Free School Meals: Further Education

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will bring forward proposals to introduce free school meals for disadvantaged 16 to 18-year-olds in further education and sixth-form colleges. [119202]

Alan Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to introduce free school meals for disadvantaged 16 to 18-year-olds in further education and sixth-form colleges. [119997]

Mr Laws: [holding answers 5 and 7 September 2012]: As the hon. Member for Bognor Regis and Littlehampton (Mr Gibb) said in the recent debate on this issue on 13 June 2012, Official Report, column 94WH, we recognise this long-standing anomaly whereby disadvantaged students in school sixth forms are entitled to free school meals while those in other settings are not. The hon. Member for Bognor Regis and Littlehampton fulfilled the commitment he made during the debate to raise the issue with his ministerial colleagues, and we are now working through all the available options.

Free Schools

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what provision for physical education free schools are required to provide for pupils. [121167]

Elizabeth Truss: Like academies, free schools have to offer a broad and balanced curriculum, promoting the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils. Good schools encourage all pupils to play sport and enjoy PE because they know it is important.

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many pupil vacancies there are in free schools in (a) London and (b) England; [121697]

(2) what proportion of free schools opening in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012 has vacancies. [121716]

Elizabeth Truss: Information on pupil numbers and vacancies is collected in the School Census. The results of the spring 2013 collection, which will include up to date figures for free schools that opened in 2011 and 2012, are likely to be released in June 2013.

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many head teachers of free schools have the National Professional Qualification for Headship. [121717]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education does not collect these data.

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate his Department has made of the value for money per pupil spend in free schools in England. [121718]

Elizabeth Truss: Once open, free schools are funded on an equivalent basis to academies and maintained schools in the same local authority area. Free schools also receive funding for necessary costs associated with setting up a new school, which is at similar levels to funding which local authorities provide when establishing new maintained schools.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 191W

We expect the overall capital cost of the first 24 free schools to be between £110 million and £130 million, which compares favourably to the average capital costs of Building Schools for the Future projects.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the pupil capacity is for each open free school. [121822]

Elizabeth Truss: The capacity of each free school is published on the Department for Education's Edubase website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/edubase

The capacity of each school can change and figures are validated annually as part of the School Census.

To date, 79 free schools have opened with varying pupil capacities. The total number of pupil places for the 24 schools that opened in 2011, when they are at full capacity, is approximately 9,000. A further 55 schools opened in September 2012 and created approximately 27,000 additional places at full capacity.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the acquisition costs were for (a) land and (b) premises of each open free school; [121823]

(2) what the refurbishment and build costs were for each open free school. [121824]

Elizabeth Truss: We publish all site acquisition and refurbishment costs relating to free schools once each school has opened and its costs have been finalised. The costs that have been published can be found on the DFES website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/freeschools/b0066077/free-schools-2011

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish the number of pupils on roll for each open free school. [121826]

Elizabeth Truss: Information on pupils is collected in the termly school census. Pupil numbers are generally based on the spring term census. The results of the spring 2013 collection are likely to be released in June 2013.

Information on the number of pupils on roll for each free school open as at January 2012 was published as underlying data to the “Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012” Statistical First Release, at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001071/index.shtml

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what arrangements govern the sale of food or drink items in free schools. [121166]

Elizabeth Truss: Governing bodies decide what food and drink is available at free schools; we trust them to make the right choices for their pupils.

GCSE

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the potential effect on social mobility in (a) Bethnal Green and Bow, (b) Tower Hamlets and (c) nationally of his proposed changes to the GCSE system. [115991]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 192W

Mr Laws: Our exam reforms will lead to higher aspirations and greater achievement for all pupils, boosting social mobility. The current GCSE system is not serving pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds well. Pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) are significantly less likely at the moment to achieve good GCSEs in English or maths. Approximately half of FSM pupils fail to achieve a grade C or above in English and in maths, compared to less than 30% of non-FSM pupils. Only 35% of FSM pupils achieved five GCSEs or equivalents at A*- C including English and maths in 2011, compared to 62% of non-FSM pupils.

