27 Nov 2012 : Column 159W

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 27 November 2012

Electoral Commission Committee

Police and Crime Commissioners

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Electoral Commission has made any estimate of the number of people aged under 25 who voted in the police and crime commissioner elections in November 2012. [130222]

Mr Streeter: It is not possible to analyse voting behaviour by age using official data, because dates of birth are not currently recorded for all electors. The Electoral Commission therefore cannot estimate the number of people aged under 25 who voted in the police and crime commissioner elections in November 2012.

The Electoral Commission has a statutory duty under the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 to report on the administration of elections, including elections for police and crime commissioners. Its assessment will look at the factors that may have affected overall levels of turnout. It will include, for example, whether voters had enough information about the elections and the candidates standing to make an informed choice, and the time of year that the election took place.

Prime Minister

Members: Correspondence

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Prime Minister when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Liverpool, Walton dated 28 September 2012. [130120]

The Prime Minister: A reply has been sent.

Transport

Airports Commission

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when his Department will announce the (a) remit and (b) members of the Davies Commission on Aviation. [130543]

Mr Simon Burns: The terms of reference for the Airports Commission, which includes the timetable it will follow and the broad scope of the interim and final reports, and the members of the Commission, were set out in the Secretary of State for Transport's written ministerial statement of 2 November 2012, Official Report, columns 28-30WS. This is available at:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm121102/wmstext/121102m0001.htm#12110251000012

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High Speed 2 Railway Line: Scotland

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has assessed the economic benefits of High Speed 2 continuation to Glasgow and Edinburgh. [130243]

Mr Simon Burns: The capacity, connectivity and reliability benefits brought about by the Y network will extend far beyond the cities it serves directly. Completion of the Y network for HS2 is expected to enable journey time savings from Edinburgh and Glasgow to London of up to an hour and provide benefits to the Scottish economy of around £3 billion. However, the Secretary of State announced last month that the Department will take forward a study in collaboration with Transport Scotland which will make progress on how best to further boost capacity and cut journey times.

Shipping: Northern Ireland

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) circumstances and (b) piloting arrangements under the terms of the Pilotage Act 1987 were in respect of the collision between the cargo ship Union Moon and the passenger ferry Stena Feronia in Belfast; and if he will make a statement. [130374]

Stephen Hammond: The circumstances of the collision between the Union Moon and Stena Feronia, including the pilotage arrangements for both ships, are set out in the Marine Accident Investigation Branch report published on 15 November. A copy has been laid in the Library of the House. It is also online at:

http://www.maib.gov.uk/publications/investigation_reports/2012/stena_feronia_and_union_moon.cfm

West Coast Railway Line

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the adequacy of arrangements made by train operating companies for travel on the west coast main line over the Christmas period in 2012. [130336]

Norman Baker: The Department is aware that major engineering works are planned over the Christmas and new year period at Bletchley and other locations on the west coast main line. It is the responsibility of Network Rail, working with the train operators, to manage these works so as to minimise any disruption to passengers, and so far as practicable to secure the provision of alternative services. The planned changes in services have been publicised well in advance to enable travellers to make alternative arrangements if necessary.

Defence

Vanguard Class Submarine

Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the main gate decision on the successor to the Vanguard class submarines will be made in 2016. [129617]

Mr Philip Hammond: As I reaffirmed in the House on 18 June 2012, Official Report, columns 611-17, the main gate decision for the successor to the Vanguard class submarines will be taken in 2016.

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2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Mr Nuttall: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent representations he has received on the Government's proposals to disband the 2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. [129618]

Mr Robathan: The recent Backbench Business Committee debate provided hon. Members with the opportunity to voice their opinions on this issue and some continue to do so. While such debate is understandable and is, no doubt, prompted by the best of intentions, it only serves to increase the uncertainty for serving members of the Regiment.

We are implementing Army 2020 as announced in July and, while the loss of any battalion is regretted, I am assured that the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers accepts the Army Board decision on this matter and is now working towards a successful merger of the two battalions.

Apprentices

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the number of apprentices employed by (a) his Department and the public bodies for which it is responsible, (b) the armed forces and (c) the main suppliers of each. [129620]

Mr Dunne: The Ministry of Defence delivers some 10,000 apprenticeships per year. This figure includes approximately 400 civilian personnel. Although armed forces personnel complete apprenticeships as part of their military training, they are not employed as apprentices.

The Ministry of Defence is the leading Government Department in delivering apprenticeships. We recognise the important contribution apprentices make to the Department and to the skills base of the nation.

Afghanistan

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of likely UK military commitments in Afghanistan in 2015. [129621]

Mr Philip Hammond: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Gillingham and Rainham (Rehman Chishti), and my hon. Friend the Member for Filton and Bradley Stoke (Jack Lopresti).

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Scottish Independence

Gregg McClymont: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues on the potential effect on UK defence policy of Scottish independence. [129622]

Mr Robathan: The Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), has regular discussions with ministerial colleagues on defence matters relating to Scotland. The UK Government's position is clear: Scotland benefits from being part of the UK and the UK benefits from having Scotland within the UK. We are confident that the people of Scotland will choose to remain part of the UK and we are not planning for any other outcome. It is for those advocating independence to explain the nature and implications of an independent Scotland; it is the policy of the UK Government to maintain the integrity of the UK.

Armed Forces: Deployment

Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list all the operations on which UK forces have served alongside the forces of other European nations in the last five years; and which countries participated in each case. [120731]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence does not hold centrally information regarding which European nations have been deployed on operations alongside UK forces in the past five years. My officials will engage with EU and NATO to collate the necessary information and I will write to the hon. Member once the information has been collated.

Substantive answer from Andrew Robathan to Sir Nick Harvey:

In my answer to your Parliamentary Question dated 12 September 2012 (Official Report, column 454W) requesting to be provided with a list of all operations on which UK forces have served alongside other European nations in the last five years and which countries participated in each individual operation, I undertook to write to you to provide a fuller answer.

After further research, it has transpired that it would be of disproportionate cost to provide a comprehensive response to your request. However, provided below is a list of UN, EU and NATO operations and missions over the last 5 years in which the UK has deployed military or civilian staff.

