Roads: Accidents

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what steps he (a) is taking and (b) plans to take to provide face-to-face support to those who are bereaved or seriously injured in road accidents; [116057]

(2) how much funding he allocated to support victims of (a) burglary and (b) road accidents in the latest period for which figures are available; [116058]

(3) what assessment his Department has made of the recommendations by Brake on support for road crash victims. [116059]

Mr Blunt: In each of the three years 2011-12 to 2013-14 the Ministry of Justice has allocated £125,000 to support victims of burglary and £277,606 to support those bereaved or injured by road traffic offending.

The funding in relation to road traffic offending goes to four organisations: the Road Victims Trust, Aftermath, Brake and Roadpeace. All except Brake provide face-to-face support.

Any victim of crime is also eligible to receive support from Victim Support which receives £38 million a year in grant funding from the Ministry of Justice.

In its response to the consultation ‘Getting it Right for Victims and Witnesses’ the Government committed to doing more for victims of road traffic offending and we will work with interested parties to identify and examine the options for doing so. The Government do not consider it feasible to extend coverage broadly to anyone bereaved through a road traffic accident or seriously injured by one.

Young Offenders

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of young offenders given a community sentence have (a) breached that order and (b) received a custodial sentence as a result in each month of the last five years. [116060]

Mr Blunt: With regard to young adult offenders aged 18 to 20, the information on the proportion of offenders who breached their community sentence is not held centrally. Information on breaches of community sentences by individual offenders is recorded by probation trusts on their case management systems. It is used in the day-to-day management of offenders, including as a trigger to appropriate action in response to breach, for example through formal warnings or enforcement action, but the figures requested do not form part of trusts' routine reporting.

Information is available for 2007 and 2008 on the number of 18 to 20-year-olds who were received into custody for breach of a community sentence, as follows:

2007: 886(1)

2008: 964(2)

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

(1)Source:

Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2007. Table 6.12

(2)Source:

Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2008. Table 6.9

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100406130654/justice.gov.uk/publications/prisonandprobation.htm

Since the roll-out of the Prison-NOMIS system commenced in May 2009 information on receptions into custody for breach has no longer been available.

The available information required to answer this question in relation to juveniles is currently being collated. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as it is available. A copy will be placed in the House Library.

Education

Free School Meals: Further Education

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the contribution of the Minister of State for Schools of 13 June 2012, Official Report, column 94WH, on free school meals (colleges), how

11 July 2012 : Column 269W

his Department estimated the cost of extending the provision of free meals to disadvantaged 16 to 18 year olds who study at further education or sixth form colleges. [115627]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 6 July 2012]:In my answer of 13 June 2012, Official Report, column 94WH, I quoted a figure of between £35 million and £70 million as the cost of extending the provision of free meals to disadvantaged 16 to 18-year-olds who study at further education or sixth form colleges.

In his letter to the Secretary of State for Education dated 13 April, Martin Doel, chief executive of the Association of Colleges (AoC), applied a figure of £32 million as the cost of extending free meals to eligible students in FE and sixth form colleges. The AoC 'No Free Lunch?' campaign quotes a figure of £38 million.

Departmental estimates are based on a number of factors, including the current cost of providing free meals to school sixth form students, which would give an upper cost threshold of £70 million. For the purposes of the debate, my estimate assumed that the actual cost of extending free meals would fall between the AoC figures and the higher cost of £70 million. I did not give a precise departmental estimate because the cost is reliant on a number of assumptions which need to be tested further.

The factors which are likely to contribute to the actual departmental estimate are the costs of providing school meals; the number of 16 to 18-year-old students who were known to be eligible for free school meals at age 15; and the proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds in school sixth forms relative to those in further education and training.

We are continuing to determine the best factors on which to base our assumptions.

Defence

Aircraft Carriers

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has spent on training individuals to handle and fly the CATOBAR aircraft since its introduction. [108868]

Peter Luff: I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 30 April 2012, Official Report, column 1123W. I will write to the right hon. Member once the costs associated with this training have been collated.

Substantive answer from Peter Luff to Jim Murphy:

In my answer to your questions related to the costs of our training individuals to handle and fly-Catapult Assisted Take Off Barrier Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) aircraft (Official Record 23 April 2012 : Column 716W) I said that I would update you on this issue.

To clarify the position on those personnel training with the US Navy as of July 2012 we now have nine Royal Navy pilots at various stages of training with US Navy carrier borne aircraft. This training does include the use of catapult and arrestor gear, but I should make clear that this is a small element of the wider carrier strike training and interoperability package being undertaken with the US Navy.

As part of the training programme for the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers, there remains a requirement for the Royal Navy to train a cadre of suitably qualified and experienced personnel who will supervise embarked carrier aviation in the future, and this training with the US helps to fulfil this requirement.

11 July 2012 : Column 270W

The Royal Air Force also has a long-standing reciprocal Pilot Exchange Programme and there are currently two Royal Air Force pilots flying US aircraft under this arrangement, which attracts minimal additional cost.

The requirement for, and continuation of, such training will see Royal Navy and Royal Air Force personnel gain experience of frontline carrier capability in its widest sense, and the incorporation of US Navy training courses. The current training programme is focused on development of a UK understanding of large carrier Flight

As part of this process, a UK/US Statement of Intent on Carrier Co-operation and Maritime Power Projection was jointly signed by the Secretary of State for Defence and the US Defence Secretary on 5 January 2012.

