Publications

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how often his Department produces a staff magazine. [137314]

Brandon Lewis: My Department does not produce a staff magazine.

Social Rented Housing

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) shared equity or shared ownership and (b) other intermediate market homes have been built by (i) registered social landlords and (ii) other housing providers in each of the last 10 years; and what information his Department holds on the number of these properties successfully resold to new occupants since they were first occupied. [137137]

Mr Prisk: Statistics on additional intermediate affordable housing provided are published in the Department's live tables 1000 and 1010, which are available at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

16 Jan 2013 : Column 844W

These figures include both newly built housing, which accounts for around 68% of additional intermediate affordable housing over the last ten years, and acquisitions from the private sector.

Information about resale of shared ownership housing by private registered providers is collected in CORE (the Continuous Recording of Lettings and Sales of Social Housing in England) for some shared ownerships schemes. Between 2002-03 and 2011-12, the most recent year for which data are available, there were approximately 22,000 re-sales of Shared Ownership, New Build HomeBuy, Social Homebuy for shared ownership, Home Ownership for people with Long Term Disability and similar schemes for earlier years. Some of these re-sales may be the same property being re-sold on more than one occasion. This is approximately 28% of the total sales recorded in CORE for these schemes over this period.

Temporary Accommodation: West Midlands

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many children have been registered as living in temporary accommodation in each local authority area in the west midlands since 2005. [136520]

Mr Prisk: A table has been placed in the Library of the House, showing the number of children living in temporary accommodation in each local authority area in the west midlands on 31 March every year since 2005.

We are determined to tackle this problem. So, from 9 November, local authorities have new powers under the Localism Act to use good-quality private rented sector accommodation to end the main homelessness duty. Families will no longer need to be placed in temporary accommodation while they wait for social housing to become available.

At the same time, we have also put in place extra protection for the most vulnerable. The Homelessness (Suitability of Accommodation) (England) Order 2012 will help prevent the use of temporary accommodation which is long distances from the families’ previous home and community.

For households already in temporary accommodation the local authority has a duty (under section 193 of the Housing Act) to find that family settled accommodation. Local authorities should continue to work with these households to discuss alternative housing options as they become available.

Wind Power: Planning Permission

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he is taking to prevent frequent applications for planning permission for the use of the land for wind farms following initial rejection of the application for the use of that land for this purpose. [136797]

Nick Boles [holding answer 14 January 2013]:I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to him on 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 20W. Local planning authorities have powers to decline to determine planning applications if they have previously refused permission for two or more substantially similar proposals on the

16 Jan 2013 : Column 845W

same site, or if a substantially similar proposal has been rejected on appeal within the past two years. The decision as to whether an application is

'the same or substantially the same'

is for the local planning authority. I have recently underlined that local planning authorities should use their local plans to help shape where development should and should not take place.

Women and Equalities

Members: Correspondence

Mr Baron: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities when her Department plans to respond to letters from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of (a) 18 September, (b) 17 October, (c) 5 November and (d) 26 November 2012 regarding a constituent, Mr Colin Taylor. [136971]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 16 January 2013]: I wrote to my hon. Friend on 15 January 2013.

Health

Aviation

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many air miles were accumulated by each Minister in his Department in 2012; how such air miles were used; and whether such air miles were donated to charity. [137090]

Dr Poulter: The information is not available in the format requested.

The latest statement received by Star Alliance (who provide an online incentive programme for corporate customers of airlines) shows that the Department as a whole, for all Ministers and officials travelling on Departmental business, had 56,475 PlusPoints available.

Air miles and any other benefits accrued through travel paid for from public funds are used for official purposes or else foregone, in line with the Ministerial Code. It is the intention of the Department that, as a matter of routine, current and future departmental air miles will be used to offset its corporate carbon emissions.

Cancer

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what safeguards he has put in place to prevent the loss of expertise and knowledge of cancer services staff during the transition to strategy clinical networks. [137033]

Norman Lamb: The essence of clinical networks is the web of relationships between individual clinicians. Clinicians are mostly unaffected by the changes in NHS commissioning architecture and will provide a key point of continuity through the transition process.