Operation/MissionDate of Operation/MissionAdditional information

EUFOR—Althea

Since 2004

EU Military Operation—Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia and UK.(1)

EUNAVFOR—Atalanta

Since 2008

EU Military Operation—24 member states and 4 third states with ships/planes provided by France, Spain, Germany, Romania, Italy, Luxembourg and Sweden.(1)

EUTM—Somalia

Since 2010

EU Military Operation—Belgium, Germany, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Sweden and UK.(1)

EULEX—Kosovo

Since 2008

EU Civilian Mission—Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania,, Luxemburg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and UK.(1)

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EUMM—Georgia

Since 2008

EU Civilian Mission—Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia and UK.(1)

EUPOL—Afghanistan

Since 2007

EU Civilian Mission—Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Latvia, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Slovakia and UK.(1)

EUJUST LEX—Iraq

Since 2005

EU Civilian Mission—Austria, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Sweden and the UK.(1)

EUCAP—Nestor

Since 2011

EU Civilian Mission—Belgium, Germany, Greece, Spain, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Sweden, UK, Netherlands and Romania.(1)

EUAVSEC—South Sudan

Since August 2012

EU Civilian Mission—Belgium, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Hungary, Sweden and UK.(1)

EUPOL COPPS

Since 2005

EU Civilian Mission—Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia and UK.(1)

EUSEC—RD CONGO

Since 2005

EU Civilian Mission—Austria, Belgium, Germany, France, Hungary, Italy, Luxemburg, Portugal, Romania and UK.(1)

EUPM—Bosnia

2003 to June 2012

Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, UK.(2)

MONUC/MONUSCO—Democratic Republic of Congo

Since 1999

UN Stabilisation Mission—European Contributors of Military Personnel: Algeria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Czech Republic, France, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

UNMEE—Ethiopia and Eritrea

July 2000 to July 2008

UN Mission European Contributors of Military Personnel: Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

UNOMIG—Georgia

August 1993 to June 2009

United Nations Observer Mission. European Contributors of Military Personnel: Albania, Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland,, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom and Uruguay.

UNAMI—Iraq

Since 2003

Currently no European Countries Participating. (As of 30 September 2012).

UNMIK—Kosovo

Since 1999

Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy, Republic of Moldova, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Turkey and Ukraine. (Participating countries on 30 September 2012).

UNMIN—Nepal

Since 2007

UNIPSIL—Sierra Leone

Since 1998

UNMIS—Sudan

March 2005 to July 2011

European Contributors of Military Personnel: Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Moldova, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

UNMISS—South Sudan

Since July 2012

European Contributors of Military Personnel: Denmark, Germany, Greece, Moldova, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

Ocean Shield—NATO Operation

Since October 2009

EU members that contributed: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom.(3)

ISAF—NATO Operation

Since 2001

EU members contributing or that contributed: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.(3)

KFOR—NATO Operation

Since 1999

EU members that contributed: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.(3)

Unified Protector—NATO Operation

March 2011 to October 2011

EU members that contributed: Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom.(3)

Active Endeavour—NATO Operation

Since 2001

EU members that contributed: Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom.(3)

(1) Correct for week commencing 22 October 2012. (2) Denotes country participation on 2 November 2012, information on past partners is not available centrally. (3) This list does not include countries that are in the process of acceding to the EU or are potential EU candidate members.

Efforts to collate further information from partner nations and international organisations (including NATO and the EU) would require significant commitment and staff time and therefore would incur disproportionate cost. Should you have any specific questions about a particular mission I would be happy to ask my officials to provide further details. Furthermore, I would be delighted to host you in the Department to answer any questions that you may have regarding UK missions and European partners.

Libya

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, columns 165-66W, on Libya, what the total cost of transporting, equipping and running the ground support for the British forward base in Gioia del Colle was; and how many British sorties were completed from that base. [126768]

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Mr Robathan [holding answer 5 November 2012]: The cost of transporting, equipping and running the ground support for the British forward base in Gioia del Colle was some £2.7 million. This excludes an element of air transport costs, that totalled some £5.6 million, but the details of which could be provided only at disproportionate cost. These costs do not include normal funded flying hours.

At its peak, there were 22 aircraft based at Gioia del Colle, from which some 2,050 operational sorties were undertaken by British aircraft.

Military Medals Review

Jason McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what consideration he has given to the findings of the first phase of the Sir John Holmes Medal Review into the National Defence Medal. [129405]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answers I gave on 13 November 2012, Official Report, column 214W, to my hon. Friend the Member for Oxford West and Abingdon (Nicola Blackwood) and the hon. Member for Bolton West (Julie Hilling).

Sir John Holmes has made good progress on the further work he was invited to undertake on the Military Medals Review and this work is being completed in stages. There are not however a finite number of phases of work; Sir John will decide how best to proceed and manage the work.

Communities and Local Government

Council Housing: Veterans

David T. C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many ex-servicemen have (a) made claims for priority housing citing vulnerability caused by service in the armed forces and (b) had such claims accepted in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [129693]

Mr Prisk: My Department does not collect information on the numbers of homelessness applications made to local authorities. It does, however, collect figures on the numbers of households accepted as homeless, including some limited information relating to ex-service personnel. In particular, quarterly P1E returns submitted by local authorities show that:

(i) During the last three financial years, the number of households identified as being within the priority need category of having served in HM forces are as follows:

2009-10—30 households of a total 40,020 acceptances

2010-11—30 households of a total 44,160 acceptances

2011-12—30 households of a total 50,290 acceptances

(ii) During the last three financial years the number of households accepted for which 'leaving HM forces' was identified as the main reason for the loss of last settled home were as follows:

2009-10—120 households of a total 40,020 acceptances

2010-11—150 households of a total 44,160 acceptances

2011-12—180 households of a total 50,290 acceptances

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Note:

1. Figures from section (i) above cannot be added to those from section (ii) because they are the results of breaking down the same total number of homelessness acceptances in two different ways

2. The above figures are for England only. Homelessness in Wales is a devolved matter.

These are likely to represent only some of the households accepted as homeless that include ex-service personnel. Other such households are likely to have been included—without being separately counted—elsewhere on P1E returns, within some of the other existing priority need categories (eg old age, mental illness); and under some of the other main reasons for the loss of the last settled home (eg where the ex-service personnel were not in HM forces immediately before being accepted as homeless).