I hope you will understand that, given the scope of this training, we continue to discuss the associated costs with the US authorities. When we have collated this information, I will consider its release.

Armed Forces: Pay

Simon Reevell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 4 July 2012, Official Report, columns 678-9W, on armed forces: pay, what the nature is of the future payments; and whether they are adjusted to claim back salaries automatically paid to service personnel in respect of the period after their death and before the month end. [116301]

Mr Robathan: Future payments relate to any additional sum due to a deceased serviceman or woman that would normally be paid with salary. These can occur where there is a backdated increase in the individual's salary, introduction of a new allowance, or increase in the rate at which an allowance is paid that includes a period before the death of an individual.

We never ask families of those killed in service to pay money back; reconciliation of the individual's pay account is made as soon as all the information is available to us. Adjustments of future payments are made to ensure families are paid all moneys to which they are entitled.

Armed Forces: Vaccination

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what vaccinations and inoculations are administered to armed forces personnel (a) on entry to the services and (b) on a routine basis throughout a person's service career. [116125]

Mr Robathan: It is Ministry of Defence policy that all entitled service personnel are recommended to be immunised in accordance with National Immunisation policy. The following list details routine vaccination requirements on entry to the armed forces:

Hepatitis A + B (as single antigen or combined vaccines)

Human papillomavirus

Low-dose diphtheria/Tetanus/Inactivated Polio (Td/IPV)

Meningococcal (serogroup C disease)

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)

Typhoid

Tuberculosis

Varicella

Yellow fever

11 July 2012 : Column 271W

Service personnel are routinely kept in date for the following vaccines throughout their career: Diphtheria, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Poliomyelitis, Tetanus, Tuberculosis, Typhoid and Yellow fever.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many cases of severe adverse reaction due to administration of vaccinations and inoculations leading to (a) the death of service personnel and (b) disablement causing medical discharge from the services have occurred in each of the last five years. [116126]

Mr Robathan: Between 2007 and 2011, the latest date for which data are available, there have been no reported UK Regular armed forces personnel deaths, including reservists deployed on operations overseas, caused by severe adverse reaction due to administration of vaccinations and inoculations.

Between financial years 2006-07 and 2010-11, no UK Regular Royal Navy Service personnel were medically discharged due to a severe adverse reaction due to administration of vaccinations and inoculations. Fewer than five UK Regular Army personnel and fewer than five Regular Royal Air Force personnel were medically discharged with severe adverse reaction due to administration of vaccinations and inoculations, but only as a contributory factor and not as a primary factor.

Data for medical discharges in the UK Regular armed forces for 2011-12 will be published on 12 July 2012 and will be available on the following website:

www.dasa.mod.uk

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what medical advice the Armed Forces has received from expert bodies on the simultaneous administration of multiple vaccinations, inoculations and biological and chemical pre-treatments (a) prior to Operation Granby and (b) most recently. [116127]

Mr Robathan: Simultaneous administration of multiple vaccinations, inoculations and biological and chemical pre-treatments prior to Operation Granby was given in accordance with the Department of Health's (DH) ‘Green Book’.

In 2006, the MOD announced that final scientific papers relating to its Vaccines Interactions Research Programme had been published. These looked at the possible adverse health effects of the combination of vaccines and tablets given to troops to protect them against the threat of biological and chemical warfare. The overwhelming evidence from the programme is that the combination of vaccines and tablets that were offered to UK forces at the time of the 1990-91 Gulf conflict would not have had adverse health effects. The scientific papers concerning the above research programme can be found on the following MOD web page:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/AboutDefence/WhatWeDo/HealthandSafety/GulfVeteransIllnesses/VaccinesInteractionsResearchProgramme.htm

More recently, we have not approached any expert bodies for medical advice on the simultaneous administration of multiple vaccinations as vaccinations are administered in accordance with the extant version of the DH ‘Green

11 July 2012 : Column 272W

Book’. This core document is continuously updated and is available on the DH website at:

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_079917

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what vaccinations, inoculations and biological and chemical pre-treatments are administered to armed forces personnel prior to deployment to Afghanistan; and what such treatments were routinely administered prior to 2012. [116128]

Mr Robathan: In addition to the vaccinations routinely provided to all personnel on entry and throughout their service career, personnel deployed to Afghanistan are offered vaccination against anthrax and seasonal influenza, and anti-malarial chemoprophylaxis in the form of Chloroquine and Proguanil. Rabies vaccination is also offered to occupational at-risk groups, namely dog handlers and those personnel likely to be assigned to dog handling duties, as well as veterinarians and their support staff. No biological or chemical pre-treatments are indicated prior to deployment to Afghanistan.

The only change to the treatments offered to deployed personnel since the start of Op Herrick has been the addition of routine vaccination against seasonal influenza.

Army

Mr Reid: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many serving Army personnel at the time of their recruitment were citizens of (a) the UK, (b) the Irish Republic and (c) other countries. [116405]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 10 July 2012]:Information on how many serving Army personnel, at the time of their recruitment, were citizens of the UK, the Irish Republic and other countries is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

However, the following table shows the nationality of those recruited to the Regular Army as either officers or soldiers, since 2007-08, if this information was declared on the Joint Personnel Administration system:

Financial yearUKIrish RepublicOther countriesNot knownTotal

2007-08

8,160

30

1,300

3,960

13,450

2008-09

9,870

30

1,490

2,370

13,760

2009-10

11,140

80

1,010

1,360

13,580

2010-11

7,510

70

540

580

8,700

2011-12

9,950

90

810

220

11,070

In addition, the nationality of Regular Army personnel, officers and soldiers, currently serving as at 1 May 2012 is shown in the following table:

NationalityTrainedUntrained

UK

86,890

9,300

Irish Republic

340

70

Other countries

10,350

700

Not known

10

10

Figures do not include those serving in the full-time reserve service.

All figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

11 July 2012 : Column 273W

Mr Reid: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many serving Army personnel lived at the time of their recruitment in (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Wales, (d) Northern Ireland, (e) the Irish Republic and (f) elsewhere. [116406]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 10 July 2012]:Information on where serving Army personnel were living at the time of their recruitment is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, the following table shows the country that recruits joining the Army from 2007 to date, have declared as their main contact address during the recruitment and selection process:

 2012-132011-122010-112009-102008-092007-08

Scotland

261

618

528

664

464

443

England

2,538

4,475

3,102

4,329

3,683

4,129

Wales

241

493

320

626

660

531

Northern Ireland

113

182

161

213

244

231

Republic of Ireland

53

101

82

103

43

28

Elsewhere

226

259

223

332

761

540

Great Britain

4

9

2

10

5

2

Not known

2,247

4,753

4,059

7,203

7,670

7,316

 

5,683

10,890

8,530

13,400

13,530

13,220

Where recruits have not completed the 'country' address field on their applications, the country is shown as not known; this may be because the information has been entered in the wrong address field or, as frequently occurs with recruits from the UK, they do not complete the 'country' field.

Electronic Warfare

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions he had with (a) ministerial colleagues and (b) external organisations prior to the publication of the draft Energy Bill on the provision of security systems to protect against cyber attack on the Government Pipeline and Storage Systems. [115882]

Peter Luff: Officials at the Oil and Pipeline Agency (OPA), which manages the Government Pipeline and Storage Systems (GPSS) on behalf of the Ministry of Defence, regularly discuss with appropriate external organisations measures to best protect the GPSS, including from the risk of cyber attack now and in the future. Concerns are raised to the appropriate level as necessary.

To date, Ministers have had no requirement to discuss security systems to protect the GPSS against cyber attack.

Iraq-Kuwait Conflict

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what vaccinations, inoculations and other biological and chemical pre-treatments were administered to Armed Forces personnel prior to deployment on Operation Granby. [116124]

Mr Robathan: The information requested is available in the Ministry of Defence published paper entitled: “Background to the use of Medical Countermeasures

11 July 2012 : Column 274W

to protect British Forces during the Gulf War (Operation Granby)”. This paper discussed the background to the use of medical countermeasures not only in terms of the scientific issues involved, but also of procurement and other matters which were raised by Gulf veterans.

The paper is available on the MOD website at:

http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/86D81B65-F0B0-46E4-8BCC-50DD4F1FF584/0/Oct97MedicalCountermeasurepaper1.pdf

and is available in the Library of the House.

Nuclear Weapons

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his Department considers to be a minimum credible nuclear deterrent. [115686]

Mr Philip Hammond: The Strategic Defence and Security Review published in October 2010 concluded that we can meet the minimum requirement of an effective and credible level of deterrence with a reduced nuclear weapons capability. We therefore decided to cut the maximum number of warheads deployed on each deployed submarine from 48 to 40, and to reduce the number of operational missiles on each submarine to no more than eight.

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the UK's need to maintain a nuclear deterrent. [115688]

Mr Philip Hammond: Our current analysis is that we cannot rule out the risk either that a major direct nuclear threat to the UK's vital interests will re-emerge or that new states will emerge that possess a more limited nuclear capability but nevertheless one that could pose a grave threat to our vital interests. We therefore see an enduring role for the UK's nuclear forces as an essential part of our national security capability.

The Rifles Regiment

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he has any plans to reduce the size of The Rifles regiment. [116010]

Mr Philip Hammond: Further to my announcement to the House on 5 July 2012, Official Report, column 1087-88, I can confirm that there are no current plans to change the size of The Rifles regiment.

Energy and Climate Change

Electricity: Meters

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many external consultants his Department engaged to work on smart meter roll-out in April (a) 2011 and (b) 2012. [115073]

Charles Hendry: None. There are industry and technical experts working on the smart meter roll-out in delivery roles, but none in a consulting capacity.

11 July 2012 : Column 275W

Energy

Dr Phillip Lee: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of counterparty risks in the draft Energy Bill's multiparty contract model; and whether he plans to make further assessments of the single counterparty model. [116564]

Charles Hendry: In developing the Contracts for Difference payment model set out in the draft Energy Bill and draft Operational Framework in May 2012, we have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders to assess any risks associated with the proposed model. We have also considered external legal advice.

While I still believe that the proposed model is workable, I recognise the concerns that have been raised by industry. For that reason, I have been assessing the viability of alternative models, including those based on a single counter-party.

I await the outcome of the Energy and Climate Change Committee's pre-legislative scrutiny before making a decision on whether to make any changes in the Bill.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the number of jobs that will be created in the UK as a result of the Norway-UK energy partnership for sustainable growth. [116677]

Charles Hendry: During a visit to Oslo on 6-7 June, the Prime Minister announced a UK-Norway energy partnership and billions of pounds of new investment by UK and Norwegian companies. The announcement can be found at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/pn12_072/pn12_072.aspx

These investments have the potential to create thousands of jobs in the UK. Details include:

Statoil's further £12 billion investment developing Mariner-Bressay North Sea oil fields will create 800 to 1,000 new jobs, including 200 to 300 jobs at a new operations centre in Aberdeen;

Aker Solutions creating 1,300 jobs in London.