The reforms and improvements that we are making through improved teacher training, pupil premium support for disadvantaged pupils, greater freedoms for head teachers and the growth of academies and free schools mean that students will be operating at a higher level, no matter what their background. Even as qualifications become more rigorous, more students will be equipped to clear the higher bar. Our aim is that over time a higher proportion of children will succeed than do so now and that we will close the attainment gap that has been a long-standing feature of our education system.

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effect of his proposed reforms to GCSEs on the proportion of students studying (a) design and technology, (b) art, (c) music and (d) drama at GCSE level. [120591]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 12 September 2012]: Together with Ofqual, we have made a number of changes to strengthen GCSEs: for two year courses starting this September, external exams will be taken at the end of the course in 2014. Marks will be awarded for accurate spelling, punctuation and use of grammar in those subjects that involve extended writing—English literature, geography, history and religious studies—from January 2013. In addition to these changes we also introduced in 2010 the English Baccalaureate to ensure students have the option to study the core subjects of English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and languages.

The latest figures available from the Joint Council for Qualifications in summer 2012 has shown some decline in entries to design and technology (5.1%), art and design (2.4%), music (3.6%) and drama (6.3%). There was a substantial increase in entries to the three separate sciences—biology, chemistry and physics—all up 12.3%. In modern foreign languages there was an overall increase of 2.0%.

GCSE: English Language

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the oral answer of 3 September 2012, Official Report, columns 8-9, on GCSEs, if he will place in the Library copies of all letters, emails, text messages and details of all telephone calls and meetings between Ofqual and Ministers in his Department in 2012 relating to the grade boundaries for GCSE English language. [119943]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 7 September 2012]: All relevant documents and records of meetings between Ofqual and Ministers relating to grade boundaries for

15 Oct 2012 : Column 193W

GCSE English have been placed in the House Libraries. This is the list of documents as of 6 September 2012:

Exchange of letters between the Secretary of State (27 August 2012) and Chief Regulator (28 August 2012).

Record of phone briefings between the Chief Regulator and the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove) (23 and 31 August 2012).

Ofqual's report: GCSE English Awards 2012: A Regulatory Report (31 August 2012).

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State was also a copy recipient to the letters sent from Glenys Stacey to my hon. Friend the Member for Beverley and Holderness (Mr Stuart) and Russell Hobby (NAHT).

This list does not include administrative contact between offices over arrangements for the phone briefings and receipt of Ofqual's report. Officials are currently looking into other requests made under the Freedom of Information Act and as further material is released I would be happy to place copies in the House Libraries.

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils took (a) GCSE English or English language wholly or partly at the foundation tier and (b) GCSE English or English language entirely at the higher tier for each secondary school in (i) 2011 and (ii) 2012; and what the (A) name, (B) URN and (C) establishment number of the school was in each case. [121525]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department holds information on entries to GCSEs and the grades achieved but does not hold information on whether candidates took foundation tier papers, focusing on grades C to G, or higher tier papers, focusing on grades A* to D, to achieve those grades.

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils achieved GCSE English or English Language at each grade at each secondary school in England and Wales (1) in (a) January 2011 and (b) January 2012; and what the (i) name, (ii) URN and (iii) establishment number of the school was in each case; [121526]

(2) in (a) June 2011 and (b) June 2012; and what the (i) name, (ii) URN and (iii) establishment number was of the school in each case. [121527]

Elizabeth Truss: Provisional national level GCSE results for England in 2011/12 will be available in a Statistical First Release (SFR): “GCSE and Equivalent Results in England, 2011/12 (Provisional)” in October. School level results will be available in the 2012 Secondary School Performance Tables to be published in January 2013 following a full data checking exercise with schools. These publications will cover the achievements of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 in 2012 and will include GCSEs awarded across the whole 2011/12 academic year and any achieved in earlier years by these pupils.

Information on English and English Language GCSE examinations completed in each of the January and June 2011 examination seasons by individual grade for every school in England could be produced only at disproportionate cost.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 194W

The Department for Education is responsible for education in England and does not collect statistics on education for Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland, responsibility for which lies with each devolved administration.

Health Education: Diabetes

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what provision he has put in place in maintained schools to provide awareness of diabetes. [121447]

Mr Laws: The Department does not provide specific information to schools in relation to diabetes or any other condition that could affect pupils. In line with the increased autonomy that is afforded to schools, we fully expect them to understand and be aware of individual children's needs. Schools should work closely with parents/carers and have a clear procedure, set out in their health care plan, with which staff are both familiar and comfortable.

