16 May 2012 : Column 123W

Written Answers to Questions

Wednesday 16 May 2012

Scotland

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department spent on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [107501]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office has incurred no costs on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 or (b) 2011-12.

Risk Assessment

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what strategic or transitional risk registers in each area of policy are held by his Department; and if he will make a statement. [107471]

David Mundell: Risk management is embedded in all aspects of the Office's policy work in accordance with good practice and HM Treasury guidance.

Sick Leave

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many days of sick leave were taken by staff in his Department in each of the last three years. [106444]

David Mundell: All Scotland Office staff are on secondment from other Government bodies, principally the Scottish Government or the Ministry of Justice, which have their own absence management policies and recording procedures that apply to those of their staff working in this Office. Since 2010, the Scotland Office has local records that confirm staff incurred 142.5 days absence in 2010, and 112.5 days in 2011. Figures for 2012 will be available at the beginning of 2013.

Trade Unions

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many trade union representatives in (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public body had (i) part-time and (ii) full-time paid facility time arrangements in 2011-12. [107292]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office and its sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, did not have any staff with facility time arrangements for trade union duties in 2011-12.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many days were utilised for paid facility time by each trade union representative in (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public body in 2011-12; and at what cost to the public purse. [107293]

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David Mundell: The Scotland Office and its sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, did not have any staff with facility time arrangements for trade union duties in 2011-12.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many days were utilised for paid facility time by each trade union representative in (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public body for trade union (i) duties and (ii) activities in 2011-12. [107294]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office and its sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, did not have any staff with facility time arrangements for trade union duties and activities in 2011-12.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will place in the Library copies of the facility time agreements between trade unions and (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public body. [107295]

David Mundell: There are no facility time agreements between trade unions and (a) the Scotland Office and (b) the Scotland Office's sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many trade union representatives in (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental public body have faced disciplinary action for abusing paid facility time or public resources in each of the last five years. [107296]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office and its sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, did not have any trade union representatives among their staff in each of the last five years.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many meetings have taken place between his (a) Department and (b) its non-departmental public body and trade union representatives utilising paid facility time in each of the last five years to discuss (i) collective bargaining, (ii) redundancies, (iii) negotiations relating to employment, pay and conditions and (iv) other trade union and industrial relations duties; and what the dates and times were of each meeting. [107297]

David Mundell: No meetings have taken place in each of the last five years between (a) the Scotland Office and (b) the Office's sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, and trade union representatives to discuss (i) collective bargaining, (ii) redundancies, (iii) negotiations relating to employment, pay and conditions and (iv) other trade union and industrial relations duties.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland on how many occasions trade union representatives from (a) his Department and (b) its non-departmental body have utilised paid facility time to represent an employee at a meeting or other industrial relations matter in each of the last five years. [107298]

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David Mundell: The Scotland Office and its sole non-departmental public body, the Boundary Commission for Scotland, did not have any staff with facility time arrangements for trade union duties in each of the last five years.

Wales

Railways

Albert Owen: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales with reference to the oral answer of 25 April 2012, Official Report, column 940, on rail transport, whether her Department has conducted an impact assessment of the potential effects of High Speed 2 on the Welsh economy; what issues her Department has raised with the Department for Transport regarding line speeds west of Crewe and across north Wales, including electrification; and if she will make a statement. [106450]

Mr David Jones: I have regular discussions with a range of interested parties, including Ministers in the Department for Transport, on issues that affect Wales. The appraisal of the economic case for High Speed 2 published as part of the Government's decisions in January set out the impacts of the scheme on the whole of Great Britain.

The High Level Output Specification (HLOS), which will be published in the summer, will set out the strategic priorities for rail and will be accompanied by a statement of funding available to pay for this. My office will continue to work to ensure all parts of Wales benefit from improvements in rail infrastructure.

Sick Leave

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many days of sick leave were taken by staff in her Department in each of the last three years. [106434]

Mr David Jones: The numbers of days sick leave taken in the last three years by staff are shown in the following table.

Financial year Total number of days sick leave

2009-10

292.5

2010-11

218

2011-12

423

It should be noted that a small number of instances of long-term sickness largely account for the overall number of sick leave absences, and well over half of those absences in 2011-12 were due to a single case.

Women and Equalities

Logos

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how much the Equality and Human Rights Commission spent on items branded with its logo in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [107088]

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Lynne Featherstone: The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is an arm's-length body; the following is based on information it has provided:

Items branded with the EHRC's logo (1)
  £

2009-10

24,264

2010-11

30,208

2011-12

4,841

(1) This excludes items such as publications and leaflets bearing the EHRC's logo.

Communities and Local Government

Local Government Pensions

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of the eligible workforce is enrolled in the Local Authority Pension Scheme in (a) Ashfield constituency, (b) Nottinghamshire and (c) the east midlands. [107440]

Robert Neill: The information requested is not available centrally. The relevant data may be sourced by contacting each employer in the Local Government Pension Scheme in the areas concerned.

Local Government: Equality

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if his Department will publish guidance for local authorities on how best to foster race equality. [106414]

Andrew Stunell: The public sector Equality Duty requires public bodies to consider all individuals when carrying out their day to day work—in shaping policy, in delivering services and in relation to their own employees. The Equality Duty covers a number of protected characteristics, including race (this includes ethnic or national origins, colour or nationality). It requires public bodies to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations between different people when carrying out their activities. The Government Equalities Office and the Equality and Human Rights Commission have published several guides to help public bodies understand the Equality Duty. These can be seen at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/equalities/equality-act/equality-duty/

Private Sector

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many jobs formerly in his Department and its agencies and non-departmental bodies were transferred to the private sector in 2011-12. [106697]

Robert Neill [holding answer 14 May 2012]: In May 2011 two posts were transferred to the private sector to manage Firebuy's framework contracts following that body's closure.

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Sick Leave

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many days of sick leave were taken by staff in his Department in each of the last three years. [106448]

Robert Neill: The following numbers of total working days lost due to sickness absence were reported to Cabinet Office for the last three calendar years for the Department for Communities and Local Government:

  Number

2009

11,096

2010

14,505

2011

13,928

Average sickness absence rates in the Department are below the civil service average.

The Department is committed to the well-being of its staff and offers a number of services to assist in minimising staff absences:

A self-test stress indicator tool for line managers, to help them identify the skills they need to tackle workplace stress in their team, has been developed by the Health and Safety Executive, in association with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, and Investors in People.

Intranet information pages to inform staff on ways in which they can actively seek to maximise their physical and mental health.

Access to a 24-hour Employee Assistance helpline which offers advice and support for all staff to deal with sick absence.

Tenants: Antisocial Behaviour

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he has taken to help residents living next to an antisocial tenant of a private landlord. [107596]

Andrew Stunell: Local authorities have extensive powers under the Housing Act 2004 to take action against private landlords who fail in their responsibilities. These powers include the discretion to introduce selective licensing schemes in areas suffering from low housing demand and/or significant incidence of antisocial behaviour without having to first seek departmental approval. I believe that it is right for these local decisions to be made by those who are directly accountable to local communities.

