Olympic Games 2012: Essex

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps he has taken to raise participation in events connected with the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games in (a) Southend and (b) Essex; and if he will make a statement. [118343]

Hugh Robertson: The Government and the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) established the Nations and Regions

3 Sep 2012 : Column 225W

Group to ensure UK-wide engagement and to maximise the legacy from London 2012. A sustained programme of proactive marketing and communications activities has generated high levels of interest and engagement in London 2012-related activities across Essex.

This can be seen through 90% of Essex schools (574) being registered for the Get Set network, with 63 from Southend. Also, six Essex schools were selected to form the Guard of Honour, lining the route as the athletes made their way through the Olympic Park. 44 Inspire Mark Projects have been running across the country, from Active Plus Games, focusing on activities for older generations, to the Essex Ambassadors volunteering programme, a 300-strong corps of all ages who provided the welcoming face of Essex at Stansted airport and key locations across the county at Games Time. A wide variety of sports and well-being initiatives—from Urban Games to Mini Games have been introduced and sustained across the county. Essex county council's Olympic and Paralympic art commission, Journey to the Podium, was selected: to be on display in Westminster Hall in August as part of the innovative Arts in Parliament programme.

Almost half a million people turned out to witness the Olympic Torch making its way across the county, with 80,000 people turning out in Southend, and the 'Sparks will Fly' cultural celebration attracted audiences of 15,000 in Chelmsford. In hosting the Olympic Mountain Bike competition at Hadleigh Farm a range of cycling initiatives has been introduced across the county—from 'Mud Sweat and Gears' for serious cyclists to 'Bicycle Ballet' a performing arts installation, with training hosted at the Hadleigh Old Fire Station, purchased by the county council and its partner Castle Point borough council to provide a community hub in the host borough. In addition, over 300 Compete For Contracts to provide goods and services for the Games were awarded to companies in Essex.

As part of the UK's bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games we promised to inspire a new generation to play sport. Through Places, People, Play, £135 million has already been committed to support community sport facilities and activity. Many sports clubs in Essex have already been allocated funding through the 'Inspired Facilities' strand, of this programme. Also, over the next four years the new Youth Sport Strategy will invest at least £1 billion of Lottery and Exchequer funding to help ensure young people across England are regularly taking part in sport.

Public Libraries

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) with reference to his Department's minded to letter of 14 February 2012, when he expects to make the decision on whether to intervene by way of a local inquiry into Brent council's library plans; and how many substantive representations he has received on his Department's minded to decision; [118367]

(2) whether he plans to intervene in respect of the library plans of (a) Gloucestershire county council, (b) Somerset county council, (c) Isle of Wight council, (d) Lewisham council, (e) Doncaster council, (f) Bolton council and (h) other library authorities. [118368]

3 Sep 2012 : Column 226W

Mr Vaizey: Since issuing the ‘minded to’ letter of 14 February 2012 to Brent council, the Department has received a formal shared response on behalf of several local Brent groups, and around 60 other items of correspondence from Brent residents. The matter remains under consideration.

On 3 September 2012, I issued letters to the Isle of Wight council, Lewisham council and Bolton council, setting out that the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport is not minded to intervene by way of a local inquiry into their library services.

Copies of the letters to the local authorities are available on the website of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport at

http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/libraries/3416.aspx

and will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Publications

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 33W, on publications, how much his Department has spent on (a) circulars, (b) consultation documents and (c) publications since May 2010. [117827]

John Penrose: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport commissions and publishes circulars, consultation documents and publications relevant to its sectors. The accounting system does not record the information in the manner requested. This information could be provided from the records kept only at disproportionate cost.

Royal Archives

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what financial support his Department gave to the Royal Archives in each of the last three years. [117822]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has not given funding specifically for the Royal Archives during the last three years; however, it has provided financial support to the Royal Household's Property Services.

The funding provided during this period is set out in the following table:

Financial yearAmount paid (£ million)

2009-10

16.107

2010-11

15.624

2011-12

15.414

This financial support includes provision for: Royal communications and information; property maintenance and utilities for the occupied royal palaces; and, security and essential work at Marlborough house.

Tourism: East Midlands

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps (a) Visit Britain and (b) Visit England is taking to promote tourism in (i) the East Midlands, (ii) Nottinghamshire and (iii) Ashfield. [117333]

3 Sep 2012 : Column 227W

John Penrose: VisitBritain promotes the east midlands overseas through activities such as the Government's GREAT Britain image campaign, its “GREAT Britain You're Invited” £122 million campaign encourages travel to Britain by offering deals in 21 priority markets. Easyjet, Hilton and Expedia, have promoted offers for the midlands as part of the campaign. VisitBritain plan to continue to work with these partners post- London 2012 games.

In the last financial year, VisitBritain's press and PR team helped generate coverage of the east midlands worth over £50 million. In 2010 VisitBritain partnered with Universal Pictures and Experience Nottingham around the release of the Robin Hood film, to market Nottingham and the east midlands to a global audience. Outcomes of this partnership included an extensive PR campaign, reaching 118 million people in 32 countries.

VisitEngland is working closely with local areas and destinations across the country, including the east midlands, in line with Government's localism agenda, on a campaign to grow the value of local tourism economies. This is co-ordinated through the National Strategic Framework for Tourism (2010 to 2020), which includes an action programme developed in consultation with the tourism sector. In addition, the Regional Growth Fund Project, “Growing Tourism Locally”, managed and coordinated by VisitEngland, aims to stimulate increased visitor spend across all regions.

VisitBritain and VisitEngland are maximising the economic legacy of London 2012 to showcase the whole nation. VisitBritain has met with rights holding broadcasters worldwide and developed content packages, including the provision of pan-Britain content from the BBC and created a Torch Relay app promoting areas, such as Nottingham, that the Torch visits. In March, VisitEngland launched a new domestic tourism campaign aimed at boosting tourism throughout the UK. The campaign is expected to deliver £500 million in extra visitor spend over four years and includes an invitation to the industry to join up in a 20.12% discount or special offer incentive for consumers. The campaign has resulted in over 3,000 offers and the vast majority of these are outside London. The campaign has been reinforced by digital media and social networking including the “Fan in a Van” tour, currently under way.

