Mr Hepburn: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many (a) men and (b) women in (i) Jarrow constituency, (ii) South Tyneside, (iii) the north-east and (iv) the UK have died from coronary heart disease in each of the last five years. [113684]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many men and women died from coronary heart disease in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each of the last five years (113684).

Table 1 shows the number of deaths where ischaemic heart disease was the underlying cause for (a) Jarrow parliamentary constituency, (b) South Tyneside local authority, (c) the North East region and the UK between 2006 and 2010 (the latest year available).

Table 1. Number of deaths from coronary heart disease among men and women in the UK, the North East Region, South Tyneside local authority and Jarrow parliamentary constituency, 2006-2010(1,2,3)
Deaths (persons)
Area20062007200820092010

United Kingdom

     

Males

52,804

51,568

49,652

47,306

46,591

Females

41,872

40,163

38,575

35,425

33,976

Total

94,676

91,731

88,227

82,731

80,567

      

North East region

     

Males

2,455

2,435

2,300

2,197

2,114

Females

1,973

1,858

1,723

1,571

1,449

Total

4,428

4,293

4,023

3,768

3,563

      

South Tyneside local authority

     

Males

164

163

144

146

138

Females

147

139

125

107

97

Total

311

302

269

253

235

      

Jarrow parliamentary constituency

     

Males

97

92

72

71

67

Females

64

56

54

60

56

25 Jun 2012 : Column 122W

Total

161

148

126

131

123

(1) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year and include non-residents for the UK. All sub-national figures exclude non-residents. (2) Cause of death for heart disease was defined using the International Classifications of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes 120-125. (3) Figures are based on boundaries as of February 2012.

Mr Hepburn: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many (a) men and (b) women aged between 35 and 64 in (i) Jarrow constituency, (ii) South Tyneside, (iii) the North East and (iv) the UK died from heart disease in each of the last five years. [113873]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many men and women aged between 35 and 64 died from heart disease in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each of the last five years (113873).

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths where ischaemic heart disease was the underlying cause for (a) Jarrow parliamentary constituency, (b) South Tyneside local authority, (c) the North East region and the UK between 2006 and 2010 (the latest year available).

Table 1: Number of deaths from heart disease among men and women aged between 35 and 64 in the UK, the north-east region, South Tyneside local authority and Jarrow parliamentary constituency, 2006-10(1, 2, 3)
Deaths (persons)
Area20062007200820092010

United Kingdom

     

Males

10,549

10,238

9,836

9,289

9,120

Females

2,670

2,556

2,527

2,302

2,245

Total

13,219

12,794

12,363

11,591

11,365

      

North-east region

     

Males

504

527

483

480

474

Females

155

137

137

132

96

Total

659

664

620

612

570

      

South Tyneside local authority

     

Males

29

35

26

35

19

Females

15

10

7

6

3

Total

44

45

33

41

22

      

Jarrow parliamentary constituency

     

Males

16

29

8

21

8

Females

4

4

4

5

3

Total

20

33

12

26

11

(1) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year and include non-residents for the UK. All sub-national figures exclude non-residents. (2) Cause of death for heart disease was defined using the International Classifications of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes I20-I25. (3) Figures are based on boundaries as of February 2012.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 123W

Non-departmental Public Bodies

Luciana Berger: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the oral answer of 13 June 2012, Official Report, column 314, on quangos, on what numerical evidence his answer was based. [112872]

Mr Maude: The 2010 Public Bodies Review covered 904 public bodies, of which 500 are proposed for reform with a reduction of more than 250 bodies by the end of 2014-15. Overall, the programme has so far abolished 92 bodies and merged 103 into 50.

Since our public bodies reform will abolish over 250 bodies, the hon. Member's assessment in the Official Report, column 314, was entirely wrong.

Older People: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people (a) of pensionable age and (b) over 80 there are in Warrington North constituency. [113666]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people (a) of pensionable age and (b) over 80 there are in Warrington North constituency (113666).

There were an estimated 18,005 people of pensionable age and 3,741 people aged 80 and over resident in Warrington North constituency at mid-2010. This is the latest year for which population estimates are available.

The estimate of pensionable age gives the number of women aged 60 and over, and men aged 65 and over, which is the closest available approximation to state pension age at mid-2010 that can be obtained for population estimates by parliamentary constituency.

Population

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the population was of each of the constituent parts of the UK on the most recent date for which figures are available. [113438]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the population was of each of the constituent parts of the United Kingdom on the most recent date for which figures are available (113438).

Table 1 shows the usually resident population of each UK constituent country in mid-2010. These are the latest available population estimates.

Table 1: Population of the UK by constituent country, mid-2010
Thousands
CountryTotal persons

England

52,234.0

Wales

3,006.4

Scotland

5,222.1

25 Jun 2012 : Column 124W

Northern Ireland

1,799.4

Source: Office for National Statistics, National Records of Scotland, Northern Ireland Statistics Research Agency

Visits Abroad

Michael Dugher: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many times the Minister without Portfolio's special adviser has accompanied her on official visits overseas since May 2010; and for which trips. [112958]

Mr Maude: Details of Ministers' overseas trips are available in the Library of the House. As has long been the case it is standard practice that a Minister can be accompanied by a special adviser on official trips.

Michael Dugher: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether any official overseas trips by Cabinet Office Ministers have been paid for by foreign governments since May 2010. [112975]

Mr Maude: No official overseas trips by Cabinet Office Ministers have been paid for by foreign governments since May 2010. It is a matter of public record that in November 2010 Baroness Warsi performed the Hajj as the guest of the Government of Saudi Arabia. This was a personal visit and was declared in the Register of Lords interests.

Michael Dugher: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the objectives were of each of the Minister without Portfolio's official overseas visits to Pakistan. [112978]

Mr Maude: Details of Ministers' overseas visits are available in the Library of the House.

Education

Academies: Oxfordshire

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) which schools in Oxfordshire are required to explore academy status; [112592]

(2) with which schools in Oxfordshire officials in his Department are in discussions about the possibility of converting to academy status. [112593]

Mr Gibb: The Department discusses the possibility of conversion to academy status with any school that approaches the Department. If a school applies to convert, the Department will allocate an official who will support that school through the conversion process. A list of schools that have applied to convert to academy status is available on the Department’s website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/b00208569/open-academies

We are also in discussion with a range of schools nationally where we believe sponsored academy status would bring about the transformational change required. It is not our policy publicly to name schools where we

25 Jun 2012 : Column 125W

would like to explore academy options. We believe this has the potential to disrupt the process of school improvement at the schools concerned, and may cause negative publicity that will distress parents, staff and pupils.