Forewind Consortium's development of Dogger Bank offshore wind farm could create many thousands of jobs.

Energy: Meters

Guto Bebb: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the relative costs for installing the available smart meter solutions. [116397]

Charles Hendry: In April 2012 DECC published updated impact assessments for the roll-out of smart meters in the domestic and non-domestic sectors. These estimate total costs of £11.5 billion and total benefits of £18.6 million, giving a net benefit of £7.2 billion. The impact assessments estimate that the total cost of installing smart meters will amount to £1.7 billion.

Guto Bebb: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the relative equipment and support costs for the available smart meter solutions. [116398]

11 July 2012 : Column 276W

Charles Hendry: In April 2012 DECC published updated impact assessments for the roll-out of smart meters in the domestic and non-domestic sectors. These estimate total costs of £11.5 billion and total benefits of £18.6 million, giving a net benefit of £7.2 billion. Of the total costs outlined in the impact assessments, equipment costs are estimated at £5.3 billion, which includes smart electricity meters, smart gas meters, In-Home Displays and in-premise communications equipment. Overall, considering both costs and cost savings to energy suppliers and energy savings by consumers, we expect the roll-out to reduce the average, annual gas and electricity bill by £25 by 2020.

Energy: Prices

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department has spent on the Check, Switch, Insulate to Save campaign since October 2012. [113435]

Gregory Barker: Excluding staff costs, the Department of Energy and Climate Change has spent just over £1,000 on banners and web work/design for the Check, Switch, Insulate to Save campaign since October 2011.

The Department developed joint messaging with partners using shared language in the lead up to Big Energy Week.

Fuel Poverty

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to the Hills Fuel Poverty Review published in March 2012, when he plans to announce a new measure of fuel poverty. [116643]

Gregory Barker: We intend to publish a consultation on a future definition of fuel poverty in September and to adopt a new approach to fuel poverty measurement after it has been completed.

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effect on levels of fuel poverty of recent increases in domestic energy tariffs. [116821]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change published its latest annual, fuel poverty statistics in May 2012. This report projected 3.9 million households to be in fuel poverty in 2012 in England, an increase of 0.4 million households from 2010 levels (the latest year for which actual data are available).

It is not possible to isolate the effect of tariff changes (either increases or, as seen in the first quarter of 2012 compared with the previous quarter, decreases) on projected fuel poverty levels in 2012. This is because there are many factors that determine whether a household is in fuel poverty or not, and these factors are not independent of each other.

Fuels

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what the terms of reference are for his Department's work on the resilience of the UK's

11 July 2012 : Column 277W

petrol and diesel supplies; when this work will be completed; and whether it will be made public; [116208]

(2) how much his Department has spent on studying the resilience of the UK's petrol and diesel supplies. [116209]

Charles Hendry: Since the financial year 2010-11, the Department has currently spent £150,000 on reports to study the resilience of the UK's petrol and diesel supplies.

DECC has published a number of assessments on the resilience the downstream oil industry:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/meeting_energy/en_security/downstream_oil/improving/improving.aspx

These reports include the terms of reference for these studies.

Further work is under way with industry to develop a strategic framework for the UK refining industry; this work is expected to report later this year in the autumn. This is the first strategic review undertaken in the past decade.

Green Deal Scheme

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what selection criteria were used by his Department when allocating the £200 million of funding pledged by his Department to incentivise take-up of the Green Deal. [116490]

Gregory Barker: The principal use of the £200 million funding is expected to be an incentive payment scheme which will reward households that take early action to have energy efficiency measures installed through the Green Deal.

Further details on the scheme, including eligibility criteria, will be announced later in the year.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which (a) individuals, (b) companies, (c) organisations and (d) local authorities have received funding from the £200 million pledged by his Department to incentivise take-up of the Green Deal; and how much funding each such individual and organisation received. [116491]

Gregory Barker: No individuals, companies, organisations or local authorities have received funding from this £200 million Green Deal take-up fund.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether any of the £200 million funding pledged by his Department to incentivise take-up of the Green Deal was allocated as part of the Government's City Deals; and whether any conditions were attached as part of these allocations. [116492]

Gregory Barker: The Department is considering options for awarding money as part of the City Deals process. No funds have been allocated, and any conditions that may be attached to such an allocation are currently under consideration.

11 July 2012 : Column 278W

Manchester Declaration

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent contribution his Department and its non-departmental bodies and agencies have made to implementation of the 2005 Manchester Declaration. [116102]

Charles Hendry: None.

Warm Front Scheme: Coventry

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households in (a) Coventry and (b) Coventry North East constituency received assistance from the Warm Front scheme in each of the last five years. [116450]

Gregory Barker: The number of households assisted in (a) Coventry and (b) Coventry North East constituency in each of the last five years is shown in the following table:

 2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13(1)Total

Coventry local authority

2,070

1,687

649

275

60

7,291

Coventry North East constituency

886

723

317

133

23

2,960

(1) Figures up to 30 June 2012

Work and Pensions

Housing Benefit

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people under the age of 25 years are in receipt of housing benefit in each parliamentary constituency. [116495]

Steve Webb: Information on how many people aged under 25 years are in receipt of housing benefit by parliamentary constituency is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Housing Benefit: Greater London

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what information his Department holds on the number of private sector tenants in receipt of housing benefit who have been relocated from each London borough in the first three months of 2012-13. [116061]

Steve Webb: The Department has commissioned a consortium of academics and research organisations led by Ian Cole, professor of housing studies at Sheffield Hallam University to undertake an independent review of the impact of changes to the local housing allowance system of housing benefit.