We secured an additional £70 million last year to help local agencies prevent and tackle homelessness. This includes the £20 million Homelessness Transition Fund to support the national roll out of No Second Night Out, tackle rough sleeping and protect vital front-line services, and the £20 million Single Homelessness Prevention Fund to help ensure single homeless people get access to good housing advice.

This is on top of the £400 million we are investing for homelessness prevention over four years (2011-12 to 2014-15) which includes £10.8 million to help single people access private rented sector accommodation.

The Ministerial Working Group on Homelessness published its second report “Making Every Contact Count” in August which focuses on preventing homelessness and includes people leaving the armed forces. A copy of the report can be obtained at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/making-every-contact-count-a-joint-approach-to-preventing-homelessness

We are determined to ensure that current and former members of the armed forces gain the housing they deserve, recognising the sacrifices they have made for the country. We have, therefore, introduced measures to place members of the armed forces at the top of the priority list for home ownership schemes, including FirstBuy.

We are also changing the law by regulation so that former personnel with urgent housing needs are always given ‘additional preference’ (high priority) for social housing; and councils are prevented from applying local connection requirements to disqualify members of the armed forces and those within five years of leaving the services. Following consultation, we are also extending these regulations to bereaved spouses and seriously injured reservists. The qualification regulations came into force on 24 August; the additional preference regulations were laid before Parliament on 18 October and, if approved, will come into force by the end of November.

We published the final new statutory social allocations guidance on 29 June following consultation, setting out how councils' allocation schemes can give priority to all service personnel, including through the use of local preference criteria and local lettings policies.

First-time Buyers

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent estimate he has made of the average deposit needed for

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a first-time house buyer in

(a)

Liverpool Walton constituency,

(b)

Merseyside and

(c)

England. [130127]

Mr Prisk: The Department does not produce estimates of the average deposit needed for first-time buyers in (a) Liverpool Walton constituency, (b) Merseyside and (c) England.

However, I can refer the hon. Member to the Council of Mortgage Lenders which estimated in September 2012 that the average deposit for a first-time buyer in the UK is 20% of the sale price of the property.

The Government's NewBuy scheme aims to help homebuyers who only have access to a 5% deposit.

Freedom of Information

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will make it his policy that local authorities should either refuse or levy a charge on applications under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 which seek to extract information on planning and other matters for commercial purposes; and if he will make a statement. [129895]

Brandon Lewis: Local authorities are public bodies in their own right under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and the Department does not interfere with local authorities carrying out their obligations under this legislation. The legislation is 'requester-blind', and there are no plans to change this. It would therefore not be appropriate or practical to charge some requesters and not others.

The Freedom of Information Act already contains a suitable charging routine and local authorities must abide by this. The recent scrutiny of the Act by the Justice Committee considered the charging regime in some detail, and did not recommend any changes. In particular it recommended maintaining the principle of requester blindness and that public authorities should not be given the power to charge some requesters and not others.

Ministers have previously received representations from local authorities asking for powers to introduce new charges for freedom of information requests; we have rejected such an approach. If town halls want to reduce the amount they spend on responding to freedom of information requests, they should consider making the information freely available in the first place.

Indeed, this Government's Open Data agenda seeks to open up public sector information rather than restrict it. The local government transparency code issued by my Department calls for councils to publish a wide range of data in an open and standardised format, for re-use and re-publication by anyone: from individuals, to voluntary sector to commercial organisations. Open and standardised formats allow creative use of data. For example, OpenlyLocal is seeking to build an open national database of planning applications.

Homelessness: Peterborough

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many people who are not UK citizens have presented themselves as being statutorily homeless under the

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terms of the Housing Act 1996 in Peterborough city council area in each year since 2004; and if he will make a statement. [130057]

Mr Prisk: The available information is given in the following table:

Decisions on non-UK homelessness applicants: Peterborough city council
 Number

2005 (Q2 to Q4)(1)

6

2006

8

2007

19

2008

35

2009 (Q2 to Q4)(2)

78

2010

147

2011

214

2012 (Q1and Q2)

105

(1) Data were not collected before Q2 2005. (2) Figures were not reported for Q1 2009. Source: Quarterly P1E returns

We secured an additional £70 million last year to help local agencies prevent and tackle homelessness.

This is on top of the £400 million we are investing in homelessness prevention over four years (2011-12 to 2014-15).

More broadly, I also refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 6 November 2012, Official Report, columns 543-44W, on housing and immigration.

Land: Public Sector

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether e-PIMS is being used to monitor and report on the accelerated release of public sector land for housing; and whether the database is up to date. [130114]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 26 November 2012]: e-PIMS (Electronic Property Information Mapping Service), now incorporates the Register of Surplus Public Sector Land that identifies land held by central Government and their agencies that is surplus to operational requirements.

Treasury guidance set out in ‘Managing Public Money’ makes it a requirement for all central Government bodies and their agencies to place details of their surplus sites on the register. The register provides a single reference point for all participating public sector bodies and provides a snapshot of the current available national supply of surplus land. e-PIMS is an integral part of the monitoring and reporting framework; however, not all land included in the accelerated programme for public sector land release is on e-PIMS because not all public bodies are mandated to do this. To remedy this we have previously resolved that Departments should record all their land holdings on e-PIMS by 31 March 2013.

Any Department wishing to dispose of surplus land is required to place that land on the register for a period of 40 working days before the land is marketed. This 40-day period allows Departments to express an interest in new uses for declared surplus sites before the sites go on the open market. An extract of e-PIMS data is made available on a quarterly basis at:

http://data.gov.uk/dataset/epims

The most up-to-date information is in the July 2012 issue of the register.

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Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) expressions of interest and (b) formal bids have been received under (i) community right to bid and (ii) community right to reclaim land in England. [130116]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 26 November 2012]:The community right to bid provisions came into force on 21 September 2012. An expression of interest or bid can only be made once an asset owner has indicated his desire to sell. It is unlikely at this early stage of implementation that an asset would have reached this point of the process.

The community right to reclaim land allows anyone to contact local authorities or other listed public sector bodies about land that they own which they see as underused or vacant. Where public landowners take no action a request can be made to Government to exercise their powers under the Local Government Planning and Land Act 1980. The process by which this is done is through a Public Request to Order Disposal which allows anyone to request that a specific area of publicly-owned land is brought back into effective use.