King's Priory Academy

Mr Alan Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place in the Library a copy of the expression of interest document made by the Woodward Trust in support of its application for academy status for the proposed Kings Priory Academy in Tynemouth. [121438]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 September 2012]: The Academy Action Plan for the Kings Priory School has been placed in the House Libraries. It has also been published on the Department's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/sponsors/b00214079/academy-expressions-of-interest---september-2010-onwards/eoik

Mobile Phones

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 3 September 2012, Official Report, column 997W, on electronic communication, whether he or his Department receive an itemised bill in respect of his departmental BlackBerry usage in each month. [121566]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 September 2012]:I can confirm that neither the Secretary of State for Education nor his Department receive an itemised bill in respect of his departmental BlackBerry usage each month.

The Department pays for collective usage on a monthly basis via a bulk payment facility.

Morecambe and Lunesdale: Funding

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding his Department has allocated to Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency since 2010. [121960]

Mr Laws: The Department does not keep details of all funding provided on a constituency basis. To provide information for a particular area would require extensive analysis which would incur disproportionate costs.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 195W

However, total identifiable expenditure by country and region can be found in the Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2011-12, pages 31 to 35, tables 6 to 8 available at the following link:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/a/9156_tso_dfe_annual_rep_2011-12.pdf

In addition, the Department provides funding to local authorities and types of funding includes:

The Pupil Premium introduced in April 2011. In financial year 2011-12, schools in the Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency attracted £1.057 million in respect of the Deprivation Premium or Service Child Premium. For financial year 2012-13, the provisional estimate for the Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency will attract £1,815 million.

Lancashire local authority received £78.9 million capital funding in financial year 2010-11, £70.5 million in 2011-12 and is forecast to receive a further £59.6 million in 2012-13. These grants are managed by the Education Funding Agency and do not include funding made direct by the Department to individual academies.

Ministerial Visits: Nottinghamshire

Mr Spencer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what ministerial visits to (a) the City of Nottingham and (b) Nottinghamshire have taken place since May 2010. [121768]

Elizabeth Truss: There have been seven ministerial visits to the City of Nottingham since May 2010. These have been listed in the following table. No ministerial visits to Nottinghamshire have taken place during this time.

MinisterPlace of visitReason for visit

Right hon. Michael Gove, MP

Nottingham Academy, Nottingham

To open Nottingham Academy

 

NCSL Learning and Conference Centre, Nottingham

Two visits to speak at NCSL Teaching Schools Induction Events

   

Nick Gibb, MP

National College for School Leadership, Nottingham

Meeting with Chief Executive, NCSL staff & Strategic Leadership . Team

 

Nottingham Academy, Nottingham

Media visit

   

Tim Loughton, MP

Several locations including Loxley House, Greenfields Childcare Centre, Strelley Cornerhouse Children's Centre and Melrose House, Nottingham

Visit to Nottingham to look at early intervention policy in action.

   

Sarah Teather, MP

National College for Leadership, Nottingham

Speech at the DCS Aspirant Residential

 

Trent College, Nottingham

Panellist on Any Questions

Olympic Games 2012

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department used the Olympic Route Network for travel for official purposes during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. [120998]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport will publish details of Government use of

15 Oct 2012 : Column 196W

tickets and hospitality in the autumn, this will include use of transport services which operated on the Olympic or Paralympic route networks.

Pay

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the highest paid position is in (a) his Department and (b) his Department's agencies. [121620]

Elizabeth Truss: The highest paid positions in the Department and its agencies are:

 Position

Department for Education

Permanent secretary

Education Funding Agency

Chief executive

National College for School Leadership

Chief executive

Standards and Testing Agency

Chief executive

Teaching Agency

Chief executive

Pre-school Education

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 4 September 2012, Official Report, column 316W, on pre-school education, what assessment he has made of the effect on schools and pupils of the decision to publish the guidance to support the new Early Years Foundation Stage Profile assessment after the school year has started; and if he will make a statement. [121508]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 September 2012]:The new Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) framework was published in March this year. It sets out the requirements that apply from this September for assessment in the early years, including the 17 early learning goals and the characteristics of learning against which children are assessed. Schools, other early years providers and local authorities therefore already have information on the content of the new and simpler assessment arrangements for five-year-olds. These new arrangements have been the subject of wide consultation and are based on recommendations made by Dame Clare Tickell's independent review of the EYFS.

