Justice

Driving Under Influence

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) women and (b) men were found guilty of drink driving, in each region in each of the last five years. [119344]

Damian Green: The number of persons found guilty at all courts for drink driving offences by sex and region, in England and Wales for the period 2007 to 2011 can be viewed in the following table.

13 Sep 2012 : Column 361W

13 Sep 2012 : Column 362W

Persons found guilty at all courts for drink driving offences(1), by sex and region, England and Wales, 2007-11(2, 3)
 20072008200920102011

Male

     

North-east

3,051

2,845

2,620

2,131

1,884

North-west

8,375

7,136

6,813

5,697

5,189

Yorkshire and Humberside

5,266

4,573

4,890

3,955

3,537

East midlands

4,692

4,280

4,045

3,510

3,218

West midlands

7,041

6,051

5,702

4,298

4,392

East of England

6,206

5,519

5,203

4,468

4,091

London

8,957

8,077

7,464

6,465

5,646

South-east

9,294

8,158

7,051

6,377

6,111

South-west

5,126

4,679

4,268

3,685

3,729

Wales

4,016

3,253

3,331

2,599

2,558

Total

62,024

54,571

51,387

43,185

40,355

Female

     

North-east

562

545

533

479

454

North-west

1,492

1,518

1,588

1,320

1,252

Yorkshire and Humberside

791

730

848

713

677

East midlands

652

671

674

623

618

West midlands

941

882

966

811

806

East of England

1,032

985

1,025

961

851

London

1,125

1,125

1,302

1,145

994

South-east

1,567

1,495

1,446

1,353

1,315

South-west

940

859

864

768

778

Wales

673

639

639

593

624

Total

9,775

9,449

9,885

8,766

8,369

      

Total(4)

     

North-east

3,613

3,396

3,154

2,612

2,347

North-west

9,867

8,737

8,432

7,032

6,463

Yorkshire and Humberside

6,057

5,318

5,747

4,675

4,228

East midlands

5,344

4,966

4,724

4,137

3,844

West midlands

7,982

6,966

6,691

5,120

5,213

East of England

7,238

6,526

6,246

5,442

4,959

London

10,082

9,284

8,807

7,648

6,684

South-east

10,861

9,699

8,511

7,739

7,441

South-west

6,066

5,568

5,149

4,468

4,520

Wales

4,689

3,897

3,976

3,196

3,184

Total

71,799

64,357

61,437

52,069

48,883

(1) Includes the following offences: Road Traffic Act 1988, S.4(1)—Driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink Road Traffic Act 1988, S.4(2)—Being in charge of mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink Road Traffic Act 1988, S.5(1)(a)—Driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit Road Traffic Act 1988, S.5(1)(b)—In charge of a motor vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit Road Traffic Act 1988, S.6(6)—Failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen of breath for a preliminary test (2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4 )The gender of a defendant proceeded against may not have been reported.  These data have been included in the persons only totals.  Therefore, males and females age group totals and sub-totals may not agree with the totals given under persons. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Hospitals: Crimes of Violence

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been (a) prosecuted and (b) convicted in relation to assaults on hospital staff in each region in the last two years. [120448]

Damian Green: Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database does not contain information about the circumstances behind each case, beyond the description provided in the statute under which proceedings are brought. It is not possible therefore to separately identify how many cases were brought in respect of assaults specifically on hospital staff.

13 Sep 2012 : Column 363W

Departmental Pay

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the likely (a) highest, (b) median, (c) median full-time equivalent and (d) lowest full-time equivalent salary to be paid by his Department in 2012-13. [120834]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice and its agencies effectively operate three sets of pay structures and arrangements. One set covers senior civil servants (SCS) within the Department; another set covers staff below the SCS in the core Department and two of its executive agencies (Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG)); and a third set covers staff below the SCS in the remaining executive agency, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS).

Because the levels of salary under each pay structure differ, the information requested, which is for the 2012-13 remit year, is provided separately for each in the following tables:

Senior civil servants (SCS)
 £

(a) Estimated highest salary

180,000

(b) Estimated median salary (i.e. reduced from full time equivalent (FTE) to reflect part-time working)

78,245

(c) Estimated median FTE salary

80,000

(d) Estimated lowest FTE salary

58,200

Ministry of Justice (including HMCTS and OPG) excluding SCS
 £

(a) Estimated highest salary

130,000

(b) Estimated median salary (i.e. reduced from full time equivalent (FTE) to reflect part-time working)

19,029

(c) Estimated median FTE salary

20,050

(d) Estimated lowest FTE salary

13,638

National Offender Management Service (NOMS) excluding SCS
£

(a) Estimated highest salary

150,000

(b) Estimated median salary (i.e. reduced from full time equivalent (FTE) to reflect part-time working)

24,203

(c) Estimated median FTE salary

25,915

(d) Estimated lowest FTE salary

13,002

Road Traffic Offences

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many foreign registered vehicles from each country of registration were the subject of prosecutions for road traffic offences in each of the last five years; [120197]

(2) how many drivers in foreign registered vehicles of each licence nationality were prosecuted for road traffic offences in each of the last five years; [120199]

(3) what the total value was of fines for road traffic offences levied against foreign registered vehicles and uncollected in each of the last five years. [120198]

Damian Green: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. This database holds information on offences provided by the statutes under

13 Sep 2012 : Column 364W

which proceedings are brought but not all the specific circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify from this centrally held information if a vehicle involved in the committing of a criminal offence is foreign registered.

Trials

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost to the public purse was of the legal action brought by Mr Berezovsky against Mr Abramovich. [120367]

Mrs Grant: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service recovers the cost of civil cases from users, in line with the fee charging requirements set out in the Treasury's ‘Managing Public Money’. On that basis, there was no cost to the public purse from the legal action brought by Mr Berezovsky against Mr Abramovich.

Leader of the House

House Business Committee

Simon Hughes: To ask the Leader of the House what steps he is taking to introduce a House Business Committee. [120668]

Mr Lansley: As I informed the House during oral questions today, I look forward to continuing discussions about the Government's commitment to a House Business Committee in the Coalition programme for government.

