Information about open academies and those in development are available on the Department for Education website at

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/b00208569/open-academies

Academies: Admissions

Mr Bailey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what process must be followed by an existing academy wishing to extend its age range; and whether an academy could extend its age range beyond the age of 18. [113161]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 26 June 2012]: The process to be followed by an existing academy that wishes to extend its age range is that it should first contact the Education Funding Agency (EFA) to discuss the proposal. The EFA will advise the academy to carry out a consultation with interested parties. Following that consultation the academy should submit a business case to the EFA. The EFA will analyse the business case and then make a recommendation to the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), who will approve or reject the request to extend the age range. Once he has made a decision, the EFA will inform the academy. If the request is approved, the funding agreement will be amended to reflect the change.

As with any significant change, an academy cannot extend its age range beyond 18 without the Secretary of State's permission. The main purpose of academies is to provide primary and/or secondary education. Where the funding agreement permits, an academy can provide further education upon which there are no legal restrictions relating to age. In relation to individual pupils, as with maintained schools, academies have the flexibility to allow a 19-year-old to remain on roll in order to complete a course of secondary education that began before they turned 18.

Academies: Primary Education

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will ask officials in his Department to notify (a) the relevant local education authority and (b) the hon. Member for the relevant constituency when his Department initiates contact with a primary school regarding possible conversion to academy status. [108718]

Mr Gibb: All primary schools that are performing well can apply to convert to academy status. Any primary school, irrespective of performance, can apply to join an established academy trust. Primary schools initiate this process by submitting an application to the Department for Education.

The Academies Act 2010 requires the governing body of a converting school to consult interested parties. Schools decide how they wish to do this and whom to consult. Departmental officials encourage schools to consult their local authority as part of this process.

The Government aim to find sponsors for the worst performing schools so they can reopen as sponsored academies. Departmental officials work closely with local authorities wherever possible to identify schools and sponsors as well as engaging directly with the school. As a result, local authorities will know which schools in their area may become sponsored academies.

In all cases, the Secretary of State writes to local authorities to notify them when he issues an academy order in relation to a school. He also writes to the Member of Parliament in whose constituency the school is located when a funding agreement is signed.

Apprentices: North East

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of apprentices in the north-east are aged (a) 16, (b) 17 and (c) 18 years. [113108]

Mr Hayes: The following table shows the number and percentage of Apprenticeship programme starts in the north-east region by learners aged 16, 17 and 18 in 2010/11; the latest year for which final year data are available.

Apprenticeship programme starts by age in the north-east region, 2010/11
 Apprenticeship startsPercentage of all age apprenticeship starts

16

2,780

8

17

4,100

12

18

4,200

12

19+

23,480

68

All age apprenticeships

34,550

100

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Figures may not sum due to rounding. 2. Percentages are calculated based on unrounded figures. 3. Age is calculated based on age at start of the programme. 4. Figures presented for 16-year-olds include a small number of under 16-year-olds. 5. Geography is based upon the home postcode of the learner. Geographic information is based on boundaries of regions as of May 2010. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by age is published in a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR and supplementary tables were published on 29 March 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/

3 July 2012 : Column 589W

Drugs: Internet

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the total cost to the public purse has been of the re-launch of the FRANK website; [114441]

(2) how many (a) unique and (b) total visitors there were to the FRANK website in each month since May 2010. [114442]

Sarah Teather: The total cost of the re-launch of the FRANK website was £199,000. This includes £145,000 to design, test and build the new website and £54,000 to design and build the mobile site.

Unique and total visitors to the FRANK website are detailed in the following table. Note that from December 2011 total visits to the website include those visiting the FRANK mobile site.

Number
 Total visits to siteUnique visits to site

May 2010 to March 2011

  

2010

  

May

222,063

183,101

June

190,626

158,475

July

164,563

137,185

August

154,348

127,746

September

205,021

171,850

October

227,596

188,270

November

241,213

199,583

December

175,214

145,304

   

2011

  

January

268,083

223,398

February

239,603

200,781

March

268,641

223,594

   

FY 2011/12

  

2011

  

April

181,509

151,982

May

230,699

193,692

June

231,194

193,945

July

204,693

172,701

August

184,273

156,928

September

235,049

201,518

October

303,206

259,152

November

412,349

335,150

December

357,835

245,847

   

2012

  

January

390,015

258,927

February

490,316

341,405

March

376,053

259,840

   

3 July 2012 : Column 590W

FY 2012/13

  

2012

  

April

292,705

194,380

May

385,319

232,301

Education: Assessments

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the effect of public examinations on educational achievement in Lincolnshire. [114510]

Mr Gibb: We publish detailed information on trends in GCSEs results in England providing both summary statistics and statistics on individual subjects in our annual Statistical First Release, “GCSE and Equivalent Results in England”, which is available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001056/index.shtml

Tables 17 and 19 provide time series for key indicators at local authority level and include Lincolnshire.

The Government is committed to ensuring that our qualifications match the best in the world. We want to give every child the opportunity to acquire the rigorous qualifications they need to succeed in further and higher education and employment.

Education: Yorkshire and Humber

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children in state education in (a) York and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber passed (i) key stage 1 SATS, (ii) key stage 2 SATS and (iii) five or more GCSEs at grades A to E in (A) 1992 and (B) each year since 1992. [111425]

Mr Gibb: National curriculum assessment provides a measurement of achievement against the precise attainment targets of the national curriculum rather than any generalised concept of ability in any of the subject areas. The national curriculum standards have been designed so that most pupils will progress by approximately one level every two years. This means that by the end of Key Stage 1 pupils are expected to achieve Level 2 and by the end of Key Stage 2 are expected to achieve Level 4, there is no measure of passing or failing.