Tourism: South East

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps he is taking to promote tourism in (a) South East Essex and (b) Southend West constituency; and if he will make a statement. [118338]

John Penrose: In March, VisitEngland launched a new marketing campaign aimed at boosting domestic tourism, maximising the economic legacy of the games for the whole country and making the most of the Torch Relay and the Cultural Olympiad. The campaign is expected to deliver £500 million in extra visitor spend over four years. This promotion includes an invitation to the industry to join up in a 20.12% special offer incentive for consumers. The 20.12 campaign has

3 Sep 2012 : Column 228W

resulted in over 3,000 offers driven through the consumer-facing website and the vast majority of these are outside London. This will build on the well reported “staycation” effect and will deliver benefit in the long-term.

In addition, VisitBritain is investing in a major international promotional campaign in key overseas markets; over the next four years, this is expected to deliver 4.6 million extra visitors, £2.27 billion in extra visitor spend and over 50,000 job opportunities across the whole nation. The programme is backed by a £125 million investment over four years, including £55 million raised from the private sector. This campaign will take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity afforded by the unique events of 2012 to maximise the industry's potential and ensure that we create a sustained legacy for tourism. Destinations all over the UK, including Southend West and South East Essex, stand to benefit from these initiatives.

Tourism: Weather

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if he will have discussions with the (a) BBC and (b) Meteorological Office on the importance of accurate reporting of local and regional weather to tourism. [118029]

John Penrose: In 2011, VisitEngland contributed to a national consultation exercise on the work of the Meteorological Office. The Meteorological Office is increasingly providing more targeted local services, so that good weather on (for example) one side of the Pennines isn't lumped into a wider overall forecast for rain on the other side. On its website it has increased the number of locations for which it provides forecasts from around 350 to 5000. Amongst these locations are a wide range of tourist attractions, beaches, youth hostels and resorts. In addition, to improve access to its forecasts, the Meteorological Office has launched new channels, such as iPhone and android applications, as well as the weather widget which allows their weather forecasts to be displayed on other websites.

Wrecks: Salvage

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on ensuring that archaeological best practice and heritage policy are followed during the salvaging of HMS Victory 1744 and other historic vessels. [117669]

John Penrose [holding answer 17 July 2012]: We have ensured that the HMS Victory wreck site will be managed in accordance with the archaeological principles set out in the Annex to the UNESCO Convention on the protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage, and the Museum Code of Ethics will be applied to any artefacts that are recovered.

No work on the site can be undertaken without prior approval of the Secretary of State for Defence, who is in turn advised by the independent Advisory Group, which includes representation from English Heritage and the National Museum of the Royal Navy.

These arrangements have been put in place through official meetings with ministerial agreement.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 229W

Health

Abortion

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 4 July 2012, Official Report, column 664W, on abortion, how many of the incomplete HSA4 forms did not record the (a) gestational age of the foetus and (b) reason for the abortion. [118119]

Anne Milton: The medical practitioner performing the abortion is required to sign form HSA4 and submit details of the termination to the chief medical officer. Included in the information is the gestation at which the termination takes place and the grounds on which it is carried out in accordance with the Abortion Act 1967 (as amended).

The following table shows the total of missing data on the HSA4 form for the years 2007 to 2011 in relation to gestational age and grounds for the termination:

Missing HSA4 data for gestational as at June 2012
 GestationGrounds

2007

0

31

2008

15

22

2009

10

15

2010

11

14

2011

0

18

Totals

36

100

Note: Totals relate to the number of errors not the number of forms.

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the names are of the licensed clinics that provided incomplete HSA4 forms in (a) 2011, (b) 2010, (c) 2009 and (d) 2008; and if he will make a statement; [118122]

(2) what (a) procedures and (b) policies are used by (i) his Department and (ii) the Care Quality Commission to investigate incomplete HSA4 forms. [118123]

Anne Milton: The Department has a duty under the Abortion Act 1967 to monitor notifications of termination of pregnancy (HSA4 forms) submitted to the chief medical officer for England. Any form with missing or invalid data is returned to the service provider until all the necessary information is received and validated.

The Department does not hold information by year on the number of clinics that have HSA4 forms returned. A list of clinics that have had HSA4 forms returned over the past four years (2008 to 2011 inclusive) is set out in the table. This has been placed in the Library.

The Department publishes a range of guidance on the completion of abortions forms including HSA4 forms. There is a thorough process for recording and monitoring information received on abortion notification forms HSA4. Checks on the forms assist in monitoring of the Abortion Act and National Statistics are produced from the data received.

A copy of the guidance documents “Guidance note for completing the abortion notification form HSA4 for abortions performed in England and Wales: paper form” and “Summary guidance note for completing the

3 Sep 2012 : Column 230W

abortion notification form HSA4 for abortions performed in England and Wales: electronic form” have been placed in the Library.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is a statutory regulatory body and has powers to investigate where complaints are made about the fitness of professionals to practice or of regulatory malpractice. The CQC is not responsible for monitoring HSA4 forms.

Alcoholic Drinks: Children

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 June 2012, Official Report, column 1026W, on alcoholic drinks: children, how many children between the ages of (a) 12 and 14, (b) 14 and 16 and (c) 16 and 18 in each unitary and county local authority area were receiving treatment for alcohol dependency in the latest period for which figures are available. [118125]

Anne Milton: The following table contains the figures for under-18s in each local authority area who access substance misuse services saying that alcohol is the main substance they have a problem with. It is not possible to say whether these young people are being treated for alcohol dependency because dependency is a clinical term, the extent of which depends on an assessment by a healthcare professional.

Young people's treatment needs differ from those of adults. Very few young people develop dependency. Those who use drugs or alcohol problematically are likely to be vulnerable and experiencing a range of problems, of which substance misuse is one.

The majority of young people accessing specialist alcohol interventions require dependency. Most young people need to be involved with specialist alcohol interventions for a short period of time, often weeks, before continuing with further support elsewhere, within an integrated young people's care plan.

The figures are for each local drug and alcohol partnership in England. These have the same boundaries as unitary and county local authorities apart from three areas, which are Bedfordshire, Cheshire, and Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, each of which contain two local authorities.

Numbers of young people in treatment for primary alcohol use varies between different local authority areas across the country. This may be partly explained by regional variations in the prevalence of alcohol use among young people, or differences in the way that young people's substance misuse services are configured in different areas (e.g. some areas may have more focus on meeting need through targeted services providing brief alcohol interventions for young people with less specialist need, and data on this are not collected through the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System).