Children: Day Care

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of children aged (a) three and (b) four years received nursery education in

25 Jun 2012 : Column 126W

(i) York and (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber in (A) 1992 and (B) each year since 1992. [111422]

Sarah Teather: The Department collects information on children receiving free early education as opposed to just numbers receiving nursery education. The number and percentage of children aged three and four benefiting from some free early education in York and Yorkshire and the Humber between 2008 and 2011 are shown in the table. Comparable figures for earlier years cannot be provided due to disproportionate cost.

Number(1) and percentage of three and four year old children benefiting from some early education(2,3) in York and Yorkshire and the Humber 2008 to 2011. Position in January
   2008200920102011

York

3 year olds

Number

2,100

1,900

2,000

2,100

  

Percentage

113

100

104

104

 

4 year olds

Number

1,900

2,000

2,000

2,000

  

Percentage

105

107

102

104

       

Yorkshire and the Humber

3 year olds

Number

56,800

57,800

59,900

61,200

  

Percentage

94

95

96

96

 

4 year olds

Number

58,200

60,400

60,800

62,400

  

Percentage

100

100

100

100

(1) Any child attending more than one provider will have only been counted once. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 100. (2) Count of children aged three and four at 31 December in the previous calendar year. (3) Numbers of three and four-year-olds in schools may include some two-year-olds. Source: Early Years Census (EYC), School Census (SC), and School Level Annual School Census (SLASC).

The percentage of children receiving free early education can exceed 100%. This is due to using different sources for the population to compare to the number of children benefiting from free early education. These different sources of data are not on a directly comparable basis and so can result in valid take-up rates of over 100%.

Data for 2012 will be available from 28 June following the publication of the ‘Provision for Children Under Five Years of Age in England’ Statistical First Release at the following link: http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001074/index.shtml

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what costs are incurred in undertaking an inspection visit of a child minder. [112158]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 19 June 2012]: This information is held by Ofsted. The Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 15 June 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

The average cost of an inspection visit of a childminder is £731. By ‘inspection visit’ we mean a programmed inspection, post registration inspection and re-inspection of either a sole childminder or childminder with assistants.

All costs relate to the most recent full year, 2011-12, and include direct and indirect costs plus overheads. It should be noted that overall costs in Ofsted have reduced since 2010-11 and are planned to reduce in total by 30% by 2014-15 (the end of the current Comprehensive Spending Review period).

A copy of this reply has been sent to Nick Gibb MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the Library of both Houses.

Children: Disability

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps his Department is taking to improve the identification of deaf-blind and multi-sensory-impaired children in schools; [112434]

(2) what his policy is on the education of deaf-blind and multi-sensory-impaired children. [112435]

Sarah Teather: The Government's reforms to special educational needs and disability policy are set out in Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability—Progress and next steps

http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/send/a0075339/sengreenpaper

These include the development of a single assessment process and a comprehensive Education, Health and Care Plan to replace the current statement system. The reforms are intended to ensure that children's needs are identified much earlier—including through early health screening and in early years provision—and that parents are given far greater control over the support that they receive.

The Department for Education has provided funding for some 9,000 special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCOs) to obtain the mandatory higher-level SENCO qualification. SENCOs play a vital role within schools, including supporting other teaching staff to identify where a pupil may have special educational needs. In addition, there is a mandatory qualification for teachers of deaf-blind children, with teachers able to apply for funding through the national teaching scholarship scheme.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 127W

The Department also provides funding to the National Sensory Impairment Partnership

www.natsip.org.uk

to help local authorities come together to benchmark their services, develop quality standards and learn from each other.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps his Department is taking with local authorities to ensure that disabled children are able to access child care; [112905]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to ensure that disabled children aged two years are able to access appropriate child care. [112906]

Sarah Teather: In “Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability—progress and next steps”, published in May 2012, the Government confirmed plans to require local authorities to publish a local offer setting out the support available to disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs and their families. The Government will set out the national framework for the local offer in law, including information on the early education that is available to children with disabilities.

Local authorities have a duty to secure sufficient child care locally to meet the needs of working parents. The Government are strengthening the statutory guidance underpinning this duty so that, from September 2012, local authorities will prepare an annual report for parents and councillors on how they are meeting the duty. This will include how they are ensuring that there is sufficient child care available to meet the needs of disabled children.

All three- and four-year-olds, including children with disabilities, are entitled to 15 hours a week of free early education. This entitlement will be extended to around 40% of two-year-olds from September 2014. The Government will consult shortly on which two-year-olds should be eligible for the entitlement.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how his Department is monitoring local authority delivery of services under the Breaks for Carers of Disabled Children Regulations 2010. [112907]

Sarah Teather: The Department does not directly monitor local authority delivery of services under draft legislation in The Breaks for Carers of Disabled Children Regulations 2010, nor under the UK statutory instrument, The Breaks for Carers of Disabled Children Regulations 2011 Number 707, which came into effect in April 2011.

The Department has contracted with a consortium known as Impact to provide tailored support to all 152 local authorities in England to help them ensure that they meet their legal obligations under the Short Breaks Duty. Impact is contracted to identify and promote good practice through case studies and research and to support local authorities in developing the capacity and sustainability of short breaks providers.

As part of its work for the Department, Impact is collecting information about the number of Short Break Duty Statements that have been published, the quality

25 Jun 2012 : Column 128W

of those statements, and the extent to which they have been developed in collaboration with local parents and carers. Impact has also developed self-evaluation tools to help local authorities to monitor and improve their own performance in relation to short breaks services.

Education: Standards

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to reduce inequalities in educational attainment. [112436]

Sarah Teather: The Government are committed to creating a highly-educated society in which opportunity is more equal for children and young people no matter what their background or family circumstances. Our reforms include an emphasis on early intervention, additional funding to support the education of disadvantaged pupils, improving teacher quality, introducing challenging floor standards for secondary schools, allowing more schools to benefit from academy status and transparency measures to ensure schools support all pupils to progress. The Department for Education has published fairness objectives which include commitments to tackle inequalities in educational attainment which can be found on the web page at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/policiesandprocedures/equalityanddiversity/b00202789/equality-commitments/equality-objectives-2012

First Aid: Curriculum

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will take steps to ensure that emergency life support skills are taught in schools; and if he will make a statement. [112575]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The current non-statutory framework for personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education includes teaching young people at primary school level about basic emergency procedures and where to get help. At secondary school level, it includes teaching young people to develop the skills to cope with emergency situations that require basic first aid procedures, including, at key stage 4 (ages 15-16), resuscitation techniques.