All primary care trusts have developed comprehensive legacy documents and network activities are included in these. It will be the role of the lead managers for strategic clinical networks in each of the 12 network support teams to ensure that the transition is well

16 Jan 2013 : Column 846W

managed at a local level. Good progress is being made with the establishment of these teams and the majority of the lead manager posts, as well as network manager, improvement manager and associated support posts, have been filled by existing network staff.

Carers

Meg Hillier: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on bringing forward legislative proposals to provide support to carers of disabled children similar to that which would be provided for adults under the draft Care and Support Bill. [137169]

Norman Lamb: There have been no meetings between the Secretary of State for Health and the Secretary of State for Education but Ministers have met to discuss issues relating to carers and disabled children among other issues. In addition, departmental officials are in regular discussions with their counterparts at the Department for Education, about the proposed legislation.

The draft Care and Support Bill proposals include significant improvements to simplify adult carers' assessments and, for the first time, to place a duty on local authorities to meet adult carers' eligible needs for support, putting them on the same footing as the people they care for. There is no parallel duty in the draft Children and Families Bill, as support for parents and carers of disabled children is already an integral part of the social care assessment for disabled children under section 17 of the Children Act. Section 17 assessments will consider and agree services and support for parents and carers where these will help to deliver better outcomes for the child.

The draft Care and Support Bill however, includes new provisions to support better transition to adult social care for young people, young carers and parent carers, including protections to ensure no gap in services over transition.

Consultants

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on external consultancy since 2010. [136929]

Dr Poulter: Total consultancy spend by the core Department and Connecting for Health for financial years 2010-11 and 2011-12 are set out in the following table, together with those for the previous two years. The figures are based on the definition of consultancy services provided by Cabinet Office Government Procurement (formerly the office of Government Commerce).

£ million
 2011-122010-112009-102008-09

Core Department

3

10

108

102

Connecting for Health

12

5

7

5

Total

15

15

115

107

Source: Financial year data 2008-09 to 2011-12 taken from NHS Summarised Accounts

16 Jan 2013 : Column 847W

2012-13 consultancy figures will not be available until the Department of Health summarised annual accounts are published later in 2013.

This Government are determined to use management consultants if and only if they can add real value and where no other alternative exists, which ensures taxpayers' money is spent wisely.

Data Protection

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many occasions each Minister in his Department carried classified documents on public transport in the last 12 months for which information is available. [137112]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not record this information.

Epilepsy

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department is taking to improve the early diagnosis and treatment of people with epilepsy in England; and if he will make a statement; [136886]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to reduce the stigma attached to those diagnosed with epilepsy; and if he will make a statement. [136887]

Norman Lamb: Long-term conditions are one of the Secretary of State for Health's priority areas and this was reflected in the prominence with which they featured in the mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board, which sets out the Government's objectives for the national health service and highlights the areas of health and care where we expect to see improvements.

The mandate contains a clear objective on enhancing the quality of life of people with long-term conditions by helping them to live healthier, for longer with a better quality of life.

Quality Standards published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) support better outcomes for patients by promoting improvement in the quality of care. We have referred to NICE the development of quality standards for children and adults with epilepsy. These quality standards, which are expected to be published in February and March 2013 respectively, will help drive improvements in the diagnosis, care and treatment of this condition.

The Department understands the importance of providing the best possible information to people with epilepsy as improved access to information and education helps to promote better care, and particularly better self-care. Such information can also be used to help promote understanding and tolerance and combat the prejudice that people with epilepsy can experience.

The Department has worked to reduce the level of stigma experienced by those with epilepsy by raising awareness of the condition among the public. In this respect, NHS Choices provides the public with information about epilepsy, including information on living with the condition.

16 Jan 2013 : Column 848W

General Practitioners

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how much and what proportion of individual GP income was (a) part of the GP's basic contract and (b) performance related in each year from 1999; [136805]

(2) what proportion of the monies allocated to GP practices was derived from the Quality and Outcome Framework in each of the last 10 years. [137018]

Dr Poulter: The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) was introduced as part of the new general practitioner contract arrangements in 2004-05. This provides additional rewards to practices based on performance against a range of quality measures.

