12 July 2012 : Column 291W

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Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 12 July 2012

Home Department

Deportation

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were deported under immigration law to (a) Afghanistan, (b) Iraq, (c) the Democratic Republic of Congo and (d) Somalia in each month since April 2011; and how many people are awaiting voluntary or enforced removal to each such country. [116429]

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Damian Green: Deportations are a specific subset of removals which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person's removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. The deportation order prohibits the person returning to the UK until such time as it may be revoked. Most illegal immigrants are removed under administrative or illegal entry powers from the UK rather than being deported.

It has therefore been assumed that the question refers to the number of enforced removals and voluntary departures from the UK as opposed to the number of deportations.

The following table shows the total number of removals and voluntary departures from the UK to Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq and Somalia in each month from April 2011 to March 2012.

Monthly total removals and voluntary departures(1,2) to Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq and Somalia(3) April 2011 to March 2012(4)
Number of departures
Year/MonthAfghanistanDemocratic Republic of the CongoIraqSomalia

April 2011

88

3

16

5

May 2011

116

1

11

5

June 2011

96

3

40

0

July 2011

126

4

16

2

August 2011

112

1

32

1

September 2011

80

0

34

0

October 2011

112

2

36

0

November 2011

144

2

23

1

December 2011

88

1

17

0

January 2012

108

2

26

1

February 2012

107

2

42

5

March 2012

21

1

39

1

Total (2011-12)

1,198

22

332

21

(1) Removals and voluntary departures recorded on the system as at the dates on which the data extracts were taken. (2) Includes enforced removals, persons departing voluntarily after notifying the UK Border Agency of their intention to leave prior to their departure, persons leaving under Assisted Voluntary Return Programmes run by Refugee Action from April 2011 (previously run by the International Organisation for Migration) and persons who it has been established left the UK without informing the immigration authorities. (3) Destination as recorded on source database. (4) Provisional figures. Figures will under record due to data cleansing and data matching exercises that take place after the extracts are taken.

Data for April 2012 onwards are not yet available, but quarterly data for April to June 2012 will be published as part of the regular Home Office publication scheme on 30th August.

The data requested on those awaiting removal are not available from published statistics.

The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics on the number of persons removed or departed voluntarily from the UK within Immigration Statistics. The data on removals and voluntary departures by country of destination are available in the latest release, Immigration Statistics:

January to March 2012, tables rv.06 and rv.06.q, from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science, research and statistics web pages at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/migration/migration-statistics1/

European Scrutiny Committee

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what basis the decisions (a) SCH/Com-ex (98) 26 def, (b) SCH/Com-ex (98) 52, (c) SCH/Com-ex (99) 6, (d) SCH/Com-ex (99) 7 rev. 2 and (e) SCH/Com-ex (99) 8 rev.2 were included in Annex A of her letter of 21 December 2011 to the Chair of the European Scrutiny Committee; and how they relate to the UK. [116610]

James Brokenshire: The measures cited were included in Annex A of my letter of 21 December 2011 to the Chair of the European Scrutiny Committee as they are:

“acts of the Union in the field of police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters which have been adopted before the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty”

(Article 10(1) of Protocol 10 to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union). This means that all “acts” with a legal base in the former Title VI (police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters) of the Treaty of the European Union (TEU) are caught by this transitional provision.

In order to incorporate the Schengen acquis into EU law, the Council was required in 1999 to allocate a legal base in the Treaties for each provision which formed part of the acquis. A large number of the legal bases allocated were in Title VI TEU. This was the case for each measure cited.

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In 2000, the UK joined elements of the Schengen acquis that relate to police and judicial co-operation (Council Decision 2000/365/EC) and has subsequently participated in measures that were deemed to build upon the parts of the acquis in which the UK participates. These Schengen measures in the field of police and judicial co-operation are therefore caught by the wording of the Transitional Protocol and properly included in the list of measures subject to the decision on whether to accept the application of full European Court of Justice jurisdiction in 2014.

Ex Gratia Payments

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate her Department has made of the monetary value of ex gratia payments made through schemes administered by her Department in the last two years. [116769]

Damian Green: There are no ex gratia payments made through schemes administered by the Home Office.

Internet: Bullying

Nick Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to monitor or regulate cyber bullying; and if she will make a statement. [115431]

Tim Loughton: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

According to Ofcom's annual Children's Media Literacy Tracker, 7% of 12-15 year olds reported being cyberbullied in 2011.

I have been working with industry, charities, academia and parenting groups, through the UK Council for Child Internet Safety, which I chair, to develop consistent advice and information about internet safety, including cyberbullying, which those providing internet services can use. The Government is also pressing industry at European level to implement clear and simple processes for monitoring and responding to reports of harmful content including that which constitutes cyberbullying.

The Government published updated advice to schools on behaviour and bullying in July 2011. The advice includes clarification on how schools can use their existing powers to respond to poor behaviour including bullying that occurs anywhere off the school premises when it is reported to them.

Schools are held to account on how well they deal with bullying through the new Ofsted inspections framework, which places a sharper focus on behaviour and bullying within the core Behaviour and Safety judgment.

Offences Against Children: Internet

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what meetings the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Equalities and Criminal Information has had with stakeholders to discuss protecting children online. [116623]

Lynne Featherstone: The Government believes that there is a need to work with a wide range of stakeholders to help protect children online. Through the work of

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the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), the Government has engaged closely with the internet industry, children's charities and other groups to ensure that all sectors play a part in the protection of children, and that work to better protect children is co-ordinated.

Police: Suicide

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers committed suicide in each of the last 3 years. [116554]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many police officers committed suicide in each of the last 3 years. (116554)

Table 1 as follows shows the number of police officer suicides in England and Wales, for the years 2009 to 2011 (the latest year available).

