roles.

Metropolitan Police

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much funding his Department allocated to the Metropolitan Police in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; how much he plans to allocate in future years; and if he will make a statement. [139424]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not allocate funds directly to the Metropolitan Police Service. However the FCO does pay the Metropolitan police for the provision of certain services such as: security for international events; specialist police officer support as part of our response to consular incidents; training for overseas capacity building work; and expertise in the field of counter-terrorism.

Occupied Territories

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on whether the Israeli Government intend to allow settlement building to continue on occupied lands. [139611]

Alistair Burt: We are awaiting the formation of the incoming Israeli Government following elections held for the 19th Knesset on 22 January 2012. We are following developments closely. When formed, we look forward to working with the next Israeli Government, and will look to them to uphold international law. We will continue to raise our concerns, calling on Israel to cease all settlement activity in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

UK Membership of EU

Emma Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what contingency plans his Department (a) has made, (b) is making and (c) plans to make for UK withdrawal from the EU; whether those plans will be published; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost of implementing those plans. [140288]

Mr Lidington: The Department has not made any plans for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the costs and benefits of UK membership of the European Union for each of the last 30 years. [140300]

Mr Lidington: A formal cost-benefit analysis would be difficult to carry out meaningfully as some of the most important benefits cannot be quantified: for example,

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our ability to secure tough, targeted EU-wide sanctions against Iran; or how enlargement has helped spread peace and freedom across Europe.

Evidence submitted to the Balance of Competences review should provide some evidence of costs and benefits of specific areas of EU activity.

Western Sahara

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 12 December 2012, Official Report, column 344W, on Western Sahara, whether MINURSO monitors the number of Moroccan soldiers stationed in the Western Sahara; what reports he has received on whether Morocco has reduced the number of troops stationed in the Western Sahara; and whether MINURSO has reported on troop confinement in that area to the United Nations Security Council. [139606]

Alistair Burt: As stated in my answer of 12 December, we do not hold information on how many Moroccan soldiers are stationed in the non-self-governing territory of Western Sahara. MINURSO is responsible for monitoring the ceasefire in place and adherence to the Military Agreement between Morocco and the Polisario. A detailed annual report on these activities is publicly available on the UN Security Council website: document S/2012/197. However, this report does not include overall troop numbers.

Written Questions: Government Responses

Emma Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he plans to answer Parliamentary Question 137663, tabled on 14 January 2013 for answer on 17 January 2013. [140211]

Mr Lidington: I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 24 January 2013, Official Report, column 419W.

Health

Action on Smoking and Health

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what funding his Department has allocated to the charity, Action on Smoking and Health in each of the last three years; [139823]

(2) whether his Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of its funding provided to the charity, Action on Smoking and Health and of the way in which that funding has been used; [139824]

(3) on how many occasions ministers and officials in his Department have met the charity, Action on Smoking and Health in the last 12 months. [139825]

Anna Soubry: Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) received funding of £220,000 in 2010-11 through the Department's “Section 64 General Scheme of Grants to Voluntary and Community Organisations” (the Section 64 Scheme). ASH received this grant specifically to carry out a defined project titled “Capitalising on Smokefree: the way forward”.

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ASH has subsequently received funding of £150,000 in 2011-12 and £150,000 in 2012-13, also through the Department's Section 64 Scheme. The grants were awarded for work to support delivery of Healthy lives, healthy people: a tobacco control plan for England.

All third, sector organisations in receipt of a grant from the Department are expected to provide quarterly and end-of-project reports, a summary of total spending on the project, and yearly accounts. Senior officials have met ASH 12 times in the last year to ensure good governance of the Section 64 grant and effective delivery of their work on implementation of the Tobacco Control Plan for England. The Department is satisfied that the grants to ASH have been used appropriately and that ASH has delivered the Department's objectives for the funding.

Details of ministerial meetings with external stakeholders are published quarterly in arrears on the Department's website at:

http://transparency.dh.gov.uk/category/transparency/ministerial-gifts-hospitality/

The Department does not keep a central diary of the engagements that every departmental official has had with ASH representatives. In discharging their official duties, Ministers, special advisors and departmental officials meet with representatives from such organisations in a wide range of fora, including speaking engagements, conferences and seminars.