The proportion of total funding to practices from the QOF for each year is shown as follows.

 Percentage funding from QOF

2004-05

9.8

2005-06

14.9

2006-07

14.0

2007-08

14.1

2008-09

14.1

2009-10

13.6

2010-11

13.8

2011-12

14.3

The remaining percentage of funding relates to the other contractual funding streams.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the (a) mean average, (b) median average, (c) upper quartile and (d) lower quartile NHS income per annum for (i) GPs and (ii) GP practices in each year from 1999-2000. [136806]

Dr Poulter: The information asked for is not all available in the form requested.

The Information Centre for health and social care publishes GP Earnings and Expenses data annually from data taken from HM Revenue and Customs tax returns that cover both national health service and private income.

The GP Earnings and Expenses report only provides details of mean and median average gross income for general practitioners (GPs), with quartile data not available. Median average figures are not available prior to 2009-10.

£
 Mean averageMedian average

1999-2000

144,946

n/a

2000-01

158,605

n/a

2001-02

166,965

n/a

2002-03

191,077

n/a

2003-04

212,467

n/a

2004-05

241,795

n/a

2005-06

257,563

n/a

2006-07

260,764

n/a

2007-08

266,110

n/a

2008-09

274,100

n/a

16 Jan 2013 : Column 849W

2009-10

278,100

242,700

2010-11

283,000

245,600

From this gross income, GP contractors need to meet their practice expenses and will retain the remainder as practice profits.

The Information Centre also publish the Investment in General Practices report which sets out total funding for practices in England. They also publish details of the number of GP practices. The relevant information from these two publications is shown in the following table with the mean average calculated from these two figures. The median and quartile information is not available.

 Total investment in GP practices (£ million)Number of GP practicesMean average (£000)

1999-2000

3,432

9,034

380

2000-01

3,624

8,965

404

2001-02

3,714

8,910

417

2002-03

4,060

8,833

460

2003-04

5,811

8,833

658

2004-05

6,914

8,542

809

2005-06

7,747

8,451

917

2006-07

7,757

8,325

932

2007-08

7,867

8,261

952

2008-09

7,957

8,230

967

2009-10

8,321

8,228

1,011

2010-11

8,349

8,324

1,003

2011-12

8,397

8,316

1,010

The number of practices is at 30 September each calendar year.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to ensure that GP funding is allocated according to the health needs of the population in each practice. [136807]

Dr Poulter: We are currently consulting with representatives of general practice on fairer, more equitable core funding arrangements for general practitioner practices. These will ensure resources are allocated on the basis of the number of patients on practice lists, with appropriate weightings for factors such as age and deprivation that are related to health needs. This would end the current

16 Jan 2013 : Column 850W

inequitable funding of practices based on historic income, with changes to practice funding phased over seven years, starting in 2014.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) mean average, (b) largest and (c) smallest global sum payment made to GP practices was in each of the last 10 years; and what proportion of average GP practice allocation was derived from the global sum element in each such year. [137029]

Dr Poulter: Global sum payments were introduced in 2004-05 as part of the new General Medical Services contract and are calculated by the NHS Applications and Infrastructure Service (NHAIS).

The information requested, based on NHAIS data, is set out as follows:

 Mean global sum (£)Largest global sum (£)Smallest global sum (£)Average global sum income as percentage of total practice NHS income (%)

2004-05

314,613

1,361,633

76

52

2005-06

326,310

1,760,056

73

47

2006-07

336,340

1,548,595

58

46

2007-08

339,665

1,518,353

68

45

2008-09

353,766

1,613,154

22

46

2009-10

397,674

2,117,667

26

49

2010-11

405,450

1,805,289

26

51

2011-12

415,795

2,446,096

65

51

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what unit payment was made to GP practices for each directed enhanced service commissioned in each of the last 10 years. [137131]

Dr Poulter: Directed enhanced services were introduced in April 2004 as part of the current arrangements for the provision of primary medical services. The table shows those directed enhanced services which were available to primary medical services contractors in each year since 2004.

