Health Education: Sex

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that schools provide young people with clear information regarding consent and domestic violence during the course of sex and relationships education. [127420]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 8 November 2012]: Sexual consent is an important issue and the Department is committed to making the cross-government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) Action Plan as powerful and effective as possible.

We encourage all schools to address the topic of sexual consent in personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education. When teaching sex education and related issues, schools must have regard to the Secretary of State's Guidance on Sex and Relationship Education.

The document makes clear that schools should ensure young people develop positive values and a moral framework that will guide their decisions, judgments and behaviour. Specifically, all young people should understand how the law applies to sexual relationships.

Home Education

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on home-schooling. [127527]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 8 November 2012]: The Department for Education respects the right of parents to educate their children at home. The current arrangements strike the right balance between the responsibilities of the parent and the state. We have no plans to change that position, however, the Education Select Committee is inquiring into support for home education and we will consider the Committee's report in due course.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the benefits of home-schooling for children. [127528]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 8 November 2012]: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has made no assessment of the benefits of home education. Parents are responsible for ensuring their child receives an education that is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have.

Languages: GCSE

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps he is taking to encourage the study of Spanish at GCSE; [128327]

(2) how many students studied Spanish at GCSE in 2011-12. [128328]

Elizabeth Truss: We are encouraging the study of modern foreign languages, including Spanish, in a number of ways. We have made a modern or ancient language part of the English Baccalaureate. We also believe that an early start to language learning will benefit pupils' education in secondary school and have proposed that a foreign language be statutory at Key Stage 2 from 2014 as part of the new national curriculum. DFE-commissioned research published in 2009 showed that 25% of primary schools were teaching Spanish and the language continues to be very popular at this level.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 367W

While the Department cannot provide figures on those studying GCSE Spanish, the Statistical First Release “GCSE and Equivalent Results (Provisional) and National Curriculum Teacher Assessments at Key Stage 3 in England, 2011/12” provides information on the number of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 attempting GCSEs in a range of subjects. This publication is available from the Department's website here:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/recentreleases/a00214981/gcse-national-curriculum-teacher-assessment-ks3-england

Table 7 shows that the number of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 in the 2011/12 academic year who attempted GCSE Spanish was 63,400. This includes attempts by these pupils in previous academic years.

Ministerial Policy Advisers

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, columns 203-4W, on Ministerial policy advisers, for what reasons he has increased the joint number of special advisers and policy advisers in his Department by 75 per cent since September 2012. [127026]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 6 November 2012]: It was the Secretary of State for Education's view that it was sensible to engage additional adviser support in developing and implementing the Government's reforms.

Outdoor Education

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that outstanding practice in fieldwork teaching outside the classroom is recognised and reported on in secondary school inspections. [127575]

Mr Laws: We have specified the core areas for Ofsted to focus on when inspecting and reporting on a school's performance. However, it is for Ofsted to decide on how to approach the inspection of those areas. HM Chief Inspector introduced a new inspection framework in September. Within the current framework inspectors can consider the impact of relevant areas of fieldwork when assessing the learning and progress of pupils as well as in looking at how well the curriculum meets the needs, aptitude and interest of pupils.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that continuing professional development available to experienced science and geography teachers in secondary schools includes training to support the teaching of high quality fieldwork. [127576]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government recognises the positive contribution that fieldwork can make to pupils' understanding of science and geography. However, it is for individual schools to decide to what extent they use such experiences to enhance the teaching of these subjects, and what continuing professional development resources are appropriate for their teachers.

The Department and the Wellcome Trust are jointly funding the national network of science learning centres to provide science teachers with access to high quality

19 Nov 2012 : Column 368W

professional development opportunities. These include courses on how to plan and deliver fieldwork as part of science teaching.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that all future routes for initial teacher training will deliver sufficient numbers of early-career teachers who are able to teach high quality GCSE and A level fieldwork in practical subjects such as geography and science. [127577]

Mr Laws: The Department's Initial Teacher Training strategy published in June 2011 provides for a number of different routes to teacher training designed to attract the highest quality of graduates to the profession.

In all of these routes, initial teacher training providers decide what trainees should be taught to enable them to achieve the teachers' standards, ensuring trainees know and understand the relevant settings and context applicable to the subject they wish to teach. Specifically, the standards state that trainees must demonstrate they are able to plan and teach

“out-of-class activities to consolidate and extend the knowledge and understanding pupils have acquired.”

Overseas Students: Panama

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to encourage Panamanian students to study in the UK. [128325]

Mr Willetts: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Government recognises the important contribution that international students make to the UK and we welcome all legitimate students to the UK to study at our world-class academic institutions. There is no cap on international students.

The Government promotes UK education through a range of channels, including the Education UK website, managed by British Council and in-country partners, through which Panamanian students can find out about education opportunities in the UK.

The Department will continue to work with partners representing the UK higher education sector to ensure that students looking to study in the UK are aware of the full range of opportunities available to them.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students from Panama are studying in the UK. [128326]

Mr Willetts: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

Information from the Higher Education Statistics Agency showed that there were around 50 Panama domiciled enrolments at UK Higher Education Institutions for the academic year 2010/11. Information on enrolments at UK Higher Education Institutions for the 2011/12 academic year will become available from the Higher Education Statistics Agency in January 2013.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 369W

Peniel Academy

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place in the Library a copy of each Ofsted inspection report for the former Peniel Academy school in Brentwood since 2000. [127749]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 9 November 2012]: Peniel Academy was renamed as Trinity School in 2010, and is inspected by the Independent Schools Inspectorate (ISI), rather than Ofsted. The report of the most recent ISI inspection is available to view through the following link:

http://www.isi.net/schools/7384/

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on what date his Department's review of personal, social health and education stopped receiving submissions; and when he plans to publish the results of that review. [128378]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 13 November 2012]: The public consultation phase of the internal review of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education ended in November 2011. The review will take account of the outcomes of the ongoing national curriculum review and we will publish conclusions in due course.

Press: Subscriptions

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department spent on newspapers, periodicals and trade publications in the last 12 months. [125682]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education subscribes to the full range of national newspapers, as well as a range of journals and magazines which cover education and children's issues. In 2011/12, the most recent financial year for which full figures are available, the Department spent £4,920 on newspapers, periodicals and trade publications. This figure has been consistent for the past three years.

Private Education

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 25 April 2012, Official Report, column 932W, on private education, how many local authorities (a) provide and (b) plan to provide those receiving independent education but whose education is publicly funded and are therefore eligible for support from the bursary fund, funding via the 16 to 19 bursary schemes. [123375]

Mr Laws: The 16-19 Bursary Fund provides targeted financial support for the most disadvantaged young people in further education and training. The vast majority of them are in publicly-funded schools, colleges or training providers, so the Government has decided that bursaries should only go to students attending publicly-funded education or training. Young people in independent schools cannot usually apply for financial support from the 16-19 Bursary Fund.

Some young people aged 16 to 19 are placed in independent special schools or other independent provision by their local authority. When a young person is attending

19 Nov 2012 : Column 370W

these types of establishments, and their education is being funded by the local authority, they can apply for support from the Bursary Fund.

However, data on the number of local authorities that provide, or plan to provide, financial support through the 16-19.Bursary Fund for young people receiving publicly-funded education in independent schools, are not held centrally.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the level of uptake of residential experiences by students studying geography and science in secondary schools in areas with multiple deprivation following the introduction of pupil premiums. [126900]

Mr Timpson: Information on residential experiences for school pupils studying either geography or science is not collected centrally. Schools are free to deploy their pupil premium funding as they wish, as school leaders and teachers are the professionals best placed to understand and respond to the individual educational needs of their disadvantaged pupils. This will include, in appropriate cases, supporting disadvantaged pupils' attendance on field trips and residential study opportunities.

At the same time, Ofsted have an increased focus on the performance of pupils who attract the premium, and on how it is used to remove barriers to learning for premium pupils. Since September 2012, as part of routine school inspection, Ofsted holds school leaders to account by looking at how schools have spent their pupil premium and at their rationale. Inspectors will examine what difference this is making to the learning and progress of the pupils concerned. Their judgments on schools' leadership will consider their use of both the premium and other resources to overcome barriers to achievement for their pupils.