Figures for under-18s in each local authority area who access substance misuse services saying that alcohol is the main substance they have a problem with
Number
Partnership12 to 1314 to 1516 to 17

Darlington

5

37

34

County Durham

15

42

62

Hartlepool

5

28

31

Redcar and Cleveland

6

13

11

3 Sep 2012 : Column 231W

Middlesbrough

*

10

8

Stockton-on-Tees

0

10

9

Newcastle upon Tyne

*

28

45

North Tyneside

*

17

26

Gateshead

*

12

*

Northumberland

12

30

30

South Tyneside

5

19

23

Sunderland

6

20

41

Salford

*

17

23

Trafford

0

*

11

Blackburn with Darwen

*

13

24

Blackpool

6

32

27

Lancashire

31

142

128

Wirral

5

25

26

Warrington

*

10

17

Halton

*

7

16

Rochdale

7

50

48

St Helens

9

25

42

Knowsley

14

32

20

Tameside

*

16

18

Oldham

8

26

30

Bolton

7

42

21

Bury

*

32

30

Cumbria

11

33

35

Liverpool

21

71

66

Manchester

9

19

21

Sefton

5

19

17

Cheshire

*

30

51

Stockport

9

37

21

Wigan

*

15

18

Kingston upon Hull

*

15

45

East Riding of Yorkshire

5

22

43

Calderdale

*

11

14

Kirklees

*

14

24

North Yorkshire

12

51

91

York

*

*

13

North Lincolnshire

*

7

9

North East Lincolnshire

*

11

24

Barnsley

*

14

15

Wakefield

*

7

7

Sheffield

*

17

16

Leeds

0

5

14

Bradford

*

27

28

Doncaster

5

27

19

Rotherham

6

26

28

Leicestershire

*

22

21

Leicester

*

9

21

Rutland

0

*

*

Derbyshire

*

14

25

Derby

*

37

40

Nottinghamshire

22

72

156

Nottingham

8

19

29

Lincolnshire

*

31

43

Northamptonshire

*

14

22

Shropshire

*

14

25

Telford and Wrekin

0

*

12

Staffordshire

18

62

46

Stoke-on-Trent

11

39

20

3 Sep 2012 : Column 232W

Birmingham

*

30

53

Coventry

0

6

28

Dudley

*

17

42

Herefordshire

6

25

20

Sandwell

12

19

25

Solihull

*

5

5

Walsall

15

56

55

Warwickshire

*

12

22

Wolverhampton

*

13

20

Worcestershire

*

16

14

Bedfordshire

*

10

12

Luton

0

8

9

Cambridgeshire

11

39

54

Peterborough

8

36

29

Essex

6

27

46

Southend-on-Sea

*

19

24

Thurrock

*

6

11

Hertfordshire

0

5

20

Norfolk

*

50

40

Suffolk

*

33

37

Barking and Dagenham

15

41

48

Havering

*

*

7

Camden

*

10

27

Islington

*

12

15

Hackney

*

*

7

Lambeth

*

0

15

Lewisham

9

10

14

Southwark

0

5

8

Redbridge

*

10

8

Waltham Forest

*

5

9

Barnet

*

7

*

Bexley

0

6

*

Brent

0

*

10

Bromley

10

35

28

Croydon

*

5

12

Ealing

*

19

12

Enfield

*

5

*

Greenwich

*

6

21

Hammersmith and Fulham

0

*

*

Haringey

0

7

18

Kensington and Chelsea

*

5

7

Kingston upon Thames

*

7

20

Merton

*

12

7

Newham

0

*

*

Richmond upon Thames

0

8

9

Sutton

5

27

23

Tower Hamlets

7

38

25

Wandsworth

10

24

13

Westminster

10

20

10

Harrow

*

24

19

Hillingdon

*

*

9

Hounslow

*

5

12

Bracknell Forest

5

11

11

Reading

0

*

9

Slough

0

0

5

West Berkshire

*

*

7

Windsor and Maidenhead

*

6

7

Wokingham

0

8

5

3 Sep 2012 : Column 233W

Buckinghamshire

*

22

29

Milton Keynes

*

*

7

Oxfordshire

*

5

18

Brighton and Hove

7

18

38

East Sussex

33

112

88

West Sussex

*

*

6

Kent

*

46

67

Medway Towns

*

6

8

Hampshire

*

26

56

Portsmouth

0

5

8

Southampton

*

23

18

Isle of Wight

6

35

24

Surrey

*

28

33

Bath and North East Somerset

*

8

11

Bristol

*

30

50

South Gloucestershire

*

5

*

North Somerset

0

*

7

Dorset

*

22

29

Bournemouth

*

13

22

Poole

6

16

15

Devon

*

31

43

Plymouth

0

21

33

Torbay

0

11

18

Swindon

0

*

11

Wiltshire

*

11

15

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

5

8

19

Gloucestershire

5

10

33

Somerset

0

5

9

* All numbers under five have been suppressed to protect clients identification. Where totals could be derived, figures have been rounded to the nearest five and marked with an asterisk. Note: Within these statistics, a young person's age is determined when they first start treatment or if they are already in treatment, at start of the year. Source: National Drug Treatment Monitoring System.

Anorexia: Children

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to reduce levels of childhood anorexia. [117770]

Paul Burstow: Hospital admission rates for anorexia are falling. However, this is one part of a complex picture and there is no room for complacency about this distressing condition. The Department is funding the ‘Children and Young People's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' project, which is transforming child and adolescent mental health services, providing training for staff in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence-approved best evidence-based therapies and embedding intensive, session by session outcome monitoring to make sure children and young people have improved access to the best possible psychological therapies in a way they find acceptable and relevant.

In year one 2011-12, the therapies offered were cognitive behavioural therapy and parenting programmes for three to 10-year-olds. In 2012-13, as part of the additional investment of £22 million over the next three years announced in February 2012, the

3 Sep 2012 : Column 234W

geographical reach of the project will be extended and two further therapies added: systemic family therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy. Together these will help support children, young people and their families and address some of the major mental health problems of adolescence including eating disorders. We are also developing a suite of interactive e-learning programmes to extend the skills and knowledge of all staff working with children and young people, including health professionals, teachers, social workers and others to help them understand and recognise emotional and mental health problems and offer early and effective interventions.

We also welcome the work of the Government Equalities Office's Body Image campaign, which seeks to raise awareness about body image and ensure that young people have healthier and happier futures regardless of their physical appearance.