Payments for participating in the schemes are set out in the Statement of Financial Entitlements (SFE). A copy has been placed in the Library—along with copies of subsequent amendments.

As the process for calculation of payments due under each scheme can vary, it is not possible to reproduce an individual unit price for each scheme.

Name of Service2004-052005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Improved patient access

Yes

Yes(1)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Childhood Immunisation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Influenza and Pneumococcal

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Minor Surgery scheme plans

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Service for Violent Patients

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

16 Jan 2013 : Column 851W

16 Jan 2013 : Column 852W

Quality Information Preparation

Yes

Towards Practice Based Commissioning

Yes

Information Management and Technology

Yes

Choice and Booking

Yes

Yes

Extended Access Scheme

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Alcohol Related Risk Reduction

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ethnicity and First Language Recording

Yes

Yes

Learning Disabilities Health Check

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Heart Failure Treatment

Yes

Osteoporosis Diagnosis and Prevention

Yes

Yes

Patient Participation(2)

Yes

Yes

(1) This scheme was revoked from 1 April 2006. A new scheme was introduced from July 2006. (2) Two year scheme.

General Practitioners: Ashfield

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints he received on waiting times to see a GP in the Ashfield primary care trust area in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [136942]

Norman Lamb: This information is not held centrally. The hon. Member may wish to contact the local primary care trust for this information.

Health

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make it his policy to publish the names of those companies who (a) sign up and (b) decline to sign up to his Responsibility Deal; and if he will publish the progress of each company which signs up against its commitments. [136777]

Norman Lamb: The Responsibility Deal (RD) website at:

http://responsibilitydeal.dh.gov.uk/

was launched on 15 March 2011 and includes the latest news and up-to-date information about the Deal.

Full details of the Deal's partners and the pledges they have signed up to are listed under the ‘our partners’ section of the website at:

http://responsibilitydeal.dh.gov.uk/our-partners/

Partners report on their progress on an annual basis. The first annual updates from over 180 partners were published on the website in June 2012. These can be viewed under the ‘pledges’ section of the website at:

http://responsibilitydeal.dh.gov.uk/pledges/

In autumn 2010, a range of organisations and individuals were invited to participate in the development of the Responsibility Deal. On the launch of the Responsibility Deal in March 2011, we invited these organisations to sign up to the Deal. Some individuals, such as academics or expert advisers, were and continue to be involved in a personal capacity rather than as representatives of organisations. Consequently, they cannot sign up as partners. The following is a list of the organisations involved in the development work which have not signed up to become partners:

Federation of Small Businesses

Diabetes UK

Alcohol Concern

Alcohol Health Alliance

British Liver Trust

British Medical Association

Institute for Alcohol Studies

British Heart Foundation

C3 Collaborating for Health

Men's Health Forum

NHS Employers—signed up to the Responsibility Deal as part of the NHS Confederation

Royal College of Physicians

South East Chambers of Commerce

TUC

Transport for London

BHF National Centre

BSkyB

CABE—organisation no longer exists

Cycling England—organisation no longer exists

Natural England

Royal Town Planning Institute.

The chairs of the RD networks, existing partners, public health professionals and officials in the Department of Health and other Government Departments promote the Deal to a wide range of organisations during the course of their work. We do not collate or publish information about these discussions.

Hospices

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people receiving care from hospices in the UK in each of the last five years. [137077]

16 Jan 2013 : Column 853W

Norman Lamb: The Department does not hold this information. Approximately 5% of patients who die in England each year die in hospices. The following statistics cover the number of deaths in hospices in England in each of the last five years that we have information for:

 Percentage of total deaths in England in hospicesNumber of deaths in hospices

2007

5.2

24,426

2008

5.0

23,948

2009

5.2

24,096

2010

5.3

24,651

2011

5.6

25,673

These figures do not include people who may have received hospice care in other settings.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to minimise the burden of regulation on hospices. [137081]

Norman Lamb: The Government recognise the valuable role that hospices play in delivering end of life care services, in particular for cancer patients. We are determined to ensure that any changes to regulation will not have a negative impact on hospices.