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils have attracted payment of the pupil premium in (a) Gillingham and Rainham constituency, (b) Medway and (c) Kent in the latest period for which figures are available. [128248]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium).

In the financial year 2012-13, 3,510 pupils in Gillingham and Rainham constituency area were eligible for either the deprivation premium or service child premium, attracting £2.158 million. It is not possible to identify, at constituency level, the number of pupils eligible for the looked after child premium or the number of pupils eligible for the deprivation premium in alternative provision settings.

In the same year, 9,960 pupils in Medway local authority and 44,240 pupils in Kent local authority were eligible for either the deprivation premium, service child premium or looked after child premium, attracting £6.084 million and £27.061 million respectively.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 371W

In 2013-14, the deprivation and looked after premium is set to rise to £900 per pupil and the service premium is set to rise to £300 per pupil. We are not yet able to provide estimates of the number of eligible pupils for 2013-14. The pupil premium allocations for 2013-14 will be based on pupil numbers as recorded in the January 2013 school census which are not yet known. We intend to provide provisional allocations later in the year, based on pupil numbers from the January 2012 censuses.

Mr Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the pupil premium will have an effect on the difference in per pupil funding between Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15. [128982]

Mr Laws: The deprivation and looked after premium is set to rise to £900 per pupil in 2013-14 and the service premium is set to rise to £300 per pupil. Figures relating to the number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in 2013-14 and 2014-15 are not yet available as they will be determined by the January 2013 and January 2014 pupil count. Provisional estimates for 2013-14 will be published on the Department for Education's website when the data is available.

The pupil premium may affect the difference in per pupil funding between authorities due to different areas having varying levels of disadvantaged pupils but this is not the premium's primary aim. The pupil premium is intended to recognise that disadvantaged pupils need extra support and provide additional funding for these children to help raise their attainment.

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the pupil premium will have an effect on the difference in per pupil funding between Worcestershire and Birmingham in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15. [128985]

Mr Laws: The deprivation and looked after premium is set to rise to £900 per pupil in 2013-14 and the service premium is set to rise to £300 per pupil. Figures relating to the number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in 2013-14 and 2014-15 are not yet available as they will be determined by the January 2013 and January 2014 pupil count. Provisional estimates for 2013-14 will be published on the Department for Education’s website when the data is available.

The pupil premium may affect the difference in per pupil funding between authorities due to different areas having varying levels of disadvantaged pupils but this is not the premium’s primary aim. The pupil premium is intended to recognise that disadvantaged pupils need extra support and provide additional funding for these children to help raise their attainment.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

Mr Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the national average per pupil unit of funding for schools in England is; and what the per pupil unit of funding is for Cambridgeshire; [128980]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 372W

(2) what the national average per pupil units of funding was for (a) Cambridgeshire and (b) Bedfordshire in the latest period for which figures are available. [128981]

Mr Laws: Local authorities receive funding for pupils through the dedicated schools grant based on a guaranteed unit of funding for each pupil. In 2012-13, the national average guaranteed unit of funding for England is £5,082.54. The guaranteed units of funding for Cambridgeshire and central Bedfordshire are £4,643.51 and £4,658.10 respectively.

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the per pupil units of funding were for (a) Worcestershire, (b) Herefordshire, (c) Gloucestershire, (d) Warwickshire, (e) Staffordshire, (f) Shropshire and (g) Birmingham in the latest period for which figures are available. [128986]

Mr Laws: Local authorities receive funding for pupils through the dedicated schools grant based on a guaranteed unit of funding for each pupil. The guaranteed units of funding for each authority for 2012-13, the latest year for which figures are available, are set out in the following table.

 Local authorityGuaranteed unit of funding, 2012-13 (£)

(a)

Worcestershire

4,600.77

(b)

Herefordshire

4,723.65

(c)

Gloucestershire

4,660.95

(d)

Warwickshire

4,662.81

(e)

Staffordshire

4,653.02

(f)

Shropshire

4,611.67

(g)

Birmingham

5,688.80

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the national average per pupil unit of funding for schools in England is; and what the per pupil unit of funding for Worcestershire is (a) including and (b) excluding the pupil premium. [128987]

Mr Laws: Local authorities receive funding for pupils through the dedicated schools grant based on a guaranteed unit of funding for each pupil. In 2012-13, the national average guaranteed unit of funding is £5,082.54 and Worcestershire’s is £4,600.77. The dedicated schools grant and pupil premium are allocated on different bases. The dedicated schools grant is allocated on the basis of all pupils in a local authority, whereas the pupil premium is allocated only to the most disadvantaged pupils, looked-after children and children from armed services families. If the pupil premium allocation is added to the dedicated schools grant allocation and the total amount divided on the same basis as the dedicated schools grant, per pupil funding for Worcestershire is £4,720.29.

Schools

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department holds on the number of children who attended (a) two, (b) three, (c) four, (d) five, (e) six, (f) seven, (g) eight, (h) nine and (i) 10 (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools in the most recent year for which figures are available. [128102]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 373W

Mr Laws: The School Census collects pupil level data on a termly basis from state-funded schools in England. We expect schools to provide data on all pupils attending their school at the time of the census. The National Pupil Database (NPD) is populated with data from the School Census and other pupil level collections. To the extent that data are collected termly, it is possible to use NPD data to track pupil movement between schools. Such analysis has not been carried out to date and developing a sufficiently robust approach and quality assuring the results could be completed only at disproportionate cost.

Schools: Admissions

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and which schools are (a) known and (b) permitted to select pupils on the basis of aptitude in (i) sports, (ii) the arts, (iii) modern languages and (iv) technology under the provisions of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998. [128099]

Mr Laws: The Department collects data showing the number of pupils in schools permitted to operate some form of selective admission arrangements, whether wholly or partially selective. It is not possible to provide numbers by any of the specialisms requested. The available information, on number of pupils educated in selective schools in local authority, is published in the table 7c of the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012’. This is available on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001071/index.shtml

Schools: Disability

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will commit to consulting (a) disabled people, (b) organisations representing disabled people and (c) architects in advance of any further revision to school design specifications. [125879]

Mr Laws: The Department's current design guidance Building Bulletin 102 ‘Designing for disabled children and children with special educational needs’ is due for review. Part of the review will involve seeking advice from organisations representing disabled people and architects with experience of designing schools.

The Department has recently published baseline designs for schools based on the Department's most recent output specification, for the Priority School Building Programme. These designs are intended to meet all relevant regulations and to ensure the schools are accessible to people with limited mobility and other disabilities. Accessibility reviews were carried out to check that the designs met all requirements. We expect the baseline designs to evolve in response to feedback, and intend to add further versions.

The baseline designs for schools can be seen at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/schoolscapital/buildingsanddesign/baseline/b00213595/baseline-designs---how-the-designs-address-the-brief/key-principles

The new PFI Output Specification is now available to download on the DFES website:

19 Nov 2012 : Column 374W

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/schoolscapital/buildingsanddesign/baseline/b00213573/facilities-output-specification-for-the-priority-school-building-programme-pfi-projects

Schools: Finance

Iain Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools have received an Environment Improvement Grant of more than £50,000 in each local authority; which such schools are sponsored academies; and which organisations sponsor such academies. [128568]

Mr Laws: A total of 124 schools (65 primaries, 59 secondaries) have been allocated Environmental Improvement Grants in the current financial year (2012-13). Of these, four primary and 16 secondary schools have so far received funding greater than £50,000. Predecessor schools receiving Environmental Improvement Grants only do so in advance of them opening as sponsored academies.

The following table provides a breakdown of this information by local authority, and the list includes details of the sponsors for these academies.

It should be noted that secondary sponsored academies receive higher rates of Environmental Improvement Grant than primary sponsored academies. Primary sponsored academies will only receive more than £50,000 in cases of exceptional need.