The research will include a spatial analysis of the effects of the changes that will examine movement from one local authority to another.

11 July 2012 : Column 279W

The Department published a report of early findings on 14 June and a copy of the report has been deposited in the House Library.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what funding of transitional benefit to recipients of housing benefit was paid by each London borough in the first three months of 2012-13; and what funding will be available for the remainder of the year. [116063]

Steve Webb: Transitional funding for the housing benefit reforms for the financial year 2012-13 was allocated to local authorities earlier this year. These funds are intended to be used to provide targeted support to help meet the housing needs of claimants affected by the housing benefit reforms. Examples of this could include additional support with homelessness prevention, negotiating with landlords, money advice and supporting people who need to move. It is for local authorities to decide how the funding will be spent and we do not monitor this expenditure on a month by month basis.

Allocations of transitional funding for each London borough for the financial year 2012-13 can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/S1-2012.pdf

Jobseeker's Allowance: Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many 18 to 24 year olds in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) region claimed jobseeker's allowance for 12 months or more in the latest period for which figures are available. [116258]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many 18 to 24 year olds in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) region claimed jobseeker's allowance for 12 months or more in the latest period for which figures are available. (116258)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles the number of claimants of Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA) from the Jobcentre Plus administrative system.

Table 1, shows the number of 18 to 24 years who had been claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for over 52 weeks in each Region and Parliamentary Constituency in May 2012. As the information requested is quite extensive, a copy has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk.

Personal Independence Payment

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he expects to announce the providers that will carry out the new personal independence payment assessment. [116242]

11 July 2012 : Column 280W

Maria Miller: The Department for Work and Pensions tendered for a framework of providers to deliver future health and disability assessments earlier this year. A competition among framework providers for the personal independence payment assessment has recently been completed. The bids have now been evaluated and we are in the process of internal governance. We aim to announce successful providers by the end of July.

Poverty: Young People

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of people under the age of 18 were living below the poverty line in the UK in each of the last five years; and what steps he is taking to tackle the problem of youth poverty. [115814]

Maria Miller: The Child Poverty Act 2010 sets four income-based UK-wide targets to be met by 2020. The targets are based on the proportion of children living in households with relative low income, absolute low income, combined low income and material deprivation and persistent poverty, all before housing costs have been taken into account.

Estimates of the number and proportion of children living in households with relative low income, absolute low income and combined low income and material deprivation are published in the “Households Below Average Income” (HBAI) series. HBAI uses household income adjusted (or ‘equivalised’) for household size and composition, to provide a proxy for standard of living. The datasets that underlie the HBAI series can be used to estimate the proportion of people under the age of 18 in poverty by these measures.

Proportion of people under the age of 18 in relative low income, absolute low income and combined low income and material deprivation, before housing costs, in the UK 2006/07-2010/11
Percentage
 Relative low incomeAbsolute low incomeCombined low income and material deprivation(1)

2006/07

22

13

16

2007/08

23

14

17

2008/09

22

13

17

2009/10

20

11

16

2010/11

18

11

14

(1) Proportion of dependent children (see Note 6)

The Government published their first strategy to tackle child poverty in April 2011. The strategy draws together the Government's radical programme of welfare and education reform. It underpins the Government's ambition for every child to realise their potential and reflects its belief that reducing poverty is about more than lifting families' incomes above an arbitrary line. It demonstrates that the Government are making a sustained, long-term attempt to lift people out of not only income poverty, but poverty of aspiration and poverty of outcomes. The child poverty strategy sets out how the Government will tackle the root causes of poverty such as worklessness, educational failure, debt, poor health and family breakdown, thereby raising the life chances of poorer children and breaking the cycle of entrenched intergenerational poverty.

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It is particularly important that during this time of economic difficulty we ensure that a generation of young people is not left behind. The Government are making £126 million of new money available as part of the Youth Contract to give teenagers opportunities to train, work and get their lives on track. Under this Government, apprenticeship starts have increased at a record rate, with growth across all age ranges, in all sectors and throughout the country. In 2010/11, there were 131,700 apprenticeship starts for 16-18 year-olds—an increase of 12.8% on 2009/10.

Notes:

1. These statistics are based on households below average income (HBAI) data sourced from the 2010/11 Family Resources survey (FRS). This uses disposable household income, adjusted using modified OECD equivalisation factors for household size and composition, as an income measure as a proxy for standard of living and is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=hbai_arc

2. These figures have been presented on a before housing costs basis. That means housing costs (such as rent, water rates, mortgage interest payments, buildings insurance payments and ground rent and service charges) are not deducted from income.

3. All estimates are based on survey data and are therefore subject to a degree of uncertainty. Small differences should be treated with caution as these will be affected by sampling error and variability in non-response.

4. The reference period for HBAI figures is the financial year.

5. Proportions have been rounded to the nearest percentage point.

6. Based on the FRS data, it is not possible to calculate material deprivation for all people under the age of 18 so the proportion of dependent children experiencing combined low income and material deprivation is provided. A dependent child is defined as an individual aged under 16. A person will also be defined as a child if they are 16 to 19 years old and they are: not married nor in a civil partnership nor living with a partner; living with parents; in full-time non-advanced education or in unwaged government training.