Antidepressants

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions for antidepressants were issued (a) in the community and (b) in hospitals in each year since 2001. [118200]

Mr Simon Burns: In terms of prescribing in primary care, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 11 June 2012, Official Report, columns 118-119W.

Information is not held centrally, for secondary care, in the format requested. The following table provides the volume, by number of packs, for antidepressant medicines, classified by the World Health Organisation's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system, used in secondary care, in England, for each available year since 2001.

Antidepressant medicines used in secondary care, in England, as classified by ATC classification code N06A0 antidepressants and mood stabilisers
 Number of packs (thousand)

2001

1,318.2

2002

1,441.8

2003

1,521.7

2004

1,508.5

2005

1,441.6

2006

1,367.0

2007

1,319.8

2008

1,329.2

2009

1,357.5

2010

1,359.7

2011

1,315.7

Source: IMS Health: Hospital Pharmacy Audit

Asbestos: Children

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he plans to publish the Committee on Carcinogenicity's findings on children's vulnerability to asbestos; and if he will make a statement. [118279]

Mr Gibb: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

The Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment publishes its advice on its website:

http://www.iacoc.org.uk/

3 Sep 2012 : Column 235W

I am informed that the Committee plans to consider a first draft of its statement on the comparative vulnerability of children to asbestos at its next meeting in November.

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on the Committee on Carcinogenicity's findings on children's vulnerability to asbestos; and if he will make a statement. [118280]

Anne Milton: The Secretary of State has not held any discussions with the Secretary of State for Education on the Committee on Carcinogenicity's findings on children's vulnerability to asbestos. The Committee has not yet published any findings.

Brain: Injuries

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the United Kingdom Acquired Brain Injury Forum's publication entitled, “Life after Brain Injury—A Way Forward”. [117742]

Paul Burstow: The Health and Social Care Act (2012) sets out a range of reforms that will improve outcomes and ensure improved access to services. It will also create more local accountability for services for neurological conditions, including those for people with an acquired brain injury. The Department has made no specific assessment.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what measures are currently in place within the NHS for the commissioning of specialist brain injury rehabilitation. [117833]

Paul Burstow: Specialised rehabilitation services for brain injury and complex disability for all ages form part of the Specialised Services National Definitions set.

Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), the NHS Commissioning Board (NHSCB) will have responsibility for the direct commissioning of a number of services including those specialised services that are currently commissioned on a national or regional basis.

Work is currently in hand to determine the list of services. No final decisions have yet been made on which services the NHSCB will directly commission from April 2013. Ministers expect to be in a position to set out an initial list in the summer. This will then be subject to consultation with the NHSCB, prior to setting out in regulations.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what measures are in place within the NHS to record data on acquired brain injuries. [117834]

Paul Burstow: Health care providers collect administrative and clinical information locally to support the care of patients, including those with acquired brain injury. These data are submitted at regular intervals to the Secondary Uses Services (SUS), which supports health care planning, commissioning, public health and national policy development. The data currently managed within SUS are derived from

3 Sep 2012 : Column 236W

commissioning datasets, which providers of national health service care must submit and make available to commissioners. They are also added to the Health Episode Statistics data warehouse.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received from (a) individuals and (b) organisations on the treatment of acquired brain injuries. [117835]

Paul Burstow: The Department has received a variety of representations from Members of Parliament and other interested parties on the United Kingdom Acquired Brain Injury Forum's publication, “Life after Brain Injury—A Way Forward”.

Breast Cancer

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many women aged (a) 49 years and under, (b) 50 to 59, (c) 60 to 69, (d) 70 to 79, (e) 80 to 89 and (f) over 90 years were diagnosed with advanced breast cancer in each (i) cancer network and (ii) primary care trust area in each year since 1997. [117944]

Paul Burstow: This information cannot be provided in the format requested. During 2011-12, we piloted the collection of metastatic and recurrent breast cancer data to identify what information could be collated from routine national health service data and cancer registries. In March 2012, the report ‘Recurrent and Metastatic Breast Cancer Data Collection Project Pilot’ was published. This set out the lessons learned and recommendations for routine collection of data, which is currently under way. A copy of the report has already been placed in the Library.

As we progress with the collection of metastatic and recurrent breast cancer data, we will consider how to make this information routinely available in the future.

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether the National Breast Cancer Audit will audit (a) patient access to clinical nurse specialists and (b) personalised information provision, including written follow-up care plans; [118107]

(2) whether the National Breast Cancer Audit will audit whether patients have their treatment and care discussed by a multidisciplinary team. [118108]

Paul Burstow: The design of the National Breast Cancer Audit will be considered at a specification meeting hosted by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) and chaired by the Department later this year. Interested stakeholders, including patient group representatives, will be invited to the meeting to contribute to the design of the audit. Minutes from this meeting will be published on the HQIP website. Following this meeting, HQIP will invite tender returns for the delivery of this national audit.

Mrs Glindon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will take steps to ensure that all women with secondary breast cancer have access to a clinical nurse specialist; [118451]

3 Sep 2012 : Column 237W

(2) how many and what proportion of breast cancer patients are offered (a) a written follow-up care plan, (b) a named individual to contact and (c) other personalised information and support in each year for which figures are available; [118454]

(3) how many and what proportion of secondary breast cancer patients were given access to a clinical nurse specialist in each year for which figures are available; [118455]

(4) whether data on patients with (a) secondary breast cancer and (b) recurrence of breast cancer will be separately identifiable as part of the 2011-12 National Cancer Patient Experience survey. [118457]

Paul Burstow: Information concerning the number of women with secondary breast cancer who are given access to a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and the number and proportion of breast cancer patients who are offered a written follow-up care plan, a named individual to contact and other personalised information and support is not collected.

However, ‘The National Report of the 2010 Cancer Patient Experience Survey’, published in December 2010, included a series of questions about CNSs, written information and provision of support. The views of over 67,000 cancer patients were included in the survey results, of which 14,264 had breast cancer. Patients with secondary breast cancer are included in this figure, but are not identified.

Set out in the following table are the responses of patients with breast cancer to questions concerning CNSs, written information and support, presented alongside the results for all cancers.

QuestionsBreast cancer (%)All cancer (%)

Given the name of a CNS

93

84

Given clear written information given about what to do or not do after leaving hospital (in-patient care)

89

82

Given the right amount of information about condition and treatment

89

88

Hospital staff provided information about support and self-help groups

86

79

Definitely given enough emotional support while being treated as an out-patient

69

71

Datasets for the 2010 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey and the forthcoming 2010-11 survey are based on International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes. C50 covers all malignant neoplasms of the breast, so patients with secondary or recurrent breast cancer cannot be identified separately.