Nurses: Pay

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average pay was of registered GP practice nurses in each year since 1999. [136808]

Dr Poulter: This information is not held centrally. General practitioners (GPs) are private employers and are therefore free to choose the terms and conditions upon which they engage their staff.

The Department has issued job profiles for GP practice staff which suggested that practice nurses should earn the same as national health service staff within Band 5 of the “Agenda for Change” (AfC) payscales.

AfC was introduced in 2004-05 and the maximum and minimum for Band 5 of the payscale for the years since then are as follows. As set out above, GPs are not obliged to pay their practice nurses these rates.

 Minimum (£)Maximum

2004-05

15,877

23,442

2005-06

16,389

19,248

2006-07

17,475

24,803

2007-08 from 1 April

18,310

25,175

2007-08 from 1 November

19,683

25,424

2008-09

20,225

26,123

2009-10

20,710

26,839

2010-11

21,176

27,534

2011-12

21,176

27,625

2012-13

21,176

27,625

Obesity

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assistance with dieting the NHS provides to those suffering from obesity; [136998]

16 Jan 2013 : Column 854W

(2) what steps his Department is taking to help people make informed decisions about their diet. [137135]

Norman Lamb: Primary care trusts are responsible for commissioning health care services to meet the needs of their population including services for those who are obese. Health care professionals are encouraged to implement guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) on the Prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children and, where appropriate, implement their local obesity care pathway to ensure that patients receive the support they need to manage their weight.

The NICE guidance is available at:

www.nice.org.uk/CG43

The Government has published “Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A call to action on obesity in England” which includes our commitment to helping people improve their diet through key initiatives such as the Responsibility Deal and Change4Life.

Through the Responsibility Deal business is taking action at every level to make it easier for people to make better choices. For example calorie labelling has expanded rapidly in out of home settings with labelling now in around 9,000 outlets across the country; In addition the Government have announced our preferred approach to front of pack nutrition labelling to help achieve greater consistency and clarity and help consumers make healthier food choices.

The Government has recently launched the Change4Life Be Food Smart campaign to give people information about the foods they eat, and help them make healthier choices.

A copy of the ‘call to action’ has already been placed in the Library.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) children and (b) adults were (i) obese and (ii) overweight when measured by body mass index in (A) Dudley North constituency, (B) Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council area, (C) the West Midlands and (D) England in the most recent period for which figures are available. [137121]

Norman Lamb: The information requested is not collected in the format requested.

Information on the prevalence of obese and overweight adults in England is available in Table 4 of the Adult trend tables from ‘Health Survey for England—2011 trend tables’. This information is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse11trendtables

Information on the prevalence of obese and overweight adults by Strategic Health Authority (SHA) is available in Table 10.4 of the “Health Survey for England—2011: Health, social care and lifestyles”. This information is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse11report

Information showing the prevalence of children who are obese and overweight in England is available in Table 4 of the Child trend tables from “Health Survey for England—2011 trend tables”.

16 Jan 2013 : Column 855W

Information on the prevalence of obese and overweight children by SHA is available in Table 11.3 of the “Health Survey for England—2011: Health, social care and lifestyles”.

Information on the prevalence of obese and overweight children by region and local authority is available in the “National Child Measurement Programme: England, 2011/12 school year” tables 3A and 3B. In table 3A the geography is derived from the postcode of the school and in table 3B it is derived from the postcode of the child's home address. However, this information is only available for children in Reception year (four to five years) and year 6 (10 to 11 years). This information is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/searchcatalogue?productid= 10135&topics=0%2fPublic+health&sort=Relevance&size= 10&page=l#top

This information has been placed in the Library.