Figures for suicides in the United Kingdom, England and Wales, and regions in England are published annually and are available at the following link:

http://ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-29400

An article published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2008 presented an analysis of patterns of suicide by occupation in England and Wales from 2001 to 2005, using ONS data. This article is available at the following link:

http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/193/1/73

Table 1: Number of police officer suicides 2009 to 2011, England and Wales(1, 2, 3, 4)(, )(5)
 Number of suicides (persons)

2009

15

2010

23

2011

17

(1) Figures relate to persons classed as police officers (inspectors and above together with sergeant and below) at death registration. These correspond to codes 1172 and 3312 in the Standard Occupational Classification 2000 and 2010. (2 )Suicide was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes X60-X84 and Y10-Y34. (3) Figures are for persons aged between 20-74 years. (4) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year. (5 )Figures include deaths of non-residents.

Schengen Agreement: ICT

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to EU Council Decision 2009/724/JHA, whether the second generation Schengen Information System is now in operation. [116566]

James Brokenshire: The second generation Schengen Information System (SIS II) is not yet in operation. The European Commission plan to have the central SIS II system ready for operation by the end of the first quarter of 2013.

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what contribution the UK will pay to cover its share of the operating costs of the Schengen Information System in 2012. [116634]

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James Brokenshire: The UK has currently budgeted to contribute £2.2 million towards the operating costs of the Schengen Information System in 2012.

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff of her Department were in the civil service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116770]

Damian Green: As at 30 June 2012, 42 members of staff were on the redeployment register operated by the Home Office and its agencies. Of these, 33 members of staff had been on the register for more than six months.

UK Border Agency: Absenteeism

Mr Andrew Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the level of staff absence was for the UK Border Agency in the latest period for which figures are available. [115615]

Damian Green [holding answer 6 July 2012]: The average number of working days lost per staff year for the rolling year 1 June 2011 to the 31 May 2012 for the UK Border Agency is 8.49 days.

Women and Equalities

Equality Act 2006

Sandra Osborne: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what the timetable is for the proposed repeal of sections of the Equality Act 2006. [116712]

Lynne Featherstone: The proposed repeal of sections of the Equality Act 2006 is included as measures in the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, which is currently in Committee stage in the House of Commons. Subject to parliamentary business, we expect the Bill to achieve Royal Assent during this session.

Attorney-General

Public Expenditure

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Attorney-General whether he expects the Law Officers' Departments to underspend their budgets for 2012-13; and what estimate he has made of any such underspend. [116478]

The Attorney-General: The Office for Budget Responsibility forecast underspends in departmental expenditure limits as part of their economic and fiscal outlook in the autumn.

As part of the Transparency Agenda the Government publishes the full detail of plans and out-turn for all Departments after the end of the financial year, usually in September. HM Treasury publish out-turn data for all Departments from the COINS database, available on

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the Treasury website on a quarterly basis. Forecasts for 2012-13 out-turn by Department will be published at Budget 2013.

Work Experience

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Attorney-General how many interns work in the Law Officers' Departments' press offices. [116179]

The Attorney-General: None.

House of Commons Commission

Internet

Keith Vaz: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, how much was spent by the House of Commons Service on consultants for web services in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [116399]

John Thurso: The House of Commons Service spent £113,738 in 2010-11 and £105,407 in 2011-12 on consultants for web services. This covered the following activities:

Online usability and accessibility testing and advice

User research including running surveys

Evaluation tools to assess the impact of Parliament's online channels

Consultancy support as part of a procurement of web hosting services to reduce costs.

The Parliament website had more than 11 million visitors in 2011-12 and was rated by 80% as satisfactory or very satisfactory.

Northern Ireland

Ex Gratia Payments

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what estimate his Department has made of the monetary value of ex gratia payments made through schemes administered by his Department in the last two years. [116793]

Mr Paterson: My Department has made no such payments in the last two years.

Leaseback Arrangements

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what assets his Department has sold and leased back over the last 12 months; what the sale price was of each asset so sold; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of leasing back each such asset over the period of the lease. [116792]

Mr Paterson: My Department has not sold or leased back any assets over the last 12 months.

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Manchester Declaration

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what progress (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies has made in implementing the Manchester Declaration of 2005. [116688]

Mr Paterson: The Manchester Declaration of 2005 has been superseded by the Malmo Declaration and eGovernment Action Plan (2011-15) and the broader Digital Agenda for Europe. The UK contribution to the eGovernment Action Plan continues to be led by the Cabinet Office.

My Department has two non-departmental public bodies: the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Parades Commission for Northern Ireland. Both public bodies are independent of Government and the hon. Gentleman may wish to write to the commissions directly on these matters.

Public Expenditure

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether he expects his Department to underspend its budget for 2012-13; and what estimate he has made of any such underspend. [116479]

Mr Paterson: The OBR forecast underspends in Departmental Expenditure Limits as part of their Economic and Fiscal Outlook in the autumn.

As part of the Transparency Agenda the Government publishes the full detail of plans and outturn for all Departments after the end of the financial year, usually in September. HM Treasury publish outturn data for all Departments from the COINS database, available on the Treasury website on a quarterly basis. Forecasts for 2012-13 outturn by Department will be published at Budget 2013.

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many staff of his Department were in the civil service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116794]

Mr Paterson: My Department does not have any staff in the civil service redeployment pool.

Wales

Departmental Pay

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what the lowest hourly rate paid to staff by her Department is; how many members of staff based outside London are paid less than £7.20 per hour; and how many members of staff based in London are paid less than £8.30 per hour. [116369]

Mr David Jones: The Wales Office does not directly employ staff. All staff in the Wales Office are employed by the Ministry of Justice, or are on loan from other Government bodies or the Welsh Government.

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Public Expenditure

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales whether she expects her Department to underspend its budget for 2012-13; and what estimate she has made of any such underspend. [116481]

Mr David Jones: The OBR forecast underspends in departmental expenditure limits as part of their Economic and Fiscal Outlook in the autumn.