The National Cancer Survivorship Initiative pilot Patient Reported Outcomes Measures survey of cancer survivors in 2011 asked breast cancer patients how their cancer responded to treatment. One of the possible responses to this question was ‘My breast cancer has come back after it was originally treated’, so these women will be separately identifiable. Results of the pilot are expected to be published in the autumn.

We know that cancer patients greatly value the care and support of CNSs. To support the national health service to develop the CNS work force, ‘Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer’ sets out our

3 Sep 2012 : Column 238W

intention to build the evidence base for the benefits and costs savings that CNSs can offer. This follows an independent report we published in December 2010 that showed that, in many scenarios, the costs of additional support roles are likely to be outweighed by the savings that can be achieved.

Mrs Glindon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment his Department has made of the effect access to a multidisciplinary team has on outcomes for women with secondary breast cancer; [118452]

(2) if he will estimate how many and what proportion of breast cancer patients have had their treatment and care discussed by a multidisciplinary team in each year for which figures are available; [118453]

(3) what arrangements he has put in place to ensure urgent clinical review of patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence or metastasis. [118456]

Paul Burstow: Information concerning the number of women with breast cancer who have their care co-ordinated by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) is not collected.

“Improving Outcomes in Breast Cancer”, published by the Department in 1996 and updated by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in 2002, sets out best practice evidence based guidance on the diagnosis, treatment and aftercare of women with breast cancer, including those with secondary breast cancer. One of its four key recommendations is that women should be treated by an MDT. The guidance is complimented by “Breast cancer (early and locally advanced)” and “Breast cancer (advanced)” published by NICE in 2009, which also make recommendations on the involvement of MDTs on the care of women with breast cancer.

To support urgent clinical review of patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence or metastasis, both the “Improving Outcomes and Early and Locally Advanced” guidance make recommendations on routine follow-up and monitoring to assess patient health and to check for recurrence. The second specifically recommends that patients treated for breast cancer should have an agreed, written care plan, recorded by a named healthcare professional. A copy of this should be provided to both the patient and their general practitioner. This plan should give the name of a designated healthcare professional(s); dates for review of any adjuvant therapy; details of surveillance mammography; signs and symptoms to look for and seek advice on; contact details for immediate referral to specialist care; and contact details for support services.

Cancer

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what data on the patient experience of breast cancer will be provided by the Survivorship Patient-Reported Outcome Measures survey pilot carried out by the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative; [118109]

3 Sep 2012 : Column 239W

(2) when data will be published from the Survivorship Patient-Reported Outcome Measures survey pilot carried out by the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative; [118110]

(3) when his Department plans to publish (a) the national report and (b) trust level reports from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011-12. [118188]

Paul Burstow: The fieldwork for the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011-12 is finished. National and trust level reports are expected to be published later this summer. The reports will provide a breakdown of the experience of cancer patients across a number of stages in the cancer care pathway and will include analysis of improvement levels since the 2010-11 survey. The trust level reports will provide benchmarked data nationally and between teams so that priority improvement areas can be identified.

The National Cancer Survivor Initiative has conducted a pilot Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) survey of around 5,000 people who have had a diagnosis of either breast, prostate or colorectal cancer or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

The survey focused on health related quality of life outcomes and covers issues such as physical symptoms; mobility; independence; work; finance; mental health; family relationships; emotional needs; and social concerns. We will publish a full analysis of the results by autumn 2012 and plans to roll out the PROMs survey nationally are being developed.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent assessment he has made of the availability of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence-approved treatments for (a) lung, (b) bowel and (c) breast cancer in Surrey Primary Care Trust; [118373]

(2) what assessment he has made of variations in access to National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence-approved treatments for (a) lung, (b) bowel and (c) breast cancer in England; and if he will make a statement. [118374]

Paul Burstow: We have made no assessment of the availability of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) approved treatments for lung, bowel and breast cancer at a national or at primary care trust (PCT) level.

PCTs are legally obliged to fund drugs and treatments recommended in NICE technology appraisal guidance within three months of guidance being published, unless the requirement is waived in a specific case.

Cancer: Drugs

Mark Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients have received the drug dasatinib on the Cancer Drugs Fund since the fund was created in 2010. [117336]

Paul Burstow: Under the interim cancer drugs funding arrangements in 2010-11 (from October 2010 to the end of February 2011), five patients received dasatinib. Patient numbers by drug for March 2011 are not available.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 240W

Based on the latest available information, a further 56 patients have received dasatinib under the Cancer Drugs Fund (from April 2011 to the end of February 2012).

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on money assigned to each Strategic Health Authority through their Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) budget which remains unspent (a) at the end of each financial year and (b) on termination of the CDF. [118224]

Paul Burstow: The overall strategic health authority (SHA) and primary care trust (PCT) surplus reported for 2011-12 includes the underspend against the funding allocated to the national health service for the Cancer Drugs Fund in 2011-12. As set out in the 2012-13 NHS Operating Framework, the aggregate 2011-12 SHA and PCT surplus is carried forward into 2012-13.

Arrangements for the Cancer Drugs Fund from 1 April 2013 and beyond are subject to discussions between the Department and the national health service Commissioning Board Authority.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that primary care trusts do not use the Cancer Drugs Fund to pay for treatments which are National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence-approved and should be available through the local NHS. [118371]

Paul Burstow: Primary care trusts are legally obliged to fund drugs and treatments recommended in National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal guidance, within three months of guidance being published, unless the requirement is waived in a specific case.

Treating clinicians, working with local national health service managers, are expected to explore all reasonable commissioning avenues for securing NHS funding before using the strategic health authority-managed Cancer Drugs Fund. This includes whether NICE has issued a positive technology appraisal for the treatment of the relevant indication. If so, such treatment must be made available on the NHS in line with NICE's recommendations.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the use of the South East Coast Strategic Health Authority Cancer Drugs Fund; and if he will make a statement. [118372]

Paul Burstow: The Cancer Drugs Fund was launched on 1 April 2011 to help thousands of cancer patients access the drugs their clinicians believe will help them. We also made an additional £50 million available to strategic health authorities in 2010-11. This funding has so far helped almost 18,500 patients in England to access the cancer drugs their clinicians recommend.