The Act also provides local authorities with powers to take over the management of individual privately rented properties should a landlord fail to deal with a tenant's antisocial behaviour. I would urge and encourage local authorities to make full use of their powers to target and tackle the small minority of rogue landlords.

Trade Unions

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many trade union representatives in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-department public bodies have faced disciplinary action for abusing paid facility time or public resources in each of the last five years. [107338]

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Robert Neill: No trade union representative at the Department for Communities and Local Government or its non-departmental bodies has faced disciplinary action for abusing paid facility time or public resources in the last five years.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on how many occasions trade union representatives from (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies have utilised paid facility time to represent an employee at a meeting or other industrial relations matter in each of the last five years. [107340]

Robert Neill: The Department for Communities and Local Government and its non-departmental bodies do not hold this information centrally. The staff costs involved to obtain this information would be disproportionate to the information required.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps the Government Equalities Office is taking to implement the recommendations of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. [106422]

Andrew Stunell: The UN Committee of the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) published a set of Concluding Observations on the UK in September 2011, which included some 32 recommendations to the United Kingdom authorities. These cover a wide range of subjects, which are the responsibility of a number of different Government Departments and, in devolved policy areas, of the devolved Administrations. It is for each of them to consider how to respond to the Committee's recommendations.

The Department for Communities and Local Government is responsible for co-ordinating the UK's periodic reports to the Committee, in consultation with other Government Departments and the devolved Administrations. The UK's next full report is due in April 2014, and this will address recommendations made by the Committee in its 2011 report. As requested by CERD in paragraph 37 of its 2011 Concluding Observations, we will also provide information to the Committee by September 2012 on our responses to four of their recommendations. These concern the response to the August 2011 riots; police powers to “stop and search”; counter-terrorism measures; and the clearance of the unauthorised Traveller site at Dale Farm.

Transport

Traffic Orders: Ashfield

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate she has made of the level of expenditure on advertising traffic orders in (a) Ashfield constituency, (b) Nottinghamshire and (c) the east midlands in the latest period in which figures are available. [107441]

Norman Baker: The consultation on amending requirements placed on traffic authorities when they propose and make temporary and permanent traffic orders has now closed.

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The consultation paper made reference to a report published by the UK Network Management Board and the results of a survey carried out in 2010 amongst traffic authorities about money spent on local newspaper advertising of traffic orders. Nottinghamshire County Council responded to the survey, and reported an annual spend of £156,183 on advertising costs for traffic orders. There is no specific information available relating to the east midland region or the Ashfield constituency. However, the report considered responses received and estimated that at that time that £22.3 million was being spent annually in England on advertising traffic orders. This figure was adjusted to £20 million for consultation purposes due to changes that have already been made

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by the Highways Agency, which has already significantly reduced its spend in this area.

Roads

Mr Yeo: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much the Highways Agency spent on downgrading lay-bys to emergency use only in (a) Suffolk, (b) the east of England and (c) England in each of the last five years; and how many were so downgraded in each year in each area. [106498]

Norman Baker [holding answer 14 May 2012]: Highways Agency lay-bys downgraded to emergency use only:

  Suffolk only East of England (excluding Suffolk) England (excluding Suffolk and east of England)
  Cost (£) Number Cost (£) Number Cost (£) Number

2007-08

158,543

1

0

0

0

0

2008-09

0

0

0

0

n/a

1

2009-10

22,000

2

33,000

3

182,000

9

2010-11

20,236

2

0

0

n/a

1

2011-12

0

0

0

0

0

0

All costs quoted are approximate, as many lay-by downgrades were undertaken as part of larger maintenance schemes.

Mr Yeo: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much the Highways Agency spent on upgrading substandard lay-bys in (a) Suffolk, (b) the east of England and (c) England in each of the last five years; and how many substandard lay-bys were upgraded in each area in each year. [106499]

Norman Baker [holding answer 14 May 2012]: Highways Agency lay-bys that have been upgraded:

  Suffolk only East of England (excluding Suffolk) England (excluding Suffolk and east of England)
  Cost (£) Number Cost (£) Number Cost (£) Number

2007-08

0

0

0

0

766,423

4

2008-09

0

0

0

0

570,079

4

2009-10

0

0

158,850

7

3,734,741

12

2010-11

91,330

2

227,338

2

434,651

11

2011-12

0

0

0

0

0

0

All costs quoted are approximate, as many lay-by upgrades have been undertaken as part of larger improvement schemes.

Not all lay-bys were classed as sub-standard by the Highway Agency. Some were enhanced as part of larger schemes.

Prime Minister

Child Malnutrition: G8 Summit

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Prime Minister if he will raise the issue of malnutrition among children in Africa at the forthcoming G8 summit. [106834]

The Prime Minister: It is unacceptable that in 2012, over 3 million children die as a result of malnutrition. At least 1 million of these will likely be in Africa.

That is why it is so important that this year's G8 summit will focus on hunger and malnutrition.

We are meeting our commitment to spend 0.7% of our national income on aid. It is because of this that we shall be able to improve nutrition for 20 million children under five by 2015. This year and last, British taxpayers also contributed £127 million in humanitarian aid for those affected by the famine in East Africa.

Home Department

Entry Clearances

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what methodology her Department uses to calculate the charges for single entry and multiple entry visas. [107597]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency sets fees by balancing a number of factors, including the administrative cost of processing an application, the importance of

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attracting certain groups of migrants to the UK and the value of a successful application to the migrant.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what comparison her Department has made between UK charges for single entry and multiple entry with (a) Schengen agreement countries, (b) the US and (c) Australia. [107598]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency regularly monitors the international competitiveness of UK fees, and factors these international comparisons into its annual fees review.

Entry Clearances: Overseas Students

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been expelled from the UK as a result of the expiration or invalidation of their student visas in each of the last 12 months. [107575]

Damian Green: The data requested are not held in a format compatible with National Statistics protocols, or produced as part of the UK Border Agency's standard reports.

However the UK Border Agency publishes immigration statistics on a quarterly and annual basis, a copy of which can be found in the Library of the House. The latest published statistics on non-asylum removals can also be found here;

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q4-2011/

Female Genital Mutilation

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to prevent female genital mutilation being carried out on British citizens. [106449]

Lynne Featherstone: The Government are absolutely committed to tackling and preventing female genital mutilation (FGM).

Last year the Government developed and launched multi-agency guidelines for all frontline professionals which aim to raise awareness about FGM and highlight the signs that practitioners and professionals should look out for which may identify girls at risk. The guidelines set out the steps that professionals such as nurses and GPs should take to protect and safeguard those at risk, or already affected by FGM. The Home Office also distributed more than 80,000 leaflets and posters to schools, health services, charities and community groups around the country and in October 2011 launched the FGM Fund—a total of £50,000 to support frontline practitioners working with women and girls affected by FGM. We continue to work with the Department for Education, Department of Health, the Department for International Development and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as well as with voluntary sector partners, to shape our work.