As part of the transparency agenda the Government publish the full detail of plans and outturn for all Departments after the end of the financial year, usually in September. HM Treasury publish outturn data for all Departments from the COINS database, available on the Treasury website, on a quarterly basis. Forecasts for 2012-13 outturn by Department will be published at Budget 2013.

Energy and Climate Change

Assets

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assets his Department has sold and leased back over the last 12 months; what the sale price was of each asset so sold; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of leasing back each such asset over the period of the lease. [116783]

Gregory Barker: No assets have been sold and leased back by the Department over the last 12 months.

Biofuels

Simon Reevell: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department has received any advice on differentiating subsidy support for biomass feedstocks sourced domestically and internationally; and when further information on this will be published. [117022]

Gregory Barker: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 15 May 2012, Official Report, column 110W, to my hon. Friend the Member for North Warwickshire (Dan Byles).

Climate Change Levy

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he next plans to meet with representatives of the UK Fashion and Textile Association to discuss the Climate Change Levy. [116447]

Gregory Barker [holding answer 11 July 2012]: The Chancellor of the Exchequer is responsible for tax policy including the climate change levy. As such, the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), and I have no plans to meet the UK Fashion and Textile Association to discuss the levy.

12 July 2012 : Column 299W

Electricity

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department has undertaken on the potential effects of his proposals for electricity market reform on the level of vertical integration of the energy wholesale and retail markets. [116682]

Charles Hendry: The large vertically integrated energy companies will have a critical role in delivering the UK's security of supply and decarbonisation objectives. Vertical integration can reduce the costs of capital and help to keep down costs to consumers. However, these large companies cannot alone deliver investment at the scale and pace that we need—one of the key aims of EMR is, therefore, to encourage new entrants and new sources of finance. Wider participation and more diversity are key to a competitive market and securing the investment we need. The Government will act where necessary to tackle any structural barriers to market entry that are not addressed through the actions taken by Ofgem.

Electricity Generation

Dr Phillip Lee: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the cost of electricity infrastructure required by 2050. [115721]

Charles Hendry [holding answer 6 July 2012]: In the Carbon Plan(1), the Department explored four scenarios which are consistent with its target to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050. The Department's 2050 Calculator(2) estimates the total capital, operating and fuel costs of the energy system (everything from power stations and industrial processes; to cars, planes and trains and the fuel they use; to gas boilers and cavity wall insulation) of these pathways. Based on the four Carbon Plan pathways, the annual total cost of the energy system is £330 billion to £370 billion(3). Of this, annual total electricity infrastructure capital and operating costs are estimated to vary between £17.9 billion and £29.7 billion. This includes the following technologies: Conventional thermal plant, Combustion + CCS, Nuclear power, Onshore wind, Offshore wind, Hydroelectric, Wave and Tidal, Geothermal, Distributed solar PV, Networks, Storage, demand shifting and backup. Note that these infrastructure costs exclude the cost of fossil fuels used in electricity generation.

(1) As published in December 2011. See:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/tackling/carbon_plan/carbon_plan.aspx

(2)Note:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/tackling/2050/2050.aspx

Results taken from version published in July 2012.

(3) Average annual cost over the period 2010-50.

If climate change is not tackled, the annual total energy system cost is estimated at £333 billion(4). Of this, the annual total capital and operating cost of the electricity infrastructure is estimated at £12.8 billion. This excludes the cost of fossil fuels used in electricity generation. It also excludes environmental damage costs associated with climate change.

(4) Average annual cost over the period 2010-50.

12 July 2012 : Column 300W

The development of the 2050 Calculator's cost methodology was open to the public, and scrutinised by experts across the energy field. However, given the long timeframe involved, there are still considerable uncertainties around the estimates.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the total amount of spending on constraint payments was, by type of technology, in (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland in (i) 2007, (ii) 2008, (iii) 2009, (iv) 2010, (v) 2011 and (vi) 2012 to date. [116745]

Charles Hendry: Total constraint costs for generators of all types are as follows: (i) 2007-08—£70 million (ii) 2008-09—£263 million (iii) 2009-10—£139 million (iv) 2010-11—£170 million (v) 2011-12—£324 million.

The Department does not hold the breakdown of constraint payments by type of technology. Constraint payments arise from actions taken by National Grid (in its role as System Operator) to resolve bottlenecks on the electricity transmission system. This is a competitive market, with the details of most such payments published at

www.elexon.co.uk

and

www.bmreports.com

Energy

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he plans to take in respect of energy companies that do not meet commitments under the Carbon Emission Reduction Target Scheme and Community Energy Saving Programme by 31 December 2012. [116650]

Gregory Barker: The Carbon Emission Reduction Target (CERT) and Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP) obligations are both relevant requirements of the obligated companies supply and/or generating licences. Failure to meet the targets set under CERT or CESP means that a company would be in breach of its licence and it would then be for Ofgem to determine whether to take enforcement action and what form any such enforcement action should take. There are a range of enforcement options available to Ofgem, including a potential fine of up to 10% of a licence holder's turnover and ultimately revocation of the licence.

The Government have no intention of extending the deadline for achievement of the targets under CERT and CESP beyond 31 December 2012.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the amount of (a) gas-powered and (b) renewable generation expected to come on-line in the next (i) five and (ii) 10 years. [116674]

Charles Hendry: The Carbon Plan, which was published on 1 December 2011, set out a range of scenarios to highlight the possibilities and the challenges we will face in decarbonising the economy between now and 2050, using currently available knowledge. It is not possible to predict with certainty the most cost-effective

12 July 2012 : Column 301W

route to decarbonisation of the power sector and the scenarios are not intended to present a definitive assessment of a particular technology.