Since the announcement of the community right to reclaim land in October 2011, 14 requests have been received for the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to direct disposal under the 1980 Act.

Non-domestic Rates: Empty Property

Mr Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate he has made of the cost of exempting all empty properties from business rates for the first (a) six and (b) 12 months after they become empty. [129182]

Brandon Lewis: It is estimated that exempting all empty properties from business rates for the first six months after they become empty would cost between £1,040 million and £1,300 million.

No estimate has been made of the cost of exempting all empty properties from business rates for the first 12 months after they become empty.

All industrial properties are exempt from business rates for the first six months they are empty. All non-industrial properties are exempt from business rates for the first three months they are empty. Any property with a rateable value of £2,600 or less is exempt from business rates for as long as it is empty. More broadly on the issue of empty property rate relief, I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 8 February 2011, Official Report, column 178W.

Regeneration: Morecambe

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether (a) his Department or (b) the Housing and Communities Agency has been contacted in the last four weeks by Lancaster city council on the redevelopment of the west end of Morecambe; and whether he will place copies of any such correspondence in the Library. [130115]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 26 November 2012]: Lancaster city council submitted a bid form to the Department of Communities and Local Government for the Clusters

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of Empty Homes Funding outlining its commitment to match funding for the scheme. A copy of the application was placed in the Library of the House.

The Homes and Communities Agency has had no written communication with Lancaster city council about Morecambe West End in the last four weeks.

The Homes and Communities Agency is, however, having ongoing discussions with Lancaster city council about Morecambe West End, the most recent meeting was on 22 November 2012.

Regional Planning and Development

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the potential cost to local authorities and local enterprise partnerships of the formation of bids to wave 2 of the city deal. [130294]

Mr Prisk: There is no bidding process for local authorities and local enterprise partnerships for wave 2 city deals. Twenty cities have been invited to develop proposals for a city deal working with their local enterprise partnerships and those proposals that will deliver strong local growth will be taken forward.

Temporary Accommodation: Children

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many children he estimates are living in hostels and bed and breakfast facilities. [129997]

Mr Prisk: According to returns from English local authorities, 3,670 children were living in hostels (including women's refuges) and 2,990 children were living in bed and breakfast accommodation as at 30 June 2012.

Statistical releases on statutory homelessness are available both in the Library of the House and via the DCLG website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-communities-and-local-government/series/homelessness-statistics#publications

We, of course, have serious concerns about the numbers of families with children living in bed and breakfast accommodation for long periods. Legislation remains in place that prohibits the use of bed and breakfast accommodation for families with children unless in an emergency, and then for no more than six weeks. We look to local authorities to do more to avoid this and included it as one of the 10 challenges we set local government in the recent Ministerial Working Group Report on Homelessness.

In addition, I will be shortly meeting London boroughs with the highest number of families in bed and breakfast and other forms of temporary accommodation such as hostels, to discuss what the issues are and how they are going to resolve them.

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent consideration she has given to introducing minimum unit pricing for alcohol in England and Wales following the recent developments in Scotland and the European Commission in that policy area. [130484]

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Mr Jeremy Browne: The Alcohol Strategy, published earlier this year, set out the Government's commitment to introduce a minimum unit price for alcohol.

The Government continue to monitor developments and progress in this area and will consider any issues arising alongside thier forthcoming public consultation on the Alcohol Strategy.

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has sought legal advice on the introduction of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in England. [130485]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The advice which the Government have received on this issue is subject to legal privilege. We do not, therefore, believe it appropriate to disclose this advice (or any summary of it).

Asylum: East of England

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information her Department holds on the cost of support of asylum seekers to each local authority in the east of England in each of the last three years. [129250]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency contracts with external providers to provide support and accommodation for destitute asylum seekers, in accordance with the provisions of the Immigration and Asylum Act (1999). The agency reimburses local authorities which incur costs in supporting and accommodating children and young people, at rates agreed with the authorities.

The Home Office holds no information on additional costs—e.g. for education or health services—which local authorities may incur in supporting asylum seekers.

Asylum: Housing

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many units of council accommodation her Department has reserved for asylum seekers in each local authority area in the east of England; for what period; and how many are vacant. [129206]

Mr Harper: In the east of England, all asylum seekers are housed in private provider accommodation and, as such, there is no requirement for local authorities to provide housing in this area.

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum seekers have been housed in (a) the east of England, (b) Bury St Edmunds constituency, (c) each local authority area in Suffolk and (d) England and Wales in each of the last five years. [129207]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency has published statistics since 2006 on the number of asylum seekers accommodated under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. The statistics include a breakdown of the numbers accommodated in specific regions, local authorities and particular towns in the United Kingdom and are available in “Table as.16.q” (asylum excel tables volume 5). A copy of which will be placed in the House Library.

27 Nov 2012 : Column 172W

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) on what date the New Asylum Model aim team carried out the goods receipt on the Adelphi System for the R100R report of Kimberley Group Housing for the period 3 to 30 November 2008; [129550]

(2) on what date the Regional Contract Manager of her Department authorised the service credits, voucher costs and agreed extras in relation to the R100R report of Kimberley Group for the period 3 to 30 November 2008; [129551]

(3) whether the New Aslyum Model aim budget holder in her Department authorised the goods receipt process to proceed from the R100R reports in relation to Kimberley Group Housing for the period 3 to 30 November 2008. [129552]

Mr Harper: The contract held with Kimberley Group Housing Ltd was terminated on 9 January 2009 after it became apparent that the company was not able to meet its trading liabilities.

The invoice for the period 3 to 30 November 2008 was withheld and consequently normal activities such as identifying any service credits, receipting and authorising services received on the Adelphi System were not necessary.

Crime Prevention

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department allocated, and to whom, through the Communities Against Guns, Gangs and Knives Fund in the latest period for which figures are available. [126106]

Mrs May [holding answer 2 November 2012]: In the 2012-13 financial year, £1,966,025.50 was allocated to 196 voluntary and community sector organisations through the Communities Against Gangs, Guns and Knives Fund. Further details on these organisations can be found on the grant administrator's website:

http://www.grantsadmin.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/CAGGK2012-13-grants-awarded.pdf

Dementia

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to support the Prime Minister's dementia challenge and the work of each of the challenge groups; what resources she has committed and what timescales she has set for this work; and if she will make a statement. [129012]

Damian Green [holding answer 19 November 2012]: The Home Office takes all mental illness very seriously. The police are on the frontline and are experienced in dealing with people with mental illnesses including dementia.