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Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the Minister for Immigration plans to reply to the letter from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton of 26 March 2012 with regard to Miss Taki Rokla Koffi. [106624]

Damian Green: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 11 May 2012.

Pay

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of her Department's officials located in Wales would be affected by proposals for local-facing pay. [107529]

Damian Green: The Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), announced in his Budget speech on 21 March 2012, Official Report, columns 793-808, that Departments would be expected to move towards introducing local market-facing pay reform over the next few years. The Home Office is currently considering what this means for staff around the country, including Wales, and will discuss this with staff and trade unions as part of the annual pay negotiating process.

At 30 April 2012, the Home Office had 517 paid civil servants based in Wales.

Police: Bureaucracy

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to reduce administrative burdens on the police. [106779]

Nick Herbert: The Government has announced a package of policies that will cut police bureaucracy, saving up to 4.5 million police hours per year, the equivalent of over 2,100 officers back on the beat. This work is being taken forward by the joint Home Office and Association of Chief Police Officers Reducing Bureaucracy Programme Board.

Social Security Benefits: Asylum

Sandra Osborne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what arrangements are in place to support asylum seekers by means of benefits payments. [106798]

Damian Green: The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) does not support asylum seekers with benefits payments. Asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute are supported by the United Kingdom Border Agency under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 until their asylum claims are decided.

If the asylum claim is accepted the person is granted refugee status and leave to remain in the United Kingdom on conditions that give access to mainstream DWP benefits, subject to the normal eligibility rules.

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UK Border Agency

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff of the UK Border Agency were working on intelligence gathering about common routes for smuggling people into the UK in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; how many are expected to be working on this area in 2012-13; and if she will make a statement. [107202]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency expects all front-line staff to be involved in the collection of intelligence. There is a core of staff dedicated to intelligence processing, analysis and operations. In 2010-11 there were 819 staff involved in intelligence operations, with 778 performing those functions in 2011-12.

The activities of those staff were focused on a range of priorities identified within the agency's intelligence requirement, including people smuggling, human trafficking and the key routes and nexus points associated with those forms of criminal behaviour.

The staffing profile for intelligence operations is under review as the agency is restructured to deliver an enhanced approach to delivering intelligence-led operations.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Direct Mail: Fraud

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to protect consumers from mail scams. [106811]

Norman Lamb: The National Fraud Agency (which runs Action Fraud) and the Metropolitan Police lead on a national strategy to confront mass marketing fraud holistically. They are engaging with key partners, including postal operators, to tackle mass-marketed postal scams.

The Government strongly advise anyone who receives material through the post that they suspect may constitute a fraud to draw their concerns to the attention of the appropriate authorities.

Scams can be easily reported to “Action Fraud” either online via the Action Fraud website:

www.actionfraud.org.uk

or by phoning 0300 123 2040. This service also provides help and advice over the phone via the Action Fraud contact centre.

The Government recognise the damage that scams can do and we will do all we can to ensure that consumers know how to spot a scam and know what they should do when they spot one. Information and advice about scams can be found on the Citizens Advice website:

www.adviceguide.org.uk

and Directgov website:

www.direct.gov.uk

Higher Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the answer of 20 March 2012, Official Report, column 685W,

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on higher education, how he ensures value for money for the Exchequer if outcomes from for-profit and not-for-profit institutions are not recorded. [107525]

Mr Willetts: The Government's higher education (HE) reforms, set out in the HE White Paper “Students at the Heart of the System”, published in June 2011, encourage institutions to focus on ensuring value for money. In the future, as the majority of funding will be channelled through students, higher education providers (whether they are for-profit or not-for-profit) will be more reliant on attracting students to maintain their income. They will need to be more responsive to students, ensure they offer good value for money, and clearly demonstrate the use made of the contribution that students make towards their higher education.

Our reforms put students at the heart of the system as money will flow through students in response to the choices that they make, not the choices that Government make for them. It is for students to determine whether or not a course provides value for money on the basis of information that is available.

We believe that new providers and new forms of higher education provision will help stimulate and strengthen market competition, and promote student choice and ensure value for money throughout the HE sector.

ICT

Mr Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to provide assistance for small and medium-sized companies in the IT sector; and what steps he is taking to encourage IT-related contracts and requirements to be assembled into appropriately sized small, medium and large packages of work for delivery by the most suitably sized and skilled organisations. [107242]

Mr Prisk: We want to make the UK the best place in the world to start and grow a business, and for the next decade to be the most entrepreneurial and dynamic in Britain's history. That is why, on 23 January 2012, the Prime Minister launched Business in You, a major year-long campaign, to inspire people to realise their business ambitions and to highlight the range of support available for start-ups and growing businesses.

Government are supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) across the UK in a number of ways:

Ensuring SMEs can access the support and advice they need to start and grow

We have transformed the way that we enable people to access the information, guidance and advice they need to start and grow a business. We have put in place a range of services including:

An improved www.businesslink.gov.uk website including: a new Growth and Improvement Service and ‘My New Business’, a comprehensive start-up service.

A Business Link helpline which will support those who are unable to access the internet.

A mentoring portal: www.mentorsme.co.uk providing an easy route to find experienced business mentors.

Started to introduce the new Business Coaching for Growth service, providing high quality coaching support for up to 10,000 SMEs a year with high growth potential.

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A streamlined Solutions for Business support portfolio was announced in March 2011, targeted at help for business, for example on helping businesses sell overseas and dealing with technology developments.

Ensuring businesses can access the finance the y need

Ensuring the flow of credit to viable SMEs is essential for supporting growth and is a core priority for this Government. We want to ensure that the financial sector can supply affordable credit that businesses need, and we would like to see more diverse sources of finance for SMEs including, where appropriate, access to equity finance. Government have:

Launched the National Loan Guarantee Scheme: up to £20 billion of guarantees for bank funding will be available over two years allowing banks to offer lower cost lending to SMEs.

Increased the funds available to invest through the Business Finance Partnership (BFP) to £1.2 billion. Government have invited the first round of proposals to help businesses access non-bank finance through the BFP, and will allocate £100 million of the BFP to invest through non-traditional lending channels.

Announced the continuation of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) scheme until 2014/15, providing, subject to demand, over £2 billion in total over the next four years.

Continuation of the Government's Enterprise Capital Funds programme, increasing our commitment by £200 million over the next four years, providing for more than £300 million of venture capital investment to address the equity gap for early stage innovative SMEs.

Announced that we will pilot the best way to introduce a programme of enterprise loans to help young people set up and grow their own businesses.

Encouraging Business Angel investment through a new £50 million Business Angel Co-Investment Fund.

Welcomed the report of the industry review of non-bank lending chaired by Tim Breedon and will take forward its recommendations over the course of this year, including: considering how to simplify access to Government support for smaller businesses; encouraging prompt payment by larger firms; and supporting industry work to remove barriers to alternative sources of finance.