We are reviewing PSHE education to improve the quality of teaching; the core outcomes which we expect PSHE to achieve and the core of knowledge and awareness that the Government should expect pupils to acquire at school. We will publish the outcome of the review later this year.

Free Schools

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many people (a) of each ethnicity, (b) of each gender and (c) in each age group were lead applicants for application to free schools since May 2010. [113030]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 21 June 2012]:We do not collect ethnicity, gender or age data from free school applicants.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 129W

History: Curriculum

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what progress has been made on the National Curriculum Review of history; and if he will make a statement; [113216]

(2) when he expects to complete the process of reviewing the submissions to the National Curriculum Review of history; [113217]

(3) what timetable he has set for the National Curriculum Review for foundation subjects for secondary schools. [113218]

Mr Gibb: We are, in our review of the National Curriculum in England, taking careful account of all of the submissions received. We have recently confirmed that history is to continue as a compulsory subject at key stages 1 and 2. We will consult fully on draft programmes of study for primary history before they are finalised.

We will also make a separate announcement in due course about plans for the secondary curriculum, including the place of history. Our intention is that the new programmes of study for all National Curriculum subjects will be introduced from September 2014.

Industry: Schools

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what measures he has put in place to promote industry engagement with schools; and whether he has given consideration to establishing a clearing house role to help large companies engage with schools on a national basis. [112258]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]: The core principle of our schools reform programme is to give greater freedoms to schools. This is because more autonomous schools are more likely to raise standards, ensuring that their curriculum meets the needs of their pupils, rather than covering in their curricula what successive Governments consider to be important.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 130W

We have no plans to establish a clearing house to help large companies engage with schools on a national basis, although there are many organisations to which schools might look to fulfil this role where they want additional support in accessing industry, such as the Education and Employers' Taskforce.

Schools provide enterprise and business education for young people to ensure that they are well equipped in facing the challenges of the world of work, employability and entrepreneurship, resulting in a positive outcome for both pupils and employers.

We are investing £4.5 million over two years (2011-12 and 2012-13) for 25 further education colleges to trial innovative models for delivering work experience for 16 to 19-year-olds; and we will ensure that work experience is fully integrated in the 16 to 19 study programmes from September 2013.

In addition, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is developing online resources for teachers that will enable them to set up school businesses and access support from local enterprise champions.

Pupils: Yorkshire and Humberside

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much (a) revenue and (b) capital funding was provided per pupil in state (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools in (A) York and (B) Yorkshire and the Humber in (1) 1992 and (2) each year since 1992 (x) in cash terms and (y) at 2012 prices. [111424]

Mr Gibb: As York only became a local authority in 1996-97 as a result of local government reorganisation, comparable funding data are available only from this date.

Average per pupil revenue funding figures, from the Department to local authorities, for pupils aged three to 10 (primary) and 11 to 15 (secondary) for York LA specifically, and the Yorkshire and Humber region on average, for years 1997-98 to 2005-06 are as follows.

These figures are in cash terms:

Average per pupil revenue funding (cash)
 1997-981998-991999-20002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-052005-06

York LA (primary)

1,866

2,002

2,184

2,397

2,574

2,702

2,893

3,064

3,337

York LA (secondary)

2,608

2,751

2,909

3,242

3,423

3,575

3,699

3,970

4,227

Yorkshire and Humber average (primary)

1,943

2,086

2,288

2,539

2,766

2,931

3,220

3,400

3,689

Yorkshire and Humber average (secondary)

2,724

2,859

3,047

3,376

3,629

3,806

4,004

4,280

4,563

Notes: 1. Price Base: Cash. 2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of standard spending assessment/education formula spending (EFS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS and LSC. 3. Funding also includes all revenue grants in DfES departmental expenditure limits relevant to pupils aged three to 15 and exclude education maintenance allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. 4. Where responsibility for funding a school has transferred from an authority, related funding no longer appears in the series. 5. The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to £ per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC three-year-old maintained pupils and estimated three to four-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers. 6. Rounding: Per pupil figures are rounded to the nearest £1.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 131W

These figures are in real terms:

25 Jun 2012 : Column 132W

Average per pupil revenue funding (real)
 1997-981998-991999-20002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-052005-06

York LA (primary)

2,471

2,615

2,795

3,055

3,221

3,295

3,456

3,558

3,798

York LA (secondary)

3,454

3,592

3,722

4,132

4,284

4,360

4,419

4,610

4,811

Yorkshire and Humber average (primary)

2,573

2,724

2,928

3,236

3,462

3,574

3,846

3,948

4,198

Yorkshire and Humber average (secondary)'

3,607

3,733

3,899

4,302

4,542

4,641

4,783

4,970

5,193

Notes: 1. Price Base: Real terms at 2010-11 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 28 March 2012. 2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of standard spending assessment/education formula spending (EFS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS and LSC. 3. Funding also includes all revenue grants in DfES departmental expenditure limits relevant to pupils aged three to 15 and exclude education maintenance allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. 4. Where responsibility for funding a school has transferred from an authority, related funding no longer appears in the series. 5. The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to £ per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC three-year-old maintained pupils and estimated three to four-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers. 6. Rounding: Per pupil figures are rounded to the nearest £1.

The total revenue per pupil figures shown in the following table are taken from the new Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG). They are not comparable with those for the years 1997-98 to 2005-06 because the introduction of the DSG in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded.

The 1997-98 to 2005-06 figures are based on education formula spending (EFS) which formed the education part of the Local Government Finance Settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. The DSG is based largely on an authority's previous spending. In addition, the DSG has a different coverage to EFS. EFS comprised a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG's Local Government Finance Settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. Consequently, there is a break in the Department's time series as the two sets of data are not comparable. An alternative time series is currently under development.

To provide a comparison for 2006-07 DSG, the Department has isolated the schools block equivalent funding in 2005-06; as described above this does not represent the totality of ‘education' funding in that year.

