BAE Systems

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department paid to BAE Systems Detica in the each of the last five years. [125079]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 26 October 2012]: The Home Department does not hold any contracts under the specific name ‘BAE Systems Detica' but since 2008-09 has paid the following amounts to its subsidiaries:

26 Nov 2012 : Column 33W

Financial yearTotal (£)

2008-09

5,607,630.65

2009-10

11,950,623.62

2010-11

8,564,901.80

2011-12

13,397,425.30

2012-13

7,445,187.48

Total

46,965,768.85

Counter-terrorism

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the work undertaken by local authorities in England and Wales in delivering the Prevent agenda. [128458]

James Brokenshire: Ongoing assessment is made by the Prevent team within the Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT) of local authorities delivery of Prevent at a local level. This includes quarterly reporting on Prevent co-ordinator and project activities, and bi-annual performance reporting.

OSCT Prevent assess that the Prevent work undertaken by local authorities is broadly on track.

Crime Prevention: Education

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will discuss with the Secretary of State for Education measures to educate teenage boys about relationships with women in order to avoid violence against women in later years. [129746]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Government Departments regularly discuss further measures to progress our strategy to end violence against women and girls. The Government are committed to challenging attitudes which foster violence against women and girls.

Last year we ran two national campaigns which challenged teenager's attitudes to relationship abuse and rape. Due to their success we will be re-running the Rape Prevention Campaign from 1 December 2012.

Criminal Investigation

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many joint investigation teams have been established between the UK and other member states since 2002. [129343]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 22 November 2012]: The total number of joint investigation teams (JITs) established between the UK and member states since 2002 is not held centrally. However, since 1 October 2010 the EU can provide financial support for JITs. From information provided by Eurojust, which supports the establishment and operation of EU JITs, the UK has had 20 JITs financially supported under this programme.

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Cybercrime

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the nature and frequency of cyber-attacks against her Department's website during 2012; what security breaches occurred; what loss of service users experienced in each case; and if she will make a statement. [128459]

James Brokenshire: Since April 2012, the Home Office website has been the subject of a number of ‘denial of service' attacks, which seek to make the website unavailable by bombarding it with traffic.

Website defences have been closely monitored and improved where necessary, but there have been some occasions where the website has become unavailable. This has usually been for just a few minutes, but a sustained attack over 7 and 8 April led to the website being difficult to access for a number of hours.

The Home Office website contains information about Home Office policy and corporate information such as its business plan. No transactions with members of the public are conducted through the site. Most of the attacks occurred outside normal working hours when the use of the site is low so the impact on users is likely to have been limited. The site was not hacked and no other systems were affected. At no point was there any risk to any personal or other secure information held on Home Office IT systems.

Firearms: Forensic Science

Damian Collins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent progress has been made in the Forensic Science Regulator's review of the historical use of the sodium rhodizonate test as a test for firearm discharge residues; and if she will make a statement. [129357]

Damian Green [holding answer 22 November 2012]: The Forensic Science Regulator (FSR) decided to undertake an initial review of the historical use of the sodium rhodizonate test and sought advice on that matter from a forensic science supplier. That advice has been received, the FSR is in the process of drafting his report and expects it to be completed in late January.

Grants

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what grant-giving programmes are operated by (a) her Department and (b) the bodies for which she is responsible; and which such programmes award grants in Scotland. [129150]

James Brokenshire: The information is as follows:

(a) In the financial year 2011-12, the Home Office had in excess of 200 grant streams The 12 largest grants in terms of spend, from the 2011-12 financial year, are listed below for the Home Department (including our agencies):

Crime and Policing Group:

Police Main Resource Grant (England)

Serious Organised Crime Agency

26 Nov 2012 : Column 35W

National Policing Improvement Agency

Neighbourhood Policing and Police Community Support Officer Grant

Police Main Resource Grant (Wales)

Police Special Grant

Police Capital Grant Allocation

FSS Liquidation Aid Payment (1st Liquidation Aid) (FSS Grant)

Local Services Support Grant (Area-Based Grant)

Office of Security and Counter Terrorism:

Counter Terrorism Policing

London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games Venue Security

UK Border Agency:

Unaccompanied asylum seeking children

On grant payments awarded to Scotland, this information would be available only at disproportionate cost.

(b) The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)

During the 2012-13 financial year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission have a Strategic Grants programme covering 33 countrywide organisations.

Three of these organisations are in Scotland

Glasgow Disability Alliance

Kingsway Health and Wellbeing Centre

LGBT Health and Wellbeing

Immigration: Married People

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what advice she has received on the potential effect of the opinion of the European Court of Human Rights in paragraph 55 of its judgment in Hode and Abdi v United Kingdom if that judgment becomes final, on the Government's policy that a refugee resident in the UK must have a minimum income before they may be joined by a post-flight spouse from abroad; and whether she plans to appeal the judgment to the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights. [129417]

Mr Harper: Careful consideration is being given to the full implications of the judgment in Hode and Abdi to determine whether any further action is appropriate. That consideration will include an assessment of the court's finding at paragraph 56 of its judgment in this case, that:

“the situation giving rise to the breach (of human rights) no longer exists as the Immigration Rules have subsequently been amended...”.

Olympic Games 2012: Security

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what representations she has received from police forces who provided extra support in place of G4S during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games; [126945]

(2) if she will reimburse those police forces who provided extra support to cover G4S Olympic duties. [126998]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 6 November 2012]: I am grateful to the police service for its willingness to step in at short notice to undertake venue security

26 Nov 2012 : Column 36W

duties, for their professionalism and the contribution that they made to a safe and secure Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Home Office has received no representations specifically on this issue from police forces.

G4S have committed to covering additional costs incurred by the police and armed forces as a result of their failing to meet their contractual guarding commitments at Games venues in full.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received from dissatisfied contractors employed by G4S during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games. [129002]

James Brokenshire: G4S' contract for security at Olympic and Paralympic venues is a matter between it and the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (LOCOG).

Pay

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many employees in her Department are paid in excess of (a) £80,000 and (b) £100,000. [128940]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 21 November 2012]: As at 30 September 2012, 93 Home Office employees are paid a base annual salary of £80,000 or higher. This figure includes 42 employees who are paid a salary of £100,000 or higher.