Next summer, schools will be expected to complete the new, slimmed down Profile assessment for children at the end of their reception year. In order to complete these assessments, we will publish later this term detailed guidance to support the new Profile. To ensure it is as effective as possible, the guidance will be informed by trials we conducted with 19 local authorities and more than 400 schools over the summer. We will communicate widely with schools, other early years providers and local authorities to let them know when the guidance is available. We plan to further support local authorities, who must ensure accuracy and consistency of Profile assessments, through workshops early in the new year.

Pre-school Education: ICT

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what representations his Department has received on the Ofsted requirement to include an IT component in nursery education provision; and if he will make a statement. [118827]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 197W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 4 September 2012]: The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) framework published by my Department sets the standards that all early year providers must meet, covering children from birth to five. It is Ofsted's role to inspect against the EYFS requirements—not to set requirements themselves.

Early learning goals in the EYFS (which children are expected to reach by the age of five) include being able to recognise a range of technology which is used, for example, at home and in school, and to be able to use it in an appropriate way. We have received a number of representations expressing concern that over-exposure to IT could be harmful to young children. We agree that it is right for early years professionals, who are best placed to make these judgments, to consider how to encourage and develop young children towards meeting the early learning goals in a way that is suitable for them.

Primary Education: Academies

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what definition his Department uses for a failing primary school in respect of a decision to impose academy status; [121985]

(2) how many schools have become academies despite opposition from the school governors. [121916]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department works with local authorities and governing bodies to agree sponsored academy solutions to turn around underperforming schools. Schools failing to comply with a warning notice issued by the local authority, or judged by Ofsted to require special measures or significant improvement, are formally eligible for intervention under the Education and Inspections Act 2006. The Academies Act 2010 allows the Secretary of State for Education to make an Academy Order for any school that is eligible for intervention. Decisions on whether to intervene in particular schools that are eligible for intervention are made on a case by case basis. To date, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has made Academy Orders in four schools in such circumstances.

Primary Education: Peterborough

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to assist Peterborough City Council in the provision of school places in the primary sector in respect of children who have English as an additional language; and if he will make a statement. [121172]

Mr Laws [holding answer 17 September 2012]: For the first two years of the current spending review period the Department has allocated a total of £5,289,144 to Peterborough City Council to support the local authority to provide additional pupil places. This funding is released as a capital grant, which is not ringfenced and it is for the local authority to determine how it is to be used.

Programme for International Student Assessment

Mark Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the usefulness of the Programme for International Student Assessment league tables; and if he will make a statement. [118939]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 198W

Mr Laws: Our education reforms are designed to enable schools in England to be among the best in the world. The OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment plays an important role in allowing us to benchmark our performance and measure our progress compared with the world’s high-performing systems.

Pupils

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the student turnover rates were in each (a) local authority and (b) (i) primary and (ii) secondary school in the latest period for which figures are available; [121568]

(2) what the average turnover was in student numbers in infant and junior schools in the latest period for which figures are available; [121569]

(3) which school had the (a) highest and (b) lowest rate of student turnover in the latest period for which figures are available; [121570]

(4) what the 10 schools are with the (a) highest and (b) lowest student turnover rate in the latest period for which figures are available. [121571]

Mr Laws: Information on pupil turnover rates is not readily available and to produce this information would incur disproportionate cost.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Jackie Doyle-Price: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much each school in Thurrock constituency received in funding from the pupil premium in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and how much they will receive in 2012-13. [120103]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium).

In financial year 2011-12 3,320 pupils in Thurrock constituency were eligible for either the deprivation premium or service child premium, attracting £1.618 million of funding. It is not possible to identify, at constituency level, the number of pupils eligible for the looked after child premium or the number of pupils eligible for the Deprivation premium in alternative provision settings.