Northern Ireland

Departmental Pay

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what estimate she has made of the likely (a) highest, (b) median, (c) median full-time equivalent and (d) lowest full-time equivalent salary to be paid by her Department in 2012-13. [120836]

Mike Penning: Following the devolution of policing and criminal justice functions to the Department of Justice (NI) in April 2010, the Northern Ireland Office adopted Ministry of Justice (MOJ) terms and conditions, including pay. The current pay freeze across MOJ remains in place until August 2013 and therefore no estimates have been made in relation to changes in full-time salary equivalents.

Public Order

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on how many occasions she has issued certificates stating that an act has been done for the purpose of safeguarding national security or protecting public order under (a) regulation 53ZA Sex Discrimination (Northern Ireland) Order 1976 (as amended), (b) article 80 of the Fair Employment and Treatment Order 1998, (c) article 41A of the Race Relations (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, (d) regulation 30 of the Employment Equality (Age) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006 and (e) regulation 27 of the Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 in the latest period for which figures are available. [120693]

Mike Penning: No such certificates have been issued since the current government came into power.

13 Sep 2012 : Column 365W

Prime Minister

Departmental Responsibilities

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Prime Minister if he will publish the details of his meetings on 4 September 2012 with the Secretary of State for International Development in connection with her appointment to the position. [120743]

The Prime Minister: It is longstanding Government practice not to disclose information relating to ministerial meetings, including the proceedings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees, as to do so would put at risk the public interest in the full and frank discussion of policy by Ministers.

Scotland

Infrastructure (Financial Assistance) Bill

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, pursuant to his answer of 6 September 2012, Official Report, column 397W, on the Infrastructure (Financial Assistance) Bill, what criteria will be used to assess applications for the Infrastructure Guarantee Programme. [120749]

Michael Moore: Eligible projects will be subject to charges, due diligence and, as a minimum, must meet five key tests. An eligible project must be:

nationally significant;

ready to start construction within 12 months;

financially credible;

dependent on a guarantee to proceed; and

good value to the taxpayer.

The Government will consider the most effective form of guarantee on a case-by-case basis using a robust assessment and approvals process.

Departmental Pay

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what estimate he has made of the likely (a) highest, (b) median, (c) median full-time equivalent and (d) lowest full-time equivalent salary to be paid by his Department in 2012-13. [120835]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office does not employ staff directly. All staff join the Office on a secondment- type arrangement, mainly from the Scottish Government and the Ministry of Justice, which remain the employing Departments. Not all bodies have set their pay levels for 2012-13 so full-time equivalent salary information cannot be provided.

West Coast Railway Line

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland pursuant to the answer of 6 September 2012, Official Report, column 398W, on the West Coast railway line, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the effect on Scotland of the decision to allow new franchisees on the West Coast Mainline to increase fares by eight per cent above the retail price index in 2013 and 2014. [120763]

13 Sep 2012 : Column 366W

Michael Moore: Scotland Office Ministers and officials regularly meet counterparts at the Department for Transport to discuss cross-border transport issues affecting Scotland.

Bidders for the West Coast Mainline franchise were told to use the planning assumptions from the 2010 spending review, as updated by the autumn statement, as the basis for their bids. This caps average increases for regulated fares at RPI+3% for 2013 and 2014, and RPI+1% for all other years.

Winter Fuel Payments

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many people who live in Scotland are eligible for winter fuel allowance. [120539]

David Mundell: In the most recent year for which data are available (2010-11) 1,113,920 people received winter fuel payments in Scotland.

The information for 2010-11 is provided in the documents "Winter Fuel Payment recipients 2010-11 by Parliamentary Constituencies and Gender (All)" and "Winter Fuel Payment recipients 2010-2011 by Local Authority and Gender (All)". These are available in the Commons Library and on the following link:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=wfp

The number of recipients in winter 2011-12 is expected to be broadly similar to last year, although in future a slight reduction in the number of people receiving winter fuel payments each winter is likely as the qualifying age increases in line with women's state pension age.

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department paid out in winter fuel allowance to people in Scotland in each of the last three financial years. [120540]

David Mundell: In the last three financial years the Department for Work and Pensions paid the following amounts to recipients of winter fuel payments in Scotland:

 £

2008-09

236,000,000

2009-10

240,000,000

2010-11

240,000,000

The information is available in the document "Winter Fuel Payment recipients 2010-11 by Parliamentary Constituencies and Gender (All)". This is available in the Commons Library and on the following link:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=wfp

Working Tax Credit

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland pursuant to the answer of 6 September 2012, Official Report, column 398W, on working tax credit, what the monetary value was of payments made through the childcare component of working tax credit in Scotland in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of the monetary value of such payments in each year to 2015. [120748]

Michael Moore: Information on annual awards of the childcare element of working tax credit in Scotland and the UK in past years is provided in the series

13 Sep 2012 : Column 367W

"Personal Tax Credits: Finalised Award Statistics—Geographical Statistics", which is published by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs and is available online at:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/stats/personal-tax-credits/menu.htm

The estimated(1) monetary value of the payments for the UK for 2011-12 is £1,430 million. The forecast(2) monetary value for the UK for 2012-13 is £1,490 million, for 2013-14 is £1,560 million and for 2014-15 is £1,650 million. There are no figures available for Scotland for the years 2011-12 to 2014-15.

(1) Finalised award statistics not yet available for 2011-12. UK estimate produced using the average number of families benefiting from the childcare element and the average monetary value of the help they receive with child care costs based on monthly snapshot statistics.

(2) Forecasts for 2012-13 onwards are drawn from the Budget 2012 Tax Credits expenditure forecast. Forecasts are not produced at a sub-UK level and so the forecast expenditure for Scotland is not available.

Transport

Airports: Thames Estuary

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what powers he has to direct any windfall gained from a sale of the Heathrow site into funding the construction of an airport in the Thames estuary. [120720]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government have no financial stake in Heathrow and any hypothetical sale of the airport would be a commercial matter for the airport operator.

The Government believe that maintaining the UK's status as a leading global aviation hub is fundamental to our long-term international competitiveness and we have appointed Sir Howard Davies to chair an independent commission tasked with identifying and recommending to Government options for maintaining this country's status as an international hub for aviation.

Bus Services: Visual Impairment

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he plans to encourage greater use of talking buses to assist blind passengers. [120613]

Norman Baker: The Government recognises that many people find audio and visual announcements useful. I have recently written to bus operators to encourage them to work in partnership with their local authorities, to see if the uptake of these systems can be increased.