Statistics for pupils at the end of Key Stages 1 and 2 in York and the Yorkshire and Humber region is shown in the following tables.

Standard measures of attainment at the end of Key Stage 4 include achievement of five or more GCSEs at A*-C grade ("five good GCSEs"). Information for five or more A-E grades could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Statistics for pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at A*-C grades in York local authority and the Yorkshire and Humber region is shown in the following table.

Percentage of pupils(1) achieving Level 2 or above in Key Stage 1 assessments for York local authority (LA) and Yorkshire and the Humber Region, Year: 1997/98 to 2010/11, Coverage: England
   ReadingWritingMaths
 Result typeData typeYork LAYorkshire and the HumberYork LAYorkshire and the HumberYork LAYorkshire and the Humber

1997/98(2)

Task/test

Final

83

79

83

81

88

84

1998/99

Task/test

Final

84

81

85

82

89

86

3 July 2012 : Column 591W

3 July 2012 : Column 592W

1999/2000

Task/test

Final

87

83

88

84

93

89

2000/01

Task/test

Final

87

84

88

86

92

90

2001/02

Task/test

Final

86

84

88

86

90

90

2002/03

Task/test

Final

87

84

83

81

92

90

2003/04

Task/test

Final

88

84

81

81

90

90

2004/05

TA

Final

87

84

82

82

91

90

2005/06

TA

Provisional

88

83

84

80

90

89

2006/07

TA

Provisional

88

82

85

78

92

88

2007/08

TA

Provisional

86

82

83

78

91

87

2008/09

TA

Provisional

90

83

86

79

92

88

2009/10

TA

Provisional

86

83

84

79

91

88

2010/11

TA

Provisional

88

83

82

79

91

88

(1) Includes all maintained schools and academies with pupils eligible for assessment at Key Stage 1. (2) Data only available from 1997/98. Source: Key Stage 1 collection
Percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or above in Key Stage 2 English and maths tests for York local authority(1) (LA) and Yorkshire and the Humber Region, Year: 1997/98 to 2010/11, Coverage: England
  EnglishMaths
 Data typeYork LAYorkshire and the HumberYork LAYorkshire and the Humber

1997/98(2)

Final

70

61

65

56

1998/99

Final

76

67

75

67

1999/2000

Final

78

72

74

70

2000/01

Final

79

72

75

69

2001/02

Final

78

72

76

72

2002/03

Final

75

73

74

71

2003/04

Final

81

76

79

73

2004/05

Final

81

77

78

74

2005/06

Revised

81

77

78

74

2006/07

Revised

84

79

81

76

2007/08

Revised

85

80

79

78

2008/09

Revised

81

78

80

78

2009/10

Revised

84

80

83

81

2010/11

Revised

82

80

83

79

(1) Figures for academies are included (where applicable) in the individual LA figures but figures exclude hospital schools and pupil referral units. (2) Data only available from 1997/98.
Percentage of pupils(1) achieving five or more GCSE grades A*-C for York local authority(2) (LA) and Yorkshire and the Humber Region(2), Year: 1995/96 to 2010/11(3,4,5),Coverage: England
 York LAYorkshire and the Humber

1991/92

(6)

30.9

1992/93

(6)

33.7

1993/94

(6)

36.0

1994/95

(6)

41.1

1995/96

47.7

37.1

1996/97

51.4

37.9

1997/98

48.9

38.7

1993/99

51.5

40.5

1999/2000

52.6

42.1

2000/01

54.2

43.0

2001/02

56.4

44.2

2002/03

58.9

45.6

2003/04(7)

56.6

47.2

2004/05

60.6

51.6

2005/06

62.1

54.5

2006/07

67.5

57.8

2007/08

68.5

62.1

2008/09

73.1

69.2

2009/10(8)

80.7

76.8

3 July 2012 : Column 593W

3 July 2012 : Column 594W

2010/11

84.3

81.5

(1) Figures from 1991/92 to 2003/04 relate to 15-year-old pupils (age at start of academic year). From 2004/05 to present relate to pupils at the end of Key Stage 4. (2) Local authority and region figures do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. Local authority and regional figures cover achievements in maintained schools including academies but excludes hospital schools, pupil referral units (PRUs) and alternative provision (AP). (3) Including attempts and achievement in previous academic years. (4) Figures for 2010/11 are revised, all other figures are final. (5) York LA figures only available from 1995/96 when it became a unitary authority. (6 )Not applicable. (7) Figures from before 2003/04 refer to GCSE/GNVQ only. After 2003/04 the figures include GCSE, GNVQ and new approved equivalences. (8) The figures given from 2009/10 onwards includes iGCSEs.

Food Technology: Curriculum

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many four to eleven year-olds received a minimum of 24 hours of practical cooking lessons per key stage in each of the last five years. [114462]

Sarah Teather: The Department does not collect this information.

The Government believe that it is very important that children and young people learn about the importance of eating healthily and acquire the knowledge that will equip them to prepare healthy meals, and we believe that schools have an important role to play.

Cooking is currently an element of design and technology in the national curriculum. In his recent announcement on the primary curriculum (Monday 11 June 2012), the Secretary of State for Education, the right hon. Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), confirmed that design and technology will continue to be compulsory in all maintained schools in Key Stages 1 and 2, and the Department is now considering what the content of design and technology should be and on which it will consult. Decisions on the subjects to be included in the secondary national curriculum beyond English, maths and science will be announced in due course.

Free School Meals

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children were eligible for free school meals in each of the last five years. [114548]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals, for 2008 to 2012, is shown in the tables.