Some estimates of future installed generation capacity, and the assumptions underlying these estimates, can be found in:

DECC's Updated Emissions Projections:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/about/ec_social_res/analytic_projs/en_emis_projs/en_emis_projs.aspx

DECC's Carbon Plan:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/tackling/carbon_plan/carbon_plan.aspx

More detail on the longer term vision for renewable electricity generation is presented in the renewable energy road map:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/meeting-energy-demand/renewable-energy/2167-uk-renewable-energy-roadmap.pdf

It illustrates that, despite starting from a low base, the UK is on course to achieve its legally-binding commitment of 15% of energy consumption coming from renewable sources by 2020.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he expects Ofgem to

12 July 2012 : Column 302W

publish its next update on the

(a)

community energy saving programme and

(b)

carbon emission reduction target. [116678]

Gregory Barker: The last annual progress report on Community Energy Saving Programme was published in May this year and Ofgem plan to publish their next update on the scheme in September 2012.

Ofgem are required to submit their annual progress report on the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target to the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), by 1 August 2012 and the report will be published shortly thereafter.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what level of generating capacity in gigawatts of renewable energy is currently (a) in the construction phase, (b) in the planning process and (c) fully operational, by type of technology. [116743]

Charles Hendry: The information is provided in the following tables(1).

Operational
TechnologyOperational 2010 RESTATS dataOperational since January 2011

Biomass

447.4

789.8

Co-firing

390.2

RO Hydro

195.4

3.6

Landfill gas

1,024.6

Offshore Round 0

14.0

Offshore Round 1

962.4

150.0

Offshore Round 2

364.8

367.2

Demonstration Projects

Offshore Round 3

Offshore Round 1 and 2 extensions

Scottish Territorial Waters

Wind Offshore Total

1,341.2

517.2

Wind Onshore

4,035.7

758.5

Sewage gas

189.2

Wave and Tide

2.6

0.8

Photovoltaics

76.9

102.7

Large hydro

1,452.9

Waste

435.3

108.7

Total

9,591.4

2,281.3

Under construction, awaiting construction and in planning
 Total Installed Capacity (MW)
 Post consentPre consent
 Under constructionAwaiting constructionApplication being considered
 LPAS36LPAS36LPAS36

Biomass

199.9

0.0

1,006.5

2,130.0

195.2

360.0

Co-firing

0.0

170.0

RO Hydro

5.3

3.6

26.9

93.8

14.3

0.8

Landfill gas

5.2

0.0

29.7

0.0

4.5

0.0

Offshore Round 0

Offshore Round 1

0.0

62.1

Offshore Round 2

0.0

2,667.0

0.0

970.0

0.0

2,920.0

Demonstration Projects

0.0

12.0

0.0

99.9

Offshore Round 3

0.0

6.0

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12 July 2012 : Column 304W

Offshore Round 1 and 2 extensions

0.0

504.0

Scottish Territorial Waters

0.0

997.2

Wind Offshore Total

0.0

2,729.1

0.0

988.0

0.0

4,521.1

Wind Onshore

855.6

1,364.7

2,581.3

1,636.4

3,443.1

3,007.8

Sewage gas

8.5

0.0

Wave and Tide

0.0

20.5

1.2

19.6

0.0

17.5

Photovoltaics

28.7

0.0

251.0

0.0

119.0

0.0

Large hydro

Waste

78.3

100.0

569.8

239.0

239.0

60.0

Total

1,173.1

4,217.9

4,475.0

5,106.8

4,015.1

8,137.2

(1)Source —RESTATS DECC data sheet May 2012: https://restats.decc.gov.uk/app/reporting/decc/datasheet

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what level of generating capacity in gigawatts of energy from (a) gas and (b) coal is currently (i) in the planning process, (ii) in the construction phase and (iii) fully operational. [116744]

Charles Hendry: There is currently 2.1 GW of gas generating capacity in respect of applications over 50 MW in the planning system in England and Wales; no coal is currently in the planning system(1).

In early June, over 3 GW of (gas) capacity was under construction in the UK. This is in addition to around 35 GW of gas capacity and around 29 GW of coal capacity, which was fully operational at the end of December 2010(2).

(1) The figure for projects in the planning process does not account for projects that have been consented but are not yet under construction. Pre-applications projects under the Planning Act are also not included, as these are not considered applications until developers actually submit an application. There is a significant volume of new CCGT capacity at various stages of the planning process, with more than 15 GW of new CCGT capacity having been granted consent in the UK (which includes Hatfield, which is currently designated as a CCGT).

(2) Source—Table DUKES 5.7 of the 2011 Digest of UK Energy Statistics, available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/energy_stats/source/electricity/electricity.aspx

Data as at the end of 2011 will be available on 26 July 2012. Fully operational coal capacity includes 23.1 GW of coal-fired capacity plus 5.6 GW of mixed or dual-fired capacity and a further 0.6 GW of capacity listed under ‘Other generators' ‘conventional steam'. Fully operational gas capacity includes 34.1 GW of CCGT capacity plus 1.1 GW of gas capacity listed under ‘Other generators' ‘conventional steam'.

Energy: Conservation

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the success of the Government's efforts to persuade domestic and business electricity users to switch lights and energy appliances off when not needed. [116713]

Gregory Barker: I have made no such assessment.

Energy: Prices

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish an index of (a) domestic energy prices, (b) domestic gas prices and (c) domestic electricity prices for each year since 2007. [116868]

Charles Hendry: DECC publishes annual and quarterly indices for domestic energy, gas and electricity in Table 2.1.1 of the publication Quarterly Energy Prices, available on the DECC website:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/media/viewfile.ashx?filepath=statistics/source/prices/qep211.xls&filetype=4&minwidth=true

A summary table is provided for reference:

Indices for domestic gas, electricity and energy on 2005=100 base year, current terms
 GasElectricityEnergy (fuel and light)

2007

142.1

131.4

133.4

2008

170.1

151.9

158.7

2009

193.5

158.8

168.6

2010

182.0

154.9

164.0

20 J1

201.4

166.1

181.4

Real terms data are available in Table 2.1.2 of the above publication, with monthly data in Table 2.1.3 on the DECC website.