The number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in 2012-13 has not yet been confirmed but the provisional estimate is that 4,390 pupils in Thurrock constituency will be eligible for either the deprivation premium or the service child premium and will attract £2.633 million of funding. This estimate is based on January 2011 school census data and data for pupils eligible for FSM since 2006. It reflects the decision to extend eligibility for the deprivation premium to those eligible for FSM in the previous six years.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 199W

Research

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department spent on research and development in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12; and how much he plans to spend in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15. [121879]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education spent £31.7 million on research and evaluation in 2008-09, £27.7 million in 2009-10, £24.7 million in 2010-11 and £12.1 million in 2011-12. The Department's annual research budget for 2012-13 is £8.5 million; we expect it to be £9.5 million in 2013-14 and 2014-15. The Department funds evaluations from individual policy programme budgets. At the moment we have £2.4 million and £1.2 million committed to evaluations which we expect to continue into 2013-14 and 2014-15 respectively.

Schools: Playing Fields

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has (1) made an assessment of the extent of school playing field sales since the establishment of the School Playing Fields Advisory Panel which have not been referred to the panel; [121836]

(2) had any discussions with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on gauging the extent of school playing field disposals which have not required referral to the School Playing Fields Advisory Panel and have been approved by the relevant local authority. [121837]

Mr Laws: The Department does not collect information on playing field sales. Local authorities and schools apply to the Secretary of State for consent to dispose of school playing field land, and applications must meet strict criteria if they are to be approved. The Department does not hold records of actual sales.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education has not had any discussions with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on gauging the extent of school playing field disposals which have not required referral to the School Playing Fields Advisory Panel and have been approved by the relevant local authority.

Schools: Arson

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many instances there were of arson on school premises in each of the last five years. [121692]

Mr Laws: The Department does not hold this information.

Schools: Asbestos

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what consideration he has given to introducing a national audit of asbestos in school buildings. [120722]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 200W

Mr Laws: A national audit of asbestos is unnecessary as it would duplicate records which those responsible for managing asbestos are required to keep. Under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, schools must maintain and regularly update an asbestos register with the location and condition of asbestos-containing materials in the school.

Schools: Crimes of Violence

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) teachers and (b) other school staff in each region have been injured as a result of assault while on duty in each of the last three years. [120245]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education does not hold or collect data on injuries in schools. The Health and Safety Executive publishes data on injuries reported under RIDDOR (the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995). These include school-related injuries affecting teachers and other school staff. Further statistical information can be obtained from the Health and Safety Executive website at

http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/index.htm

Schools: Finance

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 9 July 2012, Official Report, column 43W, on schools: finance, (1) how many of the (a) primary and (b) secondary schools whose pupil premium allocation was less than their revenue funding reduction in the 2011-12 financial year are located in each (i) top-tier local authority and (ii) parliamentary constituency; [120458]

(2) what the average percentage reduction was in total funding for those (a) primary and (b) secondary schools for which the pupil premium allocation was less than the revenue funding reduction in the 2011-12 financial year. [120459]

Mr Laws: With reference to the information provided in the previous answer, for those schools for which the pupil premium allocation was less than the revenue funding reduction in financial year 2011-12, the average percentage reduction in total funding for (a) primary schools was approximately 4.5% and for (b) secondary schools was approximately 5.8%.

It should be noted that these average reductions are mostly a result of changes in pupil numbers. They will also reflect the impact of some local authorities redistributing mainstreamed grants in financial year 2011-12.

A table with the location of the relevant schools by local authority and parliamentary constituency has been placed in the House Libraries.

Schools: Food

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on what occasions (a) he, (b) Ministers in his Department and (c) his special advisers or officials have met John Vincent or Henry Dimbleby to discuss school food (i) in his Department and (ii) at another venue. [119991]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 201W

Elizabeth Truss: The Secretary of State for Education asked John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby to carry out a review of school food in April 2012. Since April, he has met Henry Dimbleby and John Vincent together twice, on 3 July and 15 August 2012, and Henry Dimbleby alone once, on 9 May 2012, to discuss school food. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State's special adviser also met John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby on 3 July and 15 August. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State and his special adviser were present at the launch of the review on 4 July with John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby at Lauriston Primary School in Hackney. Other Ministers in the Department for Education have not met John Vincent or Henry Dimbleby to discuss school food. Officials in the Department for Education who are supporting the review meet John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby on a regular basis (several times a week) on Department for Education premises and at their office, and have accompanied them on a wide range of visits.