Information is not available on those who may be eligible but do not make a claim.

Information on the number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals as at January 2012 is published in the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012’ available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001071/index.shtml

Maintained nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary, special schools and pupil referral units(1,2,3,4): Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6,7). January each year: 2008 to 2012. England
 Maintained nursery and state-funded primary schools(1,2)State-funded secondary schools(1,3)Special schools(4)
 No. on roll(5,6)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(5,6)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(5,6)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

2008

3,837,680

637,170

16.6

2,913,725

413,365

14.2

78,265

25,705

32.8

2009

3,825,475

652,305

17.1

2,883,245

417,970

14.5

78,030

26,245

33.6

2010

3,838,680

711,405

18.5

2,864,345

441,145

15.4

78,335

27,325

34.9

2011

3,873,175

743,255

19.2

2,837,825

450,275

15.9

79,030

28,830

36.5

2012

3,947,650

760,910

19.3

2,809,815

449,485

16.0

80,505

30,170

37.5

 Pupil referral unitsTotal(7)
 No. on roll(5,6)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(5,6)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5,6)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

2008

n/a

n/a

n/a

6,829,670

1,076,240

15.8

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

6,786,750

1,096,525

16.2

2010

15,140

5,050

33.3

6,796,500

1,184,920

17.4

2011

13,725

4,745

34.6

6,803,755

1,227,110

18.0

3 July 2012 : Column 595W

3 July 2012 : Column 596W

2012

13,235

4,855

36.7

6,851,205

1,245,420

18.2

n/a = Not available. (1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes all primary academes, including free schools. (3) Includes city technology colleges and all secondary academies, including free schools. (4) Includes maintained special schools, special academes and non-maintained special schools, excludes general hospital schools. (5) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. Includes boarders. In pupil referral units includes pupils registered with other providers and further education colleges. (6) Pupils who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part-time attendance and are aged between five and 15. (7) Includes maintained nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary, special schools, and pupil referral units. Excludes pupils in alternative provision as full- and part-time status is not collected. Note: Pupil numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: School Census

Further and Higher Education Act 1992

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether section 33J of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 is in force; and to which sixth form colleges that section applies. [109609]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 201211 June]: I can confirm that section 33J of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 is in force and applies to those colleges listed in the Specified Sixth Form College Corporation Order 2010 (SI 2010/625).

Section 33J provides that the governing body of those colleges must include persons appointed for the purpose of securing so far as practicable that the established character of the sixth form college is preserved and developed and, in particular, that the sixth form college is conducted in accordance with any trust deed relating to it.

The colleges given in the following list are currently covered by section 33J:

Aquinas College, Stockport

Cardinal Newman College, Preston

Carmel College, St Helens

Christ the King Sixth Form College, Lewisham

The College of Richard Collyer in Horsham

Holy Cross College, Bury

King Edward VI College, Nuneaton

King Edward VI College, Stourbridge

Loreto Sixth Form College, Manchester

Ludlow College, Shropshire

Notre Dame Sixth-Form College, Leeds

Palmer's College, Thurrock

Paston College, Norfolk

Peter Symonds College, Winchester

Prior Pursglove College, Guisborough

Sir John Deane's College, Cheshire

St Brendan's Sixth Form College, Bristol

St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College, Kensington

St Dominic's Catholic Sixth Form College, Harrow

St Francis Xavier Sixth Form College, London

St John Rigby Catholic Sixth Form College, Wigan

St Mary's College, Blackburn

Strode's College, Surrey

Xaverian College, Manchester.

Further Education: Inspections

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of full-time Ofsted inspectors who inspect further education or sixth form colleges have worked as a principal or deputy principal in a further education or sixth form college in the last three years. [113263]

Mr Gibb: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to my hon. Friend, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 25 June 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

‘Full-time Ofsted inspectors’ is taken to mean Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMI). Ofsted has not recruited new HMI for over three years, therefore none of the Ofsted full-time inspectors who inspect further education or sixth form colleges have worked as a principal or deputy principal in a further education or sixth form college in the last three years.

However, there are 40 HMI who lead the inspection of colleges, including sixth form colleges, on a regular basis. Of these, 4 are former principals, 11 former deputy/vice principals and 19/are former college senior managers.

GCSE

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the cost was of the education of final year students who obtained mathematics and English GCSE at Grade D or below in the most recent academic year for which figures are available. [114826]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not collect information on the cost of the education of final year students who obtained mathematics and English GCSE at Grade D or below.

School Funding

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the written statement of 24 May 2012, Official Report, column 82WS, on school funding, whether his Department has calculated how much funding the Grove School, Nottinghamshire will receive; when such funding will be made available; and if he will make a statement. [110950]

3 July 2012 : Column 597W

Mr Gibb: The Education Funding Agency (EFA) is currently programming the delivery of the schools whose condition need will be met by the Priority School Programme.

Schools will be grouped together to form batches that can be delivered under one contract to make an attractive project for bidders to encourage competition and value for money for the public sector. The process to batch the schools takes into account a number of factors including condition, geography and commercial attractiveness.

We expect all projects to have been completed or to be under construction within five years. As far as possible, the needs of the schools in the worst condition will be addressed first.

The details of the works to be completed at each school and the associated funding will be determined at the next stage of the programme when feasibility studies will be undertaken for each school. The EFA will then procure the works required.

Human Rights: Children

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 25 April 2012, Official Report, columns 929-30W, on human rights: children, what contribution his Department is making to domestic policies with the objective of meeting the UK's commitments under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. [113521]

Sarah Teather: The Government are committed to the UN convention on the rights of the child (UNCRC) and take their obligation to implement the Convention seriously. In a written ministerial statement on 6 December 2010, Official Report, columns 5-7WS, the Government gave a commitment to

“give due consideration to the UNCRC articles when making new policy and legislation”.