The total and per pupil revenue funding figures for years 2005-06 to 2010-11 for York are provided in the following table. The figures in the table are for all funded pupils aged three to 19 and are in cash terms:

Average revenue per pupil funding (DSG + grants cash)
 2005-06 baseline2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

York LA

3,730

3,900

4,160

4,380

4,580

4,790

Yorkshire and Humber (average)

3,920

4,160

4,440

4,640

4,820

5,040

Notes: 1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund as well as funding from the Learning and Skills Council; it excludes grants which are not allocated at LA level. 2. Price Base: Cash. 3. These figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 19. 4. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £10.

These figures are in real terms:

Average per pupil revenue funding (DSG + grants real)
 2005-06 baseline2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

York LA

4,240

4,300

4,480

4,570

4,700

4,790

Yorkshire and Humber (average)

4,460

4,580

4,780

4,850

4,950

5,040

Notes: 1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund as well as funding from the Learning and Skills Council; it excludes grants which are not allocated at LA level. 2. Price Base: Real terms at 2010-11 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 28 March 2012. 3. These figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 19. 4. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £10

25 Jun 2012 : Column 133W

Capital funding

The following table shows capital funding for the financial years that are available. The data are in cash terms as allocations are phased across more than one year making real terms calculations meaningless. Complete information on the split of capital between phases of education is not held centrally.

£ million
 Capital allocations*PFI credits**
 YorkYorkshire and the HumberYorkYorkshire and the Humber

1996-97

0.8

57.5

1997-98

1.3

52.1

1998-99

1.8

90.7

2.0

1999-2000

4.5

151.3

62.8

2000-01

7.4

243.3

86.0

2001-02

4.8

245.2

45.2

2002-03

9.2

310.5

1.1

2003-04

11.1

305.4

188.9

2004-05

11.4

326.6.

15.4

273.2

2005-06

10.7

386.3

2006-07

23.0

281.9

255.4

2007-08

19.3

380.3

179.2

2008-09

26.7

371.5

4.5

2009-10

23.1

510.5

423.8

2010-11

18.4

701.4

348.7

2011-12

8.0

437.6

2012-13 (provisional)

8.6

289.7

Notes: 1. Capital allocations includes capital grant and supported borrowing allocations. 2. PFI credit allocations are counted at financial close. 3. Figures are rounded to the nearest £100,000. 4. — indicates that no funding was given in that year.

Schools: Discipline

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to increase discipline in classrooms and control by teachers. [112711]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 June 2012]:Improving behaviour in our schools is a key priority for this Government. We have taken the steps outlined in the 2010 Schools White Paper to ensure teachers have the powers they need to maintain discipline in the classroom.

These include: removing the requirement to give parents 24 hours' written notice of detentions outside school hours; strengthening teachers' powers to search pupils for items which disrupt teaching; and clarifying teachers’ powers to use reasonable force. We have also issued updated advice and guidance to schools on promoting good behaviour and maintaining discipline.

Further reforms will take effect in the autumn. Teachers will be entitled to anonymity when accused by pupils until they are charged with an offence and a new system of independent review panels which will ensure that a school's decision to exclude is not undermined by an appeal process that can force the reinstatement of a permanently excluded pupil.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 134W

Schools: Hygiene

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how the new School Premises Regulations will define what constitutes a suitable standard for toilets and washing facilities in schools. [112442]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]:The new School Premises Regulations will require that toilet and washing facilities are provided for the sole use of pupils and that they are suitable, having regard to pupils' ages, number, sex and any special requirements they may have. They will also require that separate toilet facilities are provided for boys and girls aged eight years or over, except where the facility is provided in a room that is intended for use by one pupil at a time and that can be secured from the inside.

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of provision of soap and hand drying facilities in schools; and whether the new School Premises Regulations will require washing facilities to provide soap and hand drying facilities to qualify as suitable. [112443]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]:The Department has not made such an assessment, but is aware of several studies carried out that noted where soap and towels were absent in school washing facilities. These were referred to in a response to the recent consultation on the proposed new School Premises Regulations.

The new regulations will not include specific requirements for soap and drying facilities, but they will require that the washing facilities provided by schools are suitable for pupils to use. They will also contain a regulation covering the general health, safety and welfare of pupils. It is difficult to see how any school could meet these standards without providing adequate means for pupils to wash and dry their hands.

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the new school premises regulations will define what constitutes a suitable number of toilets and washbasins for a given number of pupils by means of a ratio. [112458]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 June 2012]:The new School Premises Regulations will not set out a specific ratio of toilets and washbasins to numbers of pupils, but will be supported by supplementary guidance which will provide a steer on the provision of such facilities.

Schools: Inspections

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools failed their Ofsted inspection (a) nationally and (b) in North Swindon constituency in the last year for which figures are available. [112587]

Mr Gibb: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to my hon. Friend, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 135W

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 15 June 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Since 2005, maintained school inspections have been carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005 and, more recently, the Education Act 2011. Ofsted records all judgements made by inspectors in section 5 inspections, including the judgement for the overall effectiveness of the school.

Under section 5, Ofsted inspects maintained schools (nursery, primary, secondary and special schools and pupil referral units), state-funded independent schools such as academies and certain non-maintained special schools in England. All of these types of schools have been included in this response. On 1 January 2012 Ofsted implemented a hew school inspection framework for section 5 inspections. This includes a sharper focus on the judgements that matter most and a continued drive to raise standards—particularly in literacy.

Schools receive an overall effectiveness judgement on inspection. They are graded on a four point scale to be outstanding, good, satisfactory or inadequate. Schools which receive an inadequate overall effectiveness judgement require significant improvement or are placed into special measures.

Table A below shows the number of maintained schools judged inadequate for overall effectiveness at their section 5 inspection

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during the academic year 2010/11 and the academic year 2011/12 up to 31 March 2012 in the North Swindon constituency and England.

In September 2009, Ofsted implemented a policy of more proportionate inspection using risk assessment as an aid to scheduling the inspection of good and outstanding schools. We deliberately set out to inspect a greater proportion of previously satisfactory or inadequate schools each year and a smaller proportion of previously good or outstanding schools.

In September 2010, Ofsted deferred the inspections of previously outstanding schools and, as signalled in the Education Act 2011, is no longer routinely inspecting previously outstanding schools. These schools will not be inspected unless a complaint has been raised or the risk assessment process identifies that these schools would benefit from an inspection.