Information on NHS South East Coast’s use of the funding is shown in the following table.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 241W

3 Sep 2012 : Column 242W

 2010-112011-122012-13 to end June 2012 
 Number of patients fundedAmount spent (£000(1))Number of patients fundedAmount spent (£000(1))Number of patients fundedAmount spent (£000)Total number of patients funded October 2010 to end June 2012(2)

South East Coast

306

2,159

1,241

10,765

243

4,785

1,790

(1) These figures include end of year spending commitments. (2) Some individual patients may be double-counted where a patient has received more than one drug treatment through the Cancer Drugs Fund. Note: Spend figures have been rounded to the nearest £000. Source: Information supplied to the Department of Health by SHAs

Further information on the use of the Cancer Drugs Fund in England was made available in a statement from the Department and a bulletin from the National Cancer Action Team, which were published on 29 August 2012. Copies of both of these documents have been placed in the Library.

Cardiovascular System

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if his Department will take steps to ensure that the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on atrial fibrillation are being implemented by (a) GP commissioning boards and (b) primary care trusts. [118362]

Mr Simon Burns: It is for local national health service commissioners to determine the needs of their populations and ensure that appropriate services are available, taking into account the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's (NICE) clinical guidelines where appropriate.

NHS Improvement is working with the NHS to raise awareness of the importance of early detection and good management of atrial fibrillation (AF), building on the NICE guidelines. Its current work includes:

increasing the detection of AF by means of opportunistic pulse checks; and

driving the roll-out of the Guidance on Risk Assessment and Stroke Prevention in AF (GRASP-AF) tool to help ensure that those patients diagnosed with AF are receiving appropriate treatment.

NICE is responsible for the prioritisation and development of potential indicators for the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) for general practitioner practices. New indicators were introduced in the QOF from April 2012 to improve the quality of care for patients with AF.

The issue of AF is also being considered as part of the development of the Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy.

Care Homes: Fees and Charges

Esther McVey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that private care homes which receive registered nursing care contribution payments are required to make a proportionate reduction in fees charged to self-funding residents. [118233]

Paul Burstow: The Department does not set the fee rates that care homes charge residents who fund their care. These are a private matter to be negotiated and agreed between residents, or their families or representatives, and care homes.

Registered nursing care contribution payments must be transparently reflected in the fees that care homes charge, and while the Department cannot set or recommend the level of fees that they charge, care homes are required to comply with the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999 by ensuring that they use fair and clear terms in their agreements with residents.

Carers

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to place requirements on HealthWatch to improve patient support for carers whose health is affected by their caring duties. [117348]

Anne Milton: HealthWatch is being established to represent the collective voice of all people and to make sure their views and experiences of health and social care are properly reflected in the commissioning and provision of services. We will not place requirements on HealthWatch to look at specific issues or groups of people. We have, however, placed a duty on HealthWatch to ensure it discharges its functions in a way that is representative of local people, the definition of which includes carers.

Carers: Health

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will consider adopting a strategy to promote well-being among unpaid carers. [117737]

Paul Burstow: The coalition Government published their cross Government Carers Strategy, ‘Recognised, valued and supported: Next steps for the Carers Strategy’ in November 2010. It sets out the priority areas for action, focusing on what will have the biggest impact on carers' lives, including supporting carers to remain mentally and physically well. Other key priorities are supporting carers to identify themselves earlier; supporting them to achieve their full education and employment potential; and personalising support so they can live a life of their own alongside caring.

A copy of the strategy has been placed in the Library and is available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_122077

The Government published the Care and Support White Paper, together with the draft Care and Support Bill, on 11 July, which set out our plans for transformation of care and support. The draft Bill includes important provisions to extend the rights of carers to have an assessment of their own needs for

3 Sep 2012 : Column 243W

support and—for the first time—to place a new duty on local authorities to meet carers' eligible needs for support.

For the first time in law, the draft Care and Support Bill gives a proactive, positive message about what care and support is for, by creating new statutory principles designed to embed the promotion of individual well-being as the driving force behind care and support. The first clause of the draft Bill sets the context for all the provisions which follow: that the well-being of the individual is paramount and that local authorities must promote the individual's well-being in decisions made with and about them. This well-being principle is central to the Bill's approach to enshrining individual needs and outcomes at the heart of the new legal framework.

Charities

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health to which registered charities his Department has made payments in the last three years; and what sums over what period have been paid in each case. [118158]

Mr Simon Burns: Information on all departmental payments to registered charities is not available in the format requested from central records and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Contraceptives: Cambridge

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that different forms of contraception are available to women of all ages in Cambridge; [118128]

(2) what assessment he has made of the level of access to contraception services in Cambridge. [118129]

Paul Burstow: We recognise that easy access to the full range of contraception provision is an important part of health care, helping people to make informed decisions about how to avoid unintended pregnancy and plan their families.

Current legislation requires primary care trusts (PCTs) to provide open access contraception services for all people in their local area, and to provide reasonable access to all methods of contraception. It is for PCTs, with their knowledge of local need, to determine how they can best fulfil the legislative requirements.

From 1 April 2013, local authorities (LAs) will commission all contraception services out with the general practitioner contract. LAs will be mandated to commission comprehensive, open access contraception advice and services.

The Department has not made an assessment of the level of access to contraception services in Cambridge. We will be publishing a sexual health policy document later this year, which will set out the evidence base for the improvement of all sexual health provision.

Dehydration

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were admitted to hospitals with dehydration caused by poor diet in each of the last five years; and what the (a) gender and (b) age was of each such person. [117497]

3 Sep 2012 : Column 244W

Paul Burstow: The information requested is not collected centrally. However, tables showing a count of finished admission episodes where there was a named primary or secondary diagnosis of dehydration by gender and age for the years 2006-07 to 2010-11 have been placed in the Library. Please note that these are not a count of patients as a person may have been admitted to hospital more than once in the year.

Dental Services: Nottinghamshire

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS dentists were registered in (a) Ashfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire in each of the last five years. [117459]

Mr Simon Burns: The information is not available in the format requested. Data are available for the number of dentists with national health service activity in Bassetlaw, Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), for the last five years in the following table:

Headcount
 20072008200920102011

Bassetlaw PCT

53

52

53

51

65

Nottingham City PCT

138

145

142

147

164

Nottinghamshire County Teaching PCT

280

307

322

331

335

Notes: 1. Dentists are defined as performers with NHS activity recorded by FP17 forms. 2. Dentists will be counted more than once if they have a contract in more than one PCT or strategic health authority. 3. England totals exclude duplication. 4. Data consist of performers in General Dental Services, Personal Dental Services and Trust-led Dental Services. Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre, NHS Dental Services of the NHS Business Services Authority

Diabetes

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) type 1 and (b) type 2 diabetes patients eligible for insulin pumps were prescribed them in each primary care trust area in the latest period for which figures are available. [118014]

Paul Burstow: The Department does not collect this information.