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with Ofgem on the regulatory response to recent changes in the cost of energy for domestic use; and if he will make a statement. [116871]

Charles Hendry: DECC Ministers meet with Ofgem officials on a regular basis to discuss a range of issues.

Electricity and gas pricing for domestic households is a commercial matter for the companies concerned. It is for Ofgem, as the independent regulator of the gas and electricity markets, to consider whether further regulatory protection is required.

12 July 2012 : Column 305W

Environment Protection

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment he has made of the Government's progress in building a low-carbon economy; and if he will make a statement. [116731]

Gregory Barker: The UK's low carbon and environmental goods and services sector grew 4.7% in 2010-11 to £122 billion—and is the sixth largest in the world. We already have a £5 billion export surplus and are outpacing global growth rates for this sector.

We are creating the right market conditions for low carbon investment. Our electricity market reform will secure £110 billion of investment in low carbon energy over the next decade. And the Green Deal is expected to kick start around £10 billion worth of private sector investment in home energy improvements—supporting up to 60,000 jobs in the insulation industry. Energy efficiency improvements are reducing emissions—and costs—for businesses across all sectors of the economy.

Fuel Poverty

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the number of households in Scotland in fuel poverty in (a) the private rented sector, (b) local authority housing, (c) social housing and (d) owner-occupied housing since 2009. [116820]

Gregory Barker: Fuel poverty is a devolved measurement and each country of the UK is responsible for measuring the number of fuel poor households in their own country.

The following data show the number of households in fuel poverty derived from the Scottish House Condition Survey for 2010:

63,000 (27% of private rented households)

120,000 (32% of local authority households)

199,000 (30% of social housing overall including 79,000 (29%) in non-local authority housing (housing associations, etc.))

396,000 (27% of owner-occupied households).

Fuels: Birmingham

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households in Birmingham, Ladywood constituency spend more than 10 per cent of their income on fuel bills; and if he will detail the steps that he is taking to address this. [116292]

Gregory Barker: The coalition Government is committed to tackling fuel poverty and supporting low income and vulnerable consumers to heat their homes at an affordable cost.

A household is said to be fuel poor if it needs to spend more than 10% of its income on fuel to maintain an adequate level of warmth. Fuel poverty is therefore based on modelled spending on energy rather than actual spending. In 2010, the latest year for which data are available, the number of households in Birmingham, Ladywood in fuel poverty was estimated to be 10,800.(1)

(1) Sub-regional fuel poverty levels are modelled using a combination of national data taken from the 2010 English Housing Survey

12 July 2012 : Column 306W

data and nationally available small area datasets such as the census. The 2010 sub-regional figures, and the full methodology behind them, can be found here:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/fuelpov_stats/regional/regional.aspx

We continue to fund the Warm Front scheme, providing low income vulnerable households, living in energy inefficient properties, with a range of energy efficient heating and insulation measures. Since 2005, Warm Front has assisted 5,482 households in the Birmingham, Ladywood Constituency.(2) Since the start of the scheme in June 2000 the scheme has assisted 2.3 million households across England.

(2) This information is only available post 2005.

In winter 2011-12, the Warm Home Discount scheme provided energy supplier funded discounts to around 700,000 of the poorest pensioners across Great Britain with a Core Group discount of £120 off electricity bills. Nearly 600,000 of these customers received the discount without having to claim, as a result of data matching between Government and energy suppliers. This is a significant benefit for a group which may struggle to claim. Other low income vulnerable households may also be assisted through the scheme. Overall we expect 2 million low income vulnerable households a year to be assisted through the Warm Home Discount scheme.

We recently published the consultation response regarding the new Green Deal and Energy Company Obligation (ECO), which will be our flagship policy for improving the energy efficiency of the nation's housing stock. Due to launch in October 2012, ECO will run alongside the Green Deal and will have twin objectives to help reduce carbon emissions and tackle fuel poverty. ECO requires energy suppliers to help households access more expensive insulation measures such as solid wall and hard to treat cavity wall insulation through the Green Deal and to provide measures to low income and vulnerable households to help reduce the costs of staying warm and healthy. Through ECO around £540 million will be spent annually by suppliers to assist low income households and low income areas.

In addition, Government provides pensioner households with winter fuel payments to help with additional heating costs during the winter. Cold weather payments are also made to low income and vulnerable households where there is an average temperature of 0°C or below for seven consecutive days. These payments have been permanently increased to £25 per week and in winter 2011-12 over 5 million cold weather payments were paid in Great Britain worth an estimated £129 million.

Green Deal Scheme

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) which (a) individuals, (b) companies, (c) organisations and (d) local authorities have received funding from the £3.5 million pledged by his Department to train Green Deal assessors and installers; and how much each such individual and organisation received; [116493]

(2) what selection criteria were used by his Department when allocating the £3.5 million of funding to train Green Deal assessors and installers. [116494]

12 July 2012 : Column 307W

Gregory Barker [holding answer 11 July 2012]: The Department delegated this funding to Asset Skills and Construction Skills to run competitions to allocate support on our behalf. Details of the relevant processes, including the selection criteria which they used, and the eventual funding decisions reached, will shortly be made available on the individual sector skills websites, for advisers at:

www.assetskills.org

and for installers at:

http://www.cskills.org/

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will ensure that (a) Green Deal promotional materials, (b) speeches on the Green Deal made by Ministers and (c) press releases on the Green Deal make clear that the golden rule is not a savings guarantee. [116646]

Gregory Barker: It is important to communicate that the savings calculated under the Golden Rule are an estimate of expected savings rather than a guarantee, since savings are subject to customer discretion as well as product performance. We will ensure that materials produced by DECC clearly communicate this.