Anti-Depressants: Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 January 2013, Official Report, column 116W, on anti-depressants, if he will make it his policy to collect data on the number of anti-depressants prescribed to children and young people. [139440]

Norman Lamb: The Department has no plans to do so.

Beef: Horse Meat

Mr Andrew Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what findings of horse meat traces his Department has detected in (a) wholesale and (b) retail meat (i) imported from the Republic of Ireland and (ii) in (A) England, (B) Northern Ireland, (C) Scotland and (D) Wales. [139595]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency is not aware of any samples taken by United Kingdom local authorities that have detected traces of horse DNA in food products originating from the Republic of Ireland or UK countries. The recent incident concerning horse DNA in burger meat resulted from tests conducted by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland.

Cancer

Bob Blackman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department plans to take to support the NHS Commissioning Board in the prevention of premature mortality linked to cancer; [140008]

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(2) what steps he plans to take to support the NHS Commissioning Board in its aim of saving 5,000 lives a year through early diagnosis of cancer. [140011]

Anna Soubry: In the Government's mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board, we set an objective for the board to work towards making the national health service one of the most successful countries in Europe at preventing premature deaths. The aim is to make significant progress in supporting the earlier diagnosis of illness, ensuring people have access to the right treatments, reducing unjustified variation between hospitals and focusing the NHS on preventing illness.

It is for the board to decide how they will carry this out and the NHS Outcomes Framework will be used to assess progress against the mandate objectives. Domain 1 of the NHS Outcomes Framework focuses on measuring how the NHS is performing in preventing people from dying prematurely and includes mortality and survival rates for cancer.

As we have highlighted in the second annual report for Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer published in December 2012, good progress is being made in improving cancer outcomes. We are investing over £450 million in early diagnosis of cancer including funding general practice direct access to key tests to help them rule out or confirm cancer in symptomatic patients, funding more testing and treatment in secondary care and running campaigns to raise awareness of symptoms of cancer.

We are investing over £173 million to expand radiotherapy services up to 2014-15 to support the utilisation of existing radiotherapy equipment; provide for new services; support increased access to proton beam therapy abroad and deliver a £23 million Radiotherapy Innovation Fund (2012-13). The Department has set aside up to £250 million of public capital to be invested by the NHS in building proton beam therapy facilities at The Christie Hospital and University College London Hospital. These facilities will treat up to 1,500 patients a year and the first is due to become operational from the end of 2017.

Since October 2010, over 25,000 patients in England have benefited from the additional £650 million funding for cancer drugs that this Government has committed to providing.

Bob Blackman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what safeguards his Department has put in place to minimise any loss of expertise and knowledge of cancer services staff during the transition to strategic clinical networks. [140009]

Anna Soubry: I refer my hon. Friend to the written answer given to the hon. Member for Sheffield Central (Paul Blomfield) on 16 January 2013, Official Report, columns 845-6W.

Depression: Medical Treatments

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the comparative cost effectiveness of treatments sanctioned by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence for repeat episodes of depression which include use of (a) anti-depressants, (b) talking therapies and (c) mindfulness. [139510]

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Norman Lamb: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's guidance on depression incorporate consideration of the cost-effectiveness of the available treatment options. We have made no separate assessment of this guidance.

Directors

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what declarations of interest must be made by his Department's non-executive directors; with what frequency any such declarations are required to be made; and if he will make that information publicly available. [140079]

Dr Poulter: The Department's non-executive board members and non-executive members of its Audit and Risk Committee are required to declare any conflicts of interest upon appointment. They are also expected to declare any subsequent conflicts that arise and the Department checks on an annual basis that non-executives' declarations are up to date and accurate. This is in line with the requirements of the Code of Practice on Corporate Governance in Central Government Departments.