7. The measures in the Child Poverty Act 2010 are defined as:

Relative poverty: children living in households with equivalised incomes below 60% of contemporary median household income.

Absolute poverty: children living in households with equivalised incomes below 60% of 1998/99 median household income held constant in real terms.

Low income and material deprivation: percentage of children living in households in material deprivation and with less than 70% of contemporary median household income.

Persistent poverty: children living in households who have had equivalised incomes below 60% of median household income for at least three out of the last four years.

8. In the past, persistent poverty measurement has been based on the British Household Panel survey, which has now been subsumed into the much larger Understanding Society survey. There is no publication for 2009 as there is a gap in the data as the respondents are moved into the understanding society sample. This means the last data covers the period 2005-08 and has not been reported here.

Universal Credit

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether families with disabled children will be involved in monitoring and evaluating universal credit once it is rolled out nationally. [116393]

Maria Miller: The Department is currently developing the overall strategy for the evaluation and monitoring of universal credit. No detailed plans are yet available. However, monitoring and evaluation will involve capturing

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the views of representative samples of different groups of claimants such as families with disabled children. Survey data, qualitative research and feedback from stakeholder groups will be used to assess the effects for different groups of claimants. In conducting research on universal credit, the Department will draw on the guidance “Involving disabled people in social research” published in August 2011 by the Office for Disability Issues.

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions by what means his Department will monitor and evaluate the effect of the universal credit on families with disabled children. [116394]

Maria Miller: The Department is currently developing the overall strategy for the evaluation and monitoring of universal credit. No detailed plans are yet available. However, we are committed to monitoring the effects of the policy in aggregate and in terms of the outcomes for different groups of claimants, including families with disabled children. To understand the experiences and outcomes of claimants, the Department will employ a wide range of different research methods, survey techniques and sources including evidence from regular surveys.

Women and Equalities

Protection of Freedoms

Kate Green: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities (1) with reference to Chapter 4 in Part 5 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, what steps she plans to take to enable individuals to apply to have relevant offences disregarded; [115422]

(2) when she expects to implement the provisions on erasing historic convictions for consensual homosexual sex in the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012; and if she will make a statement. [115423]

Lynne Featherstone: The Home Office is leading work, in consultation with other Government Departments, Agencies and relevant stakeholders, to develop and implement an application process to enable individuals to apply to have any convictions, cautions, warnings or reprimands that meet the criteria as set out in Part 5 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, disregarded. The application process will be implemented later this year. Further details will be available on the Home Office website.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Adult Education: Blackpool

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many residents of Blackpool North and Cleveleys constituency completed a course at an adult education college in each of the last five years. [116275]

Mr Hayes: Table 1 shows Government-funded further education and skills learner achievements in general further education colleges in Blackpool North and Cleveleys parliamentary constituency by age, for academic years 2006/07 to 2010/11, the latest full years for which final data are available.

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Table 1: General further education colleges learner achievement by geography and age, 2006/07 to 2010/11
 Age2006/072007/082008/092009/102010/11

Blackpool North and Cleveleys constituency

Under 19

780

890

970

960

1,060

 

19+

1,560

1,310

1,840

1,870

1,710

 

Total

2,340

2,200

2,800

2,830

2,770

       

England

Under 19

457,610

489,320

521,120

546,780

558,360

 

19+

1,089,100

1,060,260

1,221,600

1,187,170

975,860

 

Total

1,541,700

1,549,600

1,742,700

1,734,000

1,534,200

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 except for the England totals which are rounded to the nearest 100. 2. Geography is based upon the home postcode of the learner. Geographic information is based on boundaries of regions as of May 2010. The England totals include some postcodes which are not known. 3. These data include both young people (under 19) and adults (aged 19+) achieving in apprenticeships, workplace learning, community learning and education and training provision taken at general further education colleges (including tertiary) only. 4. Age is based on age at the start of the academic year. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Information on further education and skills achievement by geography is published in a supplementary table of a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/

Apprentices

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) how many young people started a level (a) 2 and (b) 3 apprenticeship programme in construction at the age of (i) 16, (ii) 17 and (iii) 18 in each of the last three years; [116203]

(2) how many people completed level (a) 2 and (b) 3 apprenticeship programmes in construction at the age of (i) under 19, (ii) 19 to 24 and (iii) 25 in each of the last three years. [116204]

Mr Hayes: Table 1 gives the number of apprenticeship programme starts in the "Construction, Planning and Built Environment" sector subject area by level and age for 2008/09 to 2010/11, the latest years for which final data are available. Table 2 gives the equivalent information for apprenticeship achievements.

Table 1: Apprenticeship programme starts in the construction, planning and built environment sector subject area by age and level, 2008/09 to 2010/11
 Intermediate (level 2)Advanced (level 3)
Age2008/092009/102010/112008/092009/102010/11

16

4,790

3,680

3,690

1,380

890

1,060

17

4,430

4,140

3,730

1,370

1,120

1,100

18

2,860

2,840

2,940

3,490

3,000

3,270

Under 19

12,080

10,660

10,360

6,230

5,000

5,420

19-24

3,850

3,410

4,100

5,080

4,790

5,200

25+

960

690

1,650

1,020

670

1,360

Total

16,890

14,760

16,110

12,330

10,450

11,980

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Age is calculated based on age at start of the programme. 3. Figures include some apprentices aged under 16. Source: Individualised Learner Record
Table 2: Apprenticeship framework achievements in the construction, planning and the built environment sector subject area by age and level, 2008/09 to 2010/11
 Intermediate (level 2)Advanced (level 3)
Age2008/092009/102010/112008/092009/102010/11