We are using the UN Committee's 2008 Concluding Observations as a reference point for where we can strengthen policy and legislation.

To reinforce the Government's commitment, the Department for Education is working alongside key children's rights organisations to raise awareness and understanding of the UNCRC in other Government Departments.

A new version of the Cabinet Office “Guide to Making Legislation” has been published. It makes explicit the requirement to consider the UNCRC in the development of legislation. Bill teams with legislation in the second session have also received additional materials on the UNCRC through their pre-legislation training.

The Department uses the Home Affairs clearance process to raise objections to any Government proposals that appear inconsistent with the articles of the convention.

In the Department's own areas of responsibility:

we are addressing the links between children's achievement in school and their background through a pupil premium to tackle inequality and to ensure resources and support reach the pupils who need them most;

the revised statutory guidance on the roles and responsibilities of directors of children services and lead members of children services includes references to consideration of the convention;

3 July 2012 : Column 598W

the Government are legislating to strengthen the role and functions of the children's commissioner;

In May, we set out latest measures being taken to implement the Bailey review recommendations to protect children from excessive commercialisation and premature sexualisation. This included a consultation on age rating of hard copy music videos, and from this month, the introduction of a new system of age classification and labelling for videogames. On 28 June we began the process of seeking views from the information and communication industries, charities, parents and young people on current approaches to online safety, what improvements are already in development, and what more could be done;

further legislative reforms were announced in the Queen's Speech, including in relation to children with special educational needs and disabilities, adoption and family law; and

there have been significant reforms to the arrangements for children and families who have been unsuccessful in seeking asylum, prior to deportation, specifically the Government’s commitment to end the detention of children for immigration purposes and the closure of Yarl’s Wood detention centre.

New Schools Network

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what meetings and events representatives of the New Schools Network have attended at his Department in the last year; and what the subject was of each such meeting and event. [113372]

Mr Gibb: Representatives of the New Schools Network regularly attend meetings and events at the Department and did so on several occasions in the last year; providing information on the exact number, and type of events, and meetings could be done only at disproportionate cost.

Nurseries: ICT

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether a nursery can achieve the early learning goals successfully without access to computers or screen technology. [114875]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 2 July 2012]: The early learning goals describe the level of progress that children should be expected to have attained by the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). Early years settings are required to plan for the learning and development of children in seven areas of learning. There are specific references to providing opportunities for children to use technology and other media both in the current and new EYFS (in the new EYFS this will be the expressive arts and design and creative development areas of learning).

Providers are required to assess children against the goals in the final term of the year in which the child reaches age five. This is the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP). Reflecting that the EYFS does not require that children have access to specific types of technology, assessment for the EYFSP does not necessarily require the use of computers or screen technology.

Primary Education: Birmingham

Mr Godsiff: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many vacant primary school places there were in Birmingham, Hall Green constituency in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [110940]

3 July 2012 : Column 599W

Mr Gibb: The Department collects information from each local authority on the number of unfilled places in maintained primary schools (except special schools), via an annual survey. The following table shows the number of unfilled places in maintained primary schools and academies in Birmingham between 2007 and 2011, which is the most recent data available. The number of unfilled places are reported at local authority level and not broken down by constituency.

Unfilled places in maintained primary schools (including academies), Birmingham LA
 Number

2007(1)

8,649

2008(1)

8,730

2009(1)

8,414

2010(2)

7,875

2011(2)

7,635

(1) Number of places relate to position as at January. (2) Number of places relate to position as at May. Source: Surplus Places Survey and School Capacity Collection.

Primary Education: Languages

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many primary schools in England do not teach any languages; and how many children are taught in those schools. [114638]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 2 July 2012]: Research published by the Department in 2009 showed that an estimated 8% of primary schools were not teaching languages to any of their pupils. The study did not quantify how many pupils were taught in those schools and estimates cannot be produced without knowing more about the characteristics of the schools in the study.

Independent Schools: Education Maintenance Allowance

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils at independent schools received education maintenance allowance in 2010-11. [114310]

3 July 2012 : Column 600W

Mr Gibb: I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Glasgow North West (John Robertson) on 26 April 2012, Official Report, column 1035W.

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils at independent schools have received education maintenance allowance since its introduction. [114311]

Mr Gibb: 59,517 young people in independent schools received annual education maintenance allowance payments between the 2004/05 and 2010/11 academic years. Of these, 8,129 attended independent special schools, many of which will have been state-funded.

Pupil Exclusions

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many decisions by head teachers to permanently exclude pupils were overturned by appeals panels in each year since 1997; [114307]

(2) how many pupils whose permanent exclusions had been overturned by appeals panels were readmitted by their schools in each year since 1997. [114309]

Mr Gibb: The available information, for 1997/98 to 2009/10, is shown in the tables. This includes the number of appeals against permanent exclusion that have been determined in favour of the parent/pupil and the numbers of appeals where reinstatement was directed.