The Regional Growth Fund is a £2.4 billion fund operating across England from 2011 to 2015. It supports projects and programmes that lever private sector investment creating economic growth and sustainable employment.

Ensuring that regulation supports business growth

Introduced a “one-in, one-out” rule whereby no new regulations which impose costs on businesses can be brought in without regulation of an equivalent value being removed.

Introduced a three-year moratorium on new domestic regulation affecting micro businesses and genuine start-ups.

The Red Tape Challenge is tackling the stock of regulation via a comprehensive thematic review which aims to identify regulations that could be removed, simplified or done in a different way. By the end of December 2011 we had scrapped or simplified over 600 regulations.

Reforming the way in which regulations are implemented, including a review of regulators to ensure enforcement arrangements are appropriate and proportionate. Government will also launch sector-based reviews of regulation to ensure it is enforced at the lowest possible cost to business.

To reduce barriers to businesses taking on new staff Government have announced significant deregulation of employment law, including increasing the unfair dismissal qualifying period from one to two years.

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Encouraging exporting SMEs

The Government will spend £35 million to double, from 25,000 to 50,000, the number of SMEs that UKTI supports a year by 2015. Many components of the UKTI product are aimed at SMEs:

Passport to Export is a trade development programme offering new and inexperienced exporters help and support to build the capability to start exporting proactively and make their first visit to an export market. Launched in 2001, it has helped around 14,000 SMEs as of January 2012.

Gateway to Global Growth offers experienced SME exporters the opportunity to increase their exporting skills and awareness of what is on offer from UKTI and private sector suppliers. The aim is to help them enter more difficult markets or expand in existing ones.

Market Visit Support provides assistance to new to export and/or new to market SMEs visiting overseas markets, individually or in groups as part of their trade development process.

Budget 2012 set out an ambition to more than double annual UK exports to £1 trillion by 2020 through additional measures including expanding the overseas role of UK Export Finance to enable it to develop finance packages that could help UK exporters secure opportunities identified through UK Trade and Investment's High Value Opportunities programme; helping secure temporary private sector office space overseas for new UK exporters in high growth countries where such services are difficult to obtain; and continuing to increase UK Export Finance's regional presence in the UK to support SMEs seeking trade finance.

On 9 March 2012, the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend, the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), announced that in future, Government IT contracts will be more flexible, starting with two areas (application software and infrastructure IT). The Government are introducing set breakpoints in IT contracts so there is less money locked into large lengthy contracts. The Government will look to disaggregate future contracts and deliver flexible, cheaper solutions. This opens up opportunities for SMEs and reduces the cost to taxpayers.

National Childbirth Trust: Training

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether he plans to alter his Department's funding arrangements for National Childbirth Trust practitioner training courses. [107568]

Mr Willetts: The financial arrangements for higher education are changing from 2012/13 with less funding provided through block grants from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and more provided through student tuition fees, supported by a more generous system of publicly-funded student support to eligible students. These arrangements apply equally to the courses that the National Childbirth Trust offers to students in partnership with the University of Worcester and mean that previous levels of HEFCE funding cannot be maintained.

Postgraduate Education: Bexley

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many people resident in the London borough of Bexley enrolled on a postgraduate course in each of the last three years. [107648]

Mr Willetts: Information on the number of postgraduate enrolments at UK higher education institutions who were from Bexley local authority is shown in the table.

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Figures are provided for the academic years 2008/09 to 2010/11. Information for the 2011/12 academic year will become available from January 2013.

Postgraduate enrolments (1) from Bexley local authority. UK higher education institutions. Academic years 2008/09 to 2010/11
Academic year Enrolments

2008/09

920

2009/10

995

2010/11

1,015

(1) Covers students in all years of study. Note: Figures are based on a HESA standard registration population and have been rounded up or down to the nearest five, so components may not sum to totals. Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) Student Record.

Regional Growth Fund

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much funding intended for allocation from the Regional Growth Fund in 2011-12 will have been allocated to recipients by the end of financial year 2011-12. [107511]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 15 May 2012]: The budget for the Regional Growth Fund in 2011-12 was £475 million. The Fund allocated £465 million to recipients by the end of the financial year 2011-12.

Risk Assessment

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what strategic or transitional risk registers in each area of policy are held by his Department; and if he will make a statement. [107480]

Mr Willetts: In line with best practice, the Department's approach is to assign risks to those best placed to manage them. Our approach is to establish clear accountability and ownership of risk so as to ensure the risk is managed at the appropriate level and mechanisms are in place to escalate significant risks to senior management. Details of the Department's risk and control framework can be found in the annual report and accounts 2010-11. BIS holds a strategic risk register that provides a strategic overview of the major risks across the whole Department, and individual risk registers for key programmes and workstreams.

Sick Leave

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many of days of sick leave were taken by staff in his Department in each of the last three years. [107082]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 15 May 2012]: In June 2009 the Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) was merged with the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) to create the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). Therefore we only have access to data from this date.

The following table shows how many days of sick leave were taken by staff in the Department for Business,

16 May 2012 : Column 138W

Innovation and Skills including UKTI in each of the last three years. The figures are based on a 12-month rolling period.

  Number of sick leave days

(1) July 2009 to June 2010

13,036

(2) July 2010 to June 2011

9,867

(3) January 2011 to December 2011(1)

13,819

(1) 3(rd) year data overlap 2(nd) year due to the way in which data are collected on a 12 month rolling period.

All BIS core (including UKTI) and agencies sickness absence information is published on a quarterly basis and can be found in the following link.

http://www.bis.gov.uk/about/performance-reports

Culture, Media and Sport

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how much his Department spent on external consultants, including management consultants, in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [107492]

John Penrose: The following table shows the Department for Culture, Media and Sports (DCMS) expenditure on external consultants for the years 2010-11 and 2011-12. General use of consultants by DCMS has fallen substantially, although spending on two finite major projects has risen—the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK). These have been set out as individual items.

£
  BDUK Olympics DCMS

2010-11

3.00

72,764

276,807

2011-12(1)

1,039,235

103,293

115,581

1 Subject to finalisation of accounts.

Cricket

Chris Heaton-Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether he has made an assessment of the Israel Cricket Association's cricket 4 peace project. [106627]

Hugh Robertson: The Department has not carried out an assessment of the Israel Cricket Association's cricket 4 peace project. However, the International Cricket Council has provided the Department with information about the project, and we are supportive of initiatives that use sport as a tool to bring communities together.

Direct Selling

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps his Department plans to take to try to restrict the number of unwanted and nuisance marketing calls originating from overseas which are not prevented by telephone preference service opt-out. [106886]

16 May 2012 : Column 139W

Mr Vaizey: The Telephone Preference Service (TPS) offers protection against unsolicited calls either made in the UK or made overseas on behalf of UK companies. Unfortunately, unsolicited international marketing calls that are not made on behalf of UK companies are outside the jurisdiction of the UK. However, consumers are able to take a number of steps to protect themselves and reduce the need to answer such calls. Most telecom service providers offer a range of services that can help including Calling Line Identification Display, Automatic Call Rejection and Choose to Refuse. In addition, a range of other devices is also commercially available that can help to block unwanted calls.