16 Jan 2013 : Column 856W

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people aged (a) under 18, (b) between 18 and 24, (c) between 25 and 64 and (d) 65 years and over in (i) Dudley North constituency, (ii) Dudley metropolitan borough council area, (iii) the west midlands and (iv) England were treated for obesity-related illnesses in each of the last five years. [137136]

Norman Lamb: The information requested is not collected in the format requested. The Health and Social Care Information Centre has provided a count of finished admission episodes(1) with a primary diagnosis of obesity(2) for residents in England(3), West Midlands Strategic Health Authority (SHA)(4), Dudley North constituency and Dudley local authority district, by age band for 2007-08 to 2011-12(5), This information is provided in the following table. Constituency data for 2007-08 are not available.

  Age group
 Place of residenceUnder 1616-1718-2425-6465+Unknown

2007 -08

England

747

81

147

3,829

210

4

 

West Midlands SHA

96

4

17

389

13

 

Dudley local authority district

6

*

40

*

 

Dudley North constituency

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

        

2008 -09

England

774

101

221

6,603

283

3

 

West Midlands SHA

90

6

13

506

17

 

Dudley local authority district

*

34

*

 

Dudley North constituency

*

11

        

2009 -10

England

632

109

252

9,108

465

2

 

West Midlands SHA

98

10

17

653

16

 

Dudley local authority district

*

24

*

 

Dudley North constituency

*

8

*

 
        

2010 -11

England

525

89

286

10,094

571

8

 

West Midlands SHA

73

9

24

770

27

 

Dudley local authority district

*

*

64

*

 

Dudley North constituency

*

22

        

2011 -12

England

495

89

302

10,288

562

 

West Midlands SHA

88

8

27

804

37

 

Dudley local authority district

*

*

75

*

 

Dudley North constituency

*

26

*

16 Jan 2013 : Column 857W

16 Jan 2013 : Column 858W

(1) Finished admission episodes. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) Primary diagnosis. The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. The ICD-10 code for obesity is E66. (3) England. The England total includes patients who are resident in one of the 10 SHA areas in England (i.e. it excludes patients resident in an unknown SHA). (4) SHA of residence. The strategic health authority (SHA) or primary care trust (PCT) containing the patient's normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another SHA/PCT for treatment. A change in methodology in 2011-12 resulted in an increase in the number of records where the PCT or SHA of residence was unknown. From 2006-07 to 2010-11 the current PCT and SHA of residence fields were populated from the recorded patient postcode. In order to improve data completeness, if the postcode was unknown the PCT, SHA and country of residence were populated from the PCT/SHA value supplied by the provider. From April 2011-12 onwards if the patient postcode is unknown the PCT, SHA and country of residence are listed as unknown. (5) Assessing growth through time (in-patients). HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, changes in activity may be due to changes in the provision of care. Note: Small numbers. To protect patient confidentiality, figures between one and five have been replaced with “*” (an asterisk). Where it was still possible to identify figures from the total, additional figures (with the smallest data loss) have also been replaced with an “*”. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Obesity: Dudley

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to tackle obesity in Dudley; and what information his Department holds on the number of people in Dudley suffering from obesity. [136997]

Norman Lamb: In October 2011, the Government published ‘Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A call to action on obesity in England’, which sets out how obesity among children and adults will be tackled in the new public health and national health service systems, and the role of key partners.

The document sets out details of two new national ambitions for achieving a downward trend in the level of excess weight in children and adults by 2020, and sets out existing and proposed Government actions.

A copy of the ‘call to action’ has already been placed in the Library.

There are two sources of data from which relevant information about the prevalence of obesity can be obtained—the Health Survey for England (HSE) and the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP). Neither source can be used to provide information in the exact format requested.

Information on the prevalence of obese adults (men and women) aged 16 and over in England for each year from 1993 to 2011 is available in Table 4 of the adult trend tables from ‘Health Survey for England—2011 trend tables’.

Information on the prevalence of obese adults (men and women) aged 16 and over by strategic health authority (SHA) for 2011 is available in Table 10.4 of the ‘Health Survey for England—2011: Health, social care and lifestyles’.

Information on the prevalence of children aged two to 15 who are obese is available in Table 4 of the child trend tables from ‘Health Survey for England—2011 trend tables’. Information is available for children aged two to 10 and for children aged 11 to 15 and two to 15 combined in England, for each year from 1995 to 2011.