Accordingly, the sample of schools inspected during any given period is unlikely to be representative of the nation as a whole.

Statistics covering the outcomes of all inspections carried out in each academic year can be found at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/advanced-resources-search/results/Maintained%20schools/2/all/any/200/any

The most recent official statistics release covering the outcomes of maintained school Inspections carried out between 1 January 2012 and 31 March 2012 was released on 12 June 2012 and can be accessed at the same link.

Table A: Schools in England and North Swindon constituency judged inadequate for their overall effectiveness in each academic year 2010/11 and 2011/12 (year to date)
  2010/112011/12(1)
RegionPhaseNumber inspectedNumber inadequate% inadequate.Number inspectedNumber inadequate% inadequate

England

Nursery

126

0

0

103

1

1

 

Primary

4,249

230

5

3,146

236

8

 

Secondary

894

70

8

632

69

11

 

Special

328

14

4

199

7

4

 

PRU

129

7

5

117

6

5

 

All schools

5,726

321

6

4,197

319

8

        

North Swindon

Nursery

0

0

 

Primary

13

0

0

5

0

0

 

Secondary

0

1

0

0

 

Special

4

0

0

0

 

PRU

1

0

0

0

 

All schools

18

0

0

6

0

0

(1) Year to date.

Sixth-form Education

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what comparative assessment he has made of any funding disparities between sixth form colleges and school sixth forms. [112652]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 June 2012]: Historically there has been a funding disparity between schools and sixth form college and other further education establishments, with schools having been funded on a higher basic funding rate. We committed in the White Paper, ‘The Importance of Teaching’, published in November 2010, to end the disparity in post-16 funding so that, by 2015, schools and colleges will be funded at the same level as one another. In 2011/12 schools were moved onto the same base rate of funding as colleges. We introduced transitional protection for four years to give institutions sufficient time to adjust to the new base rate of funding and to the other funding changes announced in the December 2010 16-18 ‘Funding Statement’. Transitional protection will be removed completely in 2015/16.

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what comparative assessment he has made of the effectiveness of school sixth forms and sixth-form colleges. [112653]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 June 2012]: The GCE/Applied GCE A/AS and equivalent examination results in England, 2010/11 (revised) Statistical First Release, published in January shows the following comparative information for 16 to 18-year-old students entered for level 3 examinations.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 137W

Institution typeAverage point score per entry for all level 3 qualifications(1)Average point score per student for all three qualificationsPercentage achieving two or more A-levels (or equivalent)(2)Percentage achieving three or more A* or A grades at A-level including double awards(2)

Sixth-form colleges

211.5

809.7

98.1

10.2

All maintained schools(3)

213.0

779.9

97.2

11.0

(1) This includes students entered for a GCE or Applied GCE A-level or other level 3 qualification equivalent in size to an A-level. (2) This includes students entered for GCE/Applied GCE A-levels and Double Awards. (3) This includes city technology colleges and academies.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will ask Ofsted to publish a separate grade for school sixth forms as part of school inspections; and if he will make a statement. [112739]

Mr Gibb: There are no plans to ask Ofsted to publish a separate grade for sixth forms as part of school inspections. Where the assessment of the sixth form differs from the overall judgment of a school, this will be made clear in the report.

Special Educational Needs

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to provide comprehensive educational developmental programmes to pupils with physical and neurological disabilities. [112302]

Sarah Teather: Schools are responsible for identifying and meeting the educational needs of all their pupils, including those with physical and neurological disabilities. Since 2004, the Department has collected and published data on the numbers and attainment of pupils in England, broken down by pupil characteristics including ethnicity, eligibility for free school meals and different types of special educational needs (SEN). The data include information on children whose primary need is a physical disability who are receiving support either through SEN statements or through School Action Plus, the higher of two school-based levels of SEN support.

Our approach to improving services and outcomes for disabled children, including those with physical and neurological disabilities, is set out in the Green Paper, “Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability”.

20 pathfinders, representing 31 local authorities and primary care trust partners, have been appointed to test the proposals in the Green Paper and will inform the changes we make to legislation through the Children and Families Bill. The pathfinders are focusing on involving parents more fully in decisions about the education, health and social care of their children, including trialling personal budgets for those who want them, and developing a clear offer of the support that is available locally. Pathfinders are testing a single assessment process and the use of an “Education, Health and Care Plan”, which brings together the support on which children, young people and their families rely.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 138W

In addition, we have awarded a number of contracts to the voluntary and community sector in 2011-12 and 2012-13, many of which will support children with physical and neurological disabilities. These include grants over the two years of £502,466 to “Whizz Kidz”, for support to children with mobility-impairment, and £256,949 to SCOPE, to develop an online toolkit and guidance to help children with cerebral palsy and allied disabilities to access the curriculum.

Students: Finance

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what account he takes of forecast demographic trends in the number of 16 to 19-year-olds over the next 10 years when deciding whether to fund new education places for this age group. [112736]

Mr Gibb: The Department uses demographic forecasts produced by the Office for National Statistics to estimate the size of each cohort in each year. It then combines these with its own forecasts of participation rates in education for each cohort in each year when planning the number of new education places to fund over the spending review period.

Sustainable Development: Curriculum

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place a duty on schools to promote understanding of sustainability in the stewardship of resources locally, nationally and globally; and if he will make a statement. [112413]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 June 2012]:The Government are committed to sustainable development but do not think that placing duties on schools is the best way to secure it.

Our reform programme is designed to improve standards by giving greater autonomy to schools. This is based on the principle that schools perform better when they take responsibility for their own improvement.

Schools themselves are choosing to become more sustainable with the Sustainable Schools Alliance, a group of voluntary organisations, who are working together to provide a clear offer of support to all schools in the country.

Teachers: Training

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many graduates have entered teaching since 2007 in (a) South Swindon constituency and (b) England and Wales. [111809]

Mr Gibb: The information is not available for South Swindon constituency and is not available in the format requested for England and Wales.

Provisional figures show that between March 2007 and March 2010, the latest date available, 131,700 teachers with qualified teacher status entered teaching service for the first time in the publicly funded sector in England and Wales. This figure is a slight underestimate because the data source undercounts part-time teachers by around 10 to 20%. All teachers who are awarded qualified teacher status are required to have a degree or equivalent level qualification. A small number of graduate teachers

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who entered service but have not attained qualified teacher status are excluded from the figure provided.