Details of non-executives' company memberships and other significant interests are listed in the Department's Annual Report, together with any interests as part of Related Party Transactions in the accounts. This is available at:

https://www.wp.dh.gov.uk/publications/files/2012/10/23735_HC-66-DoH.pdf

Drugs: Testing

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when (a) his Department and (b) the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence last reviewed the effects of Methylphenidate on children and young people; [139511]

(2) what recent discussions (a) his Department and (b) the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have had with pharmaceutical companies on publishing the results of the testing of anti-depressants on children: and if he will make a statement; [139512]

(3) what recent discussions he has had with his counterparts from other western countries about forcing pharmaceutical companies to publish all results of the testing of new drugs. [139513]

Norman Lamb: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) led a European review of the risks and benefits of methylphenidate that concluded in January 2009. Throughout this review independent scientific expert advice was obtained from the Commission on Human Medicines on the available evidence. This concluded that the benefits of methylphenidate-containing medicines continue to outweigh their risks, when they are used in their approved indication for children aged six years or over and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as part of comprehensive treatment programmes.

As a result of this review the prescribing guidance and information for patients has been updated to ensure it contains clear, comprehensive information about the effects of methylphenidate and the importance of monitoring children and adolescents throughout their treatment. The marketing authorisation holders for methylphenidate

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products have also been asked to conduct studies to further characterise the safety of methylphenidate, particularly the long-term safety. The safety of methylphenidate remains under close review and information from the ongoing studies will be evaluated as soon as it becomes available.

NICE published technology appraisal guidance in March 2006 which recommended methylphenidate within its licensed indication as an option for the treatment of ADHD. NICE also published a clinical guideline in September 2008 on the diagnosis and management of ADHD in children, young people and adults which recommends methylphenidate as a treatment option subject to certain criteria.

NICE reviewed the need to update the clinical guideline in October 2011 and decided that it would not be updated at that time. We understand that NICE plans to consider the guideline for an update again in July 2014. Further information is available at:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG72

If an update is made to a drug's marketing authorisation by the regulator, NICE will consider updating its published guidance.

There have been no recent discussions with pharmaceutical companies about publishing the results of clinical trials of antidepressants in children.

NICE is an independent body and any such discussions are a matter for the Institute. As part of its technology appraisal process, NICE asks for full access to all the relevant information that is available to the marketing authorisation holder for the medicine being appraised.

The Secretary of State for Health, has not had discussions with his counterparts in the European Union on the matter of pharmaceutical companies publishing all results of the testing of new drugs. However, publishing results from all authorised clinical trials is planned as a development of the current EU Clinical Trials Register later this year and is further being considered as part of the proposed EU clinical trials regulation. The MHRA is leading the discussions on behalf of the United Kingdom and the topic will be considered in the coming months. Also, the MHRA has been involved in discussions on the commitment of the European Medicines Agency to publish clinical trial data that has been submitted as part of applications for a Marketing Authorisation.

Health Services

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the take-up of new treatment recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, by GPs, consultants and health authorities. [139508]

Norman Lamb: National health service organisations are legally required to fund treatments recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in its technology appraisal guidance.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre published its third report on the ‘Use of NICE appraised medicines in the NHS in England’ on 17 October 2012. The report compares actual usage data for 2010 and 2011 with an estimate of the eligible population for

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NICE-recommended medicines within the NHS in England, where possible, and shows variation between organisations.

The experimental Innovation Scorecard, published on 10 January 2013, will help the NHS understand and address unexplained variation in the uptake of new and existing treatments within the NHS. ‘NICE Technology Appraisals in the NHS in England 2011; Experimental Statistics—Innovation Scorecard’ is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB09539

Health: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 19 December 2012, Official Report, column 850W, on Health: Children, what recent assessment he has made of the impact of poverty on life satisfaction for children and young people. [135906]

Esther McVey: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions is responsible for child poverty and I am responding as the Minister responsible. The Government is committed to tackling child poverty and to eradicate the causes including worklessness, educational failure and family breakdown, rather than simply treating the consequences of the problem.

The Government is taking action to tackle child poverty including introducing universal credit, which will simplify the benefit system and ensure that work are always the best option; investing more in nursery and pre-school provision, including providing 260,000 disadvantaged two-year-olds with 15 hours a week free child care; investing in education, including £2.5 billion for the pupil premium for disadvantaged pupils and £1.2 billion for capital investment in schools; and raising the tax threshold which will lift more than 2 million people out of paying tax altogether.

As we made clear in the consultation document published in November, growing up in poverty can affect children in a number of ways, and no two children's experiences of growing up are the same. Some children suffer disadvantage and still go on to live independent and successful lives. But while some children thrive, poverty increases the risk of adverse outcomes including educational failure, teenage pregnancy, truanting and antisocial behaviour.