Information on the prevalence of obese boys and girls aged two to 15 by SHA for 2011 is available in Table 11.3 of the ‘Health Survey for England—2011: Health, social care and Lifestyles’.

Information on the prevalence of obesity in children by region and local authority is available in the NCMP in tables 3A and 3B accompanying ‘National Child Measurement Programme: England, 2011/12 school year’. In table 3A the geography is derived from the postcode of the school and in table 3B it is derived from the postcode of the child. However, this information is only available for children in school year reception (generally aged four and five) and school year 6 (generally aged 10 to 11). The latest year available is school year 2011-12.

These tables have been placed in the Library and are available from the following links:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse11trendtables

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse11report

www.ic.nhs.uk/searchcatalogue?productid= 10135&topics=0%2fPublic+health&sort=Relevance&size= 10&page=l#top

Organs: Donors

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on presumed consent for organ transplants in England; and if he will make a statement; [137356]

(2) what discussions he has had since July 2012 with Ministers in the Welsh Government on proposals to introduce presumed consent into the organ donation system in Wales; and if he will make a statement; [137357]

(3) what assessment he has made of the potential effect of measures in the Human Transplantation (Wales) Bill on organ donations and transplants in England; and if he will make a statement. [137358]

Dr Poulter: There are no plans to bring forward legislative proposals on presumed consent for organ transplants in England. In 2008, the Organ Donation Taskforce considered presumed consent in considerable detail looking at the clinical, communication, cultural,

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ethical, legal and practical aspects of opt-out legislation. Their second report, ‘The potential impact of an opt-out system for organ donation’, published in November 2008, did not recommend introducing an opt-out system at that time finding that while such a system might have the potential to deliver benefits, they were not confident its introduction would increase organ donor numbers. The taskforce felt there was some evidence that donor numbers may go down. For example, although the majority of faith and belief groups interviewed were positive about donation most were opposed to the introduction of opt-out legislation.

Instead, the taskforce believed that a significant increase in donor rates could be achieved by acting on the recommendations in their first report, ‘Organs for Transplants’, published in January 2008, without the need for legislation and the costs and risks associated with introducing a new consent system. Implementation of the taskforce recommendations has seen United Kingdom donor numbers rise by 40% since then.

The Explanatory Memorandum accompanying the draft Welsh Government Human Transplantation (Wales) Bill is not definite about the level of increase that is likely to occur with the introduction of opt-out legislation in Wales, but every additional donor could donate on average three organs to the UK pool for transplantation.

Across the UK, we have made considerable progress over the last four years with a welcome significant improvement in organ donor rates. We wish to be certain that this progress can be maintained and discussions are ongoing with the Welsh Government looking at the policy, financial, operational and legal implications of their proposal on the UK donation programme.

Palliative Care

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he plans to take to reform palliative care funding and funding for hospices; and if he will make a statement; [137078]

(2) what steps he is taking to support hospices during the transition to a new funding system. [137079]

Norman Lamb: The Government set out in the coalition agreement a commitment to introduce a new per-patient funding system for palliative care. The new system will apply to ail providers of palliative care, including hospices, and will cover care for both adults and children. To take this work forward the then Secretary of State for Health set up the independent Palliative Care Funding Review (PCFR), which published its report in July 2011. The review made a number of recommendations designed to create a new funding system based on patient need.

Following the recommendations made by the review, we have established eight pilot sites, of which seven cover adult services and one covers children's services. The pilots are collecting the data needed to inform the creation of the new funding system and will test the recommendations set out by the review. The pilot sites began work in April 2012 and are due to run for two years. The aim is to implement a new system in 2015.

We will be working with organisations across the palliative care sector to enable all providers, including hospices, to prepare for the transition to the new system. The Department will be holding events to update national stakeholders of the work of the pilots in March.

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Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will instruct health and wellbeing boards to prioritise end-of-life care. [137080]

Norman Lamb: Health and wellbeing boards will be established as local committees of local authorities and as such it is not for central Government to instruct boards or monitor their performance. Health and wellbeing boards will be responsible for developing a joint understanding of local health and care needs through joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs); and a shared set of priorities and a strategy to address these in Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies.