The figure is provided from the Database of Teacher Records, an administrative data source primarily maintained for pensions administration purposes. The data source covers both England and Wales.

Information on the number of entrants to initial teacher training in England in the academic years 2006/07 to 2011/12 has been published in Tables A1 and A2 of the School Workforce Statistical First Release, November 2010, which is available at the following web link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000997/index.shtml

Requests for information about the number of entrants to initial teacher training in Wales should be directed to the Welsh Government.

Young People: Drugs

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the relationship between employment and education status and substance misuse among under 18 year olds. [112846]

Sarah Teather: The Government has supported a numbers of studies that look at the effects of substance misuse and the well-being of young people. The main one is the Youth Cohort Study and Longitudinal Study of Young People in England: The Activities and Experiences of 18 year olds: England 2009, which shows that 36% of those who had ever tried cannabis were in full-time education at age 18, compared with 49% of those who had not. Young people who had tried cannabis were more likely to be not in education, employment or training than those who had not (19% who had tried cannabis compared with 14% who had not). In the previous year the study showed that young people who reported having tried cannabis by the time they were age 14 were twice as likely to be NEET at age 16 than those who had not.

Other assessments the Department has made relating to substance misuse and education and employment include: the Newbury-Birch review, Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Young People (2008) which showed that alcohol consumption can have a detrimental effect on young people's short term educational performance; Barnes et al, Understanding Vulnerable Young People (2011) which found that 15% of young people who drank alcohol on most days or smoked at least six cigarettes per week and had tried cannabis were NEET at age 18; and Frontier Economics, A cost-benefit analysis of substance misuse services for under-18s (2011), which showed that the reduction in the percentage of NEET young people as a result of treatment results in long-term educational and employment benefits of between £5,000 and £10,000 per young person.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Adult Education

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of the adult further education budget was spent on (a) 19 to 21, (b) 22 to 24 and (c) over 24-year-olds in respect of (i) full-time and (ii) part-time courses. [112599]

25 Jun 2012 : Column 140W

Mr Hayes: Actual spend on adult (19+) further education and skills training is not reported at the individual level. However, it is possible to provide an estimate of funding at this level calculated from the Individualised Learner Record.

Table 1 shows the proportion of estimated 19+ funding for further education and skills (excluding community learning) by age band and mode of attendance in the 2010/11 academic year, the latest full year for which final data are available.

Table 1: Further education and skills (excluding community learning)
Percentage of estimated spend by age band and mode of attendance, 2010/11
AgeFull-timePart-timeTotal

19 to 21

24

6

29

22 to 24

7

5

13

25+

16

42

58

19+ total

47

53

100

Notes: 1. Funding calculations are based on data that include adults (aged 19+) participating in education and training, apprenticeship and workplace learning provision. Community learning provision has been excluded. 2. Education and training provision (previously learner responsive and university for industry provision) covers further education learning delivered mainly in a classroom, workshop or through distance or e-learning. 3. Figures for estimated spend come from the ILR. They should not be treated as actual spend as spending is not reported at this level (age and part-time/full time). These figures can only be used to give an indicative view on the proportion of public funding for each age group and by part-time/full-time). 4. For ‘education and training' full-time learners are defined as those learners studying a programme of a minimum of 450 guided learning hours in an academic year. It is not possible to identify the mode of attendance for apprenticeships and workplace learning. For the purposes of this analysis all apprenticeships have been categorised as full-time and all workplace learning as part-time. Source: Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

Apprentices: Greater London

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of apprentices in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency, (b) the London borough of Bexley and (c) London who are employed in the retail sector. [113890]

Mr Hayes: Information on the number of apprentices employed in the retail sector is not available. Apprenticeship data are collected and reported by apprenticeship framework and sector subject area.

Table 1 shows the number of apprenticeship programme starts in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency, (b) the London borough of Bexley and (c) the London region in the retail and commercial enterprise sector subject area for the 2010/11 academic year, the latest full year for which final data are available.

Table 1: Apprenticeship programme starts in the retail and commercial enterprise sector subject area by geography, 2010/11
 Retail and commercial enterprise apprenticeship starts

Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency

180

Bexley local authority

490

London region

7,740

25 Jun 2012 : Column 141W

England total

102,770

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Geography is based on the home postcode of the learner. Geographic information is based on boundaries of regions as of May 2010. The England total includes some unknown postcodes. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by sector subject area is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 29 March 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary _tables/

Apprentices: Insolvency

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what measures his Department has put in place to support young people pursuing apprenticeships in the event that the company employing them becomes insolvent. [113788]

Mr Hayes: In the case of redundancy the National Apprenticeship Service will work with the training provider and apprentice to try and find an alternative employer that would be willing to help the apprentice complete their apprenticeship. In addition there are exceptional arrangements which may allow an apprentice to complete an apprenticeship where specified conditions are met and opportunities to gain the skills and knowledge are available without being in paid employment.

Bank Cards: Fees and Charges

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his policy is on banning excessive debit and credit card charges. [113306]

Norman Lamb: The EU Consumer Rights Directive will require member states to prohibit traders from charging consumers fees that exceed the costs borne by the trader for the use of a given means of payment. This will ban excessive payment surcharges in areas within scope of the directive. The Government supported the inclusion of this provision in the directive. The deadline for the directive to take effect in national law is 13 June 2014.

The Government shares consumers' concerns about the high level of payment surcharges imposed by some businesses. On 23 December 2011, in response to a recommendation from the Office of Fair Trading, we announced our intention to consult on implementing the payment surcharges provision of the Consumer Rights Directive ahead of the June 2014 deadline. We intend to issue a full 12 week consultation in the summer to seek views on the timing of implementation and other details on how the provision should be applied. Responses to the consultation will inform our decision on timing and our guidance to businesses.

25 Jun 2012 : Column 142W

British Nuclear Fuels

Mr Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether any individuals in his Department are receiving payments in connection with British Nuclear Fuels Limited. [113778]

Mr Prisk: No officials in the Department are receiving such payments.

Conditions of Employment

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the conclusions of the Beecroft report, what plans he has to introduce a no fault dismissal clause between employers and employees. [113255]

Norman Lamb: We issued a call for evidence on the concept of no fault dismissal, which closed on 8 June. We are now analysing the responses.