16

3,910

3,300

2,280

1,020

1,220

1,120

17

3,860

2,960

2,300

990

1,020

980

18

2,360

1,960

1,710

2,560

2,750

2,610

Under 19

10,130

8,220

6,290

4,570

4,990

4,710

19-24

3,240

2,640

2,350

3,940

4,100

4,010

25+

300

480

480

150

400

560

Total

13,680

11,340

9,110

8,650

9,490

9,280

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Age is calculated based on age at start of the programme. 3. Figures include some apprentices under 16. Source: Individualised Learner Record

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Further breakdowns of the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements are published in supplementary table to the quarterly Post 16 Further Education and Skills Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary_tables/

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of apprentices who completed a Level 2 programme in construction before their 19th birthday progressed to start a Level 3 construction programme in each of the last three years. [116205]

Mr Hayes: Table 1 gives the following information for the “Construction, Planning and Built Environment” sector subject area:

(i) the number of apprentices who successfully completed a Level 2 apprenticeship in the 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11 academic years while they were aged 18 or under; and

(ii) the number and proportion of these apprentices who then progressed to start a Level 3 apprenticeship. The figures on Level 3 apprenticeship starts relate to any ages and include provisional data for the 2011/12 academic year. Provisional data will change as further data returns are received from further education colleges and providers. Provisional data for 2011/12 data will be finalised in January 2013.

Table 1: Progression from a Level 2 to a Level 3 Apprenticeship in the construction, planning and the built environment sector subject area, 2008/09 to 2010/11
 2008/092009/102010/11

Number successfully completing a Level 2 Apprenticeship while aged 18 and under

5,730

4,820

3,570

Of which progressed to Level 3 Apprenticeship (number)

2,500

2,180

1,690

Of which progressed to Level 3 Apprenticeship (proportion)

44

45

47

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Age of the learner is based on age at completion of Level 2 Apprenticeship. Apprenticeship achievements by age are usually based on age at the start of the programme, so these figures will not match other published counts of achievements. 3. Years are based on completion date of the Level 2 Apprenticeship. The Level 3 Apprenticeship could have started in any year, including the first nine months of the 2011/12 academic year. 2011/12 data Is provisional and will be revised. Provisional data for 2011/12 data will be finalised in January 2013. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Further breakdowns of the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements are published in supplementary table to the quarterly Post 16 Education Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary_tables/

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Directors: Disqualification

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much the Insolvency Service spent on printing hard copies of D1 reports concerning the conduct of directors as required under the Company Directors Disqualification Act 1986 in each year since 2002. [116259]

Norman Lamb: The Insolvency Service does not maintain a separate record of the cost of printing D1s. The cost of printing D1s is subsumed into the overheads for the Insolvency Service.

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much the Insolvency Service has spent on couriers to send D1 reports in each year since 2002. [116262]

Norman Lamb: The Insolvency Service does not maintain a separate record of the costs resulting from using couriers to send D1 reports. The cost of using couriers is subsumed into the overheads for the Insolvency Service.

Departmental Pay

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the lowest hourly rate is paid to staff by his Department; how many members of staff based outside London are paid less than £7.20 per hour; and how many members of staff based in London are paid less than £8.30 per hour. [116380]

Norman Lamb: The lowest hourly rate paid to a member of staff in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is £8.01.

Staff based outside London paid less than £7.20: Nil

Staff based inside London paid less than £8.30: Nil

Retail Trade: Newspaper Press

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what assessment he has made of the evidence considered by the Office of Fair Trading in determining not to make a referral to the Competition Commission of the newspaper and magazine wholesale distribution sector; [115786]

(2) if he will consider using his powers under section 132 of the Enterprise Act 2002 to refer the newspaper and magazine industry to the Competition Commission for a full market investigation. [115787]

Mr Vaizey: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The Office of Fair Trading, as the appropriate independent body, is currently actively discussing the matter with the distribution chain. It would therefore be inappropriate for the Department to intervene.

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International Development

The Sahel

9. Ian Murray: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent assessment he has made of the humanitarian situation in the Sahel. [116161]

Mr O'Brien: 18 million people across the Sahel remain at risk of food shortages. I visited Niger and Senegal in late June to assess the humanitarian situation in the Sahel for myself. The UK Government have responded swiftly and is providing lifesaving aid to 1.6 million people across the region.

UN Arms Trade Treaty

10. Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions he has had with the Secretaries of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and for Defence on the implications for his Department of the UN arms trade treaty. [116162]

Mr Duncan: All Departments across Whitehall are united in wanting to see an effective arms trade treaty. Negotiations are taking place this month in New York. The UK will do its utmost to secure a successful outcome.

Diarrhoeal Disease

11. Naomi Long: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to tackle diarrhoeal disease in developing countries. [116163]

Mr O'Brien: In April we doubled our commitment on water, sanitation and hygiene to provide 60 million people with services that prevent diarrhoeal disease. Through the GAVI Alliance we are vaccinating 50 million children against rotavirus, which is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea.