In June, I chaired a Department for Transport summit on how best to improve door to door journeys for disabled people. As a result of this, and as part of the Government's Olympic and Paralympic legacy, we are currently looking at a number of ways of improving the accessibility of public transport. The outcome of this work will be included in the Department's Disability Action Plan, to be published by the end of September.

13 Sep 2012 : Column 368W

Heathrow Airport

Mark Reckless: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many airport slots are used for flights from Heathrow to Manchester; and what proportion of the total number of slots this figure represents. [121020]

Mr Simon Burns: The number of air transport movements from Heathrow to Manchester airport in 2011 was 4,671. This figure accounted for 2% of all departures from Heathrow.

High Speed 2 Railway Line

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment his Department has made of local traffic effects arising from the proposed HS2 Old Oak Common interchange. [120723]

Mr Simon Burns: HS2 Ltd is undertaking local traffic assessments to inform the design of the proposed Old Oak Common interchange station. These assessments cover all the expected transport modes including bus, taxi, bike, pedestrian and car. The methodology being used for the assessments has been discussed with our stakeholders and follows recognised industry practice. The assessment work concludes in December (12) and the results will be shared with our stakeholders and their own assessments. The conclusion of this comparison will then be included in the design and environmental statement in support of the hybrid Bill process.

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the March 2012 advice his Department received from HS2 Ltd, when he plans to announce the route and station option for Leeds, Manchester and Heathrow. [120732]

Mr Simon Burns: The advice received from HS2 Ltd is currently being considered objectively and in detail. The Department's business plan indicates that we intend to publish for consideration the Government's preferred route and station options by December.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the High Level Output specification, whether the cost of the western connection to Heathrow will be included in High Speed 2 cost estimates. [120758]

Mr Simon Burns: The cost of the western connection to Heathrow airport will not be included in the High Speed 2 cost estimates. The western connection is being built as an expansion of the existing rail network from the Great Western main line to improve airport access from the Thames valley and the west.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) for what reason a different methodology was used to assess the value of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the Preliminary Landscape Assessment study undertaken by HS2 Ltd in 2010 and the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement; [120805]

13 Sep 2012 : Column 369W

(2) for what reason the Preliminary Landscape Assessment study undertaken by HS2 Ltd in 2010 into the effect of HS2 on the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty was not included in the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement; [120809]

(3) if he will publish the methodology used to assess the land value categorisation of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement. [120810]

Mr Simon Burns: The assessment made by HS2 Ltd in 2010 was early internal work designed to give a broad indication of the potential monetary value of the landscape that might be affected by the railway. It was deliberately conservative and did not factor in many of the mitigation measures such as tunnelling and cutting that had not yet been developed at that time. It also assumed the highest possible valuations of land and did not account for areas where existing development has already reduced the value of the landscape.

In line with departmental practice, a more detailed assessment of the potential value of landscape was carried out before the Secretary of State took a decision to proceed with HS2. This assessment published in January 2012 was therefore based on more accurate route and land type information including the additional mitigation measures such as tunnelling and cutting introduced following consultation. The DFT assessment was therefore considered more robust and formed part of the economic case.

The methodology used by the DFT to assess landscape is already available on the Department's website at:

www.dft.gov.uk/foi

under FOI reference e0008944.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport about the effect of the High Speed Rail 2 project on tourism in the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty; and if he will make a statement. [120807]

Mr Simon Burns: Since taking up my post, neither I nor my Ministers have had any meeting with the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller). However the Department for Culture Media and Sport, along with English Heritage, has been involved with the HS2 scheme from its inception, inputting into the Appraisal of Sustainability and providing cross-Government clearance as appropriate. As the scheme develops they will be instrumental in providing advice on the associated environmental impact assessment.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what methodology he used to assess the value of the Chilterns Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement; [120838]

(2) for what reason non-urban land in the Chilterns Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty was valued at the lowest land value categorisation in the “Economic

13 Sep 2012 : Column 370W

Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement; [120839]

(3) what meetings he has planned with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to discuss the land value categorisation of the Chilterns Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement. [120840]

Mr Simon Burns: In the area between the M25 and Amersham the railway is judged to have a relatively low effect on the landscape because the vast majority of this section is proposed to be in an underground tunnel.

The area between Amersham and the Chilterns northern edge was given the highest landscape valuation per hectare along the entire HS2 route from London to Birmingham. This valuation reflects the character of the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and remains high even after accounting for the high levels of mitigation such as tunnelling and deep cuttings that were judged to be appropriate for an AONB.

A breakdown of the monetary valuation that was attributed to landscape by area and methodology used is already available on the Department's website at

www.dft.gov.uk/foi

under FOI reference e0008944.

I have no plans to meet the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), to discuss land value categorisation in the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. However, officials in the Department for Transport have regular discussions with their counterparts in other Government Departments regarding economic appraisal methods on a variety of topics including landscape valuation.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will review the land value categorisation of non-urban land in the Chilterns Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty; and if he will make a statement. [120841]

Mr Simon Burns: The approach to land value categorisation undertaken by the Department for Transport is based upon the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) document “Valuing the External Benefits of Undeveloped Land” which was originally published in 2001. A copy of this document can be obtained from the DCLG website. There are currently no plans to update the Department for Transport's work. However, my officials have regular discussions with their counterparts in other Government Departments regarding economic appraisal methods on a variety of topics including landscape valuation.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the lower land type categorisation of non-urban land in the Chilterns Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty included in the “Economic Case for HS2: Value for Money Statement” published by his Department in January 2012; and if he will make a statement. [120842]

13 Sep 2012 : Column 371W

Mr Simon Burns: Since taking up my post, neither I nor my Ministers have had any discussions with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), on land type categorisation.

Large Goods Vehicles: Working Hours

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will review his Department's decision on the rights of large goods vehicle drivers to an employment tribunal claim if they are prevented from taking daily rest breaks and weekly rest periods by their employers. [120678]

Stephen Hammond: We have no plans to review the Department's decision, as drivers' working time rights are already protected by a criminal law regime which the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) enforces.