This information is taken from the Statistical First Release 'Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England, 2009/10' available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001016/index.shtml

Information about appeals against permanent exclusion in 2010/11 will be published in the 'Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England, 2010/11' Statistical First Release on 25 July at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001080/index.shtml

Maintained primary, secondary and special schools(1) appeals against permanent exclusion; England, 1997/98 to 2009/10
 Appeals against exclusion from a school
 1997/981998/991999/20002000/012001/022002/032003/04

Number of appeals lodged

1,290

1,220

950

1,100

1,130

1,070

1,130

Number of appeals heard

1,010

960

860

980

1,060

990

1,050

Percentage of appeals heard(2)

78.6

79.3

91.0

89.8

94.2

92.2

92.8

Number of appeals determined in favour of the parent/pupil

200

220

320

310

260

210

220

Percentage of appeals determined in favour of the parent/pupil(3)

20.2

22.8

36.7

31.9

24.4

21.1

21.2

Number of successful appeals where reinstatement was directed

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

150

130

Percentage of successful appeals where reinstatement was directed(4)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

71.3

57.0

 Appeals against exclusion from a school
 2004/052005/062006/072007/082008/092009/10

Number of appeals lodged

1,090

1,060

1,050

780

640

510

Number of appeals heard

1,030

980

970

710

590

470

Percentage of appeals heard(2)

94.8

92.8

92.7

91.0

92.2

91.4

Number of appeals determined in favour of the parent/pupil

220

240

240

180

150

110

3 July 2012 : Column 601W

3 July 2012 : Column 602W

Percentage of appeals determined in favour of the parent/pupil(3)

21.5

24.1

24.7

26.0

25.2

24.0

Number of successful appeals where reinstatement was directed

110

130

100

60

60

30

Percentage of successful appeals where reinstatement was directed(4)

49.1

55.5

39.8

35.0

38.9

26.8

n/a = Not available. (1) Excludes non-maintained special schools, city technology colleges and academies. (2) Shown as a percentage of appeals lodged. (3) Shown as a percentage of appeals heard. (4) Shown as a percentage of appeals determined in favour of the parent/pupil. Note: Totals may not appear to equal the sum of component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Exclusion Appeals Survey

Pupils: Bullying

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many incidents of bullying relating to obesity were recorded in schools in each of the last five years. [110981]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not collect data on the incidence of bullying relating to obesity.

Tackling poor behaviour in all its forms—including bullying—is a top priority for the Government. No child should feel victimised because of their weight, or for any other reason, and where bullying occurs, schools must have robust procedures in place to respond to it quickly and effectively.

Schools: Guidance

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Education by how much he has reduced the length of official guidance for schools for each area of guidance. [114137]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 28 June 2012]:We have removed over 21,000 pages of unnecessary guidance on the schools section of the Department's website. We are making further reductions to provide a simple, definitive suite of guidance and advice which makes clear what schools must do, what they should do and what they can choose to do.

The following table sets out the approximate page number reductions by area:

AreaReduction

Admissions

110

Assessment

190

Attendance

135

Behaviour (Discipline, Bullying, Exclusions and AP)

863

Careers

363

Challenge

1,672

Curriculum

1,341

Data Collection

83

Equality

272

Extended Services

1,250

EYFS

501

Finance

695

Governance

394

Health and Safety

142

Improving Pupil Performance

2,350

Initiatives

69

Inspection

2

Look After Children

39

Media

188

NEET

87

Parental Information

524

PE/Sport

127

Pedagogy and Practice

1,896

Premises

715

Qualifications

1,174

Reducing Bureaucracy

196

Raising Participation Age

98

Safeguarding

620

School Food

88

School Improvement

562

School Organisation

626

School Travel

2

SEN

974

Staffing and Workforce

942

Science Technology Engineering Maths

795

Sustainability

785

Target Setting

54

Work Related Learning

279

Youth Support (including drugs)

274

Total

21,477

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many hours of (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) biology, (d) chemistry, (e) physics, (f) other science, (g) history, (h) geography, (i) French, (j) Spanish, (k) German, (l) other modern languages, (m) classical languages, (n) art, (o) drama, (p) citizenship, (q) leisure and tourism, (r) religious education, (s) vocational subjects/diploma subjects, (t) sociology and social studies, (u) psychology, (v) media studies, (w) business studies, (x) dance, (y) performing arts, (z) textiles, (aa) food technology, (ab) ICT, (ac) personal, social, health and economic education and (ad) general studies were taught in state secondary schools in England in (i) 2010 and (ii) 2011. [114306]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number of hours taught in publicly funded secondary schools in a typical week broken down by subject is available in table 12 of the School Workforce in England Statistical First Release, November 2011, which is available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00205723/school-workforce-in-england-provisional-nov-2011

3 July 2012 : Column 603W

Similar information for 2010 is available in table 12 of the equivalent November 2010 publication which is available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00196713/school-workforce-sfr

The tables cover all the subject categories that are included in the data collection. Some of the subjects requested are not available individually and are captured under broader subject categories.

Schools: Food Growing

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department holds on the number of schools with a food growing space in each of the last five years. [114461]

Mr Gibb: While the Department for Education does not collect this information, the report of the Food Growing in Schools Taskforce, published in March 2012, showed that 80% of schools (comprising 80% of early years settings, 86% of primary schools and 72% of secondary schools) currently grow food.

It is for individual schools to choose how to use free space within their grounds. We do, however, recognise the benefits that growing food in schools can offer both in helping support teaching, especially of science, and to promote health and well-being in relation to diet and nutrition.

Sixth Form Education

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent discussions he has had with the Sixth Form Colleges Forum on entitlement funding for sixth form providers. [112444]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The announcement on funding for the 2011/12 academic year, which included how entitlement funding was changing, was made in December 2010 in the then YPLA's 16-19 Funding Statement. Around the time of the announcement and subsequently, Ministers have met several Principals from sixth form colleges to discuss 16-19 funding, including entitlement funding. All of the sixth form colleges in England are members of the Sixth Form Colleges' Forum, which leads the Sixth Form College sector and is its distinctive voice.