The Association of British Clinical Diabetelogists, Diabetes UK and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, with support from National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, have sponsored a United Kingdom wide audit that will establish the numbers and types of insulin pumps that are in use.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) type 1 and (b) type 2 diabetes patients received diabetes management education in the latest period for which figures are available. [118019]

Paul Burstow: The Department does not collect this data.

Local national health service organisations are responsible for providing high quality and safe diabetes services appropriate to their local populations, including providing information and education to people with diabetes about their condition and how to manage it.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 245W

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) which primary care trusts have asked diabetes patients to change their blood glucose meter to a different brand for cost reasons in the last 12 months; [118021]

(2) how much the NHS spent on insulin pumps in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012. [118057]

Paul Burstow: The Department does not collect this data.

Drugs: Industry

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to monitor (a) payment and (b) gifts given to (i) GPs, (ii) other medical staff and (iii) medical administrators by pharmaceutical companies. [117454]

Mr Simon Burns: Payments or gifts to general practitioner (GPs), medical staff and medical administrators are not monitored centrally.

The General Medical Council's “Good Medical Practice” states that doctors

“must not ask for, or accept, any inducement, gift or hospitality which may affect or be seen to affect the way you prescribe for, treat or refer patients.”

Guidance issued by the Department of Health requires national health service employers to ensure their staff are aware of the standards of business conduct for NHS staff and to have local procedures in place for recording the acceptance of gifts and hospitality.

Furthermore, the provisions of the Bribery Act 2010 prevent a person from accepting a financial or other advantage in order to carry out a function or activity improperly. These provisions provide equally to NHS staff, and GPs as independent contractors.

Food: Health Hazards

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which public awareness campaigns his Department has initiated against food and drink that poses a threat to public health in each of the last five years. [118369]

Anne Milton: Change4Life was launched in January 2009. It encourages everyone in England to eat well, move more and to live longer. Originally developed as part of the childhood obesity prevention strategy, it targeted parents of children aged five to 11, it now seeks to inspire a broader social demographic from new mums to middle-aged adults. The campaign does not target specific harmful foods but encourages behaviour change across a wide range of areas including:

‘5 A DAY’—eating at least five portions of fruit per day;

Sugar Swaps—reducing consumption of added sugars;

Cut back on fat—reducing fat consumption; and

Snack check—reducing unhealthy snacking.

The Department has also run campaigns to communicate alcohol harm reduction. The campaigns ran from 2006 to 2010.

In 2012 the alcohol harm reduction campaign was incorporated into Change4Life, embracing not only the calorific content of alcohol but also the wider health harms of alcohol for adults in mid-life.

More information on Change4Life can be found in the ‘Change4Life Three Year Social Marketing Strategy’ which has already been placed in the Library.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 246W

Food: Hygiene

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what advice his Department provides to owners of shops selling food for immediate consumption who do not provide crockery and cutlery on steps to protect the personal hygiene of customers; and if he will make a statement. [118135]

Anne Milton: We are advised that the Food Standards Agency, which holds the policy remit for food safety, does not issue such advice. European Union food law requires food business operators (FBOs) to supply safe food to consumers. FBOs are not responsible for consumers' personal hygiene or the manner in which food sold for immediate consumption off the premises is consumed. Consumers are entrusted to make their own choices on whether to eat such foods with or without crockery or cutlery.

The FBO might have a more general duty of care to provide advice to customers if there are hazards associated with the consumption of a particular food in a particular way which are not widely known about by consumers.

General Practitioners

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what safeguards his Department has put in place to ensure that the constitutions adopted by local healthcare commissioning groups are reflective of NHS core principles, democratic management standards and public accountability requirements; and whether he has issued any guidelines to require decision-making power to be allocated proportionally according to the numbers of patients provided for. [117405]

Mr Simon Burns: The Health and Social Care Act 2012 requires each clinical commissioning group (CCG) to have a constitution. This must set out various matters including the arrangements the CCG has made to discharge its functions and those of its governing body; its key processes for decision-making (including arrangements for ensuring openness and transparency in the decision-making of the CCG and its governing body) and arrangements for managing conflicts of interest. The constitution will form a key part of the evidence the NHS Commissioning Board will review when considering a CCG's application to be established.

To support CCGs to put in place appropriate governance arrangements, the NHS Commissioning Board Authority has produced guidance for CCGs, which sets out how to adhere to accepted principles of good governance (including the Nolan principles and the seven key principles of the NHS constitution) and how to develop robust arrangements for accountability, transparency, and probity. The Board Authority has also produced a model constitution to assist CCGs in the development of their own constitution.

It will be for each CCG to determine how they wish to set themselves up, how they discharge their responsibilities, their decision-making procedures and how these are set out in their constitution.

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that no adverse effects on the quality of healthcare commissioning

3 Sep 2012 : Column 247W

arise from variations in the organisational structure, competency and transparency of commissioning groups. [117406]

Mr Simon Burns: The NHS Commissioning Board will be responsible for considering applications from Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) for establishment. The board will be required to satisfy itself of a number of core matters when considering applications, including whether a CCG has an appropriate area, satisfactory governance arrangements and whether it will be able to discharge its commissioning functions effectively. Where a CCG is not ready or willing to undertake its full statutory functions, the board may place conditions on the grant of an application. This could include placing restrictions on what functions a CCG carries out, or how it does so. It could also involve the board or another CCG carrying out functions on behalf of a CCG.

The NHS Commissioning Board will also be responsible for holding CCGs to account. The board must conduct an assessment of how well each CCG has discharged its functions during each financial year, including in particular how well a CCG has sought continuous improvement in the quality of services or reduced inequalities. The board must publish a report annually summarising the results of all its performance assessments of CCGs. If the board believes that a CCG is failing, has failed, or might, fail to discharge any of its functions properly, it has powers to intervene in the operations of a CCG.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the name and contact details are of the chair of each clinical commissioning group. [118020]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not held centrally. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will take on statutory responsibility for commissioning health services from April 2013. Prospective CCGs are currently developing their organisations, including finalising who will take on the role of chair of their governing body, in advance of applying to the NHS Commissioning Board for establishment.