Table 1: Environmental Improvement Grant funding over £50,000 in financial year 2012-13
Local authorityPrimarySecondary

Suffolk

2

Gloucester

1

Cheshire West and Chester

1

Darlington

1

Nottinghamshire

1

Durham

1

Wolverhampton

1

Manchester

1

Buckinghamshire

1

Walsall

1

Kent

1

Medway

1

Haringey

2

Birmingham

1

Milton Keynes

1

Merton

1

Greenwich

1

Essex

1

Sponsors of academies receiving Environmental Improvement Grant funding over £50,000 in financial year 2012-13

AET

ARK

E-ACT

Fort Pitt Academy Trust

Harris Federation

Hearts Academy Trust

Heath Park Business Enterprise College

Lang O'Rourke and Lend Lease

Longfield School

19 Nov 2012 : Column 375W

New College Durham

School Partnership Trust

University of Chester

Schools: Lancashire

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools have been put into special measures in Wyre and Preston North constituency since 2009. [127797]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, providing him with the information requested, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Michael Wilshaw, dated 7 November 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Since 2005, maintained school inspections have been carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005, and more recently the Education Act 2011. Of the 27 primary schools and six secondary schools inspected between the academic years 2009/10 and 2011/12 (up to 30 June 2012) in the Wyre and Preston North constituency, one primary school and no secondary schools, were judged inadequate for their overall effectiveness. This primary school was placed in special measures, following its section 5 inspection.

Under section 5 Ofsted inspects maintained schools (nursery, primary, secondary and special schools and pupil referral units), state-funded independent schools such as academies and certain non-maintained special schools in England. All primary and secondary schools have been included in this response. On 1 January 2012 Ofsted implemented a new school inspection framework for section 5 inspections. This reflected amendments made by the Education Act 2011 and included a sharper focus on the judgements that matter most, even more time spent in the classroom and a continued drive to raise standards, particularly in literacy.

Statistics covering the outcomes of all inspections carried out in each academic year can be found at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/advanced-resources-search/results/Maintained%20schools/2/all/any/200/any

The most recent official statistics release covering the outcomes of maintained school inspections undertaken between-1 April 2012 and 30 June 2012 was released-on 13 September and can be accessed at the same link.

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Schools: Worcestershire

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the fairness of the funding formula for schools in Worcestershire. [126002]

Mr Laws [holding answer 5 November 2012]: The Department recognises that the current funding system is unfair and out of date. It is based on a historic assessment of need which dates back to at least 2005/06. This means that as the needs of pupils have changed in areas such as Worcestershire, the levels of funding have not always reflected those changes.

In March the Secretary of State for Education, the right hon. Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), announced our intention to introduce a new national funding formula during the next spending review period.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 376W

A new national funding formula would redistribute money across local authorities to reflect the current needs of pupils.

From 2013-14, we are simplifying the way in which funding is distributed within local authorities so that there is greater transparency and consistency. This is an important first step towards a national funding formula.

To ensure that these new arrangements do not result in sharp changes to schools budgets, we have put in place a Minimum Funding Guarantee (MFG). In 2013-14 and 2014-15, the MFG will mean that, in most cases, schools will not experience a reduction to their budgets of greater than 1.5% per pupil. I cannot give an exact value beyond 2014-15, but I can assure the House that an MFG will continue. As I have discussed with the hon. Member, the Department will review the 2013-14 arrangements and consider whether changes should be made for 2014-15 to help us move towards a new national funding formula. I have made a commitment that the Department will work with Worcestershire county council in conducting this review.

Science: Education

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps his Department is taking to encourage schools to improve science teaching; and what measures are in place to assess the quality of science teaching in schools; [128177]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to promote girls studying science subjects. [128178]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 13 November 2012]: The Department is taking a number of actions to encourage schools to improve science teaching and to help to engage more girls in science education.

Improving science teaching is at the heart of the Government's key education reforms. The review of the national curriculum aims to ensure that the new primary and secondary programmes of study for science focus on the essential knowledge pupils need to be taught. Academies and free schools have more freedom to teach science in ways that best suit the needs of their pupils. The inclusion of science GCSEs in the English baccalaureate will also help improve take up and standards.

The Department has also allocated up to £135 million over the period 2011-15 to support better science teaching. This includes funding the national network of science learning centres in partnership with the Wellcome Trust to provide science teachers and technicians with access to high quality professional development opportunities. The work of the Stimulating Physics Network, delivered by the Institute of Physics, aims to support better physics teaching in schools so that more pupils, particularly girls, consider studying physics at A level. The Triple Science Support Programme continues to support greater take up of GCSE triple science through advice and support for teachers.

The Department is also taking action to recruit more specialist science teachers. This includes attracting the best graduates into science teaching through bursaries of up to £20,000. The Department has also teamed up with the Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry to offer £20,000 scholarships to the most gifted aspiring physics and chemistry teachers.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 377W

As with other areas of the curriculum, science is not explicitly covered in the current school inspection framework. However, Ofsted does carry out subject surveys. “Improving science in colleges” was published in October 2011 and “Successful Science” in January 2011. Both reports noted that good teaching and learning in science depends on how well teachers know their subject and the extent to which they can generate students’ interest and enthusiasm for science.

Inspection of initial teacher training provision includes consideration of relevant subject and curriculum knowledge and understanding.

Sixth Form Education: West Midlands

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many sixth form colleges in (a) Birmingham and (b) the West Midlands received funding for new buildings from his Department in each year since 2006; and how much his Department plans to spend in each year up to 2015. [126370]

Mr Laws: The number of sixth form colleges in (a) Birmingham and (b) the West Midlands that have received funding for new buildings from the Department for Education in each year since 2006 is as follows:

Financial yearNumber of colleges in BirminghamNumber of colleges in the West Midlands

2006-07

0

0

2007-08

0

0

2008-09

0

0

2009-10

0

0

2010-11

0

0

2011-12

1

8

2012-13

1

8

Please note that this table includes those sixth form colleges that have received capital funding for the modernisation and refurbishment of existing buildings but excludes devolved formula capital funding allocated to all sixth form colleges. The table does not list the number of sixth form colleges that have received capital funding from the Department of Business Innovation and Skills.

The amount the Department for Education plans to spend on new buildings for sixth form colleges in each year up to 2015 has not yet been determined.

Special Educational Needs

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of whether local authorities would need additional administrative support and human resources to administer the proposals contained in his draft Children and Families Bill. [127401]

Mr Timpson: The Government has published draft clauses for pre legislative scrutiny in the following areas: SEN; adoption; family justice; and Office of the Children's Commissioner. We will continue to work in preparation for introduction, and during the passage of the Bill to assess any new resource implications for local authorities, in line with the Government's New Burdens Doctrine.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 378W

Notably with regards to SEN, learning from the local pathfinder areas is helping us to understand what is needed to put the special educational needs and disability reforms into practice. The pathfinder areas have very recently been extended to continue until September 2014.

Special Guardianship Orders

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the practice of law firms advertising special guardianship orders as an alternative to surrogacy arrangements; and if he will make a statement. [126241]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 5 November 2012]: In the case of a surrogacy arrangement, parental orders can be sought to determine the legal parentage of a child born in the UK. They are governed by strict criteria. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 provides that applicants must be a husband and wife, civil partners or two persons who are living as partners in an enduring family relationship. This recognises the sensitivity and seriousness of surrogacy, an arrangement where a woman becomes pregnant with the express intention of handing the child over to someone else at birth.

Special guardianship orders may offer an alternative for single people and applicants should ensure that they are fully informed about the limitations of the order before entering into a surrogacy arrangement.

The decision to make either a special guardianship or parental order is taken by the court, which will need to be satisfied that the making of the order is in the child's best interests. The Government does not view special guardianship orders as an exact alternative to parental orders as they do not create the same legal relationship between the adult and the child. However, a special guardianship order will give the special guardian parental responsibility to the exclusion of all others, although there are some limitations.

Teachers

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many qualified teachers have stopped working as teachers in (a) England, (b) the West Midlands and (c) Birmingham since 2003. [128203]

Mr Laws: The information is not available in the format requested.

The following table provides the qualified teacher wastage figures in publicly-funded schools in England and the West Midlands region in each financial year, March 2003-04 to March 2010-11.