Marine Accident Investigation Branch

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many investigations the Marine Accident Investigation Branch conducted in each year since 1998. [120801]

Stephen Hammond: The number of investigations conducted(1) by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch in each year since 1998 is as follows:

Year investigation startedMAIB investigationPreliminary examination

1998

38

1999

39

2000

50

2001

42

2002

24

13

2003

15

24

2004

31

34

2005

25

40

2006

30

43

2007

21

40

2008

26

49

2009

20

26

2010

23

18

2011

41

2012(2)

20

(1) Based on start date of investigation. (2) To 12 September 2012

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) funding and (b) staffing levels were for the Marine Accident Investigation Branch in each year since 1998. [120802]

Stephen Hammond: The funding and staffing levels for the Marine Accident Investigation Branch in each year since 1998 are as follows:

 Funding budget (£)Outturn (£)Staffing

1998

967,000

1,579,266

20

1999

1,014,000

1,205,183

23

2000

1,158,400

1,450,562

26

13 Sep 2012 : Column 372W

2001

1,354,400

1,398,785

27

2002

1,793,000

1,695,000

30

2003

1,981,000

2,033,000

32

2004

2,301,000

2,560,000

34

2005

2,697,000

2,937,000

37

2006

3,216,000

3,368,000

39

2007

3,532,000

3,522,000

39

2008

4,046,000

3,808,000

39

2009

4,172,000

4,009,000

39

2010

4,173,000

3,832,000

39

2011

3,632,000

3,627,000

34

2012

3,629,000

33

Motorcycles: Driving Tests

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many accidents took place during module 1 motorcycle tests between the introduction of the test and September 2012; and how many of these involved injuries which required medical attention; [120674]

(2) how many serious injury accidents there were during module 1 motorcycle tests between the introduction of the test and September 2012. [120675]

Stephen Hammond: Incidents on module 1 practical motorcycling tests: 24 April 2009 to 10 September 2012.

 Number/percentage

Number Module 1 practical tests conducted

(1)201,901

  

Total incidents

750

Percentage of total tests conducted

0.37

  

RIDDOR reportable incidents

134

Percentage of total tests conducted

0.06

  

Medical attention or first aid required

73

Percentage of total tests conducted

0.03

(1) Includes an estimate of the tests conducted between 1 and 10 September 2012, based on the number of tests booked. Actual numbers of tests conducted for that period cannot yet be verified.

The Driving Standards Agency does not record incidents using the definition “serious injury”, as used by the Department for Transport for the purposes of road safety statistics. The agency records incidents occurring during module 1 tests under three categories: RIDDOR reportable incidents (those reportable to the Health and Safety Executive); incidents requiring either first aid or medical attention; and incidents requiring no or self- treatment.

Mel Stride: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what progress the Learning to Ride groups have made as part of the Motorcycle Test Review; and if he will make a statement; [120676]

(2) when he expects to introduce a fully on-road, single-part motorcycle test. [120715]

13 Sep 2012 : Column 373W

Stephen Hammond: The Motorcycle Test Review and Learning to Ride are two different projects. The Motorcycle Test Review focuses on proposed revisions to module 1 of the motorcycle test. Learning to Ride focuses on ensuring that motorcycling instructors have the appropriate skills and qualifications to deliver effective training.

As part of Learning to Ride, the Driving Standards Agency continues to discuss with motorcycling stakeholders how to ensure that motorcycling instructors have the appropriate skills and qualifications to deliver effective training. The latest industry proposals are due to be submitted for consideration by the end of October 2012.

Subject to the findings of the research being undertaken as part of the Motorcycle Test Review, the aim is to introduce a single event test that can be carried out on-road as far as possible, during spring 2014.

Motorcycles: Training

Mr Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what safety recommendations the motorcycle Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) group has made in relation to improving CBT. [121019]

Stephen Hammond: The Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) Group has made the following safety recommendations in relation to improving CBT:

align the existing CBT syllabus with the National Rider Training Standard ™;

restructure the sequence of elements of CBT that must be completed, to enable greater flexibility in the way training is delivered and move towards a more client-centred approach;

consider removal of the entitlement to ride a geared motorcycle if CBT has been completed on an automatic motorcycle;

align the qualification arrangements for CBT and Direct Access Scheme instructors with those of approved driving instructors;

successful completion of the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) assessment course to become the only route by which instructors can be certified to deliver CBT;

enhance the role of approved training bodies in assuring their instructors' training standards.

The DSA continues to work with industry stakeholders to review and develop proposals.

Ports: Channel Islands

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether ports in the Channel Islands are classified as overseas ports. [120804]

Stephen Hammond: The Channel Islands are Crown dependencies and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are responsible for policy in relation to their ports.

Road Transport (Working Time) Regulations 2005

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the meetings his Department has had with the United Road Transport Union to discuss the Road Transport (Working Time) Regulations 2005; and when he next plans to meet that organisation. [120677]

Stephen Hammond: The Department's records show that since May 2010, the Department has met once with the United Road Transport Union (URTU), on 13 October

13 Sep 2012 : Column 374W

2010, to discuss the Road Transport (Working Time) Regulations 2005. The Department does not have any plans to meet URTU to discuss these regulations and no request for a meeting has been received.

Rolling Stock: Procurement

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information his Department holds on the sums spent by train operating companies on the purchase of new rolling stock in each of the past 10 years for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [120832]

Mr Simon Burns: The majority of rolling stock purchased over the past 10 years has been bought by the rolling stock leasing companies and the actual price paid is a commercial matter for them. Train operating companies work closely with the leasing companies but any costs incurred by the train operators are commercially confidential; the Department does not hold this information.

Shipping: Channel Islands

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information his Department holds on how many residents of the Channel Islands hold a British Seaman's Card. [120803]

Stephen Hammond: The Registry of Shipping and Seamen, part of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, has records of 18 British Seaman's Cards issued in the past 10 years, the validity period of the card, to residents with postcodes in the Channel Islands.

Stansted Airport: Railways

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has recently discussed with CrossCountry Trains and Greater Anglia the possibility of introducing a half-hourly service between Cambridge and London Stansted Airport. [120860]

Mr Simon Burns: The Secretary of State for Transport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Derbyshire Dales (Mr McLoughlin), has not entered into any discussions with either CrossCountry Trains or Greater Anglia concerning the prospect of introducing half-hourly train services between Cambridge and London Stansted airport.

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will take steps to encourage Greater Anglia to improve journey times from Cambridge and London Stansted Airport to London Liverpool Street. [120862]

Mr Simon Burns: In the current short franchise agreement for Greater Anglia the train operator is required to deliver the timetable that was introduced in December 2011, which included improved journey times to morning peak Cambridge to Liverpool Street services.