The National Policing Improvement Agency has developed a suite of training products, available to all forces, that provides a consistent standardised approach to mental ill health. The new College of Policing will continue to ensure that officers and staff are trained and sensitive to the particular needs of those suffering from dementia.

27 Nov 2012 : Column 173W

Police officers actively engage with local services and agencies to ensure appropriate service provision in mental health cases.

Disclosure and Barring Service

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was of new IT systems at the Disclosure and Barring Service; and if she will make a statement. [128460]

James Brokenshire: A five-year contract to support the Disclosure and Barring Service was awarded to Tata Consultancy Services on 4 October 2012. The new contract is worth approximately £143 million over the five-year period.

27 Nov 2012 : Column 174W

Drug Interventions Programme

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department allocated to each drug action team through the Drug Interventions Programme for each year from 2006-07 to 2012-13. [126092]

Mrs May [holding answer 1 November 2012]: The Home Office allocation to drug action teams (DATs) for delivery of the Drug Interventions Programme (DIP) in each of the years 2006-07 to 2012-13 is shown in the following tables.

The figures for 2011-12 and 2012-13 reflect the fact that DIP funding for DATs from 2011-12 has been provided jointly by the Home Office and the Department of Health (via the adult Pooled Treatment Budget).

DIP Main Grant
£
 Resource
Drug Action Team2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

Barking and Dagenham

273,407

273,407

277,508

277,508

277,508

Barnet

300,231

300,231

304,734

304,734

304,734

Barnsley

897,348

807,613

819,727

819,727

747,222

Bath and North East Somerset

154,603

134,504

136,522

136,522

135,823

Bedfordshire(2)

404,163

348,484

353,711

1,064,748

1,064,748

Bexley

194,876

194,876

197,799

197,799

197,799

Birmingham

6,124,282

5,287,239

5,366,548

5,366,548

5,366,548

Blackburn with Darwen

313,701

277,625

281,789

281,789

281,789

Blackpool

534,243

472,805

479,897

479,897

456,858

Bolton

1,284,438

1,136,727

1,153,778

1,153,778

1,030,183

Bournemouth

225,487

196,173

199,116

199,116

199,116

Bracknell Forest

113,359

100,096

101,597

101,597

101,597

Bradford

2,415,921

1,926,287

1,955,181

1,955,181

1,914,920

Brent

1,375,289

1,203,160

1,221,207

1,221,207

1,067,849

Brighton and Hove

435,796

384,808

390,580

390,580

324,605

Bristol

3,063,714

2,448,659

2,485,389

2,485,389

2,363,676

Bromley

255,437

255,437

259,269

259,269

259,269

Buckinghamshire

333,981

294,905

299,329

299,329

299,329

Bury

624,066

552,298

560,582

560,582

478,653

Calderdale

909,223

685,101

695,378

695,378

558,844

Cambridgeshire

564,513

359,344

364,734

364,734

362,095

Camden

1,644,816

1,191,678

1,209,553

1,209,553

1,130,350

Cheshire

415,776

367,961

373,480

373,480

345,369

City of London

320,297

320,297

325,101

325,101

274,329

Cornwall and Isles Of Scilly

351,731

306,005

310,595

310,595

310,595

Coventry

1,017,927

900,865

914,378

914,378

914,378

Croydon

1,145,141

1,001,817

1,016,844

1,016,844

911,271

Cumbria

384,131

339,955

345,054

345,054

345,054

Darlington

205,815

182,146

184,878

184,878

174,000

Derby

529,015

468,178

475,201

475,201

427,371

Derbyshire

680,905

602,601

611,640

611,640

611,640

Devon

374,431

325,754

330,640

330,640

330,640

Doncaster

1,464,405

1,317,965

1,337,734

1,337,734

1,177,307

Dorset

182,073

158,403

160,779

160,779

160,779

Dudley

817,455

723,448

734,300

734,300

734,300

Durham

565,730

500,671

508,181

508,181

492,653

Ealing

1,130,246

988,786

1,003,618

1,003,618

1,003,618

East Riding of Yorkshire

266,268

226,328

229,723

229,723

220,104

East Sussex

404,264

356,965

362,319

362,319

358,744

Enfield

867,920

759,292

770,682

770,682

737,677

Essex

972,638

826,742

839,143

839,143

839,143

Gateshead

859,541

627,944

637,363

637,363

596,619

Gloucestershire

410,280

361,046

366,462

366,462

343,897

Greenwich

945,549

827,205

839,613

839,613

813,104

27 Nov 2012 : Column 175W

27 Nov 2012 : Column 176W

Hackney

1,730,056

1,513,524

1,536,227

1,536,227

1,471,088

Halton

155,733

137,823

139,890

139,890

136,970

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,428,482

1,118,469

1,135,246

1,135,246

1,015,850

Hampshire

682,162

602,349

611,384

611,384

611,384

Haringey

1,421,448

1,243,541

1,262,194

1,262,194

1,084,962

Harrow

222,376

222,376

225,712

225,712

190,302

Hartlepool

799,327

609,010

618,145

618,145

545,370

Havering

172,767

172,767

175,359

175,359

175,359

Herefordshire

150,647

133,323

135,323

135,323

135,323

Hertfordshire

899,123

768,856

780,389

780,389

780,389

Hillingdon

249,873

249,873

253,621

253,621

218,044

Hounslow

907,872

794,244

806,158

806,158

752,961

Isle of Wight

135,469

119,619

121,413

121,413

121,413

Islington

1,524,022

1,333,277

1,353,276

1,353,276

1,282,243

Kensington and Chelsea

1,302,366

1,008,137

1,023,259

1,023,259

876,765

Kent

1,303,933

1,151,373

1,168,644

1,168,644

1,132,300

Kingston upon Hull

1,545,674

1,422,020

1,443,350

1,443,350

1,443,350

Kingston Upon Thames

116,026

116,026

117,766

117,766

117,766

Kirklees

1,355,428

1,219,885

1,238,183

1,238,183

1,091,199

Knowsley

250,614

221,793

225,120

225,120

225,120

Lambeth

2,410,728

1,930,537

1,959,495

1,959,495

1,668,566

Lancashire

1,264,957

1,119,486

1,136,278

1,136,278

1,136,278

Leeds

3,132,337

2,737,443

2,778,505

2,778,505

2,612,601

Leicester

1,903,966

1,558,632

1,582,011

1,582,011

1,419,170

Leicestershire

480,924

425,618

432,002

432,002

432,002

Lewisham

1,575,873

1,378,639

1,399,318

1,399,318

1,153,951

Lincolnshire

663,230

586,959

595,763

595,763

541,076

Liverpool

2,584,338

2,154,389

2,186,705

2,186,705

2,026,372

Luton(2)