Full-time and part-time wastage is defined as all teachers in full-time or part-time service in English publicly-funded schools in March who were not in full-time or part-time service anywhere in English publicly-funded schools in the following March. It includes teachers who moved to other educational sectors such as independent schools and further education and those who had left teaching temporarily.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 379W

Qualified teacher wastage in publicly-funded schools(1), by type and destination(2), March 2006-07 to 2010-11, England and West Midlands(3) region
 EnglandWest Midlands

2010-11(4)

47,770

(5)

2009-10(4)

40,070

4,340

2008-09

40,460

4,400

2007-08

40,540

4,630

2006-07

42,870

4,660

2005-06

42,870

4,440

2004-05

41,880

4,320

2003-04

41,410

4,720

(1) Academies and CTCs are included in the figures from 2007-08 onwards. (2) 10% to 20% of part-time teachers may not be included in the data. (3). Full-time and part-time wastage is defined as all teachers in full-time or part-time service in English publicly-funded schools in March who were not in full-time or part-time service anywhere in the English publicly-funded schools in the following March. This does not include moves between full-time and part-time service. (4) Provisional estimates. 2010-11 figures by region are incomplete and therefore not considered reliable. (5) Not available. Note: Figures at local authority level are not available due to data quality issues. Source: Database of Teacher Records.

The source data continue to be updated until three years after the period in question and may remain incomplete after that for some local authorities. Therefore, some teachers are estimated as remaining in service, particularly in recent years, in order to obtain numbers of teachers in service that agree with other trusted sources. While this provides figures that are considered reliable nationally, there is no assurance that the same would apply for the West Midlands region for the most recent year available, or in any year for Birmingham local authority. Therefore, these have not been supplied.

Teachers: Pensions

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will consider commissioning an independent valuation of the teachers’ pension scheme; and if he will make a statement. [128365]

Mr Laws [holding answer 13 November 2012]: Actuarial scheme valuations are dependent on assumptions about the value of future pensions, the design of benefits and many other factors. Many of these assumptions are being considered as part of current work on the design of a reformed TPS.

The Public Service Pensions Bill, which is currently being debated in the House, contains provisions for each public service scheme to undertake a valuation in accordance with Treasury directions. An actuarial valuation of the teachers’ pension scheme will be completed in advance of the introduction of the reformed scheme in 2015.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 1 December 2011, Official Report, column 1093W, on teachers: pensions, when he expects the next valuation of the teachers’ pension scheme to take place. [128366]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 380W

Mr Laws [holding answer 13 November 2012]: As stated in the answer of 1 December 2011, Official Report, column 1093W, the 2008 valuation for the teachers’ pension scheme (TPS) was not completed because the Government suspended valuations of public service schemes following the interim findings of the Independent Public Sector Pensions Commission. Following the announcement of proposals to implement a reformed scheme, completion of the outstanding valuation will serve no useful purpose. A consultation is currently active which proposes to remove the provisions relating to valuation in the Teachers’ Pension Regulations 2010.

The Public Service Pensions Bill, which is currently being debated in the House, contains provisions for each public service scheme to undertake a valuation in accordance with Treasury directions. An actuarial valuation of the TPS will be completed in advance of the introduction of the reformed scheme in 2015.

Truancy

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education for how many and which (a) primary and (b) secondary schools were more than (i) 10, (ii) 20, (iii) 30 and (iv) 40 per cent of pupils classified as persistent absentees in each local authority area in the latest year for which figures are available. [128100]

Elizabeth Truss: In 2010/11, there were 677 state-funded primary schools with more than 10% of pupils classified as persistent absentees.

22 of the 677 schools had more than 20% of pupils classified as persistent absentees;

three schools had more than 30% of pupils classified as persistent absentees;

two schools had more than 40% of pupils classified as persistent absentees.

In 2010/11, there were 977 state-funded secondary schools with more than 10% of pupils classified as persistent absentees.

35 of the 977 schools had more than 20% of pupils classified as persistent absentees;

one school had more than 30% of pupils classified as persistent absentees;

No schools had more than 40% of pupils classified as persistent absentees.

Lists of these schools and their local authority area have been placed in the House Libraries.

Persistent absence is best measured on the basis of a school year. The information provided relates to school year 2010/11, the latest school year of data available.

The latest data on absence, for the school year, is published as Statistical First Release 04/2012 ‘Pupil Absence in Schools in England, Including Pupil Characteristics: 2010/11' at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001060/index.shtml

This includes school level information.

The most recent absence data, for the first two terms of 2011/12, is published as Statistical First Release 22/2012 'Pupil Absence in schools in England: Autumn Term 2011 and Spring Term 2012' at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001090/index.shtml

19 Nov 2012 : Column 381W

This includes school level information. Persistent absence figures are included in the release but these two term figures can be affected by changes in term length. For this reason, end of year data provide the best measure of persistent absence.

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and which schools had more than four per cent of half days missed due to unauthorised absence in the most recent year for which figures are available. [128108]

Elizabeth Truss: In the 2010/11 school year, there were 322 schools with more than 4% of half days missed due to unauthorised absence.

39 of the 322 schools were state-funded primary schools;

126 were state-funded secondary schools;

157 were special schools.

A list of these schools and their local authority area have been placed in the House Libraries.

The latest data on absence, for the school year, is published as Statistical First Release 04/2012 'Pupil Absence in Schools in England, Including Pupil Characteristics: 2010/11' at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001060/index.shtml

This includes school level information.

Information for the first two terms of 2011/12 is published as Statistical First Release 22/2012 'Pupil Absence in schools in England: Autumn Term 2011 and Spring Term 2012' at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001090/index.shtml

This includes school level information but does not cover special schools.

Universal Credit

Mr McCann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how the qualifying conditions for each passported benefit for which he is responsible will change under universal credit. [128330]

Mr Laws: We are working with the Department for Work and Pensions to develop new eligibility criteria following the introduction of universal credit for those passported benefits, for which the Department for Education is responsible. Our aim is to ensure that education benefits continue to be available to the families who need them most.

The development of eligibility criteria for passported education benefits in Scotland, including free school meals, is the responsibility of the Scottish Government.

Health

Accident and Emergency Departments

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of NHS patients spent fewer than four hours waiting in accident and emergency departments in English hospitals in the latest period for which figures are available. [128078]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 382W

Dr Poulter: Statistics on accident and emergency (A&E) departments are published weekly, and can be found on the Department's website:

http://transparency.dh.gov.uk/2012/06/14/weekly-ae-sitreps-2012-13/

The weekly A&E collection collects the total number of attendances in the week for all A&E types, including minor injury units, urgent care centres and walk-in centres, and of these, the number discharged, admitted or transferred within four hours of arrival.

Information about the number of patients who spent fewer than four hours in all types of A&E departments in England in the last quarter for which data is available (Q2 2012-13) is shown in the following table:

2012Percentage of patients spending four hours or less in all types of A&E department.

30 September

96.10

23 September

96.90

16 September

96.60

9 September

96.90

2 September

97.50

26 August

97.00

19 August

96.40

12 August

97.20

5 August

97.20

29 July

97.10

22 July

97.20

15 July

97.10

8 July

96.70

Alcoholic Drinks: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 7 November 2012, Official Report, columns 640-2W, on alcoholic drinks: children, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the reduction in the proportion of 11 to 15-year-olds who reported ever having had a drink from 65 per cent in 1990 to 46 per cent in 2011. [128171]

Anna Soubry: There has been a long-term trend of fewer 11 to 15-year-old pupils ever having drunk alcohol. We are not aware of published studies that examine this trend.

The decline in pupils who have ever drunk alcohol reflects declines in those talking illegal drugs and in those smoking.

Mean consumption by those pupils who do drink alcohol, shown in ‘Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England in 2011’, has not declined to the same extent. Despite a fall from 2010 to 2011, mean consumption of alcohol was still higher in 2011 than in 1990.

Research suggests that the influences on young people's decisions to drink alcohol and how much they might drink are complex and include parental supervision and drinking behaviour, the influence of friends, ease of access to alcohol, the availability of alternative social and other activities, and marketing.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 383W

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the rate of alcoholism was for (a) 11 to 18 and (b) 18 to 25-year-olds in each year from 1988 to 2011. [128173]

Anna Soubry: Figures on alcohol dependence are available from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, which was run in 2000 and 2007. This survey covered those aged 16 and over, so estimates for 11 to 15-year-olds are unavailable. Estimates are presented for 16 to 17-year-olds and 18 to 25-year-olds.

The following tables estimates the prevalence (percentage) of alcohol dependence by age group and severity for adults living in private households in England, based on the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ).