However products that are paid for by Green Deal finance and are at fault will be protected by warranties. In addition, consumers can seek redress if the Golden Rule is shown to have been calculated incorrectly and payments can be revised down to reflect the correct calculation.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to his Department's consultation on the Green Deal, what progress has been made on training community organisers to work with communities on local energy efficiency projects under the Green Deal and Energy Company Obligation; and how many such organisers have begun working on Green Deal projects. [116647]

Gregory Barker: Local partnerships of councils, communities and local businesses are central to the delivery of the Green Deal. In recognition of this we have been working to ensure that they are all prepared.

For example, earlier this year, the Department ran a Local Energy Assessment Fund (LEAF) scheme that distributed £9.2 million to 236 community groups to help them to understand the potential for improvements in energy efficiency and local deployment of renewable energy. Around 80% of these schemes included energy efficiency at the community level and details of the successful schemes can be found on the website at:

http://www.greencommunitiescc.org.uk

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent progress has been made on providing financial support for the Green Deal Finance Company. [116648]

Gregory Barker: The Green Deal Finance Company is a commercial consortium which has developed a business plan to deliver a financing and aggregation vehicle for Green Deal loans. The Green Deal Finance Company has requested a loan from UK Green Investments

12 July 2012 : Column 308W

(UKGI) and UKGI is currently considering that request. The details of those discussions are currently subject to commercial confidentiality.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether funding that has been allocated to finance incentives for the Green Deal but not spent in the financial year 2012-13 can be rolled over for use in financial year 2013-14. [116649]

Gregory Barker: £30 million was allocated to fund Green Deal incentives in financial year 2012-13. Treasury rules on budget exchange allow Departments to carry over up to 1% of resource underspends and 2% of capital underspends into future years. Any roll-over of incentives funding would be subject to this limit.

Natural Gas: Imports

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of gas used in the UK that will be imported by 2020. [116675]

Charles Hendry: DECC publishes projections of UK gas demand and production from which the implied level of net gas imports can be derived. The latest central projections are summarised at:

http://og.decc.gov.uk/en/olgs/cms/data_maps/field_data/field_data.aspx

They imply annual net import dependency of 55% in 2020 but, as with all such projections, great uncertainty applies to this estimate.

Nuclear Power

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to encourage investment in nuclear power. [116504]

Charles Hendry: The Government is committed to ensuring that conditions are right for investment in new nuclear. We have completed our facilitative actions on planning, financing for decommissioning and waste disposal and reactor design and set out reforms to transform the power sector to enable future low carbon investment. It is for energy companies to construct, operate and decommission nuclear power stations without public subsidy.

Departmental Pay

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the largest amount paid to an individual member of staff at his Department as a bonus was in (a) 2010 and (b) 2011. [116711]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change currently awards both non consolidated end of year performance awards and in year special awards.

The Department uses non consolidated performance related payments to help drive high performance in the organisations as they:

encourage continuous high attainment because the payments are dependent upon continuing strong performance

12 July 2012 : Column 309W

prevent a permanent rise in salary and an increase in pension on the basis of one off performances while still allowing good performance to be rewarded

have no long term costs, in particular they do not increase future pension payments

focus the work of employees more directly on the priority goals of the organisation

motivate employees by linking an element of compensation to the achievement of objectives

target money at those who make the biggest contribution

End of year non consolidated performance awards are used to reward the Department’s highest performers as assessed in their end of year appraisal reports.

Non consolidated in year special awards are used to recognise performance or behaviours which might not be fully reflected in an end of year performance appraisal. These may be used to reward staff for exceptional pieces of work or taking on additional responsibilities.

The largest performance award paid to a member of staff in the Department of Energy and Climate Change is shown in the following table.

 Largest award (£)

January to December 2010

12,500

January to December 2011

12,000

Public Expenditure

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether he expects his Department to underspend its budget for 2012-13; and what estimate he has made of any such underspend. [116469]

Gregory Barker: The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) forecast underspends in departmental expenditure limits as part of their Economic and Fiscal Outlook in the autumn.

As part of the Transparency Agenda the Government publishes the full detail of plans and outturn for all Departments after the end of the financial year, usually in September. HM Treasury publish outturn data for all Departments from the COINS database, available on the Treasury website on a quarterly basis. Forecasts for 2012-13 outturn by Department will be published at Budget 2013.

Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what assessment his Department has made of the potential effects of feed-in tariff contracts for difference on competition in the energy retail market; [116559]

(2) with reference to his Department's Electricity Market Reform Impact Assessment, whether he considered the potential effects of feed-in tariff contracts for difference on independent energy retailers and electricity generators. [116683]

Gregory Barker: Feed-in Tariffs with Contracts for Difference allow all forms of low carbon generation to compete on a level playing field, by providing greater

12 July 2012 : Column 310W

price certainty through revenue stabilisation. This will reduce the cost of capital and incentivise more low carbon investment to take place.

However, as recognised in the Electricity Market Reform (EMR) White Paper and accompanying impact assessment, there are a number of barriers to entry and growth in electricity generation and supply markets. One key barrier and an important enabler for EMR to deliver effectively is liquidity in the electricity wholesale market.

In the past 12 months we have seen some positive steps being taken. We welcome this; however, forward market liquidity still remains a significant issue for independents and industry needs to go further to address it.

Ofgem also recognise it as a significant issue and have just finished consulting on proposals to address this. We support the objectives set out in their consultation and in the continued absence of substantive voluntary actions we expect Ofgem to take forward workable proposals.

We have also heard from some independent generators that there are difficulties securing long-term contracts for their power. We have listened carefully and responded to concerns by issuing a Call for Evidence which will inform Government's response.

Where there are barriers to entry not addressed by Ofgem or industry action Government will work with all stakeholders to take appropriate action to address them.