We will carefully consider the evidence before deciding whether to take any further steps. However, we have no plans to take this forward in the current Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill.

Copyright

Tristram Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 21 May 2012, Official Report, column 516W, on copyright, whether he proposes to publish the Government's proposals for copyright reform before the summer. [113158]

Norman Lamb: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, my right hon. Friend the Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), announced on 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 74, that the Government would publish as soon as possible their decisions on the introduction of a scheme to allow extended collective licensing, one to allow the use of orphan works, and a back-stop power to allow the Government to require a collecting society to implement a statutory code of conduct should it fail to introduce or adhere to a suitable voluntary code. He intends to do so before recess.

Other announcements on copyright reform may be made later this year.

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether his Department switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113462]

Norman Lamb: The Department switched suppliers for gas and electricity in 2006 when it moved onto the Government Procurement Service (formally Buying Solutions) Energy Framework.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which energy supplier supplies his Department with (a) gas and (b) electricity. [113480]

25 Jun 2012 : Column 143W

Norman Lamb: The Department uses the Government Procurement Service (formally Buying Solutions) Energy Framework to purchase its gas and electricity supply. Corona is the energy supplier for gas to the Department and EDF is the energy supplier for electricity for those buildings which have half hourly meters. British Gas is the energy supplier for electricity for buildings which do not have half hourly meters.

Further Education: Higher Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the demand for higher education places at further education colleges; and whether the allocation of places under the core and margin model for 2012-13 matches this demand. [113622]

Mr Willetts: In 2012/13 a total of 26,500 entrant places are available through further education (FE) colleges funded directly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. Of these 10,000 places were awarded through the creation of a contestable margin based on price, quality and demand. Margin places are not intended to meet the totality of demand for FE provision.

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on which dates his Department has published Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010. [113362]

Norman Lamb: The Department (core BIS) has published Government Procurement Card spending over £500 as follows:

Financial Year 2011/12:

Due to the volume of transactions, data are drawn together on a quarterly basis.

Quarter 1 (April to June) published on 13 October 2011.

Quarter 2 (July to September) published on 10 November 2011.

Quarter 3 (October to December) published on 9 March 2012.

Quarter 4 (January to March) will be published by 2 July 2012.

Financial Year 2010/11:

The Department has not published data relating to 2010/11. This is in accordance with Cabinet Office guidelines.

Higher Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the time taken was between application and the awarding of designated higher education status for each application his Department has approved this year. [112387]

Mr Willetts: Privately funded institutions that wish to have a course specifically designated for student support purposes apply in the first instance to the Student Loans Company (SLC). Applications are assessed by the SLC against the course designation criteria in the Education (Student Support) Regulations and the applications are forwarded to the Department for consideration. The time taken between the application being received by the Department and the awarding of

25 Jun 2012 : Column 144W

designated course status varies significantly depending on the nature of the application, and whether or not the provider has previously had courses approved. If the provider is applying for designation for the first time they will be subject to a due diligence review.

I will place a list of all the courses that have been approved by the Department between September 2011 and 31 May 2012 in the Libraries of the House. The list shows the dates on which the applications were received by the Department and the dates on which the approval letters were issued.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the answer of 19 March 2012, Official Report, column 518W, on higher education: student numbers, what steps he plans to take in the event that parliamentary time is not available to discuss his legislative proposals on access to student support funding. [112391]

Mr Willetts: We published our response to the Higher Education White Paper, ‘Students at the Heart of the System’, on 11 June 2012. In it we set out our plans to bring alternative providers and certain further education colleges, designated for student support purposes, into the formal student number control system alongside other providers. This does not require a change to primary legislation.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the answer of 23 April 2012, Official Report, column 735W, on higher education, how many higher education designated courses (a) he and (b) the Minister of State for Universities and Science has given approval to. [112763]

Mr Willetts: The responsibility of the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable) to designate courses is in most circumstances exercised by officials on his behalf. As at the end of May 2012, 26 courses had been specifically designated, following a due diligence review.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which higher education providers who subsequently (a) applied for and (b) received designated course status Ministers and officials in his Department have met in each of the last 12 months. [112945]

Mr Willetts: I meet regularly with providers of higher education. A quarterly-updated list of all Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) ministerial meetings with external organisations is available at:

http://data.gov.uk/dataset/disclosure-ministerial-hospitality-received-department-for-business

BIS officials also have had meetings with a range of higher education providers, but a comprehensive record of these is not maintained.

A list of courses that have been specifically designated is published on the Student Loan Company's (SLC's) website:

http://www.practitioners.slc.co.uk/policy-information/designated-courses/full-list.aspx

25 Jun 2012 : Column 145W

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the answer of 23 April 2012, Official Report, column 735W, on higher education, how regularly he reviews the course designations that are being assessed on his behalf. [113026]

Mr Willetts: The responsibility of the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable) to designate courses is in most circumstances exercised on his behalf by officials. Ministers are regularly briefed on the volumes and nature of applications. Specific cases are referred to Ministers only in exceptional circumstances.

Higher Education: Admissions

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the potential effect of further education loans on access to higher education for (a) women, (b) black and minority ethnic students and (c) people from non-traditional groups. [113231]

Mr Hayes: Research commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) on the introduction of 24+ advanced learning loans showed little evidence to suggest that these groups will be particularly disadvantaged by the introduction of loans. BIS and its partners will monitor take-up and evaluate impact carefully as 24+ advanced learning loans are introduced.

Insolvency Service

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the cost to local insolvency services of employing and training new staff following the reorganisation of such services. [112947]

Norman Lamb: If a decision is taken to close offices the Insolvency Service has estimated the costs of employing and training new staff, over a range of potential outcomes, with staff at a variety of levels seeking different options, including relocation and exit.

The Insolvency Service does not propose to automatically replace all staff who may leave.

In relation to the proposed closure of its Stockton office, on an assumption that 40% of staff would seek an exit scheme rather than relocation, the Insolvency Service has estimated such costs would be £50,000, representing an estimated cost of recruitment, training and lost productivity costs at £10,000 per new full-time staff member.

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what factors his Department will take into account when deciding on the future of local insolvency offices. [112948]

Norman Lamb: Any decision to close offices will be made with all relevant and current information to hand. Reference will also be made to the criteria previously used to assess offices for potential closure which were: the volume of projected face to face activity required,

25 Jun 2012 : Column 146W

the reasonableness of alternative travel journeys to neighbouring offices and projected costs should locations be merged.