2000
Percentage
 16 to 17-year-olds18 to 25-year-olds

No dependence (0-3)

93.0

84.8

Mild dependence (4-19)

6.3

14.9

Moderate dependence (20-34)

0.7

0.4

Severe dependence (35-60)

0.0

0.0

Source: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2000.
2007
Percentage
 16 to 17-year-olds18 to 25-year-olds

No dependence (0-3)

91.9

87.4

Mild dependence (4-19)

8.1

11.6

Moderate dependence (20-34)

0.0

1.0

Severe dependence (35-60)

0.0

0.0

Source: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2007.

Survey results above were weighted to ensure they are representative of the population.

The SADQ-C, asked of all respondents with an audit score of 10 or more, consists of 20 items, covering a range of dependence symptoms, with the six months before the interview as the reference period. Answers to all questions are scored from zero to three, and summed to give a total score ranging from zero to 60. Established thresholds indicate different levels of alcohol dependence:

No dependence (scores of three or less);

Mild dependence (scores ranging from four to 19);

Moderate dependence (scores ranging from 20 to 34); and

Severe dependence (scores ranging from 35 to 60).

Arthritis

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of data collection for people with arthritis attending rheumatology department out-patient services. [127098]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 384W

Norman Lamb: The NHS Information Centre collects information on out-patient attendances through its Hospital Episode Statistics collection, available online at:

www.hesonline.nhs.uk/Ease/servlet/ContentServer?siteID=1937&categoryID=890

Information is available on the main specialty of the out-patient clinic attended. Information on the primary diagnosis is not mandatory, but is available in a sufficiently large proportion of cases to make it possible to estimate the number of people with arthritis attending rheumatology out-patient services.

Autism: Prisoners

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prisoners have been diagnosed with autism in the UK prison system. [128609]

Norman Lamb: This information is not collected centrally. The national health service information centre collects data on the number of individuals with autism on a regular basis but this does not identify whether an individual is within the criminal justice system.

Behaviour Disorders: Children

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to improve the awareness of (a) the public, (b) those who work in education and (c) GPs of the significance of childhood conduct problems. [128463]

Norman Lamb: The Government's mental health strategy “No Health Without Mental Health: a cross-Government mental health outcomes strategy” for people of all ages takes a life course approach and emphasises the importance of providing early intervention at any age. The implementation framework for the Mental Health Strategy has been produced by five national mental health organisations in partnership with Government. It is for everyone with a role in improving mental health, not just health and care services. For children and young people, it suggests actions that schools and colleges can take, including: understanding the link between emotional wellbeing and good educational and wider outcomes; and ensuring staff know how mental health relates to their work and when to intervene early to tackle mental health problems. Half of those with a lifelong mental health problem first experience symptoms by age 14 and three quarters before their mid twenties.

The Department is funding a consortium hosted by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and including the Royal College of General Practitioners, to develop an interactive e-portal for children and young people's mental health. This will extend the skills and knowledge of all staff working with children: NHS clinicians, including general practitioners, and also non-health professionals such as teaching staff, social workers, police and probation staff on how best to identify and help children and young people when they are experiencing mental health issues including conduct disorders. The e-portal will be ready for use from 2014.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 385W

Bereavement Counselling

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what grief counselling services the NHS provides to family and friends of deceased persons. [128219]

Norman Lamb: The Department does not hold information centrally on the current provision of grief counselling services by the national health service.

In 2005, the Department published ‘When a Patient Dies: Advice on Developing Bereavement Services in the NHS’, which set out the principal elements required to provide an appropriate bereavement service.

This guidance was updated in 2011 by the Bereavement Services Association in collaboration with the National End of Life Care Programme, and with support from the Department. ‘When a Person Dies’ is available at:

www.endoflifecareforadults.nhs.uk/publications/when-a-person-dies

The Quality Standard for end of life care for adults, published by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in 2011, contains 16 statements which set out the markers, of high quality care for people at the end of life and their families and carers. Statement 14 highlights the importance of communicating sensitively with those closely affected by a death, and offering immediate and ongoing bereavement support. The Quality Standard is available at:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/QS13

Calcium

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he has taken to address the low level of calcium intake; and what estimate he has made of the number of people who suffer from low calcium in England and Wales. [128503]

Anna Soubry: Most people should be able to get all the calcium they need by eating a healthy balanced diet, which is promoted through the Change4Life campaign, the Healthy Start Scheme and the NHS Choices (England) and the Welsh Government (Wales).websites.

The Department has assessed the calcium intake of the United Kingdom population using data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). 6% of adults aged 19 to 64 years have intakes below the Lower Reference Nutrient Intake (LRNI; the intake that is sufficient only for those individuals with a low requirement for calcium)—no change since 2000-01. 13% of 11 to 18-year-olds have intakes below the LRNI compared to 18% in 1997. 1% of younger children (aged one and a half to 10 years) and 3% of older adults have intakes below the LRNI.

A low intake of calcium, by an individual during a dietary survey like the NDNS does not necessarily mean that person has a calcium deficiency, but habitual intakes below the LRNI put individuals at greater risk of becoming calcium deficient.

Cancer

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the budget of the National Commissioning Board for commissioning radiotherapy services will be for 2013-14; [127986]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 386W

(2) what the budget of the National Commissioning Board for commissioning chemotherapy services will be for 2013-14. [127987]

Anna Soubry: The NHS Commissioning Board’s overall budget—its revenue and capital resource limits—for 2013-14 is set out in the mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board, alongside the objectives for the board. The mandate was published on 13 November 2012.

The NHS Commissioning Board determines budgets for the services it will directly commission, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Budgets for these services for 2013-14 have not yet been set.

Cancer: Drugs

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of how many additional people received treatment as a consequence of the introduction of the Cancer Drugs Fund. [128077]

Norman Lamb: The Cancer Drugs Fund was launched on 1 April 2011 to help national health service patients access the cancer drugs their clinicians believe will help them. We also made an additional £50 million available to strategic health authorities (SHAs) in 2010-11 to support improved access to cancer drugs.

SHAs have reported that between October 2010 and the end of September 2012, this funding has helped over 23,000 cancer patients in England to access the cancer drugs their clinicians recommended.

Care Homes: Fees and Charges

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the proposals of the final report of the Commission on Funding Care and Support, if he will place in the Library case studies showing the effect on an individual's assets in terms of depletion if they incurred care costs under a (a) £50,000 cap on care costs with an extended upper capital limit of £100,000 and (b) £60,000 cap on care costs with an extended upper capital limit of £100,000; how the depletion of assets would vary according to (i) low income and low asset individuals, (ii) low income and modest asset individuals and (iii) mid income and substantial asset individuals. [128665]

Norman Lamb: The Progress Report on funding reform sets out how people's expenditure would vary according to their wealth and the level of the cap. It also set out an individual's responsibility for care costs. Particular figures of interest are figures four, five and fourteen.

Figure four in the progress report highlights how much people spend on care with different levels of wealth and different cap levels. Figure five sets out what the cap would, and would not cover, and so what people are liable to purchase. Figure fourteen sets out the indicative proportion of assets that people spend under the current system and different levels of the cap, for people with different levels of starting wealth.

The Department does not hold the additional information requested.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 387W

Chronic Illnesses

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to enable people with long-term medical conditions to access specialist rehabilitation. [128163]

Anna Soubry: From April 2013 the NHS Commissioning Board will directly commission specialist rehabilitation services for patients with highly complex needs that are beyond the scope of their local rehabilitation services. The board will decide the best way to commission these services to meet patients' needs.

Death Certificates

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to promote the Chief Medical Officer's guidance issued in 2007 that entries in death certificates should reflect doctors' best assessment of the causes of death and other contributory factors, including healthcare associated infections. [128554]

Anna Soubry: Doctors are required under the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953 to complete the medical certificate of cause of death (MCCD) ‘to the best of their knowledge and belief’. Internationally accepted guidance from the World Health Organisation requires only those conditions that contributed directly to the death to be recorded on the death certificate, and whether a condition contributed is a matter for their clinical judgment.

Books of MCCDs have short notes at the front on how to complete the MCCD and when to refer deaths to the coroner. Additional guidance for doctors has been produced and it is available to download from the General Register Office website at:

www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/medcert/index.asp

In terms of health care associated infections, the November edition of the Medical Director's Bulletin to clinicians will contain a reminder regarding the chief medical officer's letter of October 2007.