Schools: National Anthems

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy that children in all schools in England are taught the National Anthem. [121395]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 September 2012]:It is a matter for individual schools to decide whether to teach pupils the National Anthem.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 202W

Schools: North Yorkshire

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many inspections were undertaken by Ofsted in North Yorkshire in each of the last three years; and how many ratings were given in each category in each such year. [120576]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 12 September 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, to respond.

The tables show inspection numbers and judgements for early years providers, maintained schools, learning and skills providers and social care providers.

Ofsted inspects these different types of institutions under various frameworks of inspection. The outcomes from these inspections are not directly comparable. More information on how Ofsted inspects can be found on our website:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/inspection-reports/how-ofsted-inspects

Tables A-D show the number of inspections by Ofsted remit area with their corresponding grades for academic years 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12 (year to date) in North Yorkshire. Equivalent data have also been provided for England for context, and the tables show the total number of inspections in each of these areas in each year.

Table A: How well does the setting meet the needs of children in the Early Years Foundation Stage judgement of early years providers in North Yorkshire and England in each of the last three academic years
How well does the setting meet the needs of children in the Early Years Foundation Stage
 2009/10(1)
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






Childminder

158

8

58

28

6

Childcare—Non-Domestic

116

9

66

21

4







England






Childminder

12,928

9

55

31

5

Childcare—Non-Domestic

6,809

11

58

25

6

Childcare—Domestic

39

23

44

28

5


How well does the setting meet the needs of children in the Early Years Foundation Stage
 2010/11 ²
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






Childminder

82

57

4

9

30

Childcare—Non-Domestic

80

79

1

8

13







England






Childminder

12,106

10

60

26

3

Childcare—Non-Domestic

7,707

15

64

18

4

Childcare—Domestic

43

21

37

26

16

How well does the setting meet the needs of children in the Early Years Foundation Stage
 2011/12 (September 2011 to March 2012)³
Local authorityTotal number of InspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






Childminder

97

10

55

29

6

15 Oct 2012 : Column 203W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 204W

Childcare—Non-Domestic

40

8

75

18

0







England






Childminder

7,542

10

61

26

3

Childcare—Non-Domestic

4,404

16

63

18

3

Childcare—Domestic

22

36

41

14

9

(1) Early years registered inspections include inspections of providers active at 31 August 2010, multiple inspections of the same provider, and inspections for providers who have since resigned from the register or who Ofsted have cancelled or suspended. Excludes inspections of providers on the childcare register only, and inspections where there were no children on roll. (2) Early years registered inspections include inspections of providers active at 31 August 2011, multiple inspections of the same provider, and inspections for providers who have since resigned from the register or who Ofsted have cancelled or suspended. Excludes inspections of providers on the childcare register only, and inspections where there were no children on roll. (3) Early years registered inspections include inspections of providers active at 31 March 2012, multiple inspections of the same provider, and inspections for providers who have since resigned from the register or who Ofsted have cancelled or suspended. Excludes inspections of providers on the childcare register only, and inspections where there were no children on roll.
Table B: Overall effectiveness judgement of maintained schools in North Yorkshire and England in each of the last three academic years
Overall effectiveness judgement
 2009/10
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactory

North Yorkshire

89

11

46

29

Nursery

0

Primary

70

8

36

24

Secondary

16

2

8

5

Special

2

2

Pupil Referral Unit

1

1






England

6,171

782

2,631

2,281

Nursery

158

94

56

4

Primary

4,619

421

2,039

1,814

Secondary

888

111

319

360

Special

370

128

160

64

Pupil Referral Unit

136

28

57

39

 Overall effectiveness judgement
 2010/11
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire

69

7

34

27

1

Nursery

0

Primary

55

5

29

20

1

Secondary

8

2

6

Special

4

1

2

1

Pupil Referral Unit

2

1

1







England

5,726

617

2,621

2,167

321

Nursery

126

58

58

10

Primary

4,249

323

2,003

1,693

230

Secondary

894

126

338

360

70

Special

328

91

157

66

14

Pupil Referral Unit

129

19

65

38

7

 Overall effectiveness judgement
 2011/12 (September 2011 to March 2012)(1)
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire

80

8

42

23

7

Nursery

2

1

1

Primary

62

5

32

18

7

Secondary

10

2

4

4

Special

6

1

5

15 Oct 2012 : Column 205W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 206W

Pupil Referral Unit

0







England

4,197

510

2,027

1,341

319

Nursery

103

54

46

2

1

Primary

3,146

312

1,560

1,038

236

Secondary

632

83

252

228

69

Special

199

54

98

40

7

Pupil Referral Unit

117

7

71

33

6

(1) Inspections based on provisional data published on 15 June 2012
Table C: Overall effectiveness judgement of learning and skills providers in North Yorkshire and England in each of the last three academic years
Overall effectiveness judgement
 2009/10
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






All college

Adult and community learning provider

1

1

Independent learning provider

2

2

Prison







England






All college

92

9

43

35

5

Adult and community learning provider

69

44

20

5

Independent learning provider

184

11

75

83

15

Prison

27

6

16

5

Overall effectiveness judgement
 2010/11
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






All college

2

2

Adult and community learning provider

Independent learning provider

2

1


1


Prison

1

1







England






All college

83

5

33

41

4

Adult and community learning provider

73

2

43

26

2

Independent learning provider

155

18

73

56

8

Prison

24

9

13

2

Overall effectiveness judgement
 2011/12 (September 2011 to June 2012)
Local authorityTotal number of inspectionsOutstandingGoodSatisfactoryInadequate

North Yorkshire






All college

1

1

Adult and community learning provider

1

1

Independent learning provider

Prison







England






All college

69

4

22

30

13

Adult and community learning provider

57

2

35

17

3

Independent learning provider

94

8

45

32

9

15 Oct 2012 : Column 207W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 208W

Prison

6

3

2

1

Notes: 1. Data refer to numbers of providers. 2. Based on re-categorised provider types introduced in March 2012. 3. Data for all colleges includes: General further education/tertiary colleges, specialist further education colleges, sixth form colleges, independent specialist colleges. 4. Local authority information has been taken from Edubase for all colleges. 5. Data on local authority for adult skills providers has been collated from 2009 PIMS report and recently from the learner number data (aggregated data from the Individualised Learner Record) from The Data Service. 6. Local authority data for adult skills providers has not been consistently maintained by Ofsted since 2009. Local authority data has only been provided to Ofsted from June 2012. 7. Where local authority data for adult skills providers has not been located through the above sources, it is based on the address provided to Ofsted and may not necessarily reflect the location of the provider is usually the Head Office.
Table D: Overall effectiveness judgement of social care providers in North Yorkshire and England in each of the last three academic years(1)
 2009/2010 academic year
Provision typeTotal number inspectedOutstandingGoodSatisfactory/ AdequateInadequate

North Yorkshire

     

Adoption support agency

Boarding school

6

3

2

1

Children's Home

12

1

6

3

2

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

Independent Fostering Service

Local authority Adoption Agency

Local authority fostering service

Residential Special School

3

2

1

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

1

1

Secure children's home

Voluntary Adoption Agency

1

1


     

England

     

Adoption Support Agency

10

1

8

1

Boarding School(4)

171

45

91

28

7

Children's Home

1,748

238

940

432

138

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

11

4

4

3

Independent Fostering Service

52

7

32

10

3

Local Authority Adoption Agency

36

7

19

10

Local Authority Fostering Service

30

2

12

15

1

Residential Family Centre

12

2

2

8

Residential Special School

164

77

67

18

2

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

80

11

46

16

7

Secure children's home

18

1

12

4

1

Voluntary Adoption Agency

14

4

2

8

 2010/2011 academic year
Provision typeTotal number inspectedOutstandingGoodSatisfactory/ AdequateInadequate

North Yorkshire

     

Adoption support agency

Boarding school

2

1

1

Children's Home

13

 

10

1

2

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

Independent Fostering Service

Local authority Adoption Agency

1

1

Local authority fostering service

Residential Special School

4

2

1

1

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

1

1

Secure children's home

Voluntary Adoption Agency


     

15 Oct 2012 : Column 209W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 210W

England

     

Adoption Support Agency

21

11

9

1

Boarding School(4)

160

62

77

16

5

Children's Home

1,866

359

1,046

403

58

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

12

4

8

Independent Fostering Service

72

24

29

18

1

Local Authority Adoption Agency

57

7

41

9

Local Authority Fostering Service

41

9

27

5

Residential Family Centre

24

5

12

6

1

Residential Special School

145

85

48

12

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

83

22

50

10

1

Secure children's home

18

3

11

4

Voluntary Adoption Agency

14

6

8

 2011/2012(2)
Provision typeTotal number inspectedOutstandingGoodSatisfactory / AdequateInadequate

North Yorkshire

     

Adoption support agency

Boarding school

Children's Home

9

4

4

1

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

0

Independent Fostering Service

1

1

Local authority Adoption Agency

Local authority fostering service

Residential Special School

3

1

2

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

1

1

Secure children's home

Voluntary Adoption Agency


     

England

     

Adoption Support Agency

5

2

2

1

Boarding School(4)

12

1

5

1

5

Children's Home

1,026

308

549

149

20

Further Education College with Residential Accommodation

12

9

2

1

Independent Fostering Service

64

24

27

11

2

Local Authority Adoption Agency

36

8

16

10

2

Local Authority Fostering Service

33

10

21

2

Residential Family Centre

11

5

4

2

Residential Special School

92

52

33

6

1

Residential special school (>295 days/year)(3)

57

23

29

4

1

Secure children's home

8

7

1

Voluntary Adoption Agency

6

3

3

(1) Data relate to all published inspections of children's social care providers, thus it may include more than one inspection per provider. (2) Data includes inspections between 1 September 2011 and 31 March 2012. (3) Residential special schools that care for pupils for more than 295 days per year must register as children's homes. (4) In April 2011 responsibility for the inspection of boarding schools who are members of the Independent Schools Association passed to that body and this is why there are considerably less boarding school inspections in 2011/12/.

Schools: Sports

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effect of School Sports Partnerships in increasing participation of primary school pupils in competitive sports. [119519]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 11 September 2012]: While the network of school sport partnerships had been successful in helping to raise sporting participation levels in some areas, including primary schools, the overall proportion of young people taking part in regular competitive sport was disappointingly low. Only around two in five pupils across Years 3 to 13 (age eight to 18) participated regularly in competition within their own school, and only around one in five competed regularly against other schools.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what financial commitment to the School Games his Department has made after summer 2013; [121838]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 211W

(2) what support his Department is giving to promote the School Games. [121839]

Mr Laws: The majority of the funding for the School Games comes from Sport England, the Department for Health, and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, who between them have committed over £74 million of funding up to 2015. In addition, the Department has supported competitive sport in schools through providing £65 million for a PE Teacher Release scheme. This funding pays for a day a week of a secondary PE teacher's time to be spent out of the classroom, encouraging take-up of competitive sport in primary schools, as well as their own school, including through participation in the School Games. We have not yet made any decisions about funding beyond the end of 2012-13 but will be making further announcements shortly.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to promote disability sport participation in schools beyond summer 2013. [121840]

Mr Timpson: The Government are determined to ensure that all pupils have the opportunity to take part in sport regardless of any impairment. Disability sport is a central part at all levels of the new School Games which are being managed by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. By 1 August 2012 8,341 schools, including 359 special schools (which represents 35% of the total number of special schools) reported having participated in the School Games 2011/12.

We are currently looking at how we can help schools to give all of their pupils the broadest possible range of opportunities to participate in competitive sport, and we are supporting the work of Sport England through our targeted Disability Grant to widen participation in competitive sport among disabled children.

We also intend to build on the legacy of the Olympic and Paralympic games to ensure that all schools give all of their pupils the broadest possible range of opportunities to enjoy physical activity and play competitive sport. To this end we recognise the valuable contribution being made by Sainsbury's, both through their support of the School Games and through their Active Kids for All programme, designed to inspire the next generation of children to participate in inclusive sports.

We have not yet made any final decisions about funding for future years.