745,243

700,528

711,036

Manchester

3,368,811

2,848,647

2,891,377

2,891,377

2,510,354

Medway

265,694

234,608

238,127

238,127

227,477

Merton

171,555

171,555

174,128

174,128

174,128

Middlesbrough

1,155,070

1,022,237

1,037,571

1,037,571

960,189

Milton Keynes

185,595

163,880

166,338

166,338

166,338

Newcastle Upon Tyne

1,458,276

1,290,574

1,309,933

1,309,933

1,219,584

Newham

1,552,032

1,357,782

1,378,148

1,378,148

1,327,290

Norfolk

636,456

569,371

577,912

577,912

567,528

North East Lincolnshire

1,168,921

914,255

927,969

927,969

908,599

North Lincolnshire

874,299

786,869

798,672

798,672

652,997

North Somerset

133,764

116,374

118,120

118,120

118,120

North Tyneside

232,422

205,693

208,778

208,778

207,860

North Yorkshire

438,568

364,011

369,471

369,471

369,471

Northamptonshire

1,168,666

1,034,269

1,049,783

1,049,783

962,282

Northumberland

355,521

314,636

319,356

319,356

277,311

Nottingham

2,028,008

1,794,787

1,821,709

1,821,709

1,821,709

Nottinghamshire

2,643,092

2,339,136

2,374,223

2,374,223

2,100,640

Oldham

1,006,209

890,494

903,851

903,851

903,851

Oxfordshire

1,451,071

1,195,115

1,213,042

1,213,042

1,148,092

Peterborough

950,965

774,057

785,668

785,668

691,517

Plymouth

321,150

279,400

283,591

283,591

280,278

Poole

106,035

92,250

93,634

93,634

93,634

Portsmouth

298,688

282,678

286,918

286,918

286,918

Reading

1,253,496

1,106,837

1,123,440

1,123,440

997,603

Redbridge

758,780

663,812

673,769

673,769

630,686

Redcar and Cleveland

316,564

280,159

284,361

284,361

283,347

Richmond upon Thames

124,080

124,080

125,941

125,941

117,484

Rochdale

880,097

778,885

790,568

790,568

698,744

Rotherham

840,071

756,064

767,405

767,405

683,457

Rutland

6,730

5,956

6,045

6,045

6,045

Salford

963,526

771,116

782,683

782,683

665,329

Sandwell

1,246,097

1,003,679

1,018,734

1,018,734

931,025

Sefton

745,537

659,800

669,697

669,697

669,697

27 Nov 2012 : Column 177W

27 Nov 2012 : Column 178W

Sheffield

2,609,071

2,348,164

2,383,386

2,383,386

2,225,433

Shropshire

189,419

167,636

170,151

170,151

170,151

Slough

1,003,023

854,146

866,958

866,958

733,600

Solihull

460,035

407,131

413,238

413,238

413,238

Somerset

364,096

316,763

321,514

321,514

299,268

South Gloucestershire

152,630

132,788

134,780

134,780

134,780

South Tyneside

275,814

244,095

247,756

247,756

247,756

Southampton

348,560

307,778

312,395

312,395

309,205

Southend

192,382

166,947

169,451

169,451

169,451

Southwark

1,892,216

1,655,389

1,680,219

1,680,219

1,559,664

St Helens

260,780

230,790

234,252

234,252

234,252

Staffordshire

728,316

644,560

654,228

654,228

654,228

Stockport

750,488

664,181

674,144

674,144

637,595

Stockton

778,419

688,901

699,235

699,235

699,235

Stoke on Trent

410,832

363,586

369,040

369,040

330,061

Suffolk

520,695

451,164

457,931

457,931

457,931

Sunderland

884,546

782,823

794,565

794,565

744,401

Surrey

627,573

554,147

562,459

562,459

562,459

Sutton

159,878

159,878

162,276

162,276

145,923

Swindon

188,658

164,132

166,594

166,594

166,594

Tameside

930,091

823,130

835,477

835,477

835,477

Telford and Wrekin

196,514

173,915

176,524

176,524

172,525

Thurrock

171,973

150,379

152,635

152,635

152,635

Torbay

242,318

213,239

216,438

216,438

193,192

Tower Hamlets

1,618,189

1,415,658

1,436,893

1,436,893

1,436,893

Trafford

783,160

693,096

703,492

703,492

644,976

Wakefield

1,216,177

1,094,559

1,110,977

1,110,977

1,041,628

Walsall

726,369

642,837

652,480

652,480

652,480

Waltham Forest

1,057,708

925,327

939,206

939,206

792,352

Wandsworth

1,182,107

1,034,156

1,049,668

1,049,668

892,722

Warrington

161,162

142,628

144,767

144,767

144,767

Warwickshire

536,064

474,417

481,533

481,533

417,536

West Berkshire

107,509

94,930

96,354

96,354

96,354

West Sussex

444,392

392,398

398,284

398,284

347,434

Westminster

2,304,818

2,016,350

2,046,595

2,046,595

1,748,504

Wigan

1,182,126

1,046,181

1,061,874

1,061,874

886,599

Wiltshire

248,907

216,549

219,797

219,797

219,797

Windsor and Maidenhead

116,869

103,195

104,743

104,743

104,743

Wirral

593,628

525,360

533,240

533,240

533,240

Wokingham

104,370

92,159

93,541

93,541

93,541

Wolverhampton

933,988

826,579

838,978

838,978

838,978

Worcestershire

376,256

332,987

337,982

337,982

337,982

York

225,734

187,359

190,169

190,169

184,591

Wales(4)