Dementia

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to ensure that any forthcoming proposals in respect of free end of life care are developed with consideration of people with dementia, and do not increase the costs of care borne by people with dementia. [128514]

Norman Lamb: End of life health care is provided free at the point of delivery, irrespective of the patient's diagnosis.

In the “Caring for our future” White Paper we stated that

“we think there is much merit in providing free health and social care in a fully integrated service at the end of life”.

The White Paper went on to say:

“We will use the eight palliative care funding pilot sites to collect the vital data and information we need to assess this proposal, and its costs, along with the Palliative Care Funding Review's other recommendations. A decision on including free social care at the end of life in the new funding system will be informed by the evaluation of the pilots, and an assessment of resource implications and overall affordability”.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 388W

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will publish an estimate of the number of lives saved as a result of the 52 per cent reduction in the prescribing of antipsychotics reported in his Department's audit of antipsychotic prescribing in dementia; if he will estimate the number of further lives saved by reducing prescribing by two-thirds; and if he will make a statement. [128664]

Norman Lamb: The National Dementia and Antipsychotic Prescribing Audit, published in July 2012, does not contain an estimate of the number of lives saved and it is not possible to provide an estimate from the data collected. The purpose of the audit was to measure the reduction in antipsychotic prescribing and this showed a 52% reduction in prescribing between 2008 and 2011.

Depressive Illnesses: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions were issued for the treatment of depression in children in each of the last 10 years. [128724]

Norman Lamb: This information is not collected centrally.

Diabetes

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to introduce for GPs diabetes testing targets for those patients who do not have the condition. [127974]

Anna Soubry: The National Health Service Health Check programme is aimed at everyone eligible in England between the ages of 40 and 74. It is a risk assessment and risk management programme, which assesses people's risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and diabetes and supports people to reduce or manage that risk through individually tailored support, and advice. In rolling out this programme, some primary care trusts targeted high-risk groups first, such as South Asian populations who are at particularly high risk of diabetes.

The UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) advises Ministers and the NHS in all four countries about all aspects of screening policy. The UK NSC has just commenced a review of screening for type 2 diabetes against its criteria and stakeholders will be given the opportunity to input into the review process once the completed review is posted on the UK NSC website for consultation.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's public health guidance “Preventing type 2 diabetes: population and community-level interventions in high-risk groups and the general population”, published in May 2011, makes recommendations for the provision of culturally appropriate messages about preventing type 2 diabetes. The guidance underlines the action that we are already taking to improve public health and reduce the risk of people developing type 2 diabetes.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he has any plans to increase the use of insulin pumps by type one diabetics to manage their condition; [128238]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 389W

(2) what guidelines have been issued to clinical commissioning groups on the provision of insulin pumps for type one diabetic patients. [128239]

Anna Soubry: There is no mention of insulin pumps explicitly in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) quality standard for diabetes, but there is clear NICE guidance available outlining the circumstances in which an individual with type 1 diabetes is eligible for an insulin pump. It should be noted that insulin pump therapy is not suited for everyone who is eligible, as it requires self-management and regular close monitoring. People who commence insulin pumps need to have a detailed structured education programme and good clinical support to maintain and support them on this therapy.

NHS Diabetes has produced commissioning guidance for clinical commissioning groups regarding insulin pumps, to encourage the provision of insulin pumps to eligible patients.

NHS Diabetes has also launched a Insulin Pump Network, which is aimed at reducing variation and improving access to insulin pumps. The network is not only aiming to increase uptake but aims to improve education and support for those on an insulin pump already.

The NHS Technology Adoption Centre published a ‘How to Why to Guide’ in February 2011.

The first ever United Kingdom wide audit of insulin pump use was recently sponsored by the Association of British Clinical Diabetologists, Diabetes UK and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation with support from NICE. This showed that there are at least 11,985 people over the age of 18-years-old and at least 4,447 people 17-years-old or younger using an insulin pump in England.

Subsequent audits will allow the Department to monitor trends in insulin pump usage and to identify unwarranted variation in access to insulin pumps.

The NHS Technology Centre and the NHS Information Centre are working together to ensure that in the future information collections that capture data related to insulin pumps will be improved. This will include the introduction of new codes in OPCS (operating procedure code supplement), improved diabetes datasets information and the possible introduction of HRG (healthcare resource groups) tariffs.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidelines are currently in place for GPs on the provision of testing strips for type one diabetics. [128240]

Anna Soubry: Blood glucose testing strips are one means of helping diabetics manage their condition day to day. There are currently no specific guidelines in place for general practitioners on the provision of testing strips for type 1 diabetics, although National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has issued guidelines on the use of strips by patients with type 2 diabetes. Any decisions about changing testing regimens for people with type 1 diabetes should be taken after discussion between the patient and their health care professional.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 390W

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the benefits of artificial pancreases in the treatment of diabetes. [128501]

Anna Soubry: The artificial pancreas is based on two existing and already licensed technologies. An insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor. Research has shown that the artificial pancreas can reduce the night-time risk of hypoglycaemia in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and a prototype system for home use is being developed and trialled currently.

General Medical Council

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the effect on Fitness to Practice decisions of the Cohen decision and the General Medical Council's lack of a right of appeal. [129016]

Norman Lamb: The Department is aware of the Cohen decision, where the decision of a fitness to practise panel was overturned on appeal by the practitioner to the High Court on the ground that it was found to have approached the test for impairment of fitness to practise incorrectly.

The Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence has a right of appeal against decisions of fitness to practise panels where it considers decisions are unduly lenient and it is desirable to do so to protect the public. Discussions are being held with the General Medical Council and the Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence about a proposal to also introduce a similar appeal right for the General Medical Council alongside that. This is within the context of wider proposals by the General Medical Council to improve and modernise their fitness to practise adjudication processes, to enhance the independence of adjudication while continuing to protect patients and the public. Any changes will be subject to full public consultation.

Genito-urinary Medicine

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the reasons are for the time taken to publish his Department's sexual health policy document; [128000]

(2) when he expects to publish his Department's new sexual health policy document. [128007]

Anna Soubry: The sexual health policy document will set out the framework for improving all aspects of sexual health in England. It will cover a number of important issues such as reducing unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, reducing sexually transmitted infections, and tackling HIV. We have invested time in developing this document, as we know the issues it will cover can have a substantial impact on peoples' lives. We plan to publish the document before the end of the year.

Health Services: Schools

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to encourage schools to participate in the (a) work of health and wellbeing boards and (b) development of joint health and wellbeing strategies. [128493]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 391W

Norman Lamb: Health and wellbeing boards will develop a comprehensive analysis of the current and future health and social care needs in each local area through joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs), and translate these into action in joint health and wellbeing strategies (JHWSs). Throughout the process, health and wellbeing boards will be under a statutory duty to involve local people, including children and young people—taking account of their views in JSNAs and JHWSs to ensure that local services are shaped and influenced by the people that use them. It will be for each health and wellbeing board to decide how best to engage local schools and other education institutions in their work, in particular in the development of both JSNAs and JHWSs.

The statutory membership of the director of children's services and that of local Healthwatch on health and wellbeing boards will also ensure the voice of the whole community including individuals sharing characteristics that are protected by the Equality Act 2010, which includes children and young people, are fed into the work of health and wellbeing boards.

The Department is currently developing statutory guidance to support health and wellbeing boards in undertaking JSNAs and developing JHWSs. The guidance will emphasise the importance of understanding and addressing the needs of children and young people as part of the. local population.

Hotels

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will list the discounts on hotel charges for officials on Government business which his Department has negotiated. [128186]

Anna Soubry: The Department does not negotiate discounts with hotels for use by officials on Government business but uses the mandated central contract awarded by Government Procurement Services that contains rates available across wider Government.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and Human Tissue Authority

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when he expects to publish a response to his consultation on proposals to transfer functions from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Tissue Authority; and if he will place all replies to the consultation in the Library; [129004]

(2) what proportion of respondents to his recent consultation on proposals to transfer functions from

19 Nov 2012 : Column 392W

the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Tissue Authority supported the abolition of the Human Tissue Authority; [129005]

(3) what proportion of respondents to his recent consultation on proposals to transfer functions from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Tissue Authority supported the continuation of the Human Tissue Authority; [129006]

(4) what discussions he has had with the (a) Human Tissue Authority, (b) Care Quality Commission and (c) Health Research Authority on his recent consultation on proposals to transfer functions from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Tissue Authority. [129007]

Anna Soubry: The consultation on proposals to transfer the functions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and Human Tissue Authority closed on 28 September 2012. The Department is now considering and analysing the responses, which will inform the way forward and the Government's response. We would expect to publish the response once cross-Government consideration is completed.