Leveson Inquiry

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether the costs of the legal representation of Government Ministers who have been granted core participant status at the Leveson Inquiry will be met from the public purse; and if he will make a statement. [106569]

Mr Jeremy Hunt [holding answer 14 May 2012]: The cost of the application to the Leveson Inquiry for core participant status for those Government Ministers who are to provide evidence was met from public funds. This included the cost of Treasury Counsel. The Government core participants have also been offered support from Government lawyers and other officials in the preparation of their evidence for the Inquiry insofar as that evidence relates to ministerial business.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport for what reason Ministers which are core participants at the Leveson Inquiry are being represented by Treasury Counsel. [106570]

Mr Jeremy Hunt [holding answer 14 May 2012]: First Treasury Counsel was instructed by the Treasury Solicitors Department to make the application before the Inquiry for core participant status for those Government Ministers who are to give evidence to the Inquiry. As was made clear at that hearing, it is not anticipated that the Government core participants will be routinely represented by counsel during the Inquiry.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if he will make public funding available on a non-means-tested basis to cover the costs of legal representation at the Leveson Inquiry for all core participants who are (a) active in politics and (b) hon. Members. [106571]

Mr Jeremy Hunt [holding answer 14 May 2012]: Under the Inquiries Act 2005, it is for the Inquiry Chairman to determine what awards are made in respect of legal representation in line with the Inquiry Rules 2006.

Mobile Phones

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many households' digital television reception will be affected by 4G mobile services once such services come into operation. [106475]

16 May 2012 : Column 140W

Mr Vaizey: The matter raised is an operational issue for the independent regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom).

Ofcom recently consulted on the coexistence between new services in 800 MHz and the existing digital terrestrial television (DTT) service.

Details of the number of households that could potentially be affected are set out in the consultation document which has been published on Ofcom's website, and can be found using the link:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/coexistence-with-dtt/

To address the issue the Government has now taken policy decisions relating to DTT coexistence. These are as follows:

A single implementation body (referred to as ‘MitCo’) will be set up to manage the delivery of DTT interference mitigation and provide support to DTT consumers. This will be led by the new 800 MHz licensees.

MitCo will be provided with funding of £180 million. This money is expected to come from the new 800 MHz licensees. Government will bear the risk of any overspend and there will be a 50:50 gain share of any underspend between new licensees and Government when MitCo is closed down.

MitCo will provide support to DTT consumers. This will include information and providing DTT receiver filters to households proactively and reactively. Platform changes will also be offered to households where filters do not solve the issue of interference.

A Supervisory Board will be established to monitor MitCo's performance, and to advise Ofcom accordingly.

Additional support will be provided to vulnerable consumers, including installation support; approximately £20 million of the £180 million fund is intended to cover the cost of this support.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) what plans he has to require mobile telephone operators winning the spectrum auction to provide funding to rectify any loss of digital television reception to consumers as a result of the introduction of 4G services; [107199]

(2) what his policy is on requiring mobile telephone operators winning the spectrum auction to pay the full costs of all consumers who need to take steps to rectify the loss of digital television reception as a result of the introduction of 4G services; and if he will make a statement. [107446]

Mr Vaizey: The Government has taken a number of policy decisions relating to coexistence between the new mobile services to be introduced in 800 MHz and the existing digital terrestrial television service. These are as follows:

A single implementation body (referred to as ‘MitCo’) will be set up to manage the delivery of DTT interference mitigation and provide support to DTT consumers. This will be led by the new 800 MHz licensees.

MitCo will be provided with funding of £180 million. This money is expected to come from the new 800 MHz licensees. Government will bear the risk of any overspend and there will be a 50:50 gain share of any underspend between new licensees and Government when MitCo is closed down.

MitCo will provide support to DTT consumers. This will include information and providing DTT receiver filters to households proactively and reactively. Platform changes will also be offered to households where filters do not solve the issue of interference.

16 May 2012 : Column 141W

A Supervisory Board will be established to monitor MitCo's performance, and to advise Ofcom accordingly.

Additional support will be provided to vulnerable consumers, including installation support; approximately £20 million of the £180 million fund is intended to cover the cost of this support.

Ofcom recently consulted on the implementation of these policy decisions. They are currently considering all responses received and expect to make a statement in the summer.

Anna Soubry: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what his estimate is of the number and proportion of households (a) reliant on communal aerial systems and (b) using amplification equipment to boost television signal strength that will be affected by interference to their terrestrial digital television service from the use of spectrum by 4G mobile services. [107200]

Mr Vaizey: The matter raised is an operational issue for the independent regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which is accountable to Parliament rather than Ministers. Accordingly, my officials have spoken to Ofcom, who advised:

On 23 February 2012, Ofcom published a second consultation on co-existence between new services in 800 MHz and existing digital terrestrial television services.

Within this consultation document Ofcom estimated that the number of households using signal amplifiers was 9 million of which up to 945,000 could be affected and the number of households using a communal aerial system was 5.6 million of which up to 953,000 households who use communal aerial systems could be affected. Ofcom estimates that the numbers of affected households could fall to 5,100 and 3,400 households respectively once a mixture of consumer based and selective mobile network based mitigation methods are applied.

A more detailed analysis is contained in the consultation which is available on Ofcom's website, and can be found using the link:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/coexistence-with-dtt/

This consultation closed on 19 April and Ofcom are considering the responses received and expect to make a statement in the summer.

Anna Soubry: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what his estimate is of the number of households with more than one television set that may be affected by interference from the use of spectrum by 4G mobile services. [107201]

Mr Vaizey: The matter raised is an operational one for the independent regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which is accountable to Parliament rather than Ministers. Accordingly, my officials spoke to Ofcom, who advised:

Ofcom's modelling does not differentiate between the number of television sets a household has. Its technical assessment is based on whether or not the ability to receive DTT signals from a properly installed and well maintained roof top aerial is affected by LTE transmissions).

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) with reference to the answer to my right hon. Friend, the Member for Cardiff South and Penarth (Alun Michael) of 22 March 2012, Official Report, column 791W, on mobile phones: rural

16 May 2012 : Column 142W

areas, what discussions he has had with rural campaign and consumer groups on Ofcom's proposal not to ensure all four mobile network operators have access to sub 1GHz spectrum; [107234]

(2) what estimate he has made of the cost to the consumer of lack of choice of mobile network operators and tariff because mobile network operators do not have access to the sub 1GHz spectrum necessary to provide coverage in hard to serve areas. [107235]

Mr Vaizey: I have made no assessment of these issues.

The matter raised is an operational one for the independent regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom). Ofcom's second consultation on the combined auction of 800 MHz and 2600 MHz spectrum closed on 22 March. In that consultation, Ofcom set out its refined analysis of the relative technical capabilities of spectrum at different frequencies and the impact on competition of holding sub 1 GHz spectrum. Ofcom has received over 40 responses to this consultation which it is currently analysing. They intend to decide on these issues and publish a statement in July.

Video Games

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether his Department has any plans to place further restrictions on the content of video games following the testimony of Anders Breivik. [106895]

Mr Vaizey: The Government are currently moving towards strengthening the laws in respect of video game regulation. We have recently announced our intention to designate officers of the Video Standards Council as the authorities responsible for the classification of video games. When that process is complete, it will for the first time be a legal requirement for all video games suitable for those aged 12 or over to be classified. It will be an offence to supply a video game in breach of its classification. In addition, there is one extra safeguard in the UK that is not part of the general Pan European Games Information scheme that we will be using: in the UK, there will be the option of refusing classification where a video game cannot fit within the published PEGI criteria. If a game that |s not exempt has no classification, it will be an offence to supply it to anyone.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many representations his Department has received from the Pan European Game Information Service in relation to newly-published video games. [106898]

Mr Vaizey: The Pan European Games Information system is the mechanism by which video games are rated. The bodies that implement the scheme are independent of Government and have not made any representations about newly-published video games.

Health

Cancer: Drugs

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the answer of 18 April 2012, Official Report, column 415W, on cancer, how he plans to

16 May 2012 : Column 143W

allocate the £150 million underspend from the 2011-12 cancer drug fund budget; and whether he plans to reduce the amount of money allocated to the cancer drug fund following that underspend. [106474]

Paul Burstow: The Government are committed to making £200 million available to the national health service for each of the three years of the Cancer Drugs Fund's operation. There are no plans to reduce this.

This funding is only available to the NHS to allow patients to access the additional cancer drugs that their doctors recommend for them through the Fund in each year.

Cleaning Services

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his private ministerial office has spent on dry cleaning and laundry in the last 12 months. [107034]

Mr Simon Burns: Nil.

Clinical Trials

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the effect of adaptive trials on the productivity of pharmaceutical research and development. [107541]

Mr Simon Burns: A systematic review of drug development or drug licensing decisions that could inform a quantitative answer to the question is not available. The answer is based on the experience of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in submissions received for scientific advice, clinical trial and marketing authorisation applications.

Group-sequential trials are the most common and longest established type of adaptive design. They are in widespread use and have been for many years. Trials with this type of design are proposed and conducted by the pharmaceutical industry and by academic groups, and are endorsed and accepted by regulatory agencies worldwide. A group-sequential trial that meets stopping criteria at an interim analysis (for 'efficacy' representing a success, or for 'futility' representing a failure) will, in many circumstances, mean that resources which would have been spent on the continuation of the trial to be used elsewhere, increasing productivity. For example, all clinical trial sponsors designing Phase III confirmatory clinical trials in oncology would consider a group-sequential design with the possibility of early stopping for efficacy. It should be noted though that running a group-sequential design does add additional costs which would not be present if interim analyses were not conducted so it is not always beneficial to use such a design.

Trials with sample size modifications are also uncontroversial. Before a trial begins there may not be enough information to make a good estimate of the required sample size and results from an interim analysis can be used to better inform the decision. This can improve productivity by avoiding resources being wasted in unnecessarily large trials, or on trials which turn out to be too small to answer the study objectives and have to then be repeated.

16 May 2012 : Column 144W

More recently other types of adaptive design have started to be seen, possibly encouraged by the European Medicines Agency reflection paper on the subject.

Many recent scientific advice applications have involved trials where treatment arms are discontinued after an interim analysis. For example a trial may begin with five different strengths of an experimental treatment being compared to placebo, and, based on the interim analysis, recruitment is stopped into all of the experimental strengths except for one. While many companies have sought advice on this approach the number of such trials that have been completed and submitted as part of a marketing authorisation application is limited so it is not possible to know if they would lead to productivity increases at this time. The approach could avoid the need for separate trials for dose selection and then to provide conclusive evidence of efficacy/safety for that dose, so there is potential for productivity gains. However, the need to make the dose decision quickly and without allowing wide dissemination of the interim results of the still blinded ongoing trial could mean that poorer decisions on the choice of dose are made, leading to failed trials and decreased productivity. In addition, the statistical penalties that have to be applied after dose selection to avoid increasing the number of false positive trials may also cause an increase in the number of patients needed. Therefore it is too early to say whether these newer types of adaptive design will increase productivity.

Community Nurses

Sarah Newton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to ensure universal access to 24/7 community nursing in order to allow more people to die at home. [106457]

Anne Milton: It is for local health care organisations to determine how best to use their funds to meet national and local priorities for end of life care, and to determine the work force required to meet people's needs locally.

Government policies will help enable people to choose where they wish to die. We are implementing the End of Life Care Strategy, which aims to improve the quality of choices in end of life care for all adults. We are seeing a steady improvement and the latest data from the Office for National Statistics (Q2 2011-12) show 41% die in their usual place of residence.

The Department is working with community nurses and professional organisations as part of a development programme to scope a renewed model for community nursing, focusing on district nursing services.

Companies

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department collects on the number of NHS trusts or primary care trusts establishing their own limited companies; and if he will make a statement. [107239]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not held centrally.

Contraceptives

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to improve access for women to contraceptive services. [107040]

16 May 2012 : Column 145W

Anne Milton: Government recognises that easy access to the full range of contraception provision is an important part of health care, which helps people to make informed decisions about how to avoid unintended pregnancy and plan their families.

From 1 April 2013, local authorities (LAs) will commission all contraception services outside of the general practitioner contract. LAs will be mandated to commission comprehensive, open access contraception advice and services. The Government will be publishing its sexual health policy document later this year which will set out the evidence base for how all sexual health provision can be improved.

Disability Aids

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to include augmentative and alternative communication within specialist services for the purpose of funding by the national commissioning boards. [106464]

Mr Simon Burns: The Health and Social Care Act 2012 sets out our intention that the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) will take responsibility for directly commissioning a number of services including specialised services, which are currently commissioned at both a national and regional level.

We are working with national health service colleagues who currently commission specialised services to provide a list of services using the Specialised Services National Definition Set as a solid basis. This list will be subject to consultation with the board and then will be set out in regulations.

No final decisions have yet been taken on which services will be directly commissioned by the NHS CB. Ministers expect to be in a position to confirm the list of services in the summer.

Drugs: Side Effects

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of steps taken within the NHS to ensure that adverse drug reactions in patients are detected at the earliest possible stage in cases where there are grounds for concern about potential side-effects of a drug. [106785]

Mr Simon Burns: Reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are collected by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and Commission for Human Medicines through a spontaneous reporting scheme; the Yellow Card Scheme. The scheme collects ADR reports from across the whole United Kingdom and includes all medicines and vaccines, including those from prescriptions, over-the-counter or general retail sales. Reports are also received for herbal medicines and other unlicensed medicines.

This type of reporting scheme is associated with an unknown level of under-reporting. Reporting rates are likely to be influenced by the seriousness of reactions, their ease of recognition, the extent of use of a particular drug and promotion and publicity about a drug. The MHRA have developed a Yellow Card Strategy which aims to publicise the importance of reporting to the scheme and raise awareness among health care professionals

16 May 2012 : Column 146W

and patients. Activities have included display of an information video in general practitioner (GP) surgeries, a poster campaign, and distribution of patient Yellow Card leaflets to UK pharmacies and GP surgeries.

Currently we are working to make reporting easier for health professionals through introducing electronic Yellow Card reporting into clinical information technology systems in primary care through the GP System of Choice Programme. Other initiatives in the pharmacy and secondary care settings are also ongoing.

The MHRA are also using other methods to encourage reporting through the education of reporters including the development of a Pharmacovigilance (the process by which the safety of all medicines is monitored throughout their marketed life), learning module and through working with other organisations to develop training information for health professionals.

The MHRA are working to further develop links with patient support organisations and health related charities, as well to help promote the scheme and encourage Yellow Card reporting through these organisations.

There are five regional Yellow Card centres in the UK who undertake local initiatives to educate health care professionals on drug safety and the importance of reporting suspected adverse reactions.

A monthly electronic newsletter called Drug Safety Update is produced by the MHRA to inform health professionals about the latest medicines safety issues. Urgent safety issues that are identified by the MHRA are alerted to health care professionals via the Central Alerting System.

Eye Health

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to raise awareness of the kerotoconus eye condition. [106466]

Mr Simon Burns: We have not undertaken any specific steps to raise awareness of keratoconus.

Free national health service sight tests are, however, available to large parts of the population including people aged 60 and over, children, those aged 16-18 in full-time education, people on benefits, those people at particular risk of developing eye disease and people who are registered blind and partially sighted or who have a complex spectacle prescription.

We would encourage individuals to have their sight tested every two years (or earlier if advised by their optometrist). We would also encourage anyone experiencing any visual disturbance, which may be the result of early keratoconus, to seek advice from an ophthalmic practitioner.

Sight tests provide the ideal opportunity to review all aspects of eye health, including investigations for signs of disease such as keratoconus.

Health Services

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) managers, (b) senior managers and (c) administrators there were in the (i) Mid-Essex Primary Care Trust, (ii) North East Essex Primary Care Trust and (iii) West Essex Primary Care Trust in each of the last five years; what the total cost to the public purse

16 May 2012 : Column 147W

was of those posts in each primary care trust; and what the staffing levels were of each primary care trust in the latest period for which figures are available. [106958]

Mr Simon Burns: Information about the number of staff in the primary care trusts (PCTs) requested, including managers, senior managers and administrators, is shown in the following table:

National health service hospital and community health services: senior managers, managers and clerical and administrative staff in Mid Essex PCT, North East Essex PCT and West Essex PCT as at 30 September, 2007 to 2011, and monthly provisional data for 31 January 2012
Headcount
  2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Jan 2012

North East Essex PCT

434

468

536

503

513

141

O f which:

           

Senior managers

25

27

28

27

27

18

Managers

47

41

56

51

48

30

Clerical and administrative

362

400

452

427

441

93

             
             
             

Mid-Essex PCT

306

340

429

434

407

411

O f which:

           

Senior managers

15

23

28

38

39

39

Managers

48

55

74

50

47

47

Clerical and administrative

243

262

327

349

325

325

             

West Essex PCT

307

352

388

438

326

304

O f which:

           

Senior managers

9

9

12

27

23

19

Managers

58

67

84

73

61

59

Clerical and administrative

240

276

292

339

243

227

Notes: 1. The new headcount methodology from 2010 onwards is not fully comparable with previous years' data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. 2. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. 3. The data for January 2012 is the latest available. 4. Changes in hospital and community health services staff figures may be due to PCT provider services moving to neighbouring trusts or other organisations as part of the national Transforming Community Services programme. 5. Monthly data: As from 21 July 2010, the Health and Social Care Information Centre has published provisional monthly NHS workforce data. As expected with provisional statistics, some figures may be revised from month to month as issues are uncovered and resolved. The monthly work force data are not directly comparable with the annual workforce census. They include those staff on the Electronic Staff Record (i.e. they do not include primary care staff or bank staff). They also include locum doctors (not counted in the annual census). There are also new methods, of presenting data—headcount methodology is different and there is now a role count. 6. Data quality: the Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Sources: 1. Data for 2007-11: the Health and Social Care Information Centre annual NHS work force census. 2. Data for January 2012: the Health and Social Care Information Centre provisional monthly work force statistics

Information about the “cost to the public purse” of managers, senior managers and administrators is shown in the following tables:

16 May 2012 : Column 148W

Managers and senior managers staff costs
£000
Organisation 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Mid Essex PCT

5,835

3,624

4,657

6,078

6,197

North East Essex PCT

3,634

4,200

4,300

5,704

5,025

West Essex PCT

4,585

4,976

5,592

7,658

7,949

Administrative and clerical staff costs
£000
Organisation 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Mid Essex PCT

4,380

4,825

6,462

9,131

8,914

North East Essex PCT

8,154

7,000

7,200

12,568

9,646

West Essex PCT

3,248

4,625

5,563

6,316

9,581

Notes: 1. The table provides the resource cost of managers and senior managers. The managers and senior managers category includes all staff under the 1G0*’ or ‘G1*’ codes as set out in the NHS Occupation Code Manual. These codes are part of the ‘administration and estates’ staff matrix used in the NHS. 2. Under the occupation codes, managers and senior managers who need to be a qualified doctor, nurse, therapist, scientist or trained ambulance personnel should be included in their own area of work, i.e. a manager who needs to be a trained doctor is included under the ‘medical and dental’ staff matrix. Such managers, therefore, are excluded from the figures provided. It is not possible to disaggregate these managers from the other matrices in the data held centrally. 3. Staff at executive level who do not need to be clinically qualified are included. 4. It is not possible to separately identify the cost of staff employed as ‘administrators’. The table includes the resource cost of administrative and clerical staff, which is a subcategory of the ‘administration and estates’ staff matrix. The figures for administrative and clerical staff include non NHS staff, i.e. staff employed via an employment agency. Source: 2006-07 to 2010-11 PCT Financial Returns (FRs)

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was spent on redundancies by (a) Mid-Essex Primary Care Trust, (b) North East Essex Primary Care Trust and (c) West Essex Primary Care Trust in each of the last five years. [106959]

Mr Simon Burns: Information about the total cost of 'exit packages' for Mid Essex Primary Care Trust (PCT), North East Essex PCT and West Essex PCT is shown in the following table:

Total cost of 'exit packages' for the organisations shown
£000
Organisation 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Mid Essex PCT

n/a

n/a

n/a

0

197

North East Essex PCT

n/a

n/a

n/a

49

330

West Essex PCT

n/a

n/a

n/a

3

309

Notes: 1. Information on ‘exit packages’ was first collected centrally in 2009-10, therefore figures on an equivalent basis for earlier years are not available (n/a). 2. The data is taken from the audited summarisation schedules of PCTs, from which the NHS (England) Summarised Accounts are prepared. The figures reported in the accounts represent the total resource cost of exit packages for staff leaving their organisation during the year. The expense associated with these departures may have been recognised in part or in full in a previous period. 3. Exit packages include compulsory redundancies and other departures. Other departures include early retirements (except those due to ill health). Voluntary redundancies are not separately identifiable from the other departures; therefore, an overall figure for redundancies is not available. Source: PCT audited summarisation schedules

16 May 2012 : Column 149W

Hospitals

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people waiting for treatment had been on a waiting list for (a) six months, (b) 12 months and (c) 18 months or more at (i) Northwick Park Hospital, (ii) Hillingdon Hospital, (iii) St Mary's Hospital, Paddington and (iv) Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [106971]

Mr Simon Burns: The information is not available in the format requested. Information on referral to treatment times for February 2012, provided by the trusts responsible for Northwick Park hospital, Hillingdon hospital and the Chelsea and Westminster hospital is shown in the following table. No recent information is available for Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, which is responsible for St Mary's hospital, Paddington. No information on patients waiting longer than 18 months is available.

Name of trust Total number of patients awaiting treatment at month end Total waiting over 26 weeks Total waiting over 52 weeks

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

11,196

52

0

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

11,009

445

0

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

19,298

502

9

Source: Unify2 data collection—RTT

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department collects on the number of cancelled (a) in-patient and (b) out-patient appointments; and if he will make a statement. [107238]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department does not collect information on the number of cancelled in-patient and out-patient appointments. The Department does collect information on the number of operations cancelled by the hospital on or after the day of admission (including the day of surgery) for non-clinical reasons and this information is published on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Statistics/Performancedataandstatistics/Cancelledoperations/index.htm

The NHS Information Centre does not collect information on cancelled in-patient appointments. It does collect information on the number of out-patient appointments cancelled by patients and hospitals in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and this information is published as part of the reports on HES.

NHS

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) approved social workers and (b) other mental health staff were employed by the NHS in each

16 May 2012 : Column 150W

region of England in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; how many are expected to be employed in 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [106969]

Mr Simon Burns: The number of social workers is not collected centrally as social workers are employed by local authorities in England and not by the national health service.

The number of mental health staff employed by the NHS in England by strategic health authority for 2010-11 and 2011-12 is shown in the following table for medical and non-medical staff. Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff in social services employed by the NHS in England are also shown by strategic health authority for 2010-11 and 2011-12 in the non-medical table.

For the NHS, work force planning is a matter for local organisations. They are best placed to assess the health needs of their local health community and will commission the required number of training places to develop the work force to meet those needs.

Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS): Medical staff in the psychiatry group of specialties by strategic health authority—as at 30 September each year
Headcount
  2010 2011

England

9,731

9,835

     

North East Strategic Health Authority area

596

611

North West Strategic Health Authority area

985

915

Yorkshire and the Humber Strategic Health Authority area

851

846

East Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

722

708

West Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

899

1,000

East of England Strategic Health Authority area

908

900

London Strategic Health Authority area

2,377

2,329

South East Coast Strategic Health Authority area

700

704

South Central Strategic Health Authority area

673

701

South West Strategic Health Authority area

857

833

Special health authorities and other statutory bodies

178

298

Notes: 1. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. 2 The new headcount methodology from 2010 onwards is not fully comparable with previous years data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the Census publication here: www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/010_Workforce/nhsstaff0010/Census_Bulletin_March_2011_Final.pdf 3. Data Quality: The Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality. Where changes impact on figures already published, this is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre Medical and Dental Workforce Census

16 May 2012 : Column 151W

16 May 2012 : Column 152W

NHS hospital and community health services: Non-medical staff in England in each specified area of work by strategic health authority area as at 30 September each specified year
Headcount
  England as at 30 September 2010
  Community psychiatric nurses Other psychiatric nurses Community learning disabilities nurses Other learning disabilities nurses Qualified clinical psychology staff Qualified psychotherapy staff Qualified ST&T social services staff

England

17,379

26,784

2,821

2,877

8,289

1,971

1,892

               

North East Strategic Health Authority area

1,182

1,811

271

474

398

37

168

North West Strategic Health Authority area

2,534

4,150

407

426

1,108

124

184

Yorkshire and the Humber Strategic Health Authority area

1,756

2,677

353

369

661

188

177

East Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

1,597

2,498

240

269

497

77

149

West Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

1,962

2,654

485

388

833

97

258

East of England Strategic Health Authority area

1,683

2,427

322

260

706

162

455

London Strategic Health Authority area

2,177

5,850

182

154

2,360

771

198

South East Coast Strategic Health Authority area

1,123

1,423

169

159

504

185

15

South Central Strategic Health Authority area

1,315

1,448

155

227

568

174

103

South West Strategic Health Authority area

2,052

1,842

237

151

692

170

185

Special health authorities and others

8

Headcount
  England as at 30 September 2011
  Community psychiatric nurses Other psychiatric nurses Community learning disabilities nurses Other learning disabilities nurses Qualified clinical psychology staff Qualified psychotherapy staff Qualified ST&T social services staff

England

16,927

25,942

2,604

2,585

8,307

2,398

1,850

               

North East Strategic Health Authority area

1,245

1,710

275

436

419

95

193

North West Strategic Health Authority area

2,428

3,988

361

387

1,098

228

197

Yorkshire and the Humber Strategic Health Authority area

1,668

2,641

316

362

671

233

190

East Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

1,575

2,510

245

203

475

107

132

West Midlands Strategic Health Authority area

1,804

2,478

369

390

853

134

140

16 May 2012 : Column 153W

16 May 2012 : Column 154W

East of England Strategic Health Authority area

1,611

2,324

307

229

792

175

442

London Strategic Health Authority area

2,097

5,648

157

150

2,230

793

238

South East Coast Strategic Health Authority area

1,112

1,373

161

116

529

234

13

South Central Strategic Health Authority area

1,232

1,454

141

204

556

169

122

South West Strategic Health Authority area

2,155

1,812

271

109

717

243

183

Special health authorities and others

2

8

1

2

Notes: 1. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. 2. The new headcount methodology from 2010 onwards is not fully comparable with previous years data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the Census publication here: www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/010_Workforce/nhsstaff0010/Census_Bulletin_March_2011_Final.pdf 3. ST&T—Scientific, therapeutic and technical staff. ST&T staff in the social services area of work are former local authority social care staff who may be employed by PCTs and Care trusts. These are staff who need to be (or work directly with) qualified social services staff to do their jobs within the organisation. For example social or youth workers, day-care advisers, child protection officers, family placement officers, rehabilitation staff, or handicapped service workers. (Note that this list is not exhaustive).These staff are not to be confused with social services staff employed by local authorities working in areas such as child protection, homelessness and domestic abuse. Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre Non-Medical Workforce Census.