JSNAs will be the means by which the current and future health and wellbeing needs of the local population will be determined and must therefore be inclusive of the needs of the whole local population. However, it would not be appropriate for the Department to highlight any care group or area of need over another as this would risk undermining the purpose of JSNAs being an objective, comprehensive and—most importantly—a locally-owned process of developing evidence based priorities for commissioning.

However, the Government is committed to improving the health and care experiences for those facing the end of life. We will do that by putting patients, their families and carers at the heart of everything we do. We are pressing on with implementing the Department's “End of Life Care Strategy”, which provides a blueprint for action along the entire end of life care pathway, from societal aspects through to bereavement.

Paracetamol

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions have been issued for the use of paracetamol in England in each of the last five years. [137216]

Norman Lamb: Information on the number of prescription items prescribed and then dispensed for paracetamol, in the community, in each of the most recently available five years, is as follows.

Prescription items for paracetamol written in the United Kingdom and dispensed in the community, in England(1, 2)
 Number (thousand)

2007

16,062.4

2008

17,398.4

2009

18,791.5

2010

19,889.6

2011

20,879.1

(1) Does not include items dispensed in hospitals, including mental health trusts, or private prescriptions. (2) Does not include preparations that contain both paracetamol and other chemicals, in combination. Source: Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA) system; The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Prescribing and Primary Care Services.

Part-time Employment

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of staff in his Department work part-time. [137023]

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Dr Poulter: The proportion of civil servants in the Department working part-time is published as part of routine reporting on the Civil Service Statistics website at:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-279335

As at 31 March 2012 the proportion of civil servants in the Department who work part-time was 13%.

Pharmacy

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the cost to his Department was of administering the minor ailments service in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement; [137213]

(2) which primary care trusts in England currently provide a minor ailments service via pharmacies; and if he will make a statement; [137214]

(3) how many (a) children and (b) adults have received medicines via the minor ailments service in England in each of the last five years. [137215]

Norman Lamb: The Department sets the legal framework for national health service pharmaceutical services, which includes provision for primary care trusts (PCTs) to choose to commission minor ailments services from pharmacies as a local enhanced service. The cost of administering minor ailments services, where commissioned, falls on PCTs, not the Department.

At the end of March 2012, 3,537 community pharmacies in 82 PCTs were in contract with a PCT to provide a minor ailment service. The PCTs commissioning these services were:

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan

Barking and Dagenham

Blackpool

Bolton

Bradford and Airedale Teaching

Bristol Teaching

Bury

Calderdale

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Central and Eastern Cheshire

Central Lancashire

City and Hackney Teaching

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

County Durham

Coventry Teaching

Croydon

Darlington

Doncaster

Dorset

Ealing

East Lancashire

East Riding of Yorkshire

Gateshead

Greenwich Teaching

Halton and St Helens

Hampshire Teaching

Haringey Teaching

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Heart of Birmingham Teaching

Herefordshire

Hounslow

Hull Teaching

Islington

Kirklees

Knowsley

Lambeth

Leeds

Leicester City Teaching

Lewisham

Lincolnshire Teaching

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway Teaching

Mid Essex

Newcastle

Newham

North Lincolnshire

North Tyneside

North Yorkshire and York

Northumberland Care Trust

Nottingham City

Nottinghamshire County Teaching

Oldham

Peterborough

Portsmouth City Teaching

Redbridge

Richmond and Twickenham

Rotherham

Salford Teaching

Sandwell

Sefton

Sheffield

Somerset

South Birmingham

South Staffordshire

South Tyneside

Stockport

Stoke on Trent Teaching

Sunderland Teaching

Sutton and Merton

Tameside and Glossop

Tower Hamlets

Trafford

Walsall Teaching

Waltham Forest

Wandsworth

Warwickshire

West Essex

West Kent

West Sussex Teaching

Western Cheshire

Wolverhampton City

Information on the number of people using pharmacy-led minor ailments services is not collected centrally.

Source:

Health and Social Care Information Service