We would expect to handle the consultation responses in line with Government best practice at the point of the consultation launch, which would be, as a minimum, to publish a summary of stakeholder views alongside the formal Government response.

The Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt) has not held discussions with the Human Tissue Authority, Care Quality Commission or Health Research Authority about this consultation.

Kidneys: Diseases

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of (a) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and (b) autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease have been diagnosed in East Lancashire in each of the last five years. [127891]

Anna Soubry: Information on the numbers of people with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is not collected centrally. However, we do collect the number of finished admission episodes (FAEs) with a primary diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease or polycystic kidney disease, unspecified, for East Lancashire Teaching primary care trust (PCT) of residence for the years 2007-08 to 2011-12.

PCT of residencePCT codePrimary diagnosis2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

East Lancashire Teaching PCT

5NH

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

*

*

*

0

0

  

Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

*

*

*

*

*

19 Nov 2012 : Column 393W

19 Nov 2012 : Column 394W

  

Polycystic kidney disease, unspecified

*

*

*

7

*

Notes: 1. Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Primary Diagnosis The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. ICD-10 Codes used: Q61.1 Polycystic kidney, autosomal recessive Q61.2 Polycystic kidney, autosomal dominant Q61.3 Polycystic kidney, unspecified 3. SHA/PCT of residence The strategic health authority (SHA) or primary care trust (PCT) containing the patient's normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another SHA/PCT for treatment. 4. Assessing growth through time HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, changes in activity may be due to changes in the provision of care. 5. Small numbers To protect patient confidentiality, figures between 1 and 5 have been replaced with "*" (an asterisk).

To protect patient confidentiality, figures between 1 and 5 have been replaced with "*" (an asterisk). The vast majority of counts presented in this table fall in this range and are therefore denoted as "*".

These are figures for admissions to hospital for treatment of polycystic kidney disease and are not a count of people who have the disease but did not require admission to hospital. It should be noted that these are not a count of people as the same person may have been admitted more than once in a year.

Reference should be made to the footnotes when interpreting this data.

Learning Disability: Social Services

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will include a full assessment of the adequacy of any funding levels in the final report of the Winterborne View review or any accompanying agreement; if he will make it his policy to ensure that (a) funding arrangements do not work against incentives to get people out of assessment and treatment units, (b) economies of scale do not incentivise the continued development of larger units and (c) adequate local services, including community-based intensive support services, are developed as near as possible to the families of children and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges; and if he will make a statement. [127549]

Norman Lamb: The interim report on Winterbourne View hospital published in June 2012 set out the model of care we expect for people with learning disabilities or autism who have mental health conditions or behaviour which challenges. The focus must be on developing the range of responsive local services which can prevent admissions to in-patient units or other large institutional settings.

The Department will support commissioners of health and social care services in developing shared accountability, pooled budgets and joint commissioning in order to deliver the integrated services needed in local communities.

Decisions about social care spending are made locally but local commissioners should ensure that they commission for good quality person-centred community-based care. Appropriate care may cost less than the sort of care provided by Winterbourne View with the average cost of £3,500 per person per week. Good commissioning can offer better care for less money. Local services should not be run from Whitehall, and councils were clear in discussions at the spending review that the freedom to prioritise locally would allow them to deliver better services. Local authorities received a challenging settlement in the 2010 spending review, and the Government took action to protect social care by allocating an extra £7.2 billion over four years. Along with a continued focus on efficiency, this is sufficient to allow councils to maintain access to services—a view supported by analysis from the King's Fund.

Some councils have chosen to reduce their expenditure on social care, despite the extra funding we provided. In some cases this is because of greater efficiency, but where this has led to a reduction in services the council will have to justify this decision to their electorate.

The final report from the Department's review will be published shortly.

Lung Cancer

Mr Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of selenium supplementation on the incidence of lung cancer in women. [128085]

Anna Soubry: The Department has not made an assessment of the potential effect of selenium supplementation on the incidence of lung cancer in women. The Department advises that you should be able to get all the nutrients you need by eating a varied and balanced diet.

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) is currently undertaking a review of the evidence on selenium and health, including lung cancer. SACN is due to publish its findings in a position statement in mid 2013.

Lung Diseases

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health by what mechanism Ministers in his Department will hold the NHS Commissioning Board to account for making progress on the Outcomes Strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. [128110]

19 Nov 2012 : Column 395W

Anna Soubry: The Government's Mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board asks the NHS Commissioning Board to make progress against all the outcomes in the NHS Outcomes Framework, which includes an indicator on reducing mortality from respiratory disease in under 75s. This will be a key marker of progress in improving respiratory outcomes.

It is for the NHS Commissioning Board and local commissioners to determine how best they can improve outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma for their local populations. The Outcomes Strategy and associated tools and resources, including the NHS Companion Document, have been published to support local areas in making those decisions.

Meningitis

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what support his Department provides for research to develop a vaccine for group B meningococcal meningitis. [128462]

Anna Soubry: The National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network is currently hosting a study to test a new vaccine against meningococcus group B on healthy volunteers. The name of the vaccine is MenPF-1 and it uses two bacterial proteins called PorA and FetA that are known to stimulate the immune system.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the average lifetime cost to the taxpayer of residual physical and cognitive issues caused by group B meningococcal meningitis. [128464]

Anna Soubry: The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is undertaking an assessment of the impact and cost effectiveness of potential meningococcal B vaccination strategies. As part of this assessment, JCVI is considering evidence on the epidemiology and carriage of different meningococcal serogroup B strains, the costs of treating meningococcal serogroup B disease and the costs of treating the long-term conditions that result from this disease, the quality of life of affected individuals as well as the potential clinical effectiveness of vaccination.

This assessment (expected to be completed in 2013) of the economic impact of a possible immunisation programme is following the criteria and methodology of National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence for the assessment of cost effectiveness. It therefore, will include assessment of public expenditure on health and social care associated with meningococcal disease.

Mental Health Services

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the Centre for Mental Health report entitled A Chance to Change, published in October 2012; and what assessment he has made of its recommendation on improving the availability of evidence-based parenting interventions. [128526]

Norman Lamb: A good start in life and positive parenting are fundamental to good mental health and well-being, and to lifelong resilience to adversity. Half of those with lifelong mental illness first experience

19 Nov 2012 : Column 396W

symptoms by the age of 14. For this reason we have invested around £54 million over the four years from 2011-12 until 2014-15 in the Children and Young People's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies project, which aims to embed National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence approved best evidence-based therapies across child and adolescent mental health services. These include evidence-based parenting programmes for three to 10-year-olds with conduct disorders.

The Government is also committed to increasing the number of families who can benefit from Family Nurse Partnerships (FNP) (a targeted, evidence-based intensive home visiting programme that supports first time young mothers from early pregnancy until their child is two years old) at any one time to 13,000 by 2015. Good progress towards this is being made with 10,000 places in 86 different local authority areas at October 2012. FNP is based on a robust body of evidence from the United States that shows that FNP improves a wide range of outcomes for vulnerable young mothers and their children including reduced behavioural and emotional problems.

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has to ensure that musculoskeletal health is included in the responsibilities of Public Health England and the public health observatories. [127096]

Anna Soubry: Public Health England will advise on evidence-based public health interventions to promote the public's health, including, where appropriate, the prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. It will also publish data on indicators in the Public Health Outcomes Framework (i.e. ‘Improving outcomes and supporting transparency. Part 1: A public health outcomes framework for England, 2013-2016’). The framework has two indicators, on excess weight in adults and the proportion of physically active and inactive adults, which are particularly relevant to musculoskeletal health. A copy of the Outcomes Framework has already been placed in the Library.