Unmanned Air Vehicles: EU Action

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what his policy is on the proposals in the European Commission working document, SWD

13 Sep 2012 : Column 375W

(2012) 259 final, of 4 September 2012, entitled “Towards a European strategy for the development of civil applications of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems”; and if he will make a statement. [120821]

Mr Simon Burns: The UK recognises the importance of the emerging Civil Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems sector and the many challenges to be overcome to ensure the safe integration with other aviation traffic. The UK supports this European Commission initiative to develop a clear understanding of the issues and take a harmonised approach to addressing them across Europe and with other global regions through ICAO. The UK is closely engaged, in the various work streams involved in harmonising these requirements.

West Coast Railway Line

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how the West Coast Main Line bid was assessed in relation to deliverability of projected passenger numbers; and if he will make a statement. [120487]

Mr Simon Burns: Bidders for the InterCity West Coast franchise were required to submit a set of delivery plans and financial and operational models to demonstrate how they would deliver their operational, financial and passenger demand projections for the franchise.

These plans and models were evaluated by the Department with the support of its technical advisers and we satisfied ourselves on the deliverability of these plans when determining the award of the franchise.

As my predecessor, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chipping Barnet (Mrs Villiers), set out in a written ministerial statement to this House on 3 September 2012, Official Report, columns 13-14WS, I will continue to keep the House updated, subject to the constraints of legal or commercial privilege.

Treasury

Enterprise Zones: Lancashire

Mark Menzies: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment his Department has made of the potential economic benefits to the Lancashire economy of the Warton enterprise zone. [120441]

Sajid Javid: The potential economic benefits of the Lancashire enterprise zone proposal, submitted by the Lancashire local enterprise partnership, were assessed against the same criteria as all other zones. These included the strength of the economic growth strategy, likely value for money and ease of implementation.

Insurance: Travel

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if his Department will investigate the potential benefits of making insurance compulsory for people travelling abroad. [118869]

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Greg Clark: It is for individuals to make an assessment of the risks they face when they travel, and to decide whether to take out insurance and which products are most suitable to them.

Advice on which risks to consider can be found at:

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/staying-safe/travel-insurance

Revenue and Customs

Nick de Bois: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many investigations were carried out by HM Revenue and Customs into (a) public limited companies, (b) sole traders and (c) partnerships with a turnover of (i) less than £100,000, (ii) more than £100,000 but less than £500,000, (iii) more than £500,000 but less than £1,000,000, (iv) more than £1,000,000 but less than £5,000,000, (v) more than £5,000,000 but less than £10,000,000 and (vi) more than £10,000,000 per annum in (A) 2007, (B) 2008, (C) 2009, (D) 2010 and (E) 2011. [120132]

Mr Gauke: The information requested is not available in this format. HM Revenue and Customs compliance activity—from policy making, through support and education, to audits and investigations—covers all aspects of compliance behaviour from error through to organised criminal attack.

HMRC targets its compliance activity based on risk rather than by direct reference to the legal entity or turnover. Therefore, this information could be collated only at disproportionate cost.

Shareholders: Loans

Simon Hughes: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what his policy is on the treatment of shareholder loans for tax purposes; and if he will make a statement. [119950]

Mr Gauke: A shareholder should not be in receipt of company money in an untaxed form. Where a close company—broadly a company controlled by five or fewer participators (shareholders)—makes a loan to a shareholder or his associates a tax charge is raised on the company of 25% of the amount of the loan. This tax charge can be repaid if the loan is repaid.

Additionally, an income tax charge will be raised on a shareholder who is also an employee or director where he pays little or no interest on a loan exceeding £5,000. The charge will be on the amount of the difference between the interest paid and what would be chargeable at the official rate.

Taxation: British Nationals Abroad

Alun Cairns: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what plans his Department has to use the registration of an individual overseas voter in its revenue investigations. [119899]

Mr Gauke: HMRC has no specific plans at present to acquire this data. However, exploitation of data is one of the key tools used by HMRC to inform its compliance and education-based activities. HMRC keeps under regular review the datasets which it already acquires and the costs, benefits, priorities and opportunities surrounding the acquisition of further datasets.

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Alun Cairns: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what use his Department makes of information on the registration of overseas voters. [119900]

Mr Gauke: At present HMRC does not acquire or make use of the information contained in the Overseas Voters List (i.e. UK citizens living abroad who are registered to vote in UK parliamentary and European elections).

Alun Cairns: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether HM Revenue and Customs (a) uses and (b) plans to use appearance on the UK electoral register as a criterion for assessing the tax status of Britons living overseas. [120211]

Mr Gauke: One of the range of factors that HMRC can consider when looking at an individual's UK residence status is whether or not they are registered to vote in the UK. However, appearing on the UK electoral register does not on its own mean an individual is UK resident.

The Government are currently consulting on the details of a statutory residence test which will be introduced from 6 April 2013. Appearance on the UK electoral register is not a factor in the current proposals for the statutory residence test.

Taxation: Business

Ms Gisela Stuart: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many businesses HM Revenue and Customs has selected for local compliance with tax and national insurance contributions in each of the past five years. [120829]

Mr Gauke: HM Revenue and Customs selects cases for compliance activity based on a number of risk factors rather than by reference to a particular tax or contribution. Therefore it is not possible to provide the information in the format requested. The total number of cases selected by Local Compliance, for a compliance intervention, for each of the past five years are:

 Number

2008

194,951

2009

151,273

2010

118,136

2011

103,737

2012

245,546

2011 saw the introduction of a new risk-based technology system and so the data shown above for 2012 are not directly comparable with earlier years.

Culture, Media and Sport

Mobile Phone Coverage: Argyll and Bute

13. Mr Reid: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what plans she has to improve mobile telephone coverage in the Argyll and Bute constituency. [120646]

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Mr Vaizey: The Government recognise the concerns of those who live in areas with little or no mobile phone coverage. Last autumn the Chancellor announced plans to invest up to £150 million in improving mobile phone reception in areas of the UK where homes and businesses have poor or no coverage. We are in process of procuring a supplier for this mobile infrastructure project (MIP).