Police and Crime Commissioners

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many requests for election material relating to the police and crime commissioner elections had been made via (a) the telephone number 0800107070708 and (b) www.choosemypcc.org.uk by 5pm on 14 November 2012; how many responses to such requests were dispatched by that time; and how many of these responses were sent by (i) first-class and (ii) second-class post. [129491]

Damian Green [holding answer 22 November 2012]: As of 17:00 on 14 November 2012, there were 122,215 completed leaflet requests of which:

(a) 90,191 were made via the PCC candidate information order line 0800 1070708

(b) 32,024 were made online via

www.choosemypcc.org.uk

By 17:00 on 14 November, 120,361 leaflets had been dispatched in response to these requests. Of the leaflets dispatched:

(i) 69,715 were sent by first class post

(ii) 50,628 were sent by second class post

Of the total requests for leaflets, 1,854 were not completed due to the fact that they were either spam orders, bulk candidate requests or orders for areas where elections were not taking place.

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Police and Crime Commissioners: Wales

Jessica Morden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 23 October 2012, Official Report, column 764W, on police and crime commissioners: Wales, under what budget headings costs incurred in respect of a second set of English-only ballot papers in Wales fell. [126932]

Damian Green [holding answer 6 November 2012]: The Home Office has agreed to meet reasonable contingency costs, estimated to be about £350,000, for postal ballot papers in Wales. That money will all fall under the budget heading “Printing and otherwise producing the ballot papers” subsequent to article 5(3)(c) of The Police and Crime Commissioner elections (Local Returning Officers' and Police Area Returning Officers' Charges) Order 2012.

Police: Information and Communications Technology

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate her Department has made of the number of police hours saved through the introduction of personal digital assistants for police officers. [129249]

Damian Green: This information is not held centrally. Chief constables are responsible for securing the benefits achievable from technology provided for officers. However, evaluation by the National Policing Improvement Agency of the impact of devices issued as part of the Mobile Information Programme suggested that, on average, mobile devices such as personal digital assistants enabled police officers to spend 18 minutes longer per shift out of the police station.

Police: Road Traffic Control

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police forces have reduced the number of traffic patrols undertaken since 2010; [129463]

(2) if she will take steps to ensure that traffic policing remains a priority for police forces; [129464]

(3) what recent estimate she has made of the potential effects on the number of road traffic collisions of reductions in traffic patrols. [129465]

Damian Green: Information on traffic policing is not collected centrally. It will be for police and crime commissioners to set and update a police and crime plan for their areas and to ensure that the policing needs of their communities are met as effectively as possible. How traffic policing is carried out is an operational matter for individual chief officers of police.

Police: Surveillance

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department's policy is on the personal information that undercover officers are required to pass on to supervisors where that information has been gathered from surveillance targets with whom the undercover officer is in a sexual relationship; and if she will make a statement. [129383]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 38W

Damian Green: The requirements for supervising and managing the deployment of undercover officers are set out in the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 and its related statutory code of practice. In addition, the Association of Chief Police Officers produces its own guidance on managing undercover deployments. Senior police officers have made clear in recent months that it is not acceptable for the police to engage in sexual activity with members of the public, and that this is not authorised conduct.

Press: Subscriptions

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department to which magazines, journals and newspapers her Department subscribes. [125346]

James Brokenshire: The titles of the newspapers, magazines and periodicals to which the Home Department subscribes can be found in the following list. There are other publications ordered on an ad hoc basis but this information is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Since this question was tabled, an order for Private Eye magazine has been cancelled.

Addiction

Alcohol & Alcoholism

DrugsEducation Prevention & Policy

European Journal of Criminology

Journal of Ethnic & Migration Studies

Journal of Interpersonal Violence

Policing & Society

Pyschology Crime & Law

Gunmart Magazine

Guns & Accessories

Journal of Forensic Sciences

Local Government Chronicle

Migration News

Police & Constabulary Almanac

Police Review

Shooting Times & Country

The Daily Express

The Daily Mail

The Daily Mirror

The Daily Telegraph

Financial Times

The Guardian

Independent

The Sun

The Times

The Economist

The Spectator

The New Statesman

Management Today

PR Week

Prospect

New Scientist

Prostitution

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department has allocated to proactively assisting men and women to exit prostitution by recipient organisation in the latest period for which figures are available. [129717]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 39W

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Government are committed to tackling the harm and exploitation associated with prostitution. The cross-government Action Plan to end Violence Against Women and Girls sets out our commitment to ensure that those involved in prostitution are protected from violence, free from exploitation and, where appropriate, given help to leave.

The Home Office does not directly fund organisations to proactively assist men and women to exit prostitution. Local agencies are in the best position to make an assessment of the characteristics and issues of prostitution in their local area. To empower them to do so and to respond effectively, in October 2011 the Home Office published a review of effective practice in terms of: policing, exiting, minimising harm and general multi-agency working. Our review highlighted for local areas how to best support those who wish to exit prostitution.

Energy and Climate Change

Biofuels

Sir Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the Scottish Government's decision to remove the wood biomass subsidy for biomass electricity plants over 10 megawatts; and if he will consider adopting a similar model. [130107]

Gregory Barker: As set out in our consultation on “Biomass Electricity and Combined Heat and Power plants—ensuring sustainability and affordability”(1), we do not consider that removing the subsidy for plants over 10 MW offers value for money for the consumer. Small plants are more expensive per MWh than large plants at generating electricity. Where local feedstocks are being used, a cap on plant size can also prevent plants from being optimised to match both local need and the local supply chain. In order to ensure value for money, affordability and sustainability, the consultation therefore proposed a supplier cap in order to limit total generating capacity from new build dedicated biomass. This will allow shovel-ready projects which can achieve financial close this financial year to proceed. We will publish our response to this consultation shortly.

(1) http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/consultation/ro-banding/6339-consultation-on-biomass-electricity--combined-hea.pdf

Sir Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what contact his Department has had with energy generators on the quantities of wood they require for wood biomass energy generation. [130268]

Gregory Barker: As part of discussions with generators on bioenergy deployment, the Department regularly inquires about the intended feedstock type and volume.

Under the renewables obligation, generators of 50 kW capacity and above are required to provide information concerning the biomass feedstocks they have used, including wood other than waste, on an annual basis. This information includes the material type, form, mass or volume used and its country of origin.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 40W

Annual sustainability reports summarising the collated data received from biomass generators, together with the underpinning datasets, are available from the Ofgem website:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/RenewablObl/FuelledStations/Pages/FS.aspx

Sir Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what factors are taken into consideration in assessing the total carbon emissions of wood burning for biomass energy. [130269]

Gregory Barker: The Government carried out an assessment of the total carbon emissions of wood combustion for biomass energy to inform their UK Bioenergy Strategy published on 26 April 2012:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/meeting_energy/bioenergy/strategy/strategy.aspx

The factors taken into consideration include:

The GHG emissions from carbon stock changes in forests

The quantity of harvested carbon utilised (and hence sequestered) in wood products

The GHG emissions associated with forest operations

The GHG emissions associated with wood harvesting and extraction

The GHG emissions associated with wood transport

The GHG emissions associated with wood processing

The GHG emissions associated with disposal of harvested wood products at end-of-life.