6,456,000

6,465,000

6,495,000

6,472,500

5,974,117

£
 Total(Home Office)(Dept of Health)Total(Home Office)(Dept of Health)
Drug Action Team2011-12(1)2011-122011-122012-13(1)2012-13(3)2012-13

Barking and Dagenham

263,633

96,651

166,982

255,901

88,919

166,982

Barnet

289,498

106,133

183,365

281,007

97,642

183,365

Barnsley

680,619

249,523

431,096

660,657

229,561

431,096

Bath and North East Somerset

129,696

47,548

82,148

125,892

43,744

82,148

Bedfordshire(2)

1,011,510

370,831

640,679

981,844

341,165

640,679

Bexley

187,910

68,890

119,020

182,399

63,379

119,020

Birmingham

5,098,220

1,869,066

3,229,154

4,948,695

1,719,541

3,229,154

Blackburn with Darwen

267,700

98,142

169,558

259,849

90,291

169,558

Blackpool

425,170

155,872

269,298

412,700

143,402

269,298

Bolton

925,333

339,238

586,095

898,194

312,099

586,095

Bournemouth

189,160

69,348

119,812

183,612

63,800

119,812

Bracknell Forest

96,517

35,384

61,133

93,686

32,553

61,133

Bradford

1,812,837

664,607

1,148,230

1,759,668

611,438

1,148,230

27 Nov 2012 : Column 179W

27 Nov 2012 : Column 180W

Brent

947,073

347,208

599,865

919,296

319,431

599,865

Brighton and Hove

279,644

102,521

177,123

271,442

94,319

177,123

Bristol

2,201,213

806,990

1,394,223

2,136,654

742,431

1,394,223

Bromley

246,305

90,298

156,007

239,081

83,074

156,007

Buckinghamshire

284,362

104,250

180,112

276,022

95,910

180,112

Bury

419,771

153,893

265,878

407,460

141,582

265,878

Calderdale

468,450

171,739

296,711

454,711

158,000

296,711

Cambridgeshire

343,990

126,111

217,879

333,901

116,022

217,879

Camden

1,042,787

382,298

660,489

1,012,203

351,714

660,489

Cheshire

319,055

116,969

202,086

309,697

107,611

202,086

City of London

238,768

87,535

151,233

231,765

80,532

151,233

Cornwall and Isles Of Scilly

295,065

108,174

186,891

286,411

99,520

186,891

Coventry

868,659

318,460

550,199

843,182

292,983

550,199

Croydon

820,275

300,722

519,553

796,217

276,664

519,553

Cumbria

327,802

120,176

207,626

318,188

110,562

207,626

Darlington

162,763

59,671

103,092

157,989

54,897

103,092

Derby

387,655

142,119

245,536

376,285

130,749

245,536

Derbyshire

581,058

213,023

368,035

564,016

195,981

368,035

Devon

314,109

115,156

198,953

304,897

105,944

198,953

Doncaster

1,045,932

383,451

662,481

1,015,256

352,775

662,481

Dorset

152,740

55,996

96,744

148,260

51,516

96,744

Dudley

697,585

255,743

441,842

677,126

235,284

441,842

Durham

466,725

171,107

295,618

453,036

157,418

295,618

Ealing

953,437

349,541

603,896

925,474

321,578

603,896

East Riding of Yorkshire

207,631

76,120

131,511

201,541

70,030

131,511

East Sussex

340,807

124,944

215,863

330,811

114,948

215,863

Enfield

691,871

253,648

438,223

671,579

233,356

438,223

Essex

797,186

292,258

504,928

773,805

268,877

504,928

Gateshead

552,498

202,552

349,946

536,294

186,348

349,946

Gloucestershire

320,559

117,521

203,038

311,157

108,119

203,038

Greenwich

763,336

281,613

481,723

740,807

259,084

481,723

Hackney

1,377,049

504,842

872,207

1,336,662

464,455

872,207

Halton

130,121

47,704

82,417

126,305

43,888

82,417

Hammersmith and Fulham

913,566

334,924

578,642

886,772

308,130

578,642

Hampshire

580,815

212,933

367,882

563,780

195,898

367,882

Haringey

952,022

349,022

603,000

924,100

321,100

603,000

Harrow

166,449

61,022

105,427

161,567

56,140

105,427

Hartlepool

486,107

178,212

307,895

471,850

163,955

307,895

Havering

166,591

61,074

105,517

161,705

56,188

105,517

Herefordshire

128,556

47,130

81,426

124,786

43,360

81,426

Hertfordshire

741,370

271,795

469,575

719,626

250,051

469,575

Hillingdon

192,913

70,724

122,189

187,255

65,066

122,189

Hounslow

694,796

254,720

440,076

674,418

234,342

440,076

Isle of Wight

115,343

42,286

73,057

111,960

38,903

73,057

Islington

1,192,194

437,072

755,122

1,157,228

402,106

755,122

Kensington and Chelsea

767,172

281,254

485,918

744,672

258,754

485,918

Kent

1,069,795

392,199

677,596

1,038,419

360,823

677,596

Kingston upon Hull

1,371,182

502,691

868,491

1,330,967

462,476

868,491

Kingston Upon Thames

111,878

41,016

70,862

108,597

37,735

70,862

Kirklees

971,903

356,311

615,592

943,398

327,806

615,592

Knowsley

213,864

78,405

135,459

207,592

72,133

135,459

Lambeth

1,453,184

532,754

920,430

1,410,564

490,134

920,430

Lancashire

1,079,464

395,744

683,720

1,047,804

364,084

683,720

Leeds

2,424,190

888,736

1,535,454

2,353,091

817,637

1,535,454

Leicester

1,277,726

468,429

809,297

1,240,252

430,955

809,297

Leicestershire

410,402

150,458

259,944

398,365

138,421

259,944

Lewisham

983,839

360,687

623,152

954,984

331,832

623,152

Lincolnshire

493,839

181,047

312,792

479,355

166,563

312,792

Liverpool

1,863,565

683,204

1,180,361

1,808,909

628,548

1,180,361

Luton(2)