Tourism

14. Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what priority she gives to tourism policy in England. [120647]

Hugh Robertson: Tourism is a key priority for my Department and a major driver for growth, contributing £115 billion annually to the economy. The Government will continue to maximise the tourism benefits of hosting the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games. We will invest a further £2 million in domestic tourism marketing, with match funding from industry, to build on the success of the £6 million VisitEngland 20.12 per cent “Holiday at Home” campaign.

Listed Buildings

15. Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what progress she has made on her consultation on improvements to the system of listed building consents; and if she will make a statement. [120648]

Mr Vaizey: The consultation on listed building consents closed on 23 August. We received 419 responses to the consultation. I am currently considering these and my Department will publish the Government's response shortly.

Competitive Sport: Disabled People

17. Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what plans she has to increase participation in competitive sport by people with disabilities. [120650]

Hugh Robertson: Sport England's Youth Sports Strategy, underpinned by the Community Sports Legacy “Places, People, Play”, will deliver a year-on-year growth in participation in sport by disabled people by 2017.

In addition, 5,000 young disabled people in 486 schools have already been given the chance to take part in competitive sport as part of the new School Games programme.

Television Reception: Thanet

Laura Sandys: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if she will assess the adequacy of television reception in Thanet. [120649]

Mr Vaizey: Indications from a number of coverage investigations have shown that digital terrestrial television coverage in Thanet is in line with post-digital switchover predictions. However Ofcom is currently leading an assessment of digital terrestrial television reception in the Thanet area and will report shortly. Satellite and cable television platforms are also available in the Thanet area.

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Broadcasting

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps her Department is taking to ensure that broadcasters retain and share audience data with producers to enable product involvements. [120272]

Mr Vaizey: Broadcasting audience data are collected by the Broadcasters' Audience Research Board, in the case of television, and for radio by the Radio Joint Audience Research. These data are usually made available via a subscription service to the relevant organisation. As such the use and availability of these data are the subject of commercial agreements between the relevant parties and are not a matter for Government.

Sports: Schools

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the effect that the removal of ring-fenced funding for school sport will have on the Sportivate programme. [120635]

Hugh Robertson: Sportivate is not a school-sport scheme, but a community sport initiative that is part of Sport England's £135 million “Places, People, Play” legacy programme. In its first year, 80,870 young people aged between 14-25 have taken up the chance of six to eight-week coaching sessions in a sport of their choice.

Telephones: Fees and Charges

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what discussions she has had with Ofcom on whether access charges for numbers beginning (a) 08, (b) 09 and (c) 118 will be subject to a limit when new regulations are brought in by Ofcom in 2014. [120859]

Mr Vaizey: The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has had no discussions with the Office of Communications (Ofcom) on whether access charges for numbers beginning (a) 08, (b) 09 and (c) 118 will be subject to a limit when new regulations are brought in 2014. The matter is an operational issue for the independent regulator.

Currently, under General Condition 14, Ofcom requires communications providers to publish transparent pricing information for non-geographic calls, including in their advertising and promotional material. Providers must also ensure that those charges are given the same prominence as other call-charge information. However, Ofcom recognises that the current system around non-geographic numbers does not work for consumers, with confusion around call pricing and concerns about revenue sharing. Therefore, it is proposing to simplify the number ranges. The main proposals are:

Freephone: (080 and 116 numbers) to be free from all telephones, landline and mobile;

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Revenue sharing ranges: (084, 087, 09 and 118 numbers—where a portion of the retail charge is passed back to the receiver of the call) are to have a common simplified structure.

The issue of capping access charges is still subject to the consultation process. Ofcom presented a number of proposals in April 2012, recognising that it was a finely balanced decision, but ultimately it proposed that the access charge should not be capped in the first instance, because it considered that allowing it to be subject to competition was more likely to result in prices which reflected consumer preferences. Respondents to the April consultation have provided comments on this point, with some in favour and some against a cap. Ofcom is therefore considering those arguments before making a final decision in December. Given the complexity of the changes there will need to be at least 18 months transition time, which will start when the proposals are finalised by the end of this year.

Education

Abortion: Health Education

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the Government monitor the accuracy of information on abortion provided to school children; if he will contact the campaigning organisation Lovewise to request data on (a) the names of all schools where it has given presentations on abortion and (b) the total number of presentations given; and if he will make a statement. [120586]

Elizabeth Truss: We do not monitor the accuracy of information provided to children as part of their sex and relationship education (SRE) since we believe teachers are best placed to make this judgment. The Department does not investigate or request data from organisations providing SRE information unless there is evidence that a school may be in breach of the Secretary of State for Education's SRE guidance, or pupils are receiving an unbalanced and prejudicial sex and relationship education.

Children in Care

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many (a) children and (b) black and mixed-heritage children were looked after by local authorities in each of the last five years; [118722]

(2) what proportion of (a) all and (b) black and mixed-heritage children looked after by local authorities were (i) adopted and (ii) fostered in each of the last five years. [118723]

Mr Timpson: The number of children looked after in England in the last five years is contained in the following table. The table also shows a breakdown of children of black and mixed ethnic origin who were looked after by local authorities in the last five years.

Table 1: Children looked after at 31 March by ethnic origin(1,2), years ending 31 March 2007 to 2011, coverage: England
 20072008200920102011

All children looked after at 31 March(1,2)

59,960

59,360

60,890

64,410

65,520

      

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13 Sep 2012 : Column 382W

Black and mixed ethnic origin

10,030

9,670

9,650

10,160

10,150

      

Mixed

5,310

5,220

5,260

5,590

5,620

White and Black Caribbean

2,130

2,100

2,080

2,190

2,150

White and Black African

490

490

490

530

600

White and Asian

850

820

810

910

950

Any other mixed background

1,840

1,810

1,870

1,960

1,920

      

Black or Black British

4,720

4,450

4,400

4,570

4,520

Caribbean

1,640

1,600

1,570

1,660

1,640

African

2,320

2,140

2,090

2,110

2,050

Any other Black background

750

710

740

800.

840

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placement. Source: SSDA903

The proportion of all children looked after by local authorities who were adopted or in foster placements in each of the last five years is shown in the following table. The table also shows these proportions for children of black or mixed ethnic origin.