Income matters—and will remain a key indicator in defining what it means to be in poverty, but income is not all that matters. It is now widely understood that the current relative income measure by itself is not an accurate picture of child poverty. We need to develop better measures that capture the reality of children's experience of poverty. That is why we are consulting on what those measures should be.

Hospitals: North East

Julie Elliott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average time for an operation was in (a) Sunderland and (b) the North East in each of the last five years. [139517]

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Anna Soubry: The average (median) times waited in weeks for patients who started admitted treatment during the month of November, for the last five years, for Sunderland Teaching Primary Care Trust (PCT) and the North East are shown in the following table:

As at November:Sunderland Teaching PCTNorth East

2008

7.6

7.5

2009

6.7

7.2

2010

6.4

7.3

2011

6.7

7.1

2012

6.6

7.6

Notes: 1. The Department collects and publishes monthly referral to treatment (RTT) data which are used to monitor NHS waiting times. As the question asks about average time for an operation, it is assumed the question is about average waiting times and has been answered using RTT data for patients whose treatment involved admission to hospital. 2. Data has been collected since August 2007, with adjusted admitted pathways from March 2008. November waiting times are extracted from monthly series, for comparison with latest. Source: Department of Health referral to treatment (RTT) waiting times return

Mental Health Services: Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 January 2013, Official Report, column 119W, on mental health services: young people, when his Department will publish the figures for the amount spent on the treatment of mental illness in children and young people in 2011-12. [139439]

Norman Lamb: The figures used in the response to the answer of 21 January 2013, Official Report, column 119W, came from the Programme Budget figures. The figures for 2011-12 will be published shortly.

Mental Illness: Bolton

Yasmin Qureshi: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people living in (a) Bolton South East constituency and (b) Bolton were treated for mental illness in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12. [139663]

Norman Lamb: Information is not available in the format requested.

The number of adults using national health service specialist mental health services in the Bolton metropolitan district from 2008-09 to 2010-11 is shown in the following table.

 Mental health service users; persons count

April 2010 to March 2011

6,010

April 2009 to March 2010

5,500

April 2008 to March 2009

5,400

Notes: 1. Data on numbers of people under 18 accessing mental health services is not available. 2. The data relates to number of adults accessing secondary mental health care. The data does not include number of adults treated in primary care.. 3. Data is provided at local authority level. Source: Mental Health Minimum Dataset 2010-11, Information Centre for Health and Social Care

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Methylphenidate

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many children under six years have been dispensed prescriptions for methylphenidate in each of the last 30 years; [139591]

(2) how many and what proportion of children being prescribed methylphenidate have had their prescriptions reviewed after six months in the last three years. [139592]

Norman Lamb: Information is not available on the number of people prescribed a particular medicine. Methylphenidate is approved in the European Union for children aged six years or over and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as part of comprehensive treatment programmes. It is for doctors to decide whether and at what point to review continued treatment.

Metropolitan Police

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding his Department allocated to the Metropolitan police in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; how much he plans to allocate in future years; and if he will make a statement. [139425]

Dr Poulter: The Department has made only one payment to the Metropolitan Police Authority in the period requested.

4 January 2011—£4,000.00 to support the Newham Police Alcohol Custody Referral scheme

Multiple Sclerosis

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has recently discussed with his Ministerial colleagues commissioning research on the possible association between a deficiency in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis. [139515]

Anna Soubry: The Department has not commissioned, and has no plans to commission, research into the possible association between a deficiency in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, at the request of the Department, the Government's Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) is currently carrying out an extensive review of vitamin D and health. As part of this process SACN will assess the evidence for an association between vitamin D and MS. SACN's report is due to be completed in 2014.

North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many individuals and groups have left the North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust to join (a) a clinical commissioning group and (b) the NHS Commissioning Board in 2012. [139434]

Anna Soubry: As at 31 December 2012, no individuals have left the North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust to join either a clinical commissioning group (CCG) or the NHS Commissioning Board. However, 67 staff (53.59 full-time equivalent (FTE)) have a deferred appointment to a CCG and 18 staff (16.17 FTE) have a

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deferred appointment, to the NHS Commissioning Board. It is anticipated these staff will take up their new roles on 1 April 2013.