General Practitioners: Coventry

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many general practitioner surgeries in (a) Coventry and (b) Coventry North East constituency offered extended opening hours in (i) 2010 and (ii) the latest period for which figures are available. [118330]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not held centrally.

Health Professions

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for joint working between health visitors, midwives and GPs after the implementation of the provisions of Health and Social Care Act 2012. [118241]

Anne Milton: By October 2012, there will be mechanisms in place to produce Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Joint Health and Well-being Strategies to inform clinical commissioning group

3 Sep 2012 : Column 248W

commissioning plans. Health and Well-being boards are where all commissioners come together to form a common understanding of outcomes, identify groups in need of support, listen to what matters to people locally, collaborate and hold each other to account. The NHS Commissioning Board is a key local partner of a Health and Well-being board. The NHS Commissioning Board will commission primary care services and will use the Health and Well-being Board to make links with services provided elsewhere in the system, for example, maternity services commissioned by the clinical commissioning groups and health visiting, which is expected to be commissioned by local authorities from 2015.

The Department has made available a range of documents designed to support partnership working for all professionals delivering the Healthy Child Programme 0-19 years olds. In particular, the ‘The Health Visiting and Midwifery Partnership—pathway for pregnancy and early weeks’, builds on good practice and evidence drawn from the professions and outlines aspirations and support that relate to improved outcomes. This is available at the Department's website:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/03/supporting-partnership-working/

Health Services: South West

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will publish any correspondence between his Department and Sir Ian Carruthers, Chief Executive of the South West Strategic Health Authority, on the decision of healthcare trusts in the south-west to set up a regional pay consortium. [117649]

Mr Simon Burns: There is no correspondence between the Department and Sir Ian Carruthers about the south-west regional pay consortium.

Health Visitors

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has for the future of the Health Visitor service; and how these services will be commissioned. [118242]

Anne Milton: ‘The Health Visitor Implementation Plan 2011-15—A Call to Action’, (February 2011), set out plans, accountabilities and partnership working related to the growth of the health visitor workforce. A copy has already been placed in the Library. The Department has put in place a four year transformational programme of recruitment and retention, professional development and improved commissioning linked to public health improvement. This will secure a future health visiting service that is universal, energised and fit for long-term growth.

The future commissioning route of health visiting and the wider children's public health service from pregnancy to five years was subject to consultation in the Public Health White Paper. Following this consultation, the Government announced that they are committed to transferring commissioning of children's public health services for this group to local authorities in the medium term. However, in the short-term, the

3 Sep 2012 : Column 249W

commitment to raise numbers of health visitors at the same time as strengthening the Healthy Child Programme and expanding Family Nurse Partnership by 2015, is best achieved through national health service commissioning. Between April 2013 and March 2015 the NHS Commissioning Board will lead the commissioning of health visitor services.

Health: Rural Areas

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many occasions his Department has met the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to discuss matters relating to rural health in the last two years; and what the outcomes of any such meetings were. [117981]

Anne Milton: The Department has met with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) colleagues 21 times over the last two years to discuss a range of rural health matters. These meetings have sought to coordinate and promote cross-government work on rural health and the environment, as part of our wider work with rural communities. Together with other forms of engagement, they have facilitated our contribution to DEFRA-led government policies, including the Uplands Policy Review (2011), the National Environment White Paper (“The natural choice: securing the value of nature”, 2011), and DEFRA's contribution to policies led by the Department, including the Public Health Outcomes Framework. The Public Health White Paper (“Healthy Lives, Healthy People”, 2010) notes the role of rural health, the environment and green space in improving health outcomes and tackling health inequalities.

Health: Transport

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department of the recommendations of the British Medical Association's report, entitled Healthy transport = Healthy lives. [118101]

Anne Milton: We welcome the British Medical Association report, which makes the case for health to be integrated with transport policy. We work closely with the Department for Transport to encourage active travel and optimise the health impacts of transport policies. We anticipate that the transfer of public health responsibilities from primary care trusts to local authorities will encourage greater dialogue between public health professionals and transport planners.

Heart Diseases: Children

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will review the decision to close the Leeds Children's Heart Surgery Unit. [117316]

Mr Simon Burns: The “Safe and Sustainable” review of children's congenital cardiac services has been a clinically-led national health service review conducted by the Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts (JCPCT), independent of Government.

Following the review, the JCPCT, on behalf of local NHS commissioners, made a decision on 4 July 2012 about the future location of children's congenital heart surgery units.

3 Sep 2012 : Column 250W

This independent decision means that, while in the future Leeds General Infirmary will no longer provide surgery for children with congenital heart disease, it will continue to provide the ongoing treatment and management these children need as close to their home as possible.

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many procedures for children's heart surgery at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle were registered in the Central Cardiac Audit Database in the latest period for which figures are available; and how many such procedures were performed on patients from Northern Ireland. [118221]

Mr Simon Burns: Information from the Central Cardiac Audit Database is not held centrally.

Set out in the following table is a count of all finished consultant episodes (FCEs)(1) with an operative procedure on the heart(2) for the Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust(3) and those FCEs which were for patients residing in Northern Ireland(4) (procedures performed in The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS).

It should be noted that this is not a count of patients as the same patient may have more than one episode within a spell and/or be admitted more than once in a year.

Reference should be made to the following footnotes when interpreting the data.

 Number

FCEs for heart surgery for children aged 0-17 at Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

388

Those for patients residing in Northern Ireland

10

(1) Finished Consultant Episode (FCE). A finished consultant episode (FCE) is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year. (2) Number of episodes with a (named) main procedure. The number of episodes where the procedure (or intervention) was recorded in any of the 24 procedure fields in a Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) record. A record is only included once in each count, even if the procedure is recorded in more than one procedure field of the record: OPCS codes used: K01-K78 (Heart). (3) Hospital Provider A provider code is a unique code that identifies an organisation acting as a health care provider (e.g. NHS trust or PCT). Used: Hospital provider = RTD (The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust). (4) SHA/PCT of residence The strategic health authority (SHA) or primary care trust (PCT) containing the patient's normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another SHA/PCT for treatment. Used: SHA residence=Z (Northern Ireland). Data quality: HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and PCTs in England and from some independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. Source: Hospital Episode, Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre.