Entry Clearances: Appeals

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what target time her Department has set for the time taken between promulgation of an entry clearance appeal determination when the appellant is successful and the issuing of entry clearance to the appellant. [108084]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency aims to establish whether an appeal should be contested within five working days from a decision being promulgated.

Appeals that are not contested are referred back to the relevant Visa Section, which aims to issue any relevant entry clearance within eight weeks of receiving the referral. Time scales can be affected by the standard of the postal, telephone and e-mail services in some locations in which International Group operates.

Extradition

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she expects to publish her response to the review of the UK's extradition arrangements by Scott Baker. [108541]

22 May 2012 : Column 596W

Damian Green: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department is currently giving very careful consideration to the recommendations made by Sir Scott Baker and will announce what action the Government will take in response to the review shortly.

Forgery: Euro

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to EU Council Decision 2005/511/JHA on protecting the euro against counterfeiting, what assessment she has made of the likely benefit to the UK of the designation of Europol as the central office for combating euro counterfeiting. [108240]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 21 May 2012]:The UK must decide, no later than 31 May 2014, whether to accept full European Court of Justice jurisdiction over those EU police and criminal justice measures adopted before 1 December 2009 which have not been amended or replaced. This measure falls within the scope of that decision and will be reviewed accordingly.

Immigration

Simon Reevell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many legacy immigration cases are being handled by her Department; and how many new legacy immigration cases were identified on average per month in the last 12 months. [107043]

Damian Green: Rob Whiteman, the chief executive of the UK Border Agency wrote to the Home Affairs Select Committee on 3 May that there were 21,000 live legacy cases to conclude, 80,000 cases in the asylum Controlled Archive and 21,500 cases in the migration Controlled Archive which the Case Assurance and Audit Unit (CAAU) will continue to manage, taking robust action to trace applicants and conclude cases where new information comes to light which allows cases to be progressed.

In the financial year April 2011 to March 2012 an average of 138 new legacy cases per month were identified by the CAAU.

Immigration Controls

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost to the public purse was of the transfer of additional UK Border Force and UK Border Agency staff to London airports from other locations over the May 2012 bank holiday weekend. [107935]

Damian Green: We do not disclose this type of information on the grounds that it may be prejudicial to operations and therefore security.

Immigration Controls: Ports

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on the application of immigration law to non-European economic area seafarers working on one-port voyages in (a) UK territorial waters or (b) the UK continental shelf. [108628]

22 May 2012 : Column 597W

Damian Green: Non-European economic area seafarers, under section 8(1) of the Immigration Act 1971, are normally exempt from immigration control where they arrive in the UK as a member of the crew of a vessel and will depart from the UK as a member of that crew. Where, however, such a person seeks entry to join a vessel as a crew member, they will be subject to immigration control and a work permit may be required if that vessel's operations will not involve it in leaving British territorial waters. A work permit may not, however, be required if the vessel is to undertake a one-port voyage which means that it will spend most of its time outside British territorial waters.

Internet: Fraud

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what steps she plans to take to deal with rogue websites which sell illegal driving licences and other documents; [107748]

(2) what steps the Government plans to take to close down web traders who sell illegal documents; [107749]

(3) what plans the Government has to raise awareness amongst consumers of the dangers and consequences of acquiring illegal driving licences and other documents through the internet. [108320]

Nick Herbert: The Government is concerned about the harms caused by websites that sell false documents. Law enforcement agencies, including the Metropolitan Police Service, the City of London Police, the Serious Organised Crime Agency and the Police Central e-Crime Unit, deploy a range of tactics to close down such websites and remove payment facilities where grounds exist to suspect criminal offences.

Recent initiatives have also included sending letters to websites offering false documents warning them to stop their activity or risk being prosecuted.

Lost Property

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many items of equipment valued at £10,000 or more her Department lost in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if she will make a statement. [108930]

22 May 2012 : Column 598W

Damian Green: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department can confirm that no item of equipment valued at £10,000 or more has been lost in 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Departmental Staff

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many full-time equivalent employees her Department employed in May 2010; and how many it employed in the latest period for which figures are available. [108157]

Damian Green: The numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) Home Office employees in May 2010 and April 2012 are included in the table.

Machinery of government changes during 2011-12 contributed to the change in the number of employees. These are detailed as footnotes to the table.

Table 1: Number of Home Office employees (FTE) May 2010 and April 2012
  Number of Employees (FTE)

31 May 2010

29,440

30 April 2012

(1)24,606

(1) This includes 130 (FTE) employees who transferred in as part of Machinery of Government changes when the Government Equalities Office (88 FTE) and National Fraud Authority (42 FTE) became part of the Home Office on 1 April 2011. It excludes 110 (FTE) employees who left the Department on 1 April 2011 in a Machinery of Government change when the Pay Service moved to Ministry of Justice. Extract Dates: Data as at 31 May 2010 extracted on 1 April 2011. Data as at 30 April 2012 extracted on 1 April 2012. Note: All figures are for paid civil servants only, in line with ONS guidelines on workforce reporting. Source: Data View—the Department's source of Office for National Statistics (ONS) compliant corporate Human Resources data.

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff (a) her Department and (b) its agencies employs in each parliamentary constituency. [108685]

Damian Green: There are currently 650 parliamentary constituencies within the UK and it is not possible to provide a response along these lines without incurring disproportionate cost. Office for National Statistics (ONS) requires all public sector organisations to report their work force data using Government Regions.

Table 1 provides the number of staff (a) in the Department and (b) in its Executive Agencies by Government Region.

Table 1: Number of civil servants employed by the Home Office and its Executive Agencies by region (1)
  (a) (b)
Region Departmental Total Criminal Records Bureau Headquarters (2) Identity and Passport Service United Kingdom Border Agency (2) National Fraud Authority

East Midlands

166.58

57.64

3.99

104.95

East of England

1,053.38

468.02

407.34

178.02

London

10,621.68

4,697.61

539.02

5,343.51

41.54

North East

853.04

114.02

590.48

148.53

North West

3,852.18

475.43

535.21

959.03

1,882.51

Scotland

637.16

223.04

162.59

251.53

South East

3,507.67

3,059.41

18.83

429.43

South West

302.03

182.37

17.00

102.66

Wales

485.60

132.65

158.83

194.13

West Midlands

654.70

244.46

11.69

398.54

Yorkshire and the Humber

2,045.40

290.37

13.50

1,741.53

Northern Ireland

276.78

73.30

159.34

44.15

Brussels-Capital Region

28.00

27.00

1.00

22 May 2012 : Column 599W

22 May 2012 : Column 600W

Lower-Normandy

19.18

19.18

Paris-Isle-De-France

56.00

56.00

North-Calais

32.33

32.33

Not recorded

14.27

2.00

8.05

2.22

2.00

Grand total

24,605.98

477.43

10,220.67

3,043.85

10,822.49

41.54

(1) Paid civil servants in line with Office for National Statistics work force reporting. (2) On 1 March 2012 the Border Force moved under a Machinery of Government change from UKBA to Headquarters. Extract Date: 30th April 2012 Source: Data View, the Home Office's single source of monthly Human Resources data

Police and Crime Commissioners

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent estimate she has made of the cost of the Police and Crime Commissioner elections in (a) Wales and (b) England. [108562]

Nick Herbert: The estimated cost of Police and Crime Commissioner elections in England and Wales in November 2012 is £75 million.

It is not currently possible to estimate the cost of elections in each country separately. The Home Office is modelling the estimated cost of the elections in each force area to inform the Fees and Charges Order, which we will lay before Parliament later in the year.

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether local areas will be able to hold referendums on abolishing the position of police and crime commissioner; and if she will make a statement. [108356]

Nick Herbert: No.

Police Custody: West Yorkshire

Simon Reevell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many custody records were opened by the West Yorkshire police in (a) 2001 and (b) 2011. [108645]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not held by the Home Office.

Police Numbers

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effect of change in police numbers on the level of crime since May 2010. [108049]

Nick Herbert: The Home Affairs Committee said last year:

“We accept that there is no simple relationship between numbers of police officers and levels of crime.”

The Government agrees.

Redundancy

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of her Department's employees have been made redundant in the last two years. [108063]

Damian Green: In the last two years (1 April 2010 to 31 March 2012) 26 Home Office employees have been made compulsorily redundant.

Sexual Offences: Drugs

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what steps her Department has taken to improve evidence-gathering processes to ensure that tests for date rape drugs can be carried out where appropriate; [108430]

(2) what steps her Department has taken to tackle drink spiking leading to drug-facilitated sexual assault and other offences; [108431]

(3) what recent assessment she has made of the prevalence of drug-facilitated sexual assaults. [108434]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 21 May 2012]:Actions to improve evidence gathering are a matter for the police. The Association of Chief Police Officers and the National Police Improvement Agency issue guidance on investigating and prosecuting rape.

The Home Office website offers advice to people who believe they have been victim to drug- facilitated sexual assaults. This is available at

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/CrimeJusticeAndTheLaw/Typesofcrime/DG_10027698

FRANK, the Home Office sponsored drug information and advice service, has information on tranquillisers (which includes Rohypnol) available on its website, available at:

www.talktofrank.com

Information on the prevalence of drug-facilitated sexual assaults is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when her Department's Safer Clubbing guidance was last reviewed and updated. [108433]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 21 May 2012]:The London Drug Policy Forum's , my right hon. Friend the Member forSafer Nightlife' guidance was

22 May 2012 : Column 601W

published in 2008, in collaboration with the Home Office, the Association of Chief Police Officers and other key partners. The Home Office has no current plans to review or update this guidance.

Theft: Mobile Phones

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many mobile telephone handsets have been reported stolen in each of the last five years. [108010]

James Brokenshire: The requested data are not available from police recorded crime data collected centrally.

However the 2010-11 Crime Survey for England and Wales estimates that approximately 800,000 individuals experienced one or more mobile phone thefts in England and Wales in the last year. There has been no statistically significant change in this estimate over the last five years.

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with mobile telephone handset providers and network operators on systems to disable a handset once it has been reported stolen. [108012]

James Brokenshire: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Trade Unions

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many trade union representatives in (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies had (i) part-time and (ii) full-time paid facility time arrangements in 2011-12. [107390]

Damian Green: During the period 2011-12 across the Department and its non-departmental public bodies a total of 22 staff had full-time paid facility time arrangements and a further 463 staff had part-time facility time arrangements. The majority of these part-time representatives do only minimal amounts of union work, often for only a few hours a month.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will place in the Library copies of the facility time agreements between trade unions and (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies. [107393]

Damian Green: Copies of the relevant facility time agreements will be placed in the House of Commons Library. We are currently awaiting the outcome of a Cabinet Office consultation exercise, due to begin shortly, which will review options for changes to facility time arrangements across the civil service. Once the Cabinet Office consultation exercise has concluded we will review and update the Department's facility time agreements accordingly.

22 May 2012 : Column 602W

UK Border Agency

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment she has made of staffing levels at the UK Border Agency. [108038]

Damian Green: The staffing levels within UKBA are 12,886.

UK Border Agency: Pay

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the posts were of those UK Border Agency staff who received a performance bonus payment of £10,000 in 2010-11. [107081]

Damian Green [holding answer 15 May 2012]: No member of staff in the UK Border Agency received a performance payment of £10,000 for the 2010-11 performance year. However, three members of UK Border Agency staff were paid bonuses of £10,000 in the 2010-11 financial year that were awarded for performance in the 2009-10 performance year.

Work Permits

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what work permit requirements apply to non-European economic area seafarers working in the UK (a) maritime and (b) offshore energy sectors. [108816]

Damian Green: Under the Immigration Rules, a seafarer coming to join a ship will require permission to work under the Points Based System except where he is eligible for admission as a seafarer under contract to join a ship due to leave British waters.

Education

Academies: Finance

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how the amount top-sliced from local authorities' general funds for academies was calculated in 2012-13; what the link between funds taken and the number of academies in each local authority area was; and if he will make a statement. [107589]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 16 May 2012]:We announced in December 2010 that deductions would be made from Formula Grant in 2011-12 and 2012-13 to reflect the transfer of responsibilities from local authorities to academies. Local authorities receive Formula Grant on a per-pupil basis and until 2011-12 no reduction was made for pupils who were in academies. This meant that local authorities kept the same level of Formula Grant to fund services to schools even when they had fewer schools to support because one or more schools had converted to academy status.

At the time of the decision we were only able to make estimates about the growth in the number of academies at a national level, so reductions in local authority budgets were calculated on a pro-rata national basis.

22 May 2012 : Column 603W

The top-slice was not therefore related to the current pattern of academy schools, nor did it reflect the pattern of growth in academy numbers which has subsequently taken place.

We have since announced that at the end of the 2012-13 financial year we will make a calculation of the number of pupils in academies in each local authority to determine the amount each local authority's budget should have been reduced by that year. Where the amount is less than the amount top-sliced from the local authority's budget, we will refund of the difference. There are a number of authorities where the top-slice was less than should have been deducted given the number of academies they have. To maintain stability in local authorities' budgets we have agreed not to seek to recoup this funding.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish a timetable for the return of funds to local authorities following the top-slicing of local authority general funds for academies in 2012-13. [107590]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 16 May 2012]:The level of any refund of the 2012-13 top slice paid to local authorities will be based on a calculation of the number of pupils in academies in each local authority. The final 2012-13 academies will open at the beginning of March 2013 and so the final refund, where applicable, will be calculated in March 2013 and paid as soon as possible thereafter. We will write to local authorities in January 2013 to give them an indicative calculation of any refund they may receive to assist them in their financial planning.

Academies: Reading (Berkshire)

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in (i) Reading West constituency, (ii) Reading and (iii) Berkshire have converted to academy status in the last 12 months. [106676]

Mr Gibb: Over the last 12 months the following proportions of schools converted to academies in:

(i) Reading West constituency: (a) no primary schools and (b) 33% of secondary schools;

(ii) Reading: (a) no primary schools and (b) 14% of secondary schools; and

(iii) Berkshire: (a) 2% of primary schools and (b) 24% of secondary schools.

In total, the following proportions of schools have converted to academies in:

(i) Reading West constituency: (a) 3% primary schools and (b) 50% of secondary schools;

(ii) Reading: (a) 3% of primary schools and (b) 71 % of secondary schools; and

(iii) Berkshire: (a) 4% of primary schools and (b) 49% of secondary schools.

Carbon Emissions

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his Department's total level of carbon emissions was between (a) 1 April 2010 and 1 April 2011 and (b) 2 April 2011 and 1 April 2012. [108583]

22 May 2012 : Column 604W

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education's total carbon dioxide emissions are reported as part of the Annual Accounts returned to Treasury.

(a) For the financial year 2010/11 (1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011) the Department emitted 14,887 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions.

(b) For the financial year 2011/12 (1 April 2011 to 31 March 2012) the Department emitted 13,597 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions.

The above emissions values include official UK business travel and encompass the arm’s length bodies and executive agencies of the Department with the exception of the Young People's Learning Agency as their emissions are captured within shared accommodation arrangements with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

In 2010/11, DFE participated in the Prime Minister's 10% carbon commitment to reduce office-based carbon emissions by 10% over 12 months. During this period, the Department reduced its emissions by 21.5% compared to the previous 12 months.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what measures his Department introduced to reduce its carbon emissions in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [108584]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education has focused its carbon reduction activity throughout 2010-12 on low and no-cost measures, supported by a small number of capital investments. During the period in question, the following measures were introduced:

Key measures in 2010 included:

Installing high efficiency lighting;

Installing variable speed drives (VSD) on Air Handling Units (AHUs);

Estate rationalisation and co-location;

Relocating its Sheffield HQ building to a property with solar thermal and solar PV installations;

Re-programming Building Management System (BMS) to be more demand based;

Running staff awareness energy efficiency campaigns;

Switching off unnecessary lighting;

Adjusting building temperature set points to reduce heating and cooling requirements.

Key measures in 2011 included:

Installing VSDs on heat pumps;

Installing additional automated meter reading (AMR) devices across the estate;

Monitoring and targeting unexpected building energy profiles through AMR-generated data;

Revising AHU Control Strategies;

Introducing thin-client computers.

Key measures in 2012 to date include:

Regular fine tuning of the BMS;

Introducing thin-client computers;

Installing LED lighting;

Reducing operating hours of major plant and equipment;

Shutting down buildings even more effectively during unoccupied periods.

Environmental audits are planned across our estate to identify further measures to reduce our emissions throughout 2012.

22 May 2012 : Column 605W

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department spent on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [107490]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education's expenditure on external consultants including management consultants in

(a) Financial year 2010-11 was £19.8 million

(b )Financial year 2011-12 was £3.93 million.

The hon. Member might also be interested to know the expenditure in previous years:

(i) Financial year 2008-09 was £59 million

(ii) Financial year 2009-10 was £57.4 million.

English Baccalaureate

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many and what proportion of year 10 pupils eligible for free school meals in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area (i) are studying subjects that could lead to the English Baccalaureate in academic year 2011-12 and (ii) were studying GCSEs that would now form part of the English Baccalaureate in academic year 2009-10; [108490]

(2) how many and what proportion of year 10 pupils in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area (i) are studying subjects that could lead to the English Baccalaureate in academic year 2011-12 and (ii) were studying GCSEs that would now form part of the English Baccalaureate in academic year 2009-10. [108491]

Mr Gibb: Information on the proportion of year 10 pupils who are studying subjects that could lead to the English Baccalaureate in academic year 2011-12 is not collected. Information on the proportion of year 10 pupils in 2009/10 who were studying GCSEs that would now form part of the English Baccalaureate has been answered by showing the number and percentages of pupils who were entered for the English Baccalaureate in 2010/11.

The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

Extracurricular Activities: Standards

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to promote awareness among schools of British Standard 8848 on overseas adventure activities; and if he will make a statement. [108559]

Mr Gibb: We have no plans to promote awareness among schools of British Standard 8848, the specification for provision of visits, fieldwork, expeditions and adventurous activities abroad with which UK organisations may voluntarily comply. The Department for Education has published simplified health and safety advice for schools, which covers school trips, setting out the need for schools to comply with their duties under health and safety law when planning trips abroad.

22 May 2012 : Column 606W

Financial Services: Education

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will make the teaching of financial literacy a compulsory part of the planned new national curriculum in secondary schools; [108673]

(2) if he will encourage businesses outside the financial services sector to support the provision of financial literacy in secondary schools; [108674]

(3) if he will encourage more businesses in the financial services sector to volunteer in schools to support teachers in teaching financial capability; [108678]

(4) if he will include teaching financial capability as a mandatory part of training for new teachers; [108679]

(5) if he will increase the personal finance elements of mathematics teaching; [108704]

(6) if he will create a database of personal finance teaching resources and volunteers aimed at young people to be made available to teachers. [108707]

Mr Gibb: Finance education is currently taught as part of Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education. We will be looking at the provision for finance education as part of the review to determine how we can improve the quality of all PSHE teaching and support teachers to teach the subject well. We will consider whether aspects of the subject should become statutory as part of the basic curriculum and this of course includes finance education.

Support from businesses in and outside the financial services sector is important in helping schools with their finance education programmes. In fact, schools are already drawing on expertise from financial institutions, and organisations such as Citizens Advice to help teachers improve financial capability with finances. However, we want schools to have the flexibility to use their judgment about how best to deliver finance education including which external partners to use.

The new Teachers' Standards, which set out what is expected of all qualified teachers, require teachers to be able to plan out of class activities to consolidate and extend the knowledge and understanding pupils have acquired. It is for training providers to decide what trainees should be taught to enable them to achieve the Teachers' Standards. The Department does not mandate content of initial teacher training courses.

The aim of the national curriculum review is to determine a core of essential knowledge that pupils need to succeed. As part of the review we are currently developing new programmes of study for mathematics to ensure that it reflects the core mathematical knowledge and skills in preparing students for the wider world.

We have no plans to create a database of personal finance education teaching resources and volunteers aimed at young people to be made available to teachers. There are a number of sources where schools can obtain such information, including, for example, the Personal Finance Education Group who have a wide range of resources on their website aimed at teachers and finance education practitioners.

We set out, in the White Paper, ‘The Importance of Teaching’, how schools will be freed from the constraints of central Government direction, including trusting the professional judgment of teachers in deciding on the teaching that best meets the needs of their pupils.

22 May 2012 : Column 607W

Free School Meals

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for (1) Education how many children in (a) Bristol and (b) nationally are eligible for free school meals; [106935]

(2) what proportion of children eligible for free school meals in (a) Bristol and (b) nationally take them. [106936]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals has been placed in the House Libraries.

Information on how many pupils meet the eligibility criteria but do not make a claim is not available.

The information provided here for January 2011 is published in tables 11a to 11d of the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2011' available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children living in poverty are eligible for free school meals. [107524]

22 May 2012 : Column 608W

Sarah Teather: The Department estimates that around half of children living in relative poverty in Great Britain in 2012/13 are entitled to free school meals.

Free School Meals: South Yorkshire

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children received free school meals in (a) Barnsley East constituency, (b) Barnsley Metropolitan Borough and (c) South Yorkshire in (i) 2008, (ii) 2009, (iii) 2010 and (iv) 2011. [107909]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals is shown in the tables.

Information on the number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals as at January 2011 is published in the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2011' available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Maintained nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary, special schools and pupil referral units (1,2,3,4,5) : January 2008 to 2011
  Number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals
  2008
  Number on roll (6,7) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (6,7) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

England

6,829,670

1,076,240

15.8

       

South Yorkshire

179,340

31,325

17.5

Of which:

     

Barnsley

30,777

5,707

18.5

Doncaster

41,794

7,229

17.3

Rotherham

39,481

6,764

17.1

Sheffield

67,290

11,623

17.3

       

Barnsley East Constituency

10,809

2,316

21.4

  Number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals
  2009
  Number on roll (6,7) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (6,7) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

England

6,786,750

1,096,525

16.2

       

South Yorkshire

176,750

31,970

18.1

Of which:

     

Barnsley

30,150

5,973

19.8

Doncaster

41,036

7,549

18.4

Rotherham

36,801

6,721

17.3

Sheffield

65,762

11,726

17.6

       

Barnsley East Constituency

10,622

2,461

23.2

  Number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals
  2010 (5)
  Number on roll (6,7) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (6,7) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

England

6,796,500

1,184,920

17.4

22 May 2012 : Column 609W

22 May 2012 : Column 610W

South Yorkshire

175,640

34,515

19.7

Of which:

     

Barnsley

29,849

6,436

21.6

Doncaster

40,834

8,425

20.6

Rotherham

38,435

7,193

18.7

Sheffield

66,520

12,463

18.7

       

Barnsley East Constituency

10,637

2,657

25.0

  Number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals
  2011 (5)
  Number on roll (6,7) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (6,7) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals

England

6,803,755

1,227,110

18.0

       

South Yorkshire

174,730

35,445

20.3

Of which:

     

Barnsley

29,663

6,784

22.9

Doncaster

40,487

8,418

20.8

Rotherham

38,154

7.162

18.8

Sheffield

66,428

13,080

19.7

       

Barnsley East Constituency

10,632

2,745

25.8

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (4) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (5) From 2010, includes pupil referral units (when the collection became pupil level). (6) Includes full time and part time pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. Includes boarding pupils. In pupil referral units, also includes pupils registered with other providers and further education colleges. (7) Pupils who have full time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part time attendance and are aged between five and 15. Note: National and regional totals have boon rounded to the nearest 5. Source: School Census

Free School Meals: Universal Credit

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the publication, “Universal credit: the impact on passported benefits”, when he expects to publish the consultation on eligibility for free school meals within universal credit. [108406]

Mr Gibb: The introduction of universal credit in 2013 means that the Government has to change the way it calculates eligibility for free school meals, and we expect to consult on our plans shortly.

GCE A-level: Disadvantaged

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils receiving free school meals were awarded a grade A at A Level in 2011. [108502]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is provided in the following table.

Number and percentage of pupils (1) entering at least one A-level (2) in 2010/11 who were awarded at least one A*-A grade, by free school meal eligibility (3)
  Of those pupils entering at least one A-level (2)
  Number awarded at least one A*-A grade Percentage awarded at least one A*-A grade

Pupils eligible for free school meals

2,896

21.5

All other pupils

74,677

35.3

All pupils

77,573

34.4

(1) Pupils aged 16-18 at the start of the 2010/11 academic year attending maintained schools (including academies and CTCs) and FE sector colleges. (2) Includes GCE/Applied GCE A-levels and Double Awards. (3) Pupils eligible for free school meals at the end of year 11. Source: National Pupil Database (final data)

Grove School: Nottinghamshire

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he received representations from the Grove school in Nottinghamshire on its closure during the winter because classrooms were too cold for teaching and learning. [107046]

Mr Gibb: The Department has no record of receiving any representations from the Grove school in

22 May 2012 : Column 611W

Nottinghamshire on its closure during the winter because classrooms were too cold for pupils to receive their education.

Headteachers

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will estimate how many (a) primary, (b) secondary and (c) special schools had (i) no permanent headteacher in place and (ii) one or more assistant or deputy head positions vacant in (A) 2010-11 and (B) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [107760]

22 May 2012 : Column 612W

Mr Gibb [holding answer 17 May 2012]: The following table provides the number of schools, broken down by phase of education, which reported that their head teacher post was either vacant or temporarily filled. The table also provides the number of schools with at least one vacant or temporarily filled post for deputy or assistant head teachers. The information is for all publicly funded schools in England, November 2010 and 2011. The figures show the position on the day of the School Workforce Census.

Number of schools with head and deputy and assistant head teacher vacancies (1) by phase, November 2010and 2011, England
  November 2010 November 2011
  Nursery and primary (2) Secondary (2) Special Nursery and primary (2) Secondary (2) Special

Heads

           

Vacancies including temporarily filled vacancies

260

30

20

210

30

10

Of which :

           

temporarily filled vacancies3

240

30

20

190

30

10

             

Deputy and assistant heads

           

Vacancies including temporarily filled vacancies

220

60

20

190

60

20

Of which :

           

temporarily filled vacancies(3)

150

30

10

100

20

10

(1 )Advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments (or appointments of at least one term's duration). Includes vacancies being filled on a temporary basis of less than one term. (2 )Includes academies. (3 )Temporarily filled vacancies are those that are filled by a teacher on a contract of a term or more and less than one year. Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 schools. Source: School Workforce Census

Home Education

Caroline Dinenage: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department has taken to ensure that children who are being educated at home are receiving an education suitable to their age, ability and aptitude, under section 7 of the Education Act 1996; and what criteria are used to define a suitable education. [108256]

Mr Gibb: Parents who educate their child at home have a duty to ensure that the child receives an education that is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they have. Local authorities have a duty to act where a child is not receiving a suitable education, and for that purpose suitability is defined as an efficient full-time education suitable to the child's age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have.

Caroline Dinenage: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department has taken to ensure that parents who are home-educating their children are providing a suitable education for their children. [108257]

Mr Gibb: Parents who educate their child at home have a duty to ensure that the child receives an education that is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they have. Local authorities have a duty to act where they identify a child who is not receiving a suitable education.

Ofsted

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if his Department will conduct an inquiry into Ofsted's handling of correspondence with hon. Members; [108827]

(2) how many complaints have been made to his Department about a breach of confidentiality by Ofsted in the last 12 months. [108828]

Mr Gibb: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 19 April 2012, Official Report, column 541W.

Pre-school Education: North Yorkshire

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many families will be eligible for free early education for the poorest two year-olds in (a) North Yorkshire and (b) Harrogate district; [107752]

(2) how many families in (a) North Yorkshire and (b) Harrogate district are eligible for the extension in hours of childcare available to the poorest families. [107753]

Sarah Teather: Since September 2010 all three and four-year-olds have been entitled to 15 hours a week of free early education, up from 12.5 hours.

22 May 2012 : Column 613W

The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in the autumn statement of 29 November 2011, Official Report, columns 799-810, that the early education entitlement for two-year-olds will be expanded to around 260,000 children. The Government intends to take a phased approach to the implementation of the new entitlement. The 20% most disadvantaged two-year-olds will be eligible from September 2013. From 2014, the entitlement will be extended to around 40% of two-year-olds.

We estimate that around 700 two-year-olds in the area covered by North Yorkshire county council, and less than 100 in the area covered by Harrogate borough council are likely to be eligible for the entitlement from September 2013. We are considering eligibility criteria for the second phase, and will consult in due course.

Pre-school Education: Nuneaton

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many families he expects to be eligible for the extension in hours of childcare available to the poorest families in Nuneaton constituency; [108712]

(2) how many families he expects to be eligible for free early education for the poorest two-year-olds in Nuneaton constituency. [108713]

Sarah Teather: Since September 2010 all three and four-year-olds have been entitled to 15 hours a week of free early education, up from 12.5 hours.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in the autumn statement that free early education will be extended to around 260,000 two-year-olds. The Government intends to take a phased approach to the implementation of the new entitlement. The 20% most disadvantaged two-year-olds will be eligible from September 2013. From 2014, the entitlement will be extended to around 40% of two-year-olds.

We estimate that around 300 two-year-olds living within Nuneaton and Bedworth borough council are likely to be eligible for the entitlement from September 2013. We are considering eligibility criteria for the second phase, and will consult in due course.

22 May 2012 : Column 614W

Procurement

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of payments made by his Department to small and medium-sized enterprises have been paid late since May 2010. [107790]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not currently record within its finance systems information about the size of its suppliers. To extract and analyse the data on which the invoices were classed as being paid late would incur disproportionate costs.

For the period April 2011 to March 2012 (financial year 2011-12) invoices paid on behalf of the Department by our shared services provider, 95.20% were paid within 10 days and 99.13% were paid within 30 days.

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of his Department's expenditure on procurement has gone to small and medium-sized enterprises since May 2010. [107794]

Tim Loughton: The Department's spend with SMEs has been reported in the Cabinet Office report, Making Government business more accessible to SMEs - One Year On:

www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/making-government-business-more-accessible-smes-one-year

Pupils: Barnsley

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils attended schools in Barnsley metropolitan borough in each year since 2007. [108009]

Mr Gibb: Information on pupil numbers in Barnsley local authority is shown in the following table.

Information on pupil numbers as at January 2011 is published in the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2011’ available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Number (headcount) of pupils by type of school (1) . January each year: 2007 to 2011. Barnsley local authority
  Maintained nursery State-funded primary (2,3) State-funded secondary (2,4) Special (5) Pupil referral units Independent Total

2007

n/a

19,941

13,695

172

140

229

34,175

2008

n/a

19,490

13,575

217

126

217

33,625

2009

n/a

19,242

13,263

238

111

206

33,060

2010

n/a

19,247

12,941

232

72

199

32,690

2011

n/a

19,245

12,656

260

80

196

32,435

n/a = Not applicable. No schools of this type. (1) Includes pupils of all ages who are sole or dual main registrations. In PRUs also includes pupils registered with other providers and further education colleges. (2) Includes middle schools as deemed. (3) Includes primary academies. (4) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (5) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Note: Totals have been rounded to the nearest five. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent items and totals as shown. Source: School Census

22 May 2012 : Column 615W

Pupils: Bullying

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to reduce absences from school due to bullying. [108410]

Mr Gibb: The Government wishes to reduce all absences from school, whatever their cause. We highlighted our commitment to making tackling bullying a top priority in our White Paper, ‘The Importance of Teaching’. Our approach is to make sure that schools have the powers they need to tackle bullying, and to make it clear that bullying should never be tolerated and its victims must be supported.

We have strengthened teachers' powers to maintain discipline in the classroom. It is important that teachers are able to use their powers when they need to, as part of a concerted effort by the school to tackle bullying and bad behaviour. Where a pupil is bullied schools should work with parents to keep the pupil in school.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to support children from lower-income families who wish to sit the 11-plus exams. [108549]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not centrally prescribe specific support offered to pupils from lower-income families because we believe that head teachers are best placed to decide how to meet the needs of their pupils. We have introduced a range of reforms to improve outcomes for all pupils in England, including those who are disadvantaged. Pupils registered as eligible for free school meals (FSM), pupils who have been registered as eligible for FSM at any point in the last six years, and pupils who have been looked after in public care continuously for six months or more, attract the pupil premium. For 2012-13 this means that £600 is paid to schools for each disadvantaged pupil on roll to help improve their performance. This is a total of £1.25 billion this year and will rise to £2.5 billion per year by 2014-15.

One of the fundamental principles of the pupil premium—which has been widely welcomed by schools—is that they should be free to decide how to use their pupil premium funding, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for their pupils. This may include supporting disadvantaged pupils who wish to sit the 11-plus exams.

Schools are also accountable for how well their disadvantaged pupils do: from September 2012, schools will be required to publish information on the use of pupil premium funding; performance tables now include a measure to show the attainment of pupils who attract the premium; and Ofsted inspectors will take into account schools' provision for these pupils and use of the premium in their inspections.

Pupils: Nuneaton

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many (a) schools and (b) pupils in Nuneaton constituency have participated in the pupil premium in the latest period for which figures are available; [108715]

(2) how much additional funding his Department plans to make available to schools in the Nuneaton constituency as a result of the pupil premium. [108716]

22 May 2012 : Column 616W

Sarah Teather: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so far been made for the 2011-12 financial year only. For 2011-12 the pupil premium funding was £488 per pupil in respect of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), and for children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months, and £200 per pupil for those whose parents are serving in the armed forces. In 2011-12 in Nuneaton constituency 33 schools received the pupil premium in respect of 2,060 eligible pupils, totalling £995,000.

In 2012-13 the pupil premium amount in respect of pupils known to be eligible for FSM has risen from £488 to £600 per FSM pupil and will be extended to cover pupils who have been FSM within the last six years. Allocations for the pupil premium in 2012-13 will not be confirmed until June, when the January 2012 pupil numbers are available centrally. Based on 2011-12 data, £1,836,000 pupil premium funding would be made available in 2012-13 to schools in the Nuneaton constituency.

Redundancy

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many of his Department's employees have been made redundant in the last two years. [108074]

Tim Loughton: The Department has not made any staff redundant in the last two years but has agreed voluntary early releases.

Early releases
  Number

2010-11

141

2011-12

177

Risk Assessment

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what strategic or transitional risk registers in each area of policy are held by his Department; and if he will make a statement. [107482]

Mr Gibb: The Department manages its business using project and programme management structures. These organise work into broad programmes which cover sub-programmes and projects. In each of these areas, strategic and transitional risks are actively managed using structures and tools that include risk registers. The Department's Executive Management Board and Delivery Audit Risk and Assurance Committee both review and manage the most strategic risks that have been escalated by programmes' and projects' risk managers.

School Meals: Gateshead

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average price of a school meal is in Gateshead. [107727]

Sarah Teather: The Department does not collect this information.

The School Food Trust's ‘Sixth Annual Survey of Take Up of School Lunches in England July 2011’ shows that the average lunch price was £1.88 in LA catered primary schools, and £1.98 in LA catered secondary

22 May 2012 : Column 617W

schools. Average prices in special schools were £1.87 for primaries and £1.93 for secondaries. The survey is available on the trust's website at:

http://www.schoolfoodtrust.org.uk/school-cooks-caterers/reports/sixth-annual-survey-of-take-up-of-school-meals-in-england

School Meals: Nutrition

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what information his Department holds on the proportion of (a) free schools and (b) academies opened since September 2010 which have voluntarily complied with the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007; [107849]

(2) if he will make an assessment of the nutritional standards of school meals at free schools and academies opened since 2010. [107850]

Sarah Teather: The Department does not hold information on the proportion of all free schools and academies, opened since September 2010, which have voluntarily complied with the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007.

The school food standards, set out in the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007, apply to maintained schools and, through funding agreements, to academies established prior to the Academies Act 2010. Since the Act, new funding agreements for academies or free schools are not required to specify compliance with the standards. We believe that it is likely that most new academies will continue to comply with the standards, because they will have converted from maintained schools that have always met the standards.

The Secretary of State for Education asked the School Food Trust to look at the approach taken by academies to providing healthy school food. The trust undertook a qualitative study with a mixture of established and new academies, including one free school, and examined the quality of provision to provide a baseline of food provision in academies, and demonstrate the attitudes and intentions of the sector. The trust published its report on the study on 15 May 2012. This shows that all of the academies interviewed identified food as important and a part of education.

Schools: Asbestos

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether an academy trust would be personally liable for an asbestos exposure claim against the academy. [108132]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 21 May 2012]:An academy trust is a corporate body so its members should not be held personally liable provided they act reasonably and in good faith. An academy trust acts as a single entity with an identity separate from that of its members. Responsibility for actions and decisions, therefore, lies with the whole academy trust rather than its individual members.

Academy trusts are required to have governor liability insurance with a minimum cover of several million

22 May 2012 : Column 618W

pounds. This insurance covers the collective liability of the academy trust acting in good faith.

Schools: Food

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the standard of school food in academies and free schools since the requirement for them to abide by the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007 was lifted; [107053]

(2) what (a) discussions he has had with and (b) representations he has received from representatives of academies and free schools on school food; [107054]

(3) whether he has made an estimate of the number of academies and free schools which are selling food and drink products through tuck shops and vending machines which would not be permitted under the provisions of the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007; [107056]

(4) what representations (a) he, (b) Ministers and (c) officials in his Department have received from (i) food and drink manufacturers and (ii) vending machine providers on the sale of food and drink products in free schools and academies; [107057]

(5) how many and what proportion of free schools and academies operate stay on site policies during school hours; [107058]

(6) what guidance his Department issues to free schools and academies on the (a) deployment, (b) content and (c) pricing of vending machines on school premises; [107059]

(7) how many free schools and academies have (a) received and (b) been offered sponsorship or donations from (i) food and drink manufacturers and (ii) providers of vending machines or other in-school snack retailing; [107060]

(8) whether he plans to take any action in the event that any academies or free schools are found to be supplying school meals and other food which does not meet the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007. [107070]

Sarah Teather: The school food standards, set out in the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007, apply to maintained schools and, through funding agreements, to academies established prior to the Academies Act 2010. Since the Act, new funding agreements for academies or free schools are not required to specify compliance with the standards.

The Secretary of State for Education asked the School Food Trust to look at the approach taken by academies to providing healthy school food. The trust undertook a qualitative study with a mixture of established and new academies, including one free school, and examined the quality of provision to provide a baseline of food provision in academies, and demonstrate the attitudes and intentions of the sector. The report on the study was published on 15 May 2012. This showed that all of the academies interviewed identified food as an important part of overall education provision. Some academies go

22 May 2012 : Column 619W

over and above the minimum requirements and are offering their pupils high quality, nutritional food. The study showed that the academies outperformed maintained schools in all but one of the food standards, but that there is room for improvement in all schools, as evidenced by the Secondary School Food Survey, published by the School Food Trust on 28 April. This demonstrates that academies appear to be no worse overall at meeting food-based standards at lunchtime than other schools.

The Department takes this matter very seriously, and wants all pupils to have the opportunity to select a healthy, balanced school lunch. The Department will consider this new evidence—and that from the trust's Secondary School Food Survey—to determine how best to achieve this policy aim.

Ministers and officials have not had discussions or received representations from representatives of academies and free schools; or received representations from food and drink manufacturers or vending machine providers on the sale of food and drink products in free schools and academies.

The Department has not issued guidance to schools, including to free schools and academies, about vending machines. As is the case with maintained schools, free schools and academies may determine whether to have such facilities, and if they do, which items to offer for sale. Vending machines can help some schools to deal more quickly with busy lunchtime services.

The Department does not collect information about the number of schools, including free schools and academies, which have received or been offered sponsorship from either food and drink manufacturers or providers of vending machines or other snack retailing.

The Department does not collect information about the number of free schools and academies that operate stay on site policies during school hours.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent (a) discussions he has had with and (b) representations he has received from representatives of (i) catering companies, (ii) child health organisations and (iii) other organisations on school food. [107055]

Sarah Teather: The Secretary of State for Education met with Jamie Oliver on 23 June 2011 to discuss school food and cooking. I also met recently with my hon. Friend the Member for Richmond Park (Zac Goldsmith) and his constituent Stephanie Wood, of School Food Matters, to discuss school food. Jamie Oliver was due to attend this meeting but cancelled.

The Department has received recent correspondence from MPs and members of the public. Officials have also received correspondence and had discussions with organisations, including the School Food Trust, the Children's Society, the Children's Food Campaign, LACA (formerly the Local Authority Caterers Association), Food for Life, Barnardo's, Save the Children, Sustain, Family Action and the Child Poverty Action Group, on school food and free school meals.

We have not had discussions with, or received any representations from catering companies.

22 May 2012 : Column 620W

Schools: Polling Stations

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools in England were completely closed for polling purposes on 3 May 2012. [108426]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 21 May 2012]:The Department does not collect data on the number of schools used as polling stations. Local returning officers can require schools to be used as a polling station where there is no other available accommodation. Where a school site is used, some schools will remain open where separate entrances and exits can be provided for pupils and voters; other schools will close. The decision as to whether a school remain open is for the head teacher of that particular school and is not monitored by the Department for Education.

Schools: Regulation

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress he has made in abolishing education quangos and reducing regulatory and administrative burdens on schools. [107863]

Mr Gibb: The Government is committed to reducing regulatory and administrative burdens on schools. The Department for Education has closed 11 of its arm's length bodies (ALBs), five have been retained and one has been re-classified as an independent body. Some of the functions and staff of eight ALBs have now transferred into four new Executive agencies (Standard and Testing Agency, Education Funding Agency, Teaching Agency and National College for School Leadership) or into the core Department.

We have already removed a range of unnecessary regulatory duties and subject to parliamentary process, will be removing further burdens in September. In terms of other administrative burdens, we have: cut the volume of guidance issued to schools by more than half; removed the Self Evaluation Form; replaced the FMSiS financial standard; introduced a streamlined inspection framework; removed a number of data collections and made clear that neither the Department nor Ofsted expect teachers to produce written lesson plans for every lesson. These changes are part of a continuing focus on reducing bureaucracy so that schools are able to concentrate on raising standards.

Teachers: Barnsley

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teaching staff on average there are per child in schools in (a) Barnsley East constituency and (b) Barnsley metropolitan borough. [107926]

Mr Gibb: As at November 2010, the within school pupil to teacher ratio for Barnsley East constituency was 19.0 and the overall pupil to teacher ratio for Barnsley local authority was 18.3. The pupil teacher ratios have been calculated by combining pupil numbers from the January 2011 school census with teacher numbers from the November 2010 school work force census.

An update to this information is expected to become available in June 2012.

22 May 2012 : Column 621W

Teachers: Training

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will consider the use of training days for primary school teachers to refresh their mathematics skills. [108676]

Mr Gibb: Good quality mathematics teaching in primary schools is fundamental to improving attainment. It ensures children leave primary school proficient and prepared for more complex mathematics in secondary schools. While we encourage primary schools to develop the mathematical subject knowledge of their teachers, it is for the senior leadership within primary schools to decide how training and support for teachers is managed.

The Government is supporting this by providing £6 million over three years for the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM) which co-ordinates and quality assure continuing professional development for mathematics teachers at primary and secondary level.

Justice

Carbon Emissions

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what his Department's total level of carbon emissions was between (a) 1 April 2010 and 1 April 2011 and (b) 2 April 2011 and 1 April 2012; [108569]

(2) what steps his Department took to reduce its carbon emissions in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [108570]

Mr Djanogly: Carbon dioxide emissions from the Ministry of Justice estate between April 2010 and April 2011 amounted to 502,823 tonnes of carbon as reported in the Ministry's Carbon Reduction Commitment submission to the Environment Agency and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; this does not include any emissions from transport. The Ministry is unable to provide figures for April 2012 as it is still collating and validating these data.

During 2010-11 and 2011-12 the Ministry of Justice established programmes of work to reduce carbon emissions across the estate. These programmes comprised capital measures including installing voltage optimisation equipment and new energy-efficient boilers: quick wins including installing timer switches, thermostatic controls, altering set points for heating and cooling and chillers; and behavioural change campaigns to increase staff awareness. Similar projects will be delivered in 2012-13 as part of our contribution to the Greening Government Commitments.

Departmental Staff: Political Affiliation

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the (a) job title and (b) pay band was of each official, excluding special advisers, recruited by his Department since May 2010 who was previously employed in any capacity by the (i) Conservative party or its elected representatives and (ii) Liberal Democrat party or its elected representatives; and whether their position was advertised publicly; [107110]

(2) what the (a) job title and (b) pay band was of each official, excluding special advisers, recruited by his Department since May 2010 who previously held an

22 May 2012 : Column 622W

elected position as a member of the (i) Conservative party and (ii) Liberal Democrat party; and whether their position was advertised publicly. [107111]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Ministry of Justice does not keep a central record of whether an employee has previously been employed by a political party, or held an elected position as a member of a political party. To obtain this information would require an examination of all staff personal records. This would incur a disproportionate cost. All permanent civil servants to the Ministry of Justice are employed on the basis of fair and open competition through the civil service jobs website.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what (a) grants and (b) contracts his Department has awarded to companies or organisations run by individuals who were previously employed in any capacity by (i) the Conservative party or its elected representatives and (ii) the Liberal Democrat party or its elected representatives since May 2010; what the (A) value and (B) nature was of these contracts; and whether they were publicly advertised; [107112]

(2) what (a) grants and (b) contracts his Department has awarded to companies or organisations run by individuals who previously held an elected position as a member of the (i) Conservative party and (ii) Liberal Democrat party since May 2010; what the (A) value and (B) nature was of these contracts; and whether they were publicly advertised. [107113]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: As part of this Government's transparency agenda, since 2010 all contracts over the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which individuals have been paid by his Department for consultancy or other services (1) who were previously employed in any capacity by the (a) Conservative party or its elected representatives and (b) Liberal Democrat party or its elected representatives since May 2010; what the (i) cost and (ii) nature was of the services provided; and whether they were publicly advertised; [107114]

(2) who previously held an elected position as a member of the (a) Conservative party and (b) Liberal Democrat party since May 2010; what the (i) cost and (ii) nature was of the services provided; and whether they were publicly advertised. [107115]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Ministry of Justice does not keep a central record of whether an individual engaged for consultancy or other services has previously been employed by a political party, or held an elected position as a member of a political party. To obtain this information would require an examination of the background of all workers engaged for consultancy of other services. This would incur a disproportionate cost. The procurement of consultancy is handled by the Ministry in accordance with consultancy and professional services procurement requirements and in line with direction from the Cabinet Office Efficiency and Reform Group.

22 May 2012 : Column 623W

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [107499]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Ministry of Justice has spent the following on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. The procurement of consultancy is handled by the Ministry in accordance with consultancy and professional services procurement requirements and in line with direction from the Cabinet Office Efficiency and Reform Group. Any consultancy spend over £20,000 is subject to a rigorous Department approval process which is signed off by a senior official.

(a)2010-11: £3,908,790.33

(b) 2011-12: £3,791,233.67.

The spend figures above are based on MOJ core spend; it does not include any executive agencies, arm’s length bodies or non-departmental public bodies.

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to the answer of 25 April 2012, Official Report, column 918W, on consultants, what payments were made to (a) Accenture, (b) PA Consulting, (c) the Bourton Group and (d) Orion Partners. [108697]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: I am unable to answer the right hon. Member at this time. The payment figures requested pre-date the current Accounts Payable system.

My officials will need to compile data from two historical systems and validate those data before I can answer comprehensively.

I will write to the right hon. Member as soon as possible.

Investigatory Powers Tribunal

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many complaints the Investigatory Powers Tribunal has received since its establishment; and how many of these complaints have resulted in a ruling being made. [107028]

James Brokenshire: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Home Department.

Information regarding the number of complaints made to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal is publicly available and set out in its annual report for 2010, which contains the number of complaints made annually since 2001 and the rulings and outcomes of those complaints made in 2010. A link to the report can be found at:

http://www.ipt-uk.com/docs/IPTAnnualReportFINAL.PDF

The report states that the number of complaints made to the tribunal are:

  Number of c omplaints

2001

95

2002

137

2003

110

2004

90

2005

80

22 May 2012 : Column 624W

2006

86

2007

66

2008

136

2009

157

2010

164

The total number of cases upheld since 2000 is 10:

one case in 2005

two cases in 2008

one case in 2009

six cases in 2010

Further detail of cases which the tribunal has found in favour of complainants can be found on the IPT website:

www.ipt-uk.com

Judges: Northumberland

Sir Alan Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what representations he has received from magistrates in the Northumbria area on the proposal to appoint two additional district judges; and what the projected cost is of this proposal. [108279]

Mr Djanogly: A protocol for creating a District Judge (Magistrates Court) post was agreed between the Ministry of Justice, the Senior Presiding Judge, the Magistrates Association and the National Bench Chairs forum. A consultation was undertaken in accordance with the Protocol for the creation of two District Judge (Magistrates Court) posts in Northumbria. Magistrates were able to make representations in the process via respective Bench Chairs, the Magistrates' Association, and the Northumbria Advisory Committee. In addition to the consultation six MPs have written to the Minister with responsibility for courts after hearing representations from magistrates in the area.

In 2011 the Ministry of Justice published research carried out by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Department into the relative cost and efficiency of the lay bench and District Judges. It concluded that the overall costs of the two benches were broadly comparable.

Magistrates

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what information his Department holds on the number of magistrates who have a criminal conviction. [108218]

Mr Djanogly: This information is not held centrally by my Department. To obtain this information would require a manual check of the individual records of 26,000 magistrates, which would incur disproportionate costs. However, prior to being appointed as magistrates, candidates must undergo an enhanced level CRB check.

Departmental Staff

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many full-time equivalent employees his Department employed in May 2010; and how many it employed at the latest period for which figures are available. [108156]

22 May 2012 : Column 625W

Mr Kenneth Clarke: On 30 April 2010, there were 74,194.85 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff employed and on 31 March 2012 (the latest available figures), there were 66,543.40 FTE.

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many full-time equivalent employees have (a) left and (b) been recruited to his Department in the last two years. [108172]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: In 2010-11, 5,657 employees left the Ministry of Justice and 3,985 people were recruited. In 2011-12, 7,646 employees left the Ministry of Justice and 1,929 were recruited.

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many staff (a) his Department and (b) its agencies employs in each parliamentary constituency. [108681]

Mr Blunt: The Ministry of Justice has staff in prisons, courts, tribunals and offices across England and Wales and does not keep a central record of the numbers of staff by parliamentary constituency. To identify the numbers of staff in each constituency is a substantial exercise that will incur a disproportionate cost.

Medomsley Secure Training Centre

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what his policy is on reviewing the management of the prison service at Medomsley Detention Centre for Young Offenders during the 1970s and 1980s; and when he last reviewed the case or sought advice on it from his officials. [108206]

22 May 2012 : Column 626W

Mr Blunt: I regret that I am unable to answer the right hon. Member’s question due to ongoing litigation involving former residents of Medomsley Detention Centre.

Offenders

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to the answer of 30 April 2012, Official Report, column 1161W, on offenders, what the name is of each of the 10 offenders with the most recorded convictions; on how many occasions those convictions led to a prison sentence; and if he will provide a breakdown of the offences committed. [107247]

Mr Blunt: The following table shows the number of previous convictions for the 10 recorded offenders with the most convictions, broken down by offence type and the number of immediate custodial sentences received. The number of previous convictions included in the answer are prior to the offender's most recent conviction between the years 2007 and 2010, in England and Wales.

The Ministry of Justice's guidance on ‘Publicising sentencing outcomes’ makes clear that the decision to publicise the personal details of convicted offenders is one for local areas to make according to local interest in a particular case or cases.

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Number of previous convictions for the 10 offenders with the highest number of previous convictions as recorded on the Police National Computer, by offence type and number of previous immediate custodial sentences, England and Wales
Offender Offence type for which the individual received a conviction Number of previous convictions Number of previous convictions which resulted in an immediate custodial sentence

1

Theft and handling stolen goods

245

79

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

194

27

 

Offences outside England and Wales

81

55

 

Violence against the person

15

9

 

Criminal damage

13

5

 

Other indictable offences

12

2

 

Burglary

3

3

 

Robbery

2

1

 

Fraud and forgery

1

 

Unknown

1

 

Total number of convictions

567

181

       

2

Fraud and forgery

204

95

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

71

23

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

54

6

 

Burglary

38

27

 

Criminal damage

8

3

 

Other indictable offences

8

6

 

Breach offences

5

4

 

Sexual offences

4

3

 

Violence against the person

2

1

 

Offences outside England and Wales

3

2

22 May 2012 : Column 627W

22 May 2012 : Column 628W

 

Robbery

1

1

 

Drug offences

1

 

Total number of convictions

399

171

       

3

Summary offences excluding motoring

352

 

Other indictable offences

24

2

 

Total number of convictions

376

2

       

4

Summary offences excluding motoring

341

4

 

Other indictable offences

10

2

 

Criminal damage

5

 

Violence against the person

2

1

 

Burglary

1

 

Total number of convictions

359

7

       

5

Summary offences excluding motoring

304

1

 

Other indictable offences

11

 

Fraud and forgery

6

2

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

5

1

 

Violence against the person

3

2

 

Drug offences

2

1

 

Criminal damage

1

 

Total number of convictions

332

7

       

6

Summary offences excluding motoring

280

1

 

Other indictable offences

30

1

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

4

 

Fraud and forgery

3

2

 

Drug offences

3

 

Violence against the person

1

 

Total number of convictions

321

4

       

7

Summary offences excluding motoring

286

 

Other indictable offences

19

4

 

Violence against the person

7

5

 

Criminal damage

1

 

Total number of convictions

313

9

       

8

Summary offences excluding motoring

222

 

Other indictable offences

67

8

 

Criminal damage

5

 

Fraud and forgery

2

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

8

1

 

Burglary

1

 

Violence against the person

5

3

 

Total number of convictions

310

12

       

9

Summary offences excluding motoring

192

18

 

Violence against the person

39

26

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

26

7

 

Other indictable offences

15

5

 

Drug offences

12

3

 

Criminal damage

8

3

22 May 2012 : Column 629W

22 May 2012 : Column 630W

 

Offences outside England and Wales

5

4

 

Burglary

2

1

 

Breach offences

1

1

 

Summary motoring offences

1

 

Fraud and forgery

1

 

Total number of convictions

302

68

       

10

Summary offences excluding motoring

120

23

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

75

25

 

Fraud and forgery

16

1

 

Criminal damage

14

4

 

Other indictable offences

11

10

 

Sexual offences

10

8

 

Violence against the person

9

6

 

Burglary

6

3

 

Drug offences

4

 

Unknown

2

 

Breach offences

1

1

 

Total number of convictions

268

81

Source: Ministry of Justice, Police National Computer