Carbon Emissions

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had on the Final Investment Decisions enabling process; what mechanisms have been put in place to ensure transparency in these negotiations; and what role the Panel of Technical Experts will have in the process. [129439]

Mr Hayes: A number of developers (including new nuclear, renewables, and early stage carbon capture and storage developers) have expressed interest in the Final Investment Decisions (FID) enabling process. The Government has entered into dialogue with NNB Generation Company Ltd through this process. These discussions are ongoing, and no offers of comfort have been made.

The Government are committed to transparency over the terms of any investment instruments offered through the FID-enabling process. The Energy and Climate Change Select Committee's report on pre-legislative scrutiny of the draft Energy Bill made recommendations on this issue and our full response will be included in the overarching response to the Committee's recommendations, including the question of any role for independent experts.

Climate Change

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment he has made of the policies of (a) China, (b) India, (c) South Africa and (d) Brazil on climate change; and what assessment he has made of the potential effects of those policies on the UK's international commitments. [130233]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 41W

Gregory Barker: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave my hon. Friend the Member for Beverley and Holderness (Mr Stuart), on 13 November 2012, Official Report, column 118W.

India has an international commitment to reduce the emissions intensity of its economy by 20% to 25% by 2020 compared to business as usual levels. We estimate that national policies from “Missions” under the June 2008 National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) will deliver emissions savings that would more than meet this target by 2020. In the 2011 UNFCCC mitigation workshops, India estimated that its National Mission for Enhancing Energy Efficiency should produce savings or 25 MT CO2 by 2015; and that actions currently under way or planned—the National Solar mission, Nuclear Energy, Renewable Energy, and Green India mission—would save 275 MT CO2 each year by 2020. Furthermore, India has brought in strong pro-market measures to deliver its ambitious solar energy goals of installing 20 GW of solar capacity by 2022, including 2 GW off-grid solar.

South Africa has made international pledges that would deliver a deviation of 34% by 2020 and 42% by 2025 from business as usual levels, which will require policies to reduce the energy intensiveness of its industrial base and to improve its energy efficiency. Challenges with South Africa’s infrastructure and the ongoing poverty gap have meant that limited progress has been made towards the pledged targets. However, South Africa has identified the need to improve the harmonisation of policy, and the National Climate Response White Paper approved by Cabinet on 14 October 2011 seeks to start a process to mainstream climate change into government policy, including the introduction of carbon budgets on various sectors. The paper formalizes the range for peaking by 2020 to 2025, with a ceiling on 614 MT CO2 (currently SA emissions are around 540 MT CO2, essentially placing a cap on emissions). A major 20-year electricity plan IRP2010 has been issued, aiming for 17,800 MW of renewable energy by 2030, which equates to 42% of all new plants coming on stream over this period, and is up for review in 2013.

Brazil has committed to reduce its emissions by 36% to 39% on BAU in 2020 which equates to the equivalent of 1.2 GT in avoided emissions based on the Brazilian Government’s figures. In July 2012 the Brazil Government’s update confirmed that it is already halfway to achieving the 36% target. Most of Brazil’s reductions will come from tackling emissions in the forestry sector. This reflects the profile of its emissions: historically, nearly three-quarters have come from this sector. Brazil has reduced deforestation by 77% over the past seven years and has stated that it is on track to meet its target of reducing deforestation in the Amazon to 20% of the historical average by 2020. These reductions have resulted in an estimated 34% reduction in emissions as a whole since 2005.

I am encouraged by the action being taken in many countries, but if we are to meet the global target of limited temperature increases to below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels then it will be important for all countries to take further action. That is why a global legally binding agreement is needed, to ensure that all countries undertake their fair share. My Department, and the rest of the Government are playing their parts in working with these countries to negotiate a new agreement that

26 Nov 2012 : Column 42W

will come into force in 2020. In addition, we need to encourage those countries yet to make an emissions reduction pledge to do so, and for countries that have made pledges to deliver them and at their top end. For the EU that means that the UK will continue to press for the EU to increase its 2020 target to a 30% reduction from 1990 levels.

Cold Weather Payments

Sarah Newton: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the number of households eligible for cold weather payments in the event of a particularly cold winter in each (a) local authority area and (b) parliamentary constituency in 2012-13. [129444]

Steve Webb: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

A table—‘Estimated numbers of qualifiers for cold weather payments in 2012/13’—will be placed in the Library. It shows the estimated number of qualifiers for payments at each weather station in the UK during the 2012-13 cold weather payment season. These are the estimated number of payments that will be made for each trigger of the weather station.

Information on the number of people qualifying for cold weather payments is only available for the area covered by each weather station and is not available at parliamentary constituency or local authority level.

The table also shows the parliamentary constituencies that overlap with the area covered by each weather station. The boundaries of weather station coverage areas and parliamentary constituencies do not match exactly so some constituencies will be covered by more than one weather station.

Equivalent information showing the local authorities covered by each weather station is not available.

Energy Bill

Dr Whitehead: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether he intends to publish the impact assessment of the Energy Bill at the same time as the Bill. [129510]

Mr Hayes: Yes.

Energy: Complaints

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of Ofgem in dealing with customer complaints about energy companies. [129567]

Gregory Barker: Ofgem does not have a direct role in dealing with individual consumer complaints, which are dealt with by the company itself. Energy companies must comply with complaint handling standards set by Ofgem.

If the company fails to offer a satisfactory resolution domestic and micro business customers can then pursue the matter with the Ombudsman Services: Energy. The ombudsman provides Ofgem with information on consumer complaints in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the two organisations. Ofgem

26 Nov 2012 : Column 43W

uses this information as part of its regular market monitoring activity undertaken to ensure energy companies are complying with their licence obligations.

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent representations he has received on the effectiveness of customer complaints procedures operated by energy companies. [129568]

Gregory Barker: DECC Ministers and officials receive a number of representations about gas and electricity companies.

Individual consumer complaints are dealt with by the energy company itself by following its formal complaint process. If the company fails to offer a satisfactory resolution domestic and micro business customers can then pursue the matter with the Energy ombudsman. In 2011-12, the ombudsman received 7,403 completed complaint forms of which 6,608 were resolved either informally or formally. Larger business customers can address complaints by using the legal system.

Garages and Petrol Stations

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether there is an approved system for the measurement of motor transport fuel delivered by oil suppliers to retailers; and if he will make a statement. [129738]

Mr Willetts: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills as the measurement of motor fuel falls under the responsibility of this Department.

All measurements of volume which are made for trade purposes are covered by the provisions of the Weights and Measures Act 1985. Suppliers are required to use measuring equipment which is fair and just and does not deliver short measure.

The Liquid Fuel Carried by Road Tanker Order 1985 requires documentation to accompany the delivery of the motor fuel to forecourt which identifies the type and quantity of fuel to be delivered. This is also a requirement under Section 12 of the Hydrocarbon Oil Regulations 1973 (as amended) to issue a delivery note where motor fuel is removed from a refinery or bonded warehouse.

Measurement of supplies of transport fuel to retailers typically occurs when fuel is metered into road tankers by gantry meters at the oil refinery or oil storage depot. Unlike fuel dispensers used to deliver fuel to the motorist, there is no specific regulation of this type of equipment under the 1985 Act and therefore they are not required to be of approved design and subject to verification. However, where meters are used for the determination of fuel duty taxation, they are required to meet detailed technical requirements of HM Revenue and Customs as set out in Notice 179.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the number of petrol forecourts in (a) 2010 and (b) 2011. [130138]

Mr Hayes: In April 2011 there were 8,765 petrol filling stations open in the UK, compared to 8,884 sites in April 2010, according to Experian Catalist reports held by the Department.

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DECC has commissioned a report on the retail market for road fuels to develop the evidence base on the impact of structural changes to the market over recent years. I have committed to write to all Members of Parliament with its findings later this year.

Green Deal Scheme

Mr Watts: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how will he assess the performance of the Green Deal Finance Company. [129285]

Gregory Barker: The Green Deal Finance Company is a private organisation, as such it will be TGDFC board and management’s responsibility to monitor its performance. As a broadly based membership organisation, we would anticipate scrutiny from the industry.

DECC have a wider goal to ensure there is sufficient finance available in the market and will be monitoring how the market as a whole evolves.

In the short run, DECC has provided an implementation loan of £7 million to enable TGDFC to develop its loans administration function and financing proposition. DECC regularly monitors the company’s delivery against these implementation milestones as we approach 28 January.

Hinkley Point C Power Station

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change by what date he expects to agree a strike price with EDF and Centrica for Hinkley Point C; and by what date he expects to publish (a) the strike price and (b) the associated contract terms. [129535]

Mr Hayes: The Government have entered into dialogue with NNB Generation Company Ltd regarding potential transitional arrangements ahead of the implementation of electricity market reform (EMR) for NNB’s Hinkley Point C project on the basis set out in the Technical Update on electricity market reform published in December 2011. These discussions are ongoing, and it is not possible to say when they may conclude. If agreement is reached on a contract for difference for Hinkley Point C, there will be transparency over the terms offered (including the strike price).

Housing: Insulation

Simon Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what meetings he has had with representatives of insulation companies in the last six months. [129673]

Gregory Barker: All meetings between external organisations and DECC Ministers are published on a quarterly basis on the DECC website and are available for download at this link:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/registers.aspx

Simon Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on training solid wall installers. [129674]

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Gregory Barker: DECC Ministers meet regularly with Ministers in BIS to discuss a range of issues. As has been the case with successive Administrations, it is not the Government’s practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall North of 15 October 2012 on behalf of a constituent. [129754]

Gregory Barker: The response to this letter of 15 October 2012 to the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change was signed by me on 21 November 2012. I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon. Member’s letter.

Natural Resources

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his latest assessment is of the potential resilience of the UK to adverse weather in terms of reserves of (a) oil, (b) gas and (c) coal over the winter period. [129560]

Mr Hayes [holding answer 22 November 2012]: The information is as follows:

Oil

DECC places obligations on companies supplying petroleum products in the inland market requiring them to hold stocks of crude oil and its products equivalent to a minimum of 67.5 days of annual daily inland consumption using powers under the Energy Act 1976. These are emergency stocks, separate to commercial stocks held by companies, and are available to release to the market in the event of supply disruptions. At the end of August 2012 (the latest data available), the UK held almost 83 days of gasoline stocks, over 75 days of middle distillates (including diesel and aviation fuel) and almost 500 days of fuel oil.

Gas

For this winter 2012-13, seasonal demands for gas and electricity are forecast to be comparatively lower, in general, than recent years with prices strongly favouring coal rather than gas for fuelling power generation. For gas, last winter’s experience of supply flexibility through increased use of import capacity and storage is expected to continue. However, there is greater uncertainty over liquefied natural gas (LNG) levels as Japan is expected to continue to draw cargoes to the Pacific basin over the medium to short term. For electricity, margins are similar to last year and are historically high, though it is possible that for a one in 20 demand scenario high interconnector exports may lead to low reserve levels.

Coal

We anticipate no difficulties with coal supplies over the winter period.

Nuclear Power

Dr Whitehead: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions his Department has had with EU state aid officials concerning (a) a nuclear power strike price, (b) the auctioning of

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nuclear power contracts for difference and

(c)

the proportion of electricity supplied that is underwritten by contracts for difference. [129511]

Mr Hayes: State aid issues are a bilateral matter between the Government and the European Commission. The Government are in discussion with the Commission as to the application of the state aid rules in this context and detailed accounts of the content of discussions are not normally published. In common with other similar situations, such discussions cover whether or not state aid may be present, and if there is state aid, whether it is approvable under the treaty.

If the Government make a formal notification of their arrangements, we expect the Commission to make a decision as soon as possible consistent with the proper exercise of its responsibilities. Such Commission decisions are published and include an explanation of how the decision has been reached.

Offshore Industry

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to the Civil Aviation Authority's decision to restrict use of Super Puma EC225 helicopters in servicing the oil and gas sector in the North Sea, what steps he is taking to promote the safety of the offshore oil and gas workforce during transfers of staff to and from rigs and installations. [128094]

Mr Hoban: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is responsible for assessing and regulating safety on offshore installations in the UK. Following the restriction in use of Super Puma helicopters in October, HSE wrote to offshore industries, trade unions, and shipping and aviation stakeholders, to reiterate the availability of existing safety guidance in HSE Offshore Safety Information Sheet 1/2007 about safe procedures for the transfer of personnel by carriers, and emergency evacuation arrangements in times of limited helicopter availability. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) also wrote to industry to advise on the safe carriage of offshore workers on vessels and subsequent transfer to and from an installation. MCA has given short-term authority for certain ships to be utilised as alternative means for transferring and transporting offshore personnel.

The main offshore industry trade association, Oil and Gas UK, has an established Helicopter Safety Steering Group (HSSG). This group includes helicopter operators, oil and gas operators and contractors, offshore trade unions, the pilots' union BALPA and CAA. Since October, HSE has attended two HSSG meetings to advise on the consequences for safe transport and evacuation arrangements. HSE has also met with the Step Change Marine Safety Workgroup to discuss marine transfer of workers.

HSE works closely with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the MCA to regulate and promote all aspects of safe transport of staff to and from offshore installations. HSE continues to monitor the situation and will act both within its regulatory jurisdiction and

26 Nov 2012 : Column 47W

in cooperation with its co-regulators offshore to best retain safe practice while flight restrictions remain in place.

Temperature

David T. C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish a table showing the average global temperature for each year since 1997. [129719]

Gregory Barker: The Met Office already makes such information publicly available. A table of global average near-surface annual temperatures, including each year since 1997, is available on the Met Office website at:

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/monitoring/climate/surface-temperature

Wind Power: Noise

Sir Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans he has to review noise regulations for wind turbines. [129743]

Gregory Barker: We have no plans to review noise regulations for wind turbines.

DECC commissioned acoustic experts at Hayes McKenzie to carry out a research project to analyse matters arising in the consideration of noise impacts when determining planning applications in England. The 2011 study found that the current noise guidance, known as ‘ETSU-R-97’, remained fit for purpose. However, it recommended that further guidance was needed to confirm, and where necessary, clarify, the way it should be implemented in practice.

In response, DECC has asked the Institute of Acoustics to develop this good practice guidance. We expect this to be published in spring 2013.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Animals: Roads

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of animals involved in road traffic accidents per annum. [130399]

Stephen Hammond: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Transport.

The Department for Transport only collects information relating to personal injury road accidents, and therefore does not include damage-only accidents in its statistics.

Information regarding the number of animals involved in personal injury accidents is not held by the Department. However, the Department holds information relating to the number of accidents involving an animal (except a ridden horse) in the carriageway.

The total number of personal injury road accidents in Great Britain which involved an animal in the carriageway was 851 in 2011. Of these accidents, eight were fatal, 126 were serious, and 717 were of the slight severity.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 48W

Fisheries: Morocco

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make it his policy to seek for any extension of the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement to be limited to the waters off Morocco. [129715]

Richard Benyon: The UK will not be calling for an extension of the fisheries partnership Agreement to be limited to the waters off Morocco. However, in negotiations we are insisting that Morocco will need to demonstrate that money received for any fishing opportunities offered to the EU in Western Sahara is used for the benefit of the local population.

Hares

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what steps he plans to take to prevent a decline in the population of brown hares in the UK; [128952]

(2) if he will implement measures to protect brown hares in England and Wales. [128960]

Richard Benyon: Our current view is that habitat changes due to modern farming practices are the main cause of their population decline. This is being addressed through habitat/landscape restoration and agri-environment schemes such as Environmental Stewardship.

Marine Animals: Turks and Caicos Islands

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his policy is on the proposed dolphinarium in the Turks and Caicos Islands. [129210]

Mark Simmonds: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

This is a matter for the Turks and Caicos Islands Government. There are already dolphinariums in three other territories—Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the implications of the amendment of the law of the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) to permit performing marine mammals to be held in captivity in the TCI for his policy on marine conservation in the UK Overseas Territories. [129216]

Mark Simmonds: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

No assessment has been made as this is a matter for the Turks and Caicos Islands Government. There are already dolphinariums in three other territories—Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 49W

Nappies: Waste Disposal

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans he has to assess the composition of household waste, including disposable nappies; if he will estimate the costs to local authorities of disposing of nappies; and if he will make a statement. [128479]

Richard Benyon: A DEFRA-commissioned report on the national compositional estimates for local authority collected waste in England in 2010-11 is currently being finalised. This will include a subcategory for disposable nappies. The last published report on national municipal waste compositional estimates was for 2006/07 (project WR1002). This is available on DEFRA's Science and Research Projects web pages and I have placed copies in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nappies are a small fraction of collected residual waste, and generally not collected separately, so it is not possible to produce specific costs. However, by using information from the Environment Agency's 2006 report, ‘An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies’ (available on the Environment Agency's website) and population estimates for England from the Office for National Statistics, we estimate that the total cost of disposing of disposable nappies in England was approximately £77 million in 2011. This estimate includes costs of £23 million for landfill or incineration gate fees, £25 million for landfill tax and £29 million for collection. Landfill tax is paid by local authorities to central Government.

Primates: Animal Welfare

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to his review of the Code of Practice for the Welfare of Privately Kept Non-Human Primates, what evidence will be used to determine the efficacy of the code, how that evidence will be collected, by whom and when; and when and how the results of the review will be made public. [129226]

Richard Benyon: The Code of Practice for the Welfare of Privately Kept Non-Human Primates will be reviewed after it has been in force for five years in 2015. The final format for the review has not been decided. However, as part of the review we will be asking key stakeholders from affected sectors (such as keepers, industry, animal welfare organisations, local authorities and veterinary groups) to submit evidence on the effectiveness of the code.

Staff

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much his Department spent on (a) recruitment agency fees, (b) outplacement agency fees for displaced or redundant staff and (c) staff training in each of the last 12 months. [125698]

Richard Benyon: The amount paid by core DEFRA in the last 12 months to organisations providing headhunting and talent management services is £47,295. To provide a monthly analysis or costs relating to temporary workers would incur disproportionate cost.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 50W

In the same period, core DEFRA has spent £3,000 on outplacement services for displaced staff or staff under threat of redundancy.

The amount spent by core DEFRA on staff training is not centrally held and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Water Abstraction

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many abstraction licences were refused in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012 to date by the general reason for that refusal. [128992]

Richard Benyon: The following table shows the number of licences refused in each year and the general reason for refusal:

 Reason for refusalNumber refused

2010

Applied for wrong licence

1

 

No rights of access

3

 

Two applications received on one weir, alternative scheme licensed

3

 

No reasonable justification of need for water

1

 

Adverse environmental impact to protected sites and impacts to other existing licence holders

1

 

Catchment over abstracted therefore licence refused as would cause adverse environmental impact

2

 

Total for 2010

11

   

2011

No reasonable justification of need for water

1

 

Catchment over abstracted therefore licence refused as would cause adverse environmental impact

1

 

Application for amount of water in excess of that permitted by the Hydro-Electric Power Good Practice Guidelines without justification

2

 

Licence not required, activity permitted by an existing licence

1

 

To licence would have caused adverse environmental impact

1

 

Adverse environmental impact and impacts to other existing licence holders

1

 

Total for 2011

7

   

2012

No rights of access

6

 

Adverse environmental impact to protected sites

3

 

Total for 2012

9

   
 

Total for period 2010-12

27

Of the 27 listed above, six have been appealed or been subject to judicial review, as shown in the following table:

 OutcomeTotal

2010

Appealed, unsuccessful

1

 

Appealed, re-determined and issued

1

 

Judicially Reviewed, issued licence quashed and both applications being re-determined

2

 

Total for 2010

4

   

2011

Appealed, re-negotiated and issued

2

 

Total for 2010-11

6

26 Nov 2012 : Column 51W

Whales: Conservation

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage an end to commercial whaling. [129594]

Richard Benyon: I attended this year's International Whaling Commission meeting in July to demonstrate our commitment to the conservation and welfare of whales and our support for the moratorium on commercial whaling. I also wrote to my counterparts in the Republic of Korea following their announcement at the meeting of their intention to commence so called 'scientific' whaling, urging them to reconsider their plans. The Government will continue to make our opposition to whaling known at every appropriate opportunity.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many members of staff in her Department work full-time on (a) libraries, (b) the arts and (c) the creative industries. [129730]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport deploys staff flexibly across a range of projects and priorities. Currently, four full-time and one part-time members of staff are deployed to work on public libraries policy; seven full-time members of staff are deployed on projects that include arts and arts related policy, including cross-cutting projects across the cultural sector; and eight fall time members of staff are deployed on projects that include work on the creative industries. Press officers and legal advisors also support the work across these areas.

Civil Partnerships

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what legal rights the Government proposes to accord to same sex couples in its proposed legislation on same sex marriage in addition to those accorded in civil partnership legislation. [123595]

Mrs Grant: Civil partnerships gave same-sex couples the equivalent rights, responsibilities and freedoms to those afforded to couples in a marriage. However, there remains some differences between civil partnerships and marriage, for example how they are formed, reasons for which they can be ended, and pension rights.

The consultation on equal civil marriage sought views on these differences. The Government's response to the consultation will be published by the end of the year.

Football Association

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the planned timetable for the implementation of constitutional reforms to the Football Association. [130225]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 52W

Hugh Robertson: The football authorities have already begun work to reform their governance structure including partial reform of the FA Board. We expect further reforms, including the introduction of a new licensing system for clubs and rationalisation of the relationship between the FA Board and its council, by summer 2013.

Grants

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what grant-giving programmes are operated by (a) her Department and (b) the bodies for which she is responsible; and which such programmes award grants in Scotland. [129155]

Hugh Robertson: Lottery funded programmes and schemes are developed by the lottery distributors independently of Government and the Department. A list of lottery funded programmes that award grants to Scotland can be found at:

http://www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/funding-finder

The Department's arm's length bodies publish details of their grant programmes, including which organisations are eligible to apply, on their websites. A list of these bodies and links to their websites can be found at:

http://www.culture.gov.uk/about_us/our_sponsored_bodies/963.aspx

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport provides grant awards to the Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme and Memorials Grant Scheme. Both schemes operate for the whole of the United Kingdom and consequently do make grant payments to Scottish organisations.

Nuisance Calls

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) what the largest fine imposed on a company for making nuisance calls is; [122704]

(2) how many companies have been prosecuted for making nuisance calls in each of the last 30 years; and what sector each such company belonged to. [122301]

Jeremy Wright: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Justice.

A breach of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003 (which regulate cold calling either to telephone or by text message) is not a criminal offence, hence there have been no prosecutions and consequently no fines issued at criminal courts for making such calls.

The Information Commissioner has the power to issue enforcement notices requiring companies that cease making them and, since the Regulations came into force on 11 December 2003, the ICO has issued seven enforcement notices for breaches of the regulations relating to nuisance recorded messages.

Playing Fields

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many organisations have applied to the Protecting Playing Fields Fund since it was established; how many such applications have been successful; how much money has

26 Nov 2012 : Column 53W

been allocated from the fund since it was established; and for how many pitches or playing fields such funds have been used. [129785]

Hugh Robertson: Since it was established, in Rounds 1, 2 and 3, 237 organisations have applied to the Protecting Playing Fields Fund. Of these applications, 163 were successful. Around £8.2 million has been allocated from the fund over these rounds, benefiting 504 playing fields and pitches.

Sports: Clubs

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what progress has been made on the doorstep club initiative; and if she will make a statement. [129784]

Hugh Robertson: To deliver the Door Step Club project, Sport England is working with StreetGames to create sustainable clubs for young people in disadvantaged areas. These are informal clubs run for young people, by young people, and have a transformative impact on the individuals themselves as well as the communities which they come from. The £0.5 million pilot is under way to deliver 46 Door Step Clubs across the country. This will be scaled up to £20 million delivery over the next four years to 2017.

Sports: Schools

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what recent progress her Department has made on improving links between community sports clubs and schools. [129185]

Hugh Robertson: Sport England, as part of the new Youth and Community Sport Strategy, will invest at least £1 billion of lottery and Exchequer funding over the next four years to help to ensure that people, particularly those aged 14 to 25, are regularly playing sport. Links will be improved between schools and community sports clubs to establish at least 6,000 partnerships between schools and local sports clubs by 2017. Funding of £8.13 million has now been approved for County Sport Partnership Club Link Makers, and Sport England expect them to be in post by April 2013.

Also, £48.5 million will be invested in the creation of hundreds of new 'satellite clubs', which aim to bridge the gap between school and community sports clubs. To date, 30 national governing bodies have indicated that they will deliver satellite clubs as part of their 2013 to 2017 Whole Sport Plans (subject to confirmation of their final Whole Sport Plan settlement which is expected in December 2012), and Sport England have begun project work which will deliver 204 satellite clubs across 17 sports.

Tourism: Yorkshire and the Humber

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps her Department is taking to promote tourism in Yorkshire; and if she will make a statement. [129546]

Hugh Robertson [holding answer 22 November 2012]: Yorkshire is an important part of our tourism offer.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 54W

Although VisitEngland, our national tourism board, does not promote at the local level, it does engage in national promotions and public relations work which benefits such locations as Yorkshire. In fact, North Yorkshire is the third highest value county destination in terms of visitor spend outside London. The county more widely incorporates many iconic landmarks and attractive landscape which features frequently in VisitEngland marketing materials. VisitEngland is currently developing four thematic marketing campaigns based on City, Coast, Countryside and Heritage, and Yorkshire embodies all four.

VisitEngland staff meet regularly with ‘Welcome to Yorkshire’ (the Destination Management Organisation for the historic county of Yorkshire) and they play a full part in many of VisitEngland's activities. Most recently VisitEngland has worked with Welcome to Yorkshire on the successful GREAT 2012 TV campaign and on this summer's programme of visits for non-accredited media during the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

VisitBritain is investing in a major international promotional campaign in key overseas markets; over the next four years, this is expected to deliver 4.6 million extra visitors, £2.27 billion in extra visitor spend and over 50,000 job opportunities across the whole nation. This campaign will take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity afforded by the unique events of 2012 to maximise the industry's potential and ensure that we create a sustained legacy for tourism. Destinations all over the UK, including those in Yorkshire, stand to benefit from these initiatives.

Justice

Tribunals

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the savings made to the Tribunal Service following implementation of recommendations made by the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council. [129459]

Mrs Grant: The MOJ have not made any assessment of savings arising from recommendations of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council (AJTC).

The creation of the Tribunals Service in 2007 led to substantial savings, as did the unification of the Tribunals Service with Her Majesty's Courts Service. These savings were as a result of reform, rationalisation and service improvement on which the AJTC and others provided advice.

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what consideration he has given to the consequences for devolved tribunals in (a) Scotland and (b) Wales of the proposed abolition of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council. [129519]

Mrs Grant: The Government recognise that the progress that has been made in UK-wide tribunals since 2007 has not been fully replicated in those tribunals that deal with devolved matters. The Ministry of Justice is working with officials in the Scottish and Welsh Administrations to ensure that their programmes of tribunal reform continue to receive appropriate support following the

26 Nov 2012 : Column 55W

proposed abolition of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council. Once agreed, these proposed arrangements will be detailed when the Order is laid in Parliament.

Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation is subject to a deferred prosecution agreement. [130193]

Damian Green: No. Proposals to bring Deferred Prosecution Agreements into effect in England and Wales are currently before Parliament within the Crime and Courts Bill. Prosecutors are not yet able to make use of the provisions and no Deferred Prosecution Agreements have been or are in the process of being made.

Hillsborough Stadium

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has to fund potential new

26 Nov 2012 : Column 56W

inquests into the deaths of those who died in the Hillsborough disaster. [129687]

Mrs Grant: The Attorney-General is yet to apply to the High Court to have the inquests into the deaths of those who died in the Hillsborough disaster quashed and for new inquests to be ordered. It would therefore be inappropriate to comment at present, as we would not wish to risk pre-judging the Court's decision.

Human Rights: Research

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what research on human rights has been commissioned by his Department and its predecessors since April 2006; on what date each such piece of research was commissioned; who commissioned the research; and how much funding was granted in each case. [129415]

Damian Green: The Ministry of Justice does not hold the requested information centrally. However the following table, prepared by my officials, summarises the information currently available from the Department's records.

Research (excluding human rights guides, consultation documents (e.g. Green Papers), and periodic human rights reports to the United Nations and the Council of Europe)Commissioning authorityStart dateDate of publication/completionCost

Review of the implementation of the Human Rights Act

Previous Government

May 2006—approximately

July 2006

Produced within Government

Human rights tracker surveys

Previous Government

2006— approximately

2009

No separate figures

Human rights in education project

Previous Government

2007— approximately

2008

No separate figures

Public protection, proportionality, and the search for balance

Previous Government

2007

September 2007

£24,514

Human rights insight project

Previous Government

2007

January 2008

No separate figures

The optional protocol to the United Nations Convention for the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW): the experience of the United Kingdom

Previous Government

May 2007

December 2008

No separate figures

Institutional Scope of National Human Rights Protections: A comparative study in relation to ‘public authorities’

Previous Government

August 2008

January 2009

£59,850

The relationship between rights and responsibilities

Previous Government

August 2009

December 2009

No separate figures

People and power: shaping democracy, rights and responsibilities

Previous Government

October 2009

March 2010

£842,111.35 (cost for 8 deliberative engagement events across the UK)

Legal Aid

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what proportion of appeals cases using legal aid were successful in each of the last five years; [128907]

(2) how many and what proportion of the total legal aid budget was spent on appeals cases in each of the last five years. [128908]

Jeremy Wright: The Legal Services Commission (LSC) does not hold information on the success of appeals in criminal matters funded by legal aid, neither does the LSC hold information on the total cost of all appeals in civil matters as it is not possible to disaggregate expenditure specific to the appeal in all funded cases. For example, where funding under a legal aid certificate covers both the initial proceeding and appeal.

However, the LSC is currently identifying the legal aid cost of criminal appeals; the cost of civil appeals in those cases where the funding can be specifically identified; and, the success outcome of the civil appeals.

I will write to my hon. Friend once the LSC have provided the information.

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many cases were eligible for legal aid in each of the last five years. [128909]

Jeremy Wright: The number of acts of assistance in each year since 2007-08 to 2011-12 is provided in the following table.

26 Nov 2012 : Column 57W

 Acts of assistance (thousand)

2007-08

2,502

2008-09

2,860

2009-10

2,965

2010-11

2,715

2011-12

2,477

An act of assistance includes legal aid granted in civil and criminal cases that may proceed to court as well as legal advice and assistance, such as police station advice in criminal matters and initial advice in civil matters. One legal aid applicant may receive more than one act of assistance in a particular matter.

It is possible that a number of cases privately funded would have been eligible for legal aid had the litigant or defendant applied for legal aid. However, it is not possible to determine the number.

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice on what date he plans to bring into force Section 73 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. [129258]

Mrs Grant: Section 73 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 will come into force on 3 December 2012.

Personal Injury: Compensation

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the effect of the ban on referral fees in personal injury cases introduced under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 on the number of whiplash claims made. [129264]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 58W

Mrs Grant: The provisions in part 2 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 to prohibit the payment and receipt of referral fees in personal injury cases, will come into force in April 2013. The Government will evaluate the impact of part 2 of the Act—including the effect of the ban on referral fees—within three to five years of the implementation date.

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of costs recovered through personal injury claims were made in respect of whiplash in the last three years for which figures are available. [129265]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice does not hold aggregate data on the amount recovered in costs from personal injury claims. Data from the Department of Work and Pensions Compensation Recovery Unit suggests that in 2011-12 just over 1 million personal injury claims were recorded; of which approximately 540,000 claims were described as whiplash related. Different claim types may attract different levels of costs and it is not possible to comment on the costs recovered in respect of these claims.

Planning Permission: Appeals

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many applications for statutory appeals in respect of planning and related cases were made in each of the last 10 years; and how many subsequent appeals determined by the court were (a) allowed, (b) dismissed and (c) withdrawn. [130039]

Jeremy Wright: The following data provide figures for Statutory Appeals made under section 289 of the Town and County Planning Act of 1990 relating to enforcement notice appeals and appeals under section 288 of the same act relating to challenges to a planning decision.

Administrative Court Office—Judicial Review Town and Country Planning
Applications received in the Administrative Court Office
Town and Country Planning Act 199019981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011

Section 288

200

171

139

180

142

154

135

124

188

138

153

102

97

121

Section 289

66

48

53

37

39

44

37

34

50

63

57

67

59

65

Grand total

266

219

192

217

181

198

172

158

238

201

210

169

156

186

Applications granted permission to proceed to a full hearing
Town and Country Planning Act 199019981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011

Section 289

30

35

34

22

22

19

15

16

16

15

25

22

12

26

Substantive hearings allowed
Town and Country Planning Act 199019981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011

Section 288

62

53

71

38

33

26

22

11

7

11

18

21

9

9

Section 289

17

16

21

13

5

7

6

4

5

4

4

7

5

3

Grand total

79

69

92

51

38

33

28

15

12

15

22

28

14

12

26 Nov 2012 : Column 59W

26 Nov 2012 : Column 60W

Cases determined by court (including cases determined by consent without a substantive hearing)
Town and Country Planning Act 199019981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011

Section 288

134

154

157

98

129

120

108

68

78

91

107

137

65

50

Section 289

39

52

49

41

32

37

37

17

36

32

51

51

48

55

Grand total

173

206

206

139

161

157

145

85

114

123

158

188

113

105

Planning Permission: Judicial Review

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many applications for judicial review related to planning or infrastructure proposals have been made in each year since 1998; and how many of those applications were (a) allowed to proceed to a hearing and (b) granted. [129493]

Jeremy Wright: The following tables provide the number of judicial reviews received relating to planning made each year from 1998 to 2011 and indicates the number of those granted permission to proceed to a full hearing, the number of substantive cases that were allowed at hearing and the total number allowed including those by consent without a hearing.

Applications received in the Administrative Court Office
TypeTopic Number

Judicial review civil

Town and Country Planning

1998

112

  

1999

116

  

2000

121

  

2001

142

  

2002

119

  

2003

122

  

2004

119

  

2005

140

  

2006

142

  

2007

151

  

2008

184

  

2009

165

  

2010

148

  

2011

191

Applications granted permission to proceed to a full hearing (at initial permission and renewal stage)
TypeTopic Number

Judicial review civil

Town and Country Planning

1998

51

  

1999

56

  

2000

68

  

2001

63

  

2002

47

  

2003

54

  

2004

49

  

2005

44

  

2006

50

  

2007

51

  

2008

67

  

2009

64

  

2010

46

  

2011

61

Substantive hearings allowed
TypeTopic Number

Judicial review civil

Town and Country Planning

1998

10

  

1999

19

  

2000

29

  

2001

17

  

2002

12

  

2003

11

  

2004

10

  

2005

11

  

2006

7

  

2007

17

  

2008

14

  

2009

15

  

2010

17

  

2011

6

Cases determined by Court (including cases determined by consent without a substantive hearing)
TypeTopic Number

Judicial review civil

Town and Country Planning

1998

64

  

1999

69

  

2000

98

  

2001

71

  

2002

72

  

2003

67

  

2004

66

  

2005

76

  

2006

44

  

2007

77

  

2008

111

  

2009

116

  

2010

87

  

2011

122

Prisoners: Credit Unions

Paul Goggins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) which prisons encourage prisoners to join credit unions; [129976]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 61W

(2) how many prisoners were members of credit unions in the latest period for which figures are available. [129977]

Jeremy Wright: Information on the number of prisons that specifically encourage prisoners to engage with credit unions, and the numbers of prisoners who become members of credit unions, is not routinely collected.

We do see credit unions as a key part of the solution in addressing the lack of bank accounts for prisoners where mainstream accounts cannot be accessed. Through the work that we are doing with prisons and the support and provision provided by third sector partners, we are keen to continue to raise awareness and encourage prisoners to engage with credit unions.

The National Offender Management Service commissioned research to find the best way to enable offenders to access community financial services through the development of partnerships between credit unions and justice agencies in England and Wales. A policy report will be published in the new year, and a project is underway to enable people who are serving, or have served, a prison or community sentence, and their families, to access community financial services through the development of such partnerships.

Prisons: Bank Services

Paul Goggins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners had a bank account on (a) admission to and (b) release from prison in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [129980]

Jeremy Wright: Information on the number of offenders entering or leaving a prison who have a bank account is not routinely collected. A survey by the Legal Service Research Centre in 2007 reported that 40% of people in prison surveyed had no current account or other financial products. An evaluation by Liverpool John Moores university in 2008 found that 69% of prisoners at one prison had no bank account.

We recognise that access to bank accounts and other basic financial services can positively contribute to the rehabilitation of prisoners and their resettlement into society, and we are working closely across departments and with banks to increase provision.

Prisons: Procurement

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will publish the reasoning behind each decision taken as part of the prison marketisation process. [128573]

26 Nov 2012 : Column 62W

Jeremy Wright: Bids for all six lots within Prison Competitions Phase 2 were evaluated to determine the most economically advantageous having regard to both price and non-price criteria. The evaluation methodology was published to all bidders before submission of their bids and includes the detailed criteria. I have placed a copy of the evaluation booklet setting out this process in the Library of the House.

When considering the outcome for Northumberland and the three South Yorkshire prisons, the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling), considered the best bids to represent a compelling package of reforms for delivering cost reduction, improvements to regimes and a working prisons model in these prisons, and so he decided that the competition should progress to the next stage.

For Durham, Onley, and Coldingley, he did not consider the best bids sufficiently compelling when compared to the approach of delivering the new competition benchmark in remaining public sector prisons and competing non-core services, so he decided not to take the competition into the next stage.

In respect of HMP Wolds, the benefits of the competition did not represent best value to the public when compared to the option of clustering the Wolds with the nearby prison Everthorpe. He therefore decided not to progress with the competition for this prison.