NHS

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when the NHS Commissioning Board plans to announce its list of national clinical leads. [127896]

Anna Soubry: This is a matter for the NHS Commissioning Board. We understand its plans relating to national clinical leadership will be announced shortly.

NHS Commissioning Board

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health who will sit on the National Commissioning Board's 27 local area teams; and what skills relating to health members of those teams will be required to have. [128335]

Anna Soubry: These will be matters for the NHS Commissioning Board to determine. We understand that working as part of a single organisation, each local area team will have a director supported by qualified, appropriately skilled medical, nursing, finance, operations and delivery, and commissioning directors.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 397W

NHS: Disclosure of Information

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the number of instances in which confidentiality clauses have been included in NHS staff severance agreements. [128636]

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not held centrally by the Department, but would be held locally by individual organisations.

The Department approves business cases for extra contractual payments proposed under a compromise agreement but does not usually have sight of the agreements and therefore does not routinely monitor the use of confidentiality clauses.

NHS: Drugs

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with hospital trusts and health organisations on the use of junior drugs. [128511]

Dr Poulter: In 2007 a new European regulation was introduced concerning the development of medicines for children. All new medicinal products and some existing drugs being explored for additional uses are now investigated in paediatric patients unless there is a clear reason not to do so, such as the disease not occurring in children or where there are safety concerns.

The issue of the safety of medicines for children was raised in the Children and Young People's Health Outcomes Forum report published in July. The forum made a number of recommendations on this issue and discussions have been taking place between departmental officials and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society on how these can be taken forward. The Children and Young People's Health Outcomes Strategy is to be published by Christmas.

Organs: Donors

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he has had with the Welsh Government on the effect that the introduction of presumed consent into the organ donation system in Wales will have on the organ transplantation system in England. [128410]

Anna Soubry: We continue to work closely with the Welsh Government on the potential policy, financial, operational and legal implications of their proposed introduction of an opt-out system of consent for organ donation in Wales. Across the United Kingdom we have made considerable progress over the last four years with a welcome significant improvement in organ donor rates. We wish to be certain that the introduction of opt-out legislation in Wales will not have an adverse impact on this progress overall.

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of the effect on the number of human organs likely to become available for

19 Nov 2012 : Column 398W

transplant in England if presumed consent were to be introduced in England; [128625]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effect on the number of human organs likely to become available for transplant in England if presumed consent were to be introduced in Wales; [128626]

(3) what discussions he has had with (a) black and minority ethnic, (b) Muslim and (c) Jewish communities in England on the introduction of presumed consent into the organ donation system. [128627]

Anna Soubry: In 2008, the Organ Donation Taskforce considered the issue of presumed consent in considerable detail looking at the clinical, communication, cultural, ethical legal and practical aspects of opt-out legislation. Their second report, “The potential impact of an opt-out system for organ donation” published in November 2008, did not recommend introducing an opt-out system at that time finding that while such a system would have the potential to deliver benefits, they were not confident its introduction would increase organ donor numbers, and felt there was some evidence that donor numbers may go down. For example the majority of faith and belief groups interviewed were positive about donation but most were opposed to the introduction of opt-out legislation.

Instead, the Taskforce believed that a significant increase in donor rates could be achieved by acting on the recommendations in their first report, “Organs for Transplants”, published in January 2008, without the need for legislation, and the costs and risks associated with introducing a new consent system. Implementation of the Taskforce recommendations has seen United Kingdom donor numbers rise by 40% over the baseline year of 2007-08.

The Explanatory Memorandum accompanying the recent draft Welsh Government Human Transplantation (Wales) Bill is not definite about the level of increase that is likely to occur with the introduction opt-out legislation in Wales but every additional donor could donate on average three organs to the UK pool for transplantation.

Palliative Care

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many formal complaints have been made to his Department claiming that patients were placed on the Liverpool Care Pathway without discussion with the next of kin beforehand. [128148]

Norman Lamb: We have received no formal complaints about the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). However, we have received a number of letters from Members of this House and members of the public raising concerns about aspects of the LCP and about reports in the media.

In response to the recent media speculation about the LCP, a number of organisations, led by the National End of Life Care Programme, Dying Matters and the Association for Palliative Medicine, are working with patients, carers and health professionals to look for evidence to support or refute the accusations made in the press. If this work suggests any cause for concern we will respond on the basis of that evidence.

19 Nov 2012 : Column 399W

I will be meeting these organisations as well as other organisations representing professionals and patient groups, as well as some patient representatives, for a roundtable discussion to hear a range of views on the issues to be addressed. We are taking a close interest in this work and the outcomes of the projects under way.

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what proportion of hospital deaths in (a) England and (b) Wales were on the Liverpool Care Pathway; [128149]

(2) how many patients in (a) England and (b) Wales have been taken off the Liverpool Care Pathway after reassessment by clinicians in each of the last 10 years; [128150]

(3) how many patients in (a) England and (b) Wales have been placed on the Liverpool Care Pathway in each of the last 10 years. [128151]

Norman Lamb: The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) was developed by the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute in Liverpool as an approach to support the delivery of good care in the last hours or days of life.

The Department does not collect information centrally on the number of hospitals, or the number of wards in those hospitals, hospices or care homes which use the LCP, or the number of patients whose care is guided by the LCP.

The LCP is subject to regular audit. The results of the third audit, undertaken by the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute with the Royal College of Physicians, was published in November 2011.

Information on the LCP, including the third audit and how the pathway should be used, is available from the LCP website:

www.mcpcil.org.uk/mcpcil/liverpool-care-pathway/index.htm

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training (a) nurses and (b) doctors receive in palliative care. [128210]

Norman Lamb: The General Medical Council (GMC) set out its recommendations on undergraduate medical education in ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’ (2009). This provides the framework that medical schools use to design detailed curricula and schemes of assessment, and sets out the standards that the GMC use to judge the quality of undergraduate teaching and assessments at individual medical schools. Describing the doctor as a practitioner, ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’ states that in diagnosing and managing clinical presentations, the doctor will need to contribute to the care of patients and their families at the end of life, including management of symptoms and effective communication and team working. ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’ is available at:

www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/tomorrows_ doctors.asp

Following qualification, doctors can choose to undertake specialist postgraduate training in palliative medicine.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council is liable for quality assuring the provision of nurse education and ensuring that education providers produce educational programmes that meet the minimum standards set. These standards are included in ‘Standards for pre-registration nursing education’ (2010). They set out

19 Nov 2012 : Column 400W

broad standards of proficiency, which enable local and national needs to be reflected in local curricula, and include specific reference to supporting and addressing the needs of people approaching the end of life.

The standards are available at:

http://standards.nmc-uk.org/Pages/Welcome.aspx

Nurses are also able to choose to undertake specialist postgraduate training in palliative care, which would range from degree programmes to training provided by hospices.

As well as recognising the important role of palliative care specialists, the ‘End of Life Care Strategy’ (2008) highlighted the importance of increasing the skills of generalist doctors and nurses, and other health and social care staff, in the delivery of end of life care.

A number of initiatives have been pursued to develop this element of work force, including:

the development of core competences and principles for end of life training care;

developing an extensive e-learning package on end of life care;

free to access for health and social care staff; and

producing ‘Talking about end of life care: right conversations, right people, right time’, based on the findings of a number of communication skills projects.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on how many people have been placed on the Liverpool Care Pathway since its inception. [128212]

Norman Lamb: The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) was developed by the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute in Liverpool as an approach to support the delivery of good care in the last hours or days of life.

The Department does not collect information centrally about the LCP, including the number of patients whose care is guided by the LCP.

Information on the LCP, including the third audit and how the pathway should be used, is available from the LCP website:

www.mcpcil.org.uk/liverpool-care-pathway/index.htm

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that the relatives of a patient who is in and out of consciousness are consulted and supported to help make decisions such as whether to resuscitate. [128346]

Anna Soubry: It is for health care providers to have appropriate resuscitation policies in place which respect patients' rights, and are understood by all relevant staff, and accessible to those who need them.

The Department has commended the Joint Statement from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing, ‘Decisions relating to cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ (2007), to national health service trusts as the basis for a resuscitation policy. The Joint Statement provides guidance to assist health care staff in making decisions about resuscitation and on the involvement of the patient and their family in the decision-making process.