Renewable Energy: Heating

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what support his Department provides to projects for renewable heating in social housing. [116234]

Gregory Barker: Over the last year, the Government supported 37 social housing projects through the first Renewable Heating Premium Payment (RHPP) competition, to install renewable heating technologies. At the end of the scheme on 31 March 2012, this had resulted in the deployment of 948 renewable heating technologies in 914 households, at a cost of £3.7 million. Early feedback from social landlords indicates that tenants have found living with these technologies a positive experience with some providing anecdotal evidence of reductions in fuel costs .

In May 2012, the Government opened a second Renewable Heat Premium Payment competition, increasing funding for this sector to £10 million. This competition has now closed and we are reviewing applications at this stage. An announcement on the outcome of the competition will be made shortly.

Renewables Obligation

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the value of penalties issued under the Renewables Obligation was, by company at which the penalty was imposed, in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012 to date. [116742]

Gregory Barker: The buyout payments made by suppliers who did not fully meet their obligations under the Renewables Obligation for the periods 2009-10 and

12 July 2012 : Column 311W

2010-11 are included in the following annual reports on the Ofgem Renewables Obligation webpage

(1)

as follows:

(1)Note:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/RenewablObl/Pages/RenewablObl.aspx

2009-10:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/RenewablObl/Documents1/RO%20Annual%20Report%202009-10.pdf

—see Table A10, column ‘Total payments made by Suppliers’

2010-11:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/RenewablObl/Documents1/Renewables%20Obligation%20Annual%20Report%202010-11.pdf

—see Table A2, column ‘Total payments’

Buyout and late payments for 2011-12 have not yet been determined. Ofgem will publish the final values of the Buyout and Late Payment funds for the 2011-12 Obligation period later this year.

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff of his Department were in the Civil Service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116785]

Gregory Barker: As of 10 July 2012 there were six staff in the Department of Energy and Climate Change redeployment pool. Five have been on the register for over six months.

Wind Power

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on subsidies for onshore wind farms. [116508]

Mr Davey: I regularly discuss Government policy with the Chancellor of the Exchequer and my Cabinet colleagues.

Throughout the renewables obligation banding review and the comprehensive review of feed-in tariffs I have had discussions with many stakeholders, and with my officials and ministerial colleagues, on subsidies for wind farm generators.

Culture, Media and Sport

Manchester Declaration

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what progress his Department and its agencies have made on implementation of the Manchester Declaration of 2005. [116366]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and its agencies did not have a role in the implementation of the Manchester Declaration of 2005. This declaration and its implementation were the

12 July 2012 : Column 312W

responsibility of the Cabinet Office. However, DCMS is responsible for co-ordinating the UK's response to the Digital Agenda for Europe, the EU's five-year ICT strategy. The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), believes that the main priority arising from the Digital Agenda should be the creation of a true European Digital Single Market that could help realise much needed economic growth within the EU. DCMS is spending £830 million up to 2015 on infrastructure programmes run by Broadband Delivery UK as well as managing the process that will lead to the auction of spectrum to support 4G mobile broadband services. These programmes will help to ensure that the digital infrastructure to deliver essential public services is as widely available throughout the UK as possible.

Mobile Phones

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 28 June 2012, Official Report, column 332W, on mobile telephones, whether his official mobile telephone device is capable of sending and receiving emails from private accounts. [116710]

Mr Jeremy Hunt: All departmental BlackBerrys are associated with a specific official mailbox and no other. They receive any email sent to the associated mailbox that is allowed through the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, and Public Service, spam filters and anti-virus software. The devices will only send emails from the associated official account. However, the devices can access the internet and would be capable of accessing webmail services such as gmail and Hotmail.

Television: Subtitling

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether his Department has undertaken any research on the importance to people with hearing loss of the provision of subtitles on all broadcast programmes. [116417]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has not undertaken any research on the importance to people with hearing loss of the provision of subtitles on broadcast programmes.

As part of the Communications Review process, DCMS has published a paper on the ‘Consumer Perspective' which, among other things, asks questions about accessibility issues and we welcome any evidence or research being fed in to the Review. This will be discussed at the next meeting of the DCMS eAccessibility Forum, and comments on this and other papers can be submitted before 14 September, via the Communications Review website:

http://dcmscommsreview.readandcomment.com/

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether he proposes to include discussion of subtitle provision on broadcast television programmes in the series of seminars planned to replace a Communications Green Paper. [116418]

12 July 2012 : Column 313W

Mr Vaizey: As part of the Communications Review process, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has published a paper on the ‘Consumer Perspective’ which, among other things, asks questions about accessibility issues. This will be discussed at the next meeting of the DCMS eAccessibility Forum, and comments on this and other papers can be submitted before 14 September, via the Communications Review website:

http://dcmscorhmsreview.readandcomment.com/

More information about the forum can be found at:

http://www.discuss.culture.gov.uk/eaccessibility/

Tourism

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what estimate he has made of the average spend per night by Japanese tourist visitors to the UK in the latest period for which figures are available. [116389]

John Penrose: The Department does not record this information. However, the International Passenger Survey, conducted by the Office for National Statistics, reports that the average spend per night by Japanese tourist visitors in 2011 was £109.

We have defined Japanese tourists as Japanese residents visiting the UK on holiday. This does not include Japanese residents visiting friends/relatives, on business or studying.

12 July 2012 : Column 314W

Health

Alcoholic Drinks: Young People

Mrs Laing: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 18 June 2012, Official Report, column 780W, on alcoholic drinks: young people, how many of the admissions of people under the age of 18 years in each (a) socio-economic, (b) ethnic and (c) gender group admitted to hospital with suspected alcohol-induced conditions in each of the last 10 years were (i) wholly and (ii) partially attributable to alcohol. [115976]

Anne Milton: The following table gives the estimated number of admissions with an alcohol-related primary or secondary diagnosis. The earliest year for which such estimates are available is 2002-03.