Table 2: Children granted an adoption order in year, or in a foster placement at 31 March, as a percentage of all looked after children at 31 March(1,2), years ending 31 March 2007 to 2011, Coverage: England
Percentage
 20072008200920102011

Number of children adopted(3) as a percentage of all looked-after children

6

5

5

5

5

Number of children in foster placements as a percentage of all looked-after children

70

71

72

73

74

Number of black or mixed ethnicity children(4) adopted(3) as a percentage of all black or mixed ethnicity looked-after children

4

5

5

4

4

Number of black or mixed ethnicity children(4) in foster placements as a percentage of all black or mixed ethnicity looked-after children

71

71

73

73

74

(1) Percentages have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placements. (3) Number of children adopted at any time during the year ending 31 March. (4) Mixed, Black or Black British origin, as shown in table 1. Source: SSDA903

These figures are based on data published in tables E1, A1 and A3 of the Statistical First Release: “Children looked after by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2011”. This is available on the Department's website via the following link.

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/statistics-by-topic/childrenandfamilies/a00196857/children-looked-after-by-las-in-england

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has recently commissioned any research into the quality of care provided to black and mixed-heritage children looked after by local authorities. [118724]

Mr Timpson: The Department has not recently commissioned any research into the quality of care provided to black and mixed-heritage children looked after by local authorities. The quality of care for looked- after children should be of a consistently high standard, regardless of a child's race or culture. The assessment of each individual child's needs, taking account of the child's own views, will determine the actions in the care plan which must be taken to promote and safeguard the child's welfare. Guidance to local authorities emphasises how important it is for social workers and carers to be aware of the child's race, religion and culture and the ways in which these are reflected in their daily lives. This will include helping the child to preserve and positively promote their identity.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many submissions have been received via the Tell Tim page on his Department's website; [120027]

(2) how many policy suggestions received via the Tell Tim page on his Department's website have been (a) considered and (b) developed into departmental policy; [120028]

(3) how many submissions received via the Tell Tim page on his Department's website have been responded to by (a) Ministers and (b) officials of his Department. [120029]

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Mr Timpson: The Tell Tim page was published on the Department's website in March 2011 to enable Ministers and the Department to hear directly from young people in care and those who support them within the care system. The Department for Education has received and considered 251 messages to date.

Some of the key issues raised and the Department's responses have included:

financial support for young people in care wanting to go on to further education, where the new 16-19 bursary provides young people in care and care leavers with a bursary of £1,200;

the status of foster carers, where the Foster Carers' Charter now sets out clear principles about what foster carers should be able to expect from their fostering service and what is expected from them in return;

red tape which frustrates foster carers, where the Minister wrote to every local authority to underline the principle that day-to-day decision making about foster children should be delegated to their foster carers wherever possible.

Ministers and officials cannot respond directly to messages as the Tell Tim page has been designed as a channel for anonymous feedback, given the potentially sensitive or personal nature of messages. However, summaries of the main issues raised along with the Department's responses are broadcast on the Department's YouTube channel.

Children: Day Care

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average cost to Ofsted is of inspecting an individual child care setting for each category of provider. [120010]

Elizabeth Truss: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Lady, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 10 September 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

The average cost to Ofsted of inspecting an individual childcare setting by category of provider is as follows.

 £

Sole childminder

708

Childminder with assistants

798

Childcare on domestic premises (4-6 childminders) and childcare on non-domestic premises (sessional care)

972

Childcare on domestic premises (more than 6 childminders) and childcare on non-domestic premises (full day care)

1,508

By “inspecting” we mean programmed inspection, post registration inspection and re-inspection of childminder and childcare settings. Childminders care for children on domestic premises—usually their own home. They may work with up to two assistants at any one time. Childcare on domestic premises is where four or more childminders or childminders and assistants work together. Sessional care relates to settings open for part of a day, such as a morning only pre-school or an after-school club for young children. Full day care relates to nurseries and pre-schools offering care for at least the length of a school day (and often longer) to support working parents.

The average costs relate to providers that are registered on the Early Years Register only, that is, for children below school age. Providers who are on the Childcare Register for children of

13 Sep 2012 : Column 384W

school age are not subject to regular inspection. We inspect a sample of providers and the cost of those inspections is covered by the annual fee for remaining on that register.

All costs relate to the most recent full year, 2011-12, and include direct and indirect costs plus overheads. It should be noted that the overall costs in Ofsted have reduced since 2010-11 and are planned to reduce in total by 30% by 2014-15 (the end of the current Comprehensive Spending Review period).

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Children: Health

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will implement the recommendations relevant to his Department contained in the Report of the Children and Young People's Health Outcomes Forum published in July 2012. [120009]

Mr Timpson: We are grateful to the Children and Young People’s Health Outcomes Forum for its work in producing this report. We are considering the recommendations relevant to the Department for Education, working with colleagues in the Department of Health. The Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), will publish the Government’s response in the autumn.

Children: Visual Impairment

Stephen Gilbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy to ensure that the statutory requirement on local authorities to establish and maintain registers for sight-impaired and severely sight-impaired children and young people remains in force. [119935]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 7 September 2012]: A local authority is required to keep a register of disabled children within its area, and this will include children who are sight impaired and severely sight impaired. There are no amendments proposed to the legislation under the SEN provisions in the Bill or any other pieces of legislation that will change this requirement.

Education: Children

Mr Andrew Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of children in each local authority have statements of educational need. [112486]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The requested information is published in Table 14A of the Statistical First Release ‘Special Educational Needs in England: January 2012’, available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001075/index.shtml

Further Education: Special Educational Needs

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what access to further education will be available to young people with a statement of special

13 Sep 2012 : Column 385W

educational needs who turn 16 years old before the implementation of the Government's proposed education health and care plans. [118777]

Mr Timpson: Young people who leave school with a statement of special educational needs (SEN) have access to a range of further education, in mainstream and specialist settings. Local authorities have a duty to undertake a learning difficulty assessment (LDA) for any 16 to 19-year-old with a statement, moving into further education. The LDA sets out the education the young person will participate in, and the support they will need to do that.

The Government have this week published draft legislation to reform and improve arrangements for young people with SEN. The provisions include a new single assessment process and Education, Health and Care Plan and will, for the first time, extend rights comparable to those in schools to 16 to 25-year-olds in further education.

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GCSE

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of (a) pupils receiving free school meals, (b) pupils not receiving free school meals and (c) all pupils at the end of key stage 4 did not achieve any (i) G and (ii) C grades or better at GCSE in each year since 1997. [115985]

Mr Laws: Figures for the years 2005-06 to 2010-11 on the number and percentage of pupils who did not achieve a grade G or above or a grade C or above in a GCSE or equivalent qualification at the end of key stage 4 by their free school meal eligibility can be found in the following table. Information on whether or not a pupil is actually receiving free school meals is not available. Figures for the years 2001-02 to 2004-05 can be provided only at a disproportionate cost. Figures for the years prior to 2001-02 are not available because pupil-level data have only been collected in the School Census since the 2001-02 academic year.

Percentage of pupils at the end of key stage 4(1) not achieving a grade G or above in a GCSE or equivalent qualification by free school meal (FSM) eligibility. Years: 2005/06 to 2010/11(2). Coverage: England, maintained schools (including academies and CTCs)
 Pupils eligible for FSMAll other pupils(3)All pupils
 Number not achieving a grade G or abovePercentage not achieving any G level GCSE's or equivalentNumber not achieving a grade G or abovePercentage not achieving any G level ' GCSE's or equivalentNumber not achieving a grade G or abovePercentage not achieving any G level GCSE's or equivalent

2005/06

6,538

8.4

14,154

2.7

20,692

3.5

2006/07

5,598

7.3

12,799

2.4

18,397

3.1

2007/08

4,403

5.9

10,407

2.0

14,810

2.5

2008/09

3,646

4.9

8,082

1.6

11,728

2.0

2009/10

3,023

3.9

6,542

1.3

9,565

1.7

2010/11

2,669

3.4

5,410

1.1

8,079

1.4

(1) Number of pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) Figures for 2005/06 to 2010/11 are based on final data. (3) Includes pupils for whom free school meal eligibility could not be determined. Source: National Pupil Database
Percentage of pupils at the end of key stage 4(1) not achieving a grade C or above in a GCSE or equivalent qualification by free school meal (FSM) eligibility. Years: 2005/06 to 2010/11(2). Coverage: England, maintained schools (including academies and CTCs)
 Pupils eligible for FSMAll other pupils(3)All pupils
 Number not achieving a grade C or abovePercentage not achieving any C level GCSE's or equivalentNumber not achieving a grade C or abovePercentage not achieving any C level GCSE's or equivalentNumber not achieving a grade C or abovePercentage not achieving any C level GCSE's or equivalent

2005/06

30,891

39.6

89,795

17.4

120,686

20.3

2006/07

27,313

35.7

80,372

15.3

107,685

17.9

2007/08

21,355

28.6

61,743

11.S

83,098

13.9

2008/09

16,111

21.6

42,655

8.5

58,766

10.2

2009/10

11,901

15.4

29,335

5.9

41,236

7.1

2010/11

9,540

12.1

20,749

4.3

30,289

5.3

(1) Number of pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) Figures for 2005/06 to 2010/11 are based on final data. (3) Includes pupils for whom free school meal eligibility could not be determined. Source: National Pupil Database

Health Education

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to encourage schools to educate children on the risks of childhood obesity and diabetes. [117764]

Elizabeth Truss: The non-statutory framework for personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education includes learning about the importance of health and living healthy lifestyles. Pupils should be taught about the benefits of exercise and healthy eating; how to keep healthy and what influences health; and about the different food choices and the safer choices they can make.

The framework does not specify particular aspects of health that schools should cover. Schools are free to illustrate these concepts through a range of contexts that are relevant to their pupils. An example of this could be the risks of childhood obesity and diabetes.

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We are currently reviewing PSHE education to determine how we can improve the quality of all PSHE teaching and support teachers to teach the subject well. The review also aims to identify the essential core body of knowledge that pupils should be taught.

Parents: Education

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many vouchers have been distributed under the CANparent trial scheme; [119460]

(2) what discussions his Department has had with church groups on the CANparent trial scheme. [119461]

Mr Timpson: The CANparent trial was launched by the Prime Minister on 18 May 2012. It aims to remove the stigma associated with attending universal parenting classes and to test how a self-sustaining market in such classes can be established, by offering vouchers that mothers and fathers of children aged 0-5 in three areas can exchange for high quality parenting classes. Vouchers are being distributed by members of the Foundation Years' workforce and by staff at Boots stores in the three areas. We are currently surveying voucher distributors, of which there are over 300, to gauge activity levels to date. The independent evaluation of the trial will robustly assess the number of parents who have received vouchers. Interviews with a representative sample of eligible mothers and fathers in the trial areas are currently taking place.

The Department has been in contact with a wide variety of organisations in the course of the development and implementation of the trial, including a number with various faith group affiliations.

Pupils: Bullying

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of Stonewall's “The School Report” 2012; and if he will make a statement; [120510]

(2) what advice his Department provides to head teachers on dealing with (a) bullying and (b) homophobic bullying; [120511]

(3) what steps his Department has taken to eliminate homophobic bullying from schools. [120512]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government have made tackling all forms of bullying, particularly bullying motivated by prejudice, one of their top priorities. This commitment was highlighted in the schools White Paper: “The Importance of Teaching”.

A number of the findings in the 2012 report by Stonewall are already reflected in the measures the Government are taking to ensure schools are properly equipped to prevent and tackle all forms of bullying, including through clearer and more concise advice to schools. The new advice summarises the legal obligations and powers schools have to tackle bullying, outlines general principles used in the most successful schools, and signposts schools to specialist organisations, including Stonewall.

Alongside new advice, we have given teachers the legal powers that they need to ensure good behaviour and enforce the school rules. Through the Education Act 2011, we have strengthened teachers' powers to

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search pupils, including a specific power to tackle cyber-bullying, whereby inappropriate images on electronic devices, including mobile phones, can be deleted.

We have also taken steps to strengthen schools accountability. The new Ofsted inspection arrangements mean that schools are now held more closely to account for the way they tackle bullying. When evaluating the behaviour and safety of pupils at the school (one of the four core areas), inspectors must consider pupils' behaviour towards other pupils and adults. This will include whether pupils are free from bullying and harassment, including bullying based on sexual orientation and all other kinds of prejudice-based bullying.

The Government believe that, taken together, these measures provide a comprehensive approach to ending not just homophobic bullying, but all bullying in schools.

Schools: Boxing

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools teach boxing. [119100]

Mr Timpson: The last PE and sport survey (2009/10) showed that 10% of schools provided boxing for their pupils in 2009-10.