All responses to the ongoing public consultations will be taken into account in reaching a decision on the current potential office closures and mergers, along with the existing evidence set out in the consultation documents and any new evidence or data that arises in response to the five questions posed in the consultations.

Insolvency Service: Stockton on Tees

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will place in the Library a copy of the evidence his Department used to reach the conclusion that closing the Stockton Insolvency Service will not affect customer services or the level of investigation. [112918]

Norman Lamb: In relation to the impact on customer services, should closure be pursued, no further assessment has been made other than that as set out in the consultation document of March 2012. A copy of the consultation document can be found in the Library of the House and online at:

www.bis.gov.uk/insolvency/Consultations/Stockton

The consultation seeks to test the assumptions and estimates set out within the document, and seeks further comment on the impact of the proposed closure.

As the proposed closure of Stockton does not envisage the loss of any posts for staff involved in investigation, it is not considered that this will significantly impact upon the level of investigation undertaken. No further assessment of this has been made.

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consideration he gave to Stockton Insolvency Service’s score ratings in the delivery strategy proposal when deciding which regional insolvency offices should be considered for closure. [112919]

Norman Lamb: The criteria used to assess offices for potential closure were the volume of projected face to face activity required, the reasonableness of alternate travel journeys to neighbouring offices and projected costs should locations be merged.

These criteria were set out in the consultation, in particular annex A, a copy of which can be found in the Libraries of the House and online at:

www.bis.gov.uk/insolvency/Consultations/Stockton

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate his Department has made of the cost of transferring staff from the Stockton Insolvency Service to other offices in the event that it closes. [112920]

Norman Lamb: In estimating the cost of transferring staff from Stockton to other offices, the Insolvency Service has used the following benchmarks per individual:

 £

Estimated excess fares

11,520

25 Jun 2012 : Column 147W

Estimated full relocation costs for home owners

34,000

The actual costs would be determined by the individual staff member’s personal circumstances and the number of staff electing to relocate.

The Insolvency Service has estimated the costs over a range of potential outcomes, with staff at a variety of levels seeking different options. If a decision is made to proceed to closure, these estimates will be revisited in conjunction with individual discussions with staff as to their personal circumstances.

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consultation his Department undertook when considering co-locating the Stockton Insolvency Service office with another local government office in the same area. [112922]

Norman Lamb: The Insolvency Service has been in discussions with the estates office within the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) about potential alternative accommodation, within the BIS family, in the wider Teesside area.

The Insolvency Service does not consider that finding alternate accommodation on the Government estate, in the wider Teesside area, would be overly difficult should a decision be made not to proceed with the proposed merger with its Newcastle office.

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take into account the different cost of living in Newcastle and Stockton when making a decision on the future of the Stockton Insolvency Service office. [112921]

Norman Lamb: The Insolvency Service will take account of all representations made in response to the consultation on the potential closure of the office in Stockton, in coming to a final decision. This includes any representations made regarding differences in the cost of living between Newcastle and Stockton.

Low Associates

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether his Department has received any representations from Low Associates since May 2010. [111598]

Norman Lamb: Details of ministerial and the permanent secretary's meetings with external organisations are published on the BIS website at

http://www.bis.gov.uk/transparency/staff

No central record is kept of other departmental officials' meetings with external organisations and the information could therefore be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

New Businesses: Bexley

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) how many businesses in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency and (b) the

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London borough of Bexley have signed up as mentors for the Mentor scheme since the inception of the scheme; [113227]

(2) how many businesses in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency and (b) the London borough of Bexley have benefited from the Mentor scheme since the inception of the scheme. [113228]

Mr Prisk: Get Mentoring is a SFEDI-led (Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative) project, supported by grant funding (from both BIS and the Government Equalities Office,) to recruit and train 15,000 volunteer business mentors from the small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) community.

Over 12,000 volunteers have now been recruited through this initiative and over 7,000 of them have completed training—around 16% of whom are based in London and the south-east. This estimate is only approximate and based on the location of the workshop they attended. We do not currently have the data to ascertain how many were recruited from Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency and the London borough of Bexley specifically.

Volunteer mentors recruited and trained through Get Mentoring are deployed via the mentoring organisations on

http://www.mentorsme.co.uk/

the national mentoring portal or mentor businesses within their own networks. We do not have data to say how many mentoring relationships have been developed and therefore how many businesses have benefited as a result of the site. It is too early yet to provide robust data on the number of businesses being mentored by Get Mentoring volunteers.

At the start of 2011 it is estimated that there were almost 1.5 million private sector SMEs in London and the south-east. Based on results from the Small Business Survey 2010 it is estimated that around 120,000 (8%) of these would have used a business mentor in the previous 12 months.

New Businesses: Offices

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) how many businesses he expects to use premises made available under the Start Up Spaces scheme by the end of (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; [113039]

(2) how many premises will be made available under the Start Up Spaces scheme by the end of (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; [113040]

(3) what capacity is available to businesses under the Start Up Spaces scheme and what he expects this will be by the end of (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; [113041]

(4) how many businesses are using premises made available under the Start Up Spaces scheme. [113042]

Mr Prisk: My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister's initiative to encourage start-up businesses in the current economic climate by using the Government's stock of surplus unoccupied office space, is being led jointly by the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) and the Cabinet Office. BIS is responsible for the business start-up element of the scheme. The Cabinet Office,

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through the Government Property Unit (GPU), is leading work on the property aspect and has been working with Departments to identify viable space.

GPU has identified a first batch of viable spaces and on 29 May 2012 Government began a process to find providers to manage the spaces and deliver business support to future occupants. Space is likely to become available to businesses in the late autumn, subject to the identification and appointment of suitable providers. This initiative is a novel and innovative venture by Government which we trust will prove successful, with further spaces added to the initiative as they are identified in subsequent waves.

At this stage, it is not possible to predict how many premises will be made available under the scheme by the end of (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014. The Government's property portfolio is fluid and actively managed to maximise efficiency and deliver value for money for the taxpayer. Government continue to seek to dispose of its unoccupied space where they can, either through sale or the early surrender of leases. Where these options are not suitable, the Government Property Unit will work with Departments to identify suitable property for this initiative.