In the case of patients aged 16 or over, the estimates are based on the proportion of diseases and injuries that can be wholly or partially attributed to alcohol. In the case of patients aged under 16, the figures relate only to diseases and injuries wholly attributable to alcohol, as research is not available for this age group to estimate diseases and injuries that can be partially attributed to alcohol. Some of the observed increase in admissions for patients aged 16 or over is the result of improvements in the recording of secondary diagnoses.

Estimated number of admissions of patients aged under 18 with an alcohol-related primary or secondary diagnosis¹, split by (i) wholly attributable and (ii) partially attributable conditions and (a) socio-economic group², (b) ethnicity³, and (c) gender for the years 2002-3 to 2010-11: Activity in English national health service hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
(a) Socio-economic group
 2002-032003-042004-05
Socio-economic groupWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributable

Least deprived 10%

367

319

426

347

438

350

Less deprived 10-20%

461

369

464

349

506

369

Less deprived 20-30%

427

355

541

339

528

387

Less deprived 30-40%

456

339

572

332

572

417

Less deprived 40-50%

489

402

557

394

598

431

More deprived 40-50%

572

453

639

471

702

522

More deprived 30-40%

684

554

752

518

805

608

More deprived 20-30%

757

491

864

583

949

631

More deprived 10-20%

871

646

947

659

1,035

751

Most deprived 10%

1,062

824

1,191

983

1,309

921

Unknown

60

36

81

51

111

56

(a) Socio-economic group
 2005-062006-072007-08
Socio-economic groupWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributable

Least deprived 10%

511

388

474

383

452

420

Less deprived 10-20%

571

428

465

441

543

418

Less deprived 20-30%

565

431

533

432

588

504

Less deprived 30-40%

638

526

614

542

667

457

Less deprived 40-50%

735

499

734

529

656

544

More deprived 40-50%

808

567

754

611

741

619

More deprived 30-40%

897

591

884

585

863

581

More deprived 20-30%

1,073

661

1,063

677

1,025

713

More deprived 10-20%

1,166

710

1,196

777

1,149

834

Most deprived 10%

1,433

1,023

1,574

1,017

1,425

1,078

Unknown

141

68

140

61

158

80

12 July 2012 : Column 315W

12 July 2012 : Column 316W

(a) Socio-economic group
 2008-092009-102010-11
Socio-economic groupWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributable

Least deprived 10%

411

392

368

410

334

420

Less deprived 10-20%

441

446

415

477

370

473

Less deprived 20-30%

515

451

469

434

391

503

Less deprived 30-40%

502

468

502

456

420

496

Less deprived 40-50%

544

469

531

506

501

485

More deprived 40-50%

623

596

648

549

613

559

More deprived 30-40%

721

613

693

653

647

678

More deprived 20-30%

817

716

895

700

767

701

More deprived 10-20%

970

736

1,020

832

864

805

Most deprived 10%

1,220

1,023

1,137

989

1,148

1,017

Unknown

112

61

103

44

88

51

(b) Ethnic group
  2002-03(4)2003-042004-05
 EthnicityWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributable

A

British (White)

2,923

2,382

3,792

2,931

4,361

3,394

B

Irish (White)

4

6

8

7

11

7

C

Any other White background

126

107

137

113

157

130

D

White and Black Caribbean (Mixed)

19

10

14

16

16

13

E

White and Black African (Mixed)

4

1

3

8

1

6

F

White and Asian (Mixed)

3

9

6

7

7

6

G

Any other Mixed background

16

8

14

12

15

10

H

Indian (Asian or Asian British)

20

32

43

35

28

51

J

Pakistani (Asian or Asian British)

3

56

6

63

7

96

K

Bangladeshi (Asian or Asian British)

4

11

7

14

12

16

L

Any other Asian background)

5

19

8

19

14

20

M

Caribbean (Black or Black British)

17

23

21

34

14

34

N

African (Black or Black British)

16

13

14

24

7

36

P

Any other Black background

12

32

21

42

21

45

R

Chinese (other ethnic group)

1

12

5

11

6

3

S

Any other ethnic group

29

51

50

35

53

50

X

Not known

155

89

555

343

591

307

Z

Not stated

2,200

1,448

2,330

1,312

2,232

1,218

0

White

212

215

1

Black—Caribbean

3

4

2

Black—African

2

3

Black—Other

3

1

4

Indian

0

5

Pakistani

2

6

Bangladeshi

1

8

Any other ethnic group

3

4

9

Not given

428

249

(b) Ethnic group
  2005-062006-072007-08
 EthnicityWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributableWholly attributablePartially attributable

A

British (White)

5,440

3,914

5,828

4,283

6,098

4,624

B

Irish (White)

15

8

17

8

15

9

C

Any other White background

149

109

139

111

149

118

12 July 2012 : Column 317W

12 July 2012 : Column 318W

D

White and Black Caribbean (Mixed)

26

16

28

23

17

27

E

White and Black African (Mixed)

3

3

3

3

8

8

F

White and Asian (Mixed)

3

8

5

25

17

32

G

Any other Mixed background

25

24

27

27

40

29

H

Indian (Asian or Asian British)

32

36

40

48

39

47

J

Pakistani (Asian or Asian British)

15

100

15

77

13

108

K

Bangladeshi (Asian or Asian British)

7

22

8

27

26

30

L

Any other Asian background)

13

27

16

35

20

45

M

Caribbean (Black or Black British)

25

34

25

37

29

45

N

African (Black or Black British)

13

36

25

48

19

49

P

Any other Black background

28

42

39

55

40

56

R

Chinese (other ethnic group)

2

6

1

7

4

6

S

Any other ethnic group

87

72

88

78

105

83

X

Not known

627

271

546

256

443

208

Z

Not stated

2,028

1,164

1,581

909

1,185

724

0

White

1

Black—Caribbean

2

Black—African

3

Black—Other

4

Indian

5

Pakistani

6

Bangladeshi

8

Any other ethnic group

9

Not given