Bilateral Aid Review

12. Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress his Department has made on its objectives for water and sanitation set out in the bilateral aid review. [116164]

Mr O'Brien: As stated in DFID's new annual report, the UK has given 2 million people access to clean drinking water, 2 million people improved access to sanitation and 7.4 million people improved hygiene since 2010. The right hon. Member for Leeds Central (Hilary Benn) was candid in 2007 when he admitted that the previous government had 'taken their eye off the ball' in relation to water and sanitation. The coalition will not make the same mistake. In April we announced our intention to double results by reaching 60 million people. We are seeking to match one person in the poor world without access to water and sanitation to every person living in the UK.

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Development Aid: Legislation

13. Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent discussions he has had with the Prime Minister and other Ministerial colleagues on enshrining in law spending on international development equal to 0.7% national income. [116165]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: I am in regular discussions with my colleagues on the coalition's Government's development priorities, including enshrining the 0.7% commitment into law.

Aid Effectiveness

14. Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what arrangements his Department has put in place to monitor the effectiveness of UK aid to the Palestinian Authority and the UN Relief and Works Agency. [116166]

Mr Duncan: Our agreements with the PA and UNRWA specify a number of results milestones against which progress is reviewed annually. This is designed to improve effectiveness and value for money. This year, UK aid will provide primary education for 36,000 children and cash transfers for 200,000 people.

Developing Countries: Debts

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what information his Department holds on the amount of (a) new and (b) rescheduled debt to the UK held by developing countries. [116071]

Mr Duncan: DFID holds information on loans previously provided by DFID (and its predecessor Departments) and a portfolio of loans to governments once held by CDC but managed and administered by DFID since 2008. The total outstanding value of these loans (principal amount only) is £91,871,000, this figure can be found on page 170 of the DFID 2011-12 annual report and accounts and is the total of all outstanding loans as at 31 March 2012.

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/About-us/How-we-measure-progress/Annual-report/?tw_p=twt

Of this amount, the total outstanding value of rescheduled loans (principal only) is £34,272,864.

DFID does not currently make any new loans directly to developing countries. Information on the amount of new and rescheduled bilateral export credit is held by UK Export Finance (Export Credit Guarantee Department).

Developing Countries: Family Planning

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development (1) if he will use the upcoming London Summit on Family Planning to consider the link between child marriage and fertility and maternal health outcomes; [116035]

(2) if he will encourage Governments and donors making commitments at the upcoming London Summit on Family Planning to also commit to fund projects

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addressing early and forced marriage, sexual violence and social barriers to contraceptive access; [116036]

(3) if he will be encourage Governments and donors making commitments at the upcoming London Summit on Family Planning to also commit to implement legal and policy changes that will address early and forced marriage; [116037]

(4) if he will encourage Governments and donors making commitments at the upcoming London Summit on Family Planning to also commit to implement legal and policy changes that will address social barriers to women and girls accessing family planning and other health services in developing countries. [116038]

Mr Duncan: The London Summit on Family Planning aims to support the right of women and girls to decide, freely and for themselves, whether, when, and how many children they have. At its core is the objective of saving lives and empowering girls and women to be able to make decisions about their own future. Over the last year, UK investment has given 1 million additional women in developing countries access to modern methods of contraception. Much more needs to be done, which is why we are co-hosting the summit with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The summit aims to galvanise unprecedented political and financial commitment to meet the unmet need of an additional 120 million women who want to avoid or delay pregnancy. Significant political, policy and financial commitments by donors and developing countries are anticipated.

Addressing wider social and cultural barriers to women's and girls' empowerment will be essential to achieving the summit's objectives. Building the support of men, families, and communities, and ensuring laws and policies are in place to support women's and girls' empowerment and their sexual and reproductive health and rights, is critical.

The summit recognises the link between violence against women and girls, coerced sex and unintended pregnancies. There are an estimated 14 million births to adolescents every year, before they are physically, emotionally or economically prepared. Many of these girls are married. Girls who can delay marriage and their first pregnancy are at less risk of death or disability from complications arising from pregnancy, childbirth and unsafe abortion, as these are a leading cause of death among young women aged 15 to 19. They are also more likely to stay in school and secure productive employment.

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There will be a focus on these issues throughout the different sessions of the summit itself on 11 July. Commitments sought by the summit include measures to address these wider issues and it is anticipated that participants will make specific commitments to address social and cultural barriers.

Developing Countries: Malaria

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to ensure that its targets on control of malaria are met. [115813]

Mr O'Brien: Controlling malaria is one of the main priorities of the UK Government. In March 2011 we announced that we will help halve malaria deaths in at least 10 of the worst affected countries by 2015.

The UK's Framework for Results for malaria in the developing world sets out how we will work with other international and UK organisations in partner countries to achieve more results and greater value for money to ensure that our malaria targets are met. We will focus on achieving results by blending experience of what works with fresh thinking and a new focus innovation. The results contained in the Framework are specific and quantifiable, against which we, and others, will monitor our performance and hold ourselves to account. The Framework for Results will be subject to a mid-term review in 2013 and an independent evaluation in 2015.

Overseas Aid

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will bring forward proposals for funding to be made available to overseas missions which would be used for local anti-human trafficking projects. [116485]

Mr O'Brien: The Department for International Development (DFID) is already funding a range of anti-trafficking and anti-slavery projects in developing countries. These include projects in India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Malawi. DFID's regional anti-trafficking project in South Asia aims to reduce trafficking of 60,000 women and girls in the garment and domestic work sectors over four years.

DFID officials are currently discussing with Home Office officials whether there is scope for any additional support to anti-trafficking initiatives in priority countries, within the programme allocations agreed in the Bilateral Aid Review in 2011.