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects on attainment of the reduction to entitlement funding for sixth form providers. [112445]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The announcement on funding for the 2011/12 academic year, which included how entitlement funding was changing, was made in December 2010 in the then YPLA's 16-19 Funding Statement.

At the time of the spending review announcement in October 2010 we made clear the need to make unit costs savings in relation to.16-19 education and training, due to the difficult economic and financial position of the country. The priority for the Department for 16-19 funding is to protect the core education programmes offered by schools and colleges. These core programmes equip young people with the knowledge and skills they need and are fundamental to students' successful

3 July 2012 : Column 604W

progression into higher education or employment. We therefore made savings elsewhere, including by reducing the “Curriculum 2000” entitlement allocation from 114 teaching hours to 30 hours, as that would be less likely to impact on attainment.

Since this change came into effect only for the current academic year, it is too early for the Department to have any attainment data for courses undertaken since the funding was altered. However, it will be very difficult to separate out from other factors changes in achievement linked to changes in entitlement funding.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools with a sixth form success rate of less than 80 per cent were graded (a) outstanding and (b) good by Ofsted in the last two years. [112738]

Mr Gibb: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Gentleman, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Richard Brooks, dated 25 June 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me for response.

Success rates data for school sixth forms are under development. In line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics, these are currently classified as experimental statistics. They are published in order to involve users and stakeholders in their development as their reliability and accuracy is being improved.

Experimental statistics; covering the 2009/10 academic year were released by The Young People's Learning Agency on 5 March 2012. They were published following a data checking exercise with schools. However, only about half the schools made returns to adjust their success rates, so the figures are not robust enough to be used for comparative purposes.

The statistics released showed, at a headline level, the proportion of young people that start a qualification in an institution and achieve it by the end of the required period of study.

Since 2009/10 further work has been taking place to improve quality. No data have yet been released to cover either the 2010/11 or 2011/12 academic years.

School sixth form success rates have not as yet been used as evidence in inspection by Ofsted inspectors. In the academic year 2009/10, there were 24 schools judged outstanding for their overall effectiveness and 76 schools judged good for their overall effectiveness that had sixth form success rates (on the basis of the experimental statistics) of less than 80%.

During the same year Ofsted inspected 888 secondary schools including 617 sixth forms. No generalisations can be drawn between these success rates and the overall effectiveness judgement made on section 5 inspections.

Statistics covering the outcomes of all inspections carried out in each academic year can be found at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/advanced-resources-search/results/Maintained%20schools/2/all/any/200/any

The most recent official statistics release covering the outcomes of maintained school inspections carried out between 1 January 2012 and 31 March 2012 was released on 12 June 2012 and can be accessed at the same link.

Special Educational Needs: Rural Areas

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will provide additional funding to small rural secondary schools to support disadvantaged pupils with special educational needs. [109642]

3 July 2012 : Column 605W

Mr Gibb: Under the reformed arrangements for school funding from 2013-14 announced on 26 March, it will be for local authorities to devise simpler formulae through which maintained schools and academies will be funded. The formulae will include a notional special educational needs (SEN) budget for each school. If a school has unusually high levels of SEN, perhaps because it is seen as a local centre of excellence, local authorities will be free to provide further funding outside the formula following locally agreed principles.

Special Educational Needs: Teachers

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what training teachers receive to enable them to recognise (a) dyslexia and (b) autism in children; and if he will make a statement. [114278]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 28 June 2012]: The Government are committed to improving the quality of training teachers receive to enable them to better identify all areas of special educational needs (SEN) including dyslexia and autism and overcome the barriers to learning that some children and young people face.

Teacher training supports trainees to meet the standards for qualified teacher status. From September 2012, the new teacher standards will have a sharpened focus on meeting the broad range of pupils' needs including those with special educational needs.

The Department has, between 2009 and 2011, funded up to 3200 teachers to undertake specialist dyslexia training courses approved by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA).

We have also funded the Autism Education Trust—some £1.3 million over two years—to develop national standards for those working with autistic children and also tiered training at universal, enhanced and specialist levels and to deliver the universal training to at least 5,000 staff, including teachers, across the country.

In addition, we have recently developed a range of advanced-level online training materials for teachers which include modules on both dyslexia and ASD. These are now available on the DFE website.

Our National Scholarship Fund provides opportunities for teachers to apply to undertake Masters-level qualifications in specific impairments including dyslexia and ASD.

Furthermore, we are committed to continuing to support the role of the SEN Co-ordinator (SENCO) in schools. Since 2009 almost 9000 teachers have been funded to undertake the masters-level SENCO training. Funding for a further 1,000 SENCOs has been confirmed for 2012/13. The training is designed to support teachers to meet the needs of all pupils with SEN, including those with dyslexia and ASD.

Teachers: Pay

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average pay for full-time classroom teachers is in (a) academies and (b) maintained schools. [114133]

Mr Gibb: In November 2011 the average salary of full-time qualified teaches in academies was £35,700. The figure for local authority maintained schools was

3 July 2012 : Column 606W

£34,400. This information was taken from table 9a of the Statistical First Release 'School Workforce in England, November 2011' which is available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00205723/school-workforce-in-england-provisional-nov-2011

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the mean teachers' salary was in each of the last three years. [114244]

Mr Gibb: The following table provides the mean gross salary including allowances of full-time qualified teachers of all grades in regular service in publicly funded schools in England in March 2010, November 2010 and November 2011 which represent the last three academic years.