Manchester

2,212,011

810,949

1,401,062

2,147,135

746,073

1,401,062

Medway

214,095

78,490

135,605

207,816

72,211

135,605

27 Nov 2012 : Column 181W

27 Nov 2012 : Column 182W

Merton

165,422

60,646

104,776

160,570

55,794

104,776

Middlesbrough

880,601

322,838

557,763

854,774

297,011

557,763

Milton Keynes

158,021

57,932

100,089

153,386

53,297

100,089

Newcastle Upon Tyne

1,122,895

411,666

711,229

1,089,962

378,733

711,229

Newham

1,246,489

456,977

789,512

1,209,931

420,419

789,512

Norfolk

539,151

197,659

341,492

523,338

181,846

341,492

North East Lincolnshire

862,849

316,330

546,519

837,543

291,024

546,519

North Lincolnshire

556,407

203,985

352,422

540,088

187,666

352,422

North Somerset

112,214

41,139

71,075

108,923

37,848

71,075

North Tyneside

198,340

72,714

125,626

192,523

66,897

125,626

North Yorkshire

350,998

128,680

222,318

340,704

118,386

222,318

Northamptonshire

879,438

322,412

557,026

853,645

296,619

557,026

Northumberland

246,386

90,328

156,058

239,160

83,102

156,058

Nottingham

1,730,623

634,466

1,096,157

1,679,866

583,709

1,096,157

Nottinghamshire

1,876,079

687,792

1,188,287

1,821,056

632,769

1,188,287

Oldham

858,659

314,794

543,865

833,475

289,610

543,865

Oxfordshire

1,070,548

392,475

678,073

1,039,150

361,077

678,073

Peterborough

615,433

225,625

389,808

597,383

207,575

389,808

Plymouth

266,265

97,616

168,649

258,456

89,807

168,649

Poole

88,952

32,611

56,341

86,343

30,002

56,341

Portsmouth

272,572

99,928

172,644

264,578

91,934

172,644

Reading

892,782

327,304

565,478

866,598

301,120

565,478

Redbridge

583,159

213,793

369,366

566,056

196,690

369,366

Redcar and Cleveland

270,144

99,038

171,106

262,221

91,115

171,106

Richmond upon Thames

110,002

40,328

69,674

106,776

37,102

69,674

Rochdale

623,912

228,733

395,179

605,613

210,434

395,179

Rotherham

613,366

224,867

388,499

595,377

206,878

388,499

Rutland

5,742

2,105

3,637

5,574

1,937

3,637

Salford

578,669

212,147

366,522

561,697

195,175

366,522

Sandwell

846,957

310,504

536,453

822,117

285,664

536,453

Sefton

636,212

233,243

402,969

617,553

214,584

402,969

Sheffield

2,053,110

752,694

1,300,416

1,992,894

692,478

1,300,416

Shropshire

161,643

59,260

102,383

156,902

54,519

102,383

Slough

637,938

233,875

404,063

619,228

215,165

404,063

Solihull

392,576

143,923

248,653

381,062

132,409

248,653

Somerset

277,959

101,903

176,056

269,807

93,751

176,056

South Gloucestershire

128,041

46,941

81,100

124,286

43,186

81,100

South Tyneside

235,369

86,289

149,080

228,466

79,386

149,080

Southampton

293,745

107,690

186,055

285,130

99,075

186,055

Southend

160,979

59,017

101,962

156,258

54,296

101,962

Southwark

1,434,549

525,922

908,627

1,392,475

483,848

908,627

St Helens

222,539

81,585

140,954

216,012

75,058

140,954

Staffordshire

621,517

227,855

393,662

603,289

209,627

393,662

Stockport

592,824

217,336

375,488

575,437

199,949

375,488

Stockton

664,273

243,530

420,743

644,791

224,048

420,743

Stoke on Trent

298,389

109,393

188,996

289,638

100,642

188,996

Suffolk

435,035

159,489

275,546

422,276

146,730

275,546

Sunderland

688,149

252,283

435,866

667,966

232,100

435,866

Surrey

534,336

195,894

338,442

518,664

180,222

338,442

Sutton

133,319

48,876

84,443

129,409

44,966

84,443

Swindon

158,265

58,022

100,243

153,623

53,380

100,243

Tameside

793,703

290,981

502,722

770,425

267,703

502,722

Telford and Wrekin

163,898

60,087

103,811

159,091

55,280

103,811

Thurrock

145,003

53,160

91,843

140,750

48,907

91,843

Torbay

174,932

64,132

110,800

169,801

59,001

110,800

Tower Hamlets

1,365,049

500,443

864,606

1,325,014

460,408

864,606

Trafford

589,561

216,140

373,421

572,270

198,849

373,421

Wakefield

963,194

353,118

610,076

934,945

324,869

610,076

Walsall

619,855

227,246

392,609

601,675

209,066

392,609

Waltham Forest

688,787

252,517

436,270

668,586

232,316

436,270

Wandsworth

779,291

285,697

493,594

756,435

262,841

493,594

Warrington

137,529

50,420

87,109

133,495

46,386

87,109

27 Nov 2012 : Column 183W

27 Nov 2012 : Column 184W

Warwickshire

370,790

135,936

234,854

359,915

125,061

234,854

West Berkshire

91,536

33,558

57,978

88,851

30,873

57,978

West Sussex

309,480

113,459

196,021

300,403

104,382

196,021

Westminster

1,521,663

557,859

963,804

1,477,034

513,230

963,804

Wigan

763,116

279,767

483,349

740,735

257,386

483,349

Wiltshire

208,807

76,551

132,256

202,683

70,427

132,256

Windsor and Maidenhead

99,506

36,480

63,026

96,588

33,562

63,026

Wirral

506,578

185,717

320,861

491,721

170,860

320,861

Wokingham

88,865

32,579

56,286

86,259

29,973

56,286

Wolverhampton

797,029

292,200

504,829

773,653

268,824

504,829

Worcestershire

321,083

117,713

203,370

311,666

108,296

203,370

York

175,362

64,290

111,072

170,219

59,147

111,072

Wales(4)

5,509,457

5,509,457

0

5,068,700

5,068,700

0

(1) From 2011-12, grants were paid jointly by the Home Office and Department of Health to areas in England. (2) Grants to Bedfordshire and Luton have been consolidated into a single grant to Bedfordshire from 2009-10 onwards. (3) For 2012-13, a total grant of £7,828,438 was paid in London to the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC), with indicative amounts for the 32 boroughs, excluding City of London, as listed above. (4) Total grant paid by Home Office to Wales Government for local distribution.