Average salary (mean) of full-time qualified teachers in regular(1) service in publicly funded schools, March 2010, November 2010 and November 2011(2), coverage: England
 Mean salary (£)

March 2010

37,900

November 2010

38,000

November 2011

37,900

(1 )Regular service includes any teacher in service with a contract of 28 days or more. (2 )The time period includes figures for 3 separate academic years. Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £100. Source: Database of Teacher Records, March 2010 and the School Workforce Census, November 2010 and 2011.

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average salary rise was of teachers who progressed up the pay scale in 2011. [114245]

Mr Gibb: The data requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The salary rises applicable to classroom teachers in maintained schools who progressed by one point on the main pay scale in September 2011 are shown in the following table.

Salary increase received by classroom teachers progressing on the main pay scale between academic years 2010/11 and 2011/12
£
Spine pointLondon InnerLondon OuterLondon FringeRest of England

M1 to M2

1,408

1,557

1,705

1,707

M2 to M3

1,481

1,651

1,872

1,873

M3 to M4

1,557

1,755

1,943

1,936

M4 to M5

2,419

2,550

2,132

2,136

M5 to M6

2,522

2,486

2,310

2,312

Notes: 1. Other pay scales for teachers in maintained schools may be found in the 2011 School Teachers' Pay and Conditions Document (STPCD) which is available on the Department's publications website at: www.education.gov.uk Teachers' pay is subject to the two year public sector pay freeze from 2011/12. 2. Data on the actual numbers receiving progression payments in 2011/12 will be available in autumn 2012 and will be based on School Workforce Census data for 2010 and 2011.

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of teachers received an allowance in addition to their basic salary in each of the last three years. [114246]

Mr Gibb: In November 2011 161,200 full and part-time qualified teachers of all grades in publicly funded schools in England were recorded as being in receipt of an

3 July 2012 : Column 607W

additional allowance, 34% of the total. In November 2010 the figures were 156,100, 33%. No comparable information is available for earlier years.

Source:

School Workforce Census.

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of teachers progressed to the upper pay scale within (a) one, (b) two and (c) three years of reaching the top of the main pay scale in the latest period for which figures are available. [114247]

Mr Gibb: The data are not available centrally in the format required. The latest figures, taken from a survey, are for academic years 2007/08 to 2008/09(1). These figures show that 45% of full-time primary school classroom teachers on the top of the main pay scale (M6) in 2007/08 progressed to the upper pay scale (U1) in 2008/09. For secondary schools, 47% of full-time classroom teachers on the top of the main pay scale (M6) in 2007/08 progressed to the upper pay scale (U1) in 2008/09.

(1) Survey of Teachers' Pay 2008 (Office of Manpower Economics, March 2009)

Notes:

1. The numbers represent the proportions of teachers progressing to the upper scale regardless of how many years these teachers had been on M6.

2. More recent data will be available in autumn 2012 and will be based on the School Workforce Census data for 2010 and 2011.

Teachers: Training

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what programmes his Department has put in place to assist people wishing to move into teaching. [113524]

Mr Gibb: The Department has put in place a range of programmes designed to ease the transition of people into teaching.

The School Experience Programme gives those considering a career in teaching the opportunity to spend one or more observation days in schools to gain an insight into the role and responsibilities of a teacher.

The new School Direct Training Programme (salaried) available from September 2013, gives schools the opportunity to recruit high quality career changers and pay them a salary while they train.

The Subject Knowledge Enhancement Programme, available in priority subjects, provides potential trainees with in-depth subject knowledge of their chosen area before they begin teacher training.

The Troops to Teachers Programme provides places for 50 high quality graduate service leavers to enter teaching through an employment-based route.

School Funding

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to his statement of 24 May 2012, Official Report, column 82WS, on school funding, how much funding will be allocated to William Beamont High School, Warrington. [112267]

3 July 2012 : Column 608W

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The details of the works to be completed at each school and the associated funding will be determined at the next stage of the programme when feasibility studies will be undertaken for each school. The EFA will then procure the works required.

Deputy Prime Minister

House of Lords Reform

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what estimate he has made of the cost of elections to a reformed House of Lords where (a) 80% and (b) 100% of its members are elected. [115053]

Mr Harper: The Government published their cost projections for House of Lords reform on 27 June 2012. These are available on the Cabinet Office website at:

http://www.dpm.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/house-lords-reform-bill-documents

The total cost of elections to an 80% elected House of Lords is estimated at £85.7 million per election in 2012-13 price terms. This figure consists of £42.9 million for the conduct of the poll and £42.8 million for candidates' mailings. The Government have made no estimate of the cost of elections to a 100% elected House of Lords.

Cabinet Office

Joint Ministerial Committee

Margaret Curran: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) when he plans to publish the annual report on the work of the Joint Ministerial Committee and its sub-committees in 2011-12; [115061]

(2) how many meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee (Officials) took place in the last year; who attended those meetings; what was discussed at them; and if he will place in the Library a record of those meetings; [115064]

(3) how many meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee (Europe) took place in the last year; who attended those meetings; what was discussed at them; and if he will place in the Library a record of those meetings; [115065]


(4) how many meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee (Domestic) took place in the last year; who attended those meetings; what was discussed at them; and if he will place in the Library a record of those meetings; [115066]

(5) how many meetings of the Joint Ministerial Committee took place in plenary format in the last year; who attended those meetings; what was discussed at them; and if he will place in the Library a record of those meetings. [115067]

The Deputy Prime Minister: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

The Joint Ministerial Committee (JMC) annual report will be published in the autumn 2012, following the plenary meeting of the Committee. The annual report will contain details of all the meetings of the JMC and

3 July 2012 : Column 609W

its Domestic and European sub-committees that have taken place since the last annual report was published on 8 June 2011. A copy of the annual report will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Mental Health

John Pugh: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps he is taking to promote good mental health and well-being within the Civil Service. [114680]

Mr Maude: While Departments are responsible for the wellbeing of their own staff, the Cabinet Office supports a collaborative approach within the civil service to improving the morale and wellbeing of civil servants. We facilitate a network for Departments and agencies to promote best practice activities, and share learning and different approaches to improving engagement and wellbeing within their organisations. More detail can be found on the civil service website at:

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/improving/employee-engagement-in-the-civil-service

Public Services

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 20 June 2012, Official Report, column 1074W, on public services, what deadline has been set for each Government Department to publish its Open Data Strategy. [115083]

Mr Maude: Open Data White Strategies were published to coincide with the launch of the Open Data White Paper and are available on data.gov.uk.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 26 June 2012, Official Report, column 159W, on public services, if he will place in the Library a copy of the Prime Minister's letters of 31 May 2010 and 7 July 2011 on transparency commitments. [115084]

Mr Maude: Both of the Prime Minister's letters are publically available on the No. 10 website:

www.number10.gov.uk

Thalidomide

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will publish any Cabinet papers relating to thalidomide from the period between December 1961 and December 1963. [114522]

Mr Maude: All Cabinet papers covering the period 1961 to 1963 have been released and are available at the National Archives (catalogue reference CAB 129/104-115). A small amount of information from one paper unrelated to the thalidomide issue remains closed.

Trade Union Officials: Pay

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much funding from the public purse was spent on paying trade union officials salaries in the latest period for which figures are available. [114653]

3 July 2012 : Column 610W

Mr Maude: The Government have announced their intention to consult with the civil service trade unions on changes to current facility time arrangements. The consultation paper which will be published shortly will include details on public funding for facility time.

Unemployment: Ethnic Groups

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what his most recent estimate is of the level of unemployment among young black men. [114804]

Mr Hurd [holding answer 2 July 2012]: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking for the most recent estimate of the level of unemployment among young black men. (114804)

Estimates of unemployment come from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). For the period January-March 2012 it is estimated that there were 28,000 unemployed men aged 16 to 24 inclusive who reported their ethnicity as Black. This is an unemployment rate of 50 per cent.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. It is estimated that the true value is likely to lie between 18,000 and 38,000.

Culture, Media and Sport

Broadband

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what recent discussions he has had with internet service providers on improving broadband speeds for businesses. [114300]

Mr Vaizey: There has not been any recent specific discussion of broadband speeds for businesses; however, the Government are investing in superfast broadband to support economic growth for the benefit of all businesses and consumers. Many businesses have a choice of internet service providers, most of whom provide services and tariffs aimed at business and many of which would have specific service level agreements attached.

Broadband: South East

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps he is taking to implement superfast broadband in (a) the South East and (b) Mid Sussex constituency. [115039]

Mr Vaizey: The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has approved the all local broadband plans covering the South East of England, including the plan covering Sussex. East Sussex has been allocated £10.64 million and West Sussex will receive £6.26 million in funding.

Broadband Delivery UK are supporting the project teams to prepare for procurement and will continue to support them throughout the process.

3 July 2012 : Column 611W

Broadband: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many businesses in Warrington he expects to receive investment to improve broadband speeds. [114299]

Mr Vaizey: The Government are investing in superfast broadband to support economic growth for the benefit of all businesses and consumers. However, there has been no specific assessment of the number of businesses in Warrington that would benefit.

Chief Scientific Advisers

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what use his Department makes of the wider network of departmental chief scientific advisers when seeking scientific advice to inform policymaking. [114493]

John Penrose [holding answer 2 July 2012]: This Department maintains contact with the chief scientific advisers (CSA) network via a representative in its Evidence and Analysis Unit, who also provides the secretariat for the Department's Science and Research Advisory Committee (SRAC). Through meetings and e-mail circulars co-ordinated by the Government Office for Science (GO-Science), the Department's representative, in consultation with its SRAC, works to identify wider scientific issues pertinent to its work and where it would be appropriate to access expert advice. In addition to this, the chair of the SRAC meets with the Government chief scientific adviser and CSA at regular meetings organised by GO-Science, involving (a) the CSAs and the wider scientific community and (b) the CSAs and chairs of all governmental scientific advisory committees.

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many meetings he has had with his Department's Scientific Research Advisory Committee since May 2010. [114494]

John Penrose [holding answer 2 July 2012]: Since May 2010, the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), has had no formal meetings with the Department's Science and Research Advisory Committee (SRAC), but he has met with Dr Michael Dixon, the Chair of the Department's SRAC, on a number of occasions. Much of the scientific input from SRAC is, of course, expected to flow into the Department through meetings and technical briefings for officials rather than Ministers.

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport for what reasons the position of chief scientific adviser in his Department has remained vacant since August 2010. [114495]

John Penrose [holding answer 2 July 2012]: Since 2010 the Department has undergone a significant reduction in staff numbers so, to be fair to remaining and departed staff, any new appointments have to be considered very carefully. That said, we believe we have identified a solution which is appropriate for a Department of DCMS size and expect to recruit shortly.

3 July 2012 : Column 612W

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) if he will consider hiring a chief scientific adviser for his Department on a part-time basis; [114496]

(2) what plans his Department has to hire a chief scientific adviser. [114497]

John Penrose: This Department expects to have a new head of analysis (at civil service grade 5 level), who will lead on issues of scientific advice and cover the principle functions of a chief scientific adviser (CSA), in place by autumn 2012. The Department is working with the Government chief scientific adviser and the Government Office for Science to establish mechanisms for the post-holder to draw on the advice and varied expertise of the chief scientific advisers network.