14 May 2012 : Column 1W

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 14 May 2012

Communities and Local Government

Audit Commission

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what savings he expects to arise under each budget heading from the abolition of the Audit Commission. [106636]

Robert Neill: The details will be included in the Impact Assessment accompanying the draft legislation that we intend to publish in the summer.

As I outlined in my written statement of 25 April 2012, Official Report, column 37WS, abolition will save around £650 million over the next five years, net of transitional costs.

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the cost was of the Audit Commission in each of the last 20 financial years. [106770]

Robert Neill: This is an operational matter for the Audit Commission and I have asked the chief executive of the Audit Commission to write to the right hon. Member directly.

Letter from Eugene Sullivan, dated 14 May 2012:

Your Parliamentary Question has been passed to me to reply.

The costs of the Commission include the costs of auditing local public bodies including those audited by private firms under contract to the Commission, the Commission's central costs and from 1998/99 to 2010/11 the costs of carrying out inspections and assessments of local public services and registered social landlords.

The cost of the Audit Commission in each of the last 20 financial years (taken from the Commission's annual accounts which are laid before Parliament each year) was:

Financial year £000

1992/93

74,221

1993/94

82,740

1994/95

88,960

1995/96

92,592

1996/97

93,381

7 months to October 1997

60,676

1997/98

105,703

1998/99

111,620

1999/2000

144,145

2000/01

178,755

2001/02

214,032

17 months to March 2004

325,789

2004/05

234,801

2005/06

196,537

2006/07

219,605

2007/08

202,900

2008/09

204,777

2009/10(1)

222,520

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2010/11(2)

206,116

2011/12(3)

162,457

(1) Includes redundancy costs of £5.3 million. (2) Includes redundancy costs of £25.8 million. (3) Unaudited draft annual accounts, including estimated redundancy costs of £20.0 million.

The Commission changed its financial year end in 1997 from March to October. So there are a set of accounts for the period 1 April to 31 October 1997 and a set from 1 November to 31 October 1998. Our financial year end was changed again in 2004, so the period 2002-2004 is for 17 months, from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2004.

Regional Planning and Development: South East

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when he expects the South East Plan to be revoked. [106756]

Robert Neill: The Localism Act provides for the abolition of regional strategies outside London in a two-stage process. The first stage, to remove the regional planning framework and prevent further strategies from being created, took effect when the Localism Act received Royal Assent on 15 November.

The second stage is to abolish the existing regional strategies by secondary legislation. It remains our intention to lay Orders in Parliament to that effect, subject to the outcome of the environmental assessments process, which is ongoing.

Northern Ireland

Dealing with the Past

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what recent progress he has made on party talks on dealing with the past in Northern Ireland; and if he will make a statement. [106521]

Mr Paterson: I continue to meet political party representatives and interest groups to seek their views on how consensus on this difficult issue might be achieved. While the Government has a role to play, any successful outcome will be possible only if agreement is found from within Northern Ireland. It remains clear to me that no such consensus exists at present.

Culture, Media and Sport

Departmental Responsibilities

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether he has had discussions with (a) the Minister for the Cabinet Office, (b) the Prime Minister and (c) the Deputy Prime Minister about the continued existence of his Department. [106556]

John Penrose: The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), has had no such discussions. He regularly updates the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister on progress against the Department's long-term work programme.

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Olympic Games 2012

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if he will meet ATOC and LOCOG to discuss discounted travel for Games Maker and London Ambassador volunteers to permit them to travel to London at the same cost as London 2012 ticket holders. [106500]

Hugh Robertson: All volunteers are entitled to free travel on public transport in London (zones 1-6) in order to get to their shifts during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. This undertaking was set out in the London Olympics bid and contained the Host City Contract signed with the IOC (International Olympic Committee).

All potential volunteers were advised throughout the recruitment process that no accommodation or other transport costs to or from London would be provided. These costs must be covered at the expense of the volunteers.

Sick Leave

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many days of sick leave were taken by staff in his Department in each of the last three years. [106443]

John Penrose: The information requested by my hon. Friend can be found in the following table:

  Total number of sick days

2009

1,839

2010

2,459

2011

2,111

Energy and Climate Change

Fracking

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department has made of the potential effects of fracking on the UK energy market over the next 10 years. [106850]

Charles Hendry: A British Geological Survey study in 2010 estimated that if UK shales were similar to those in the USA they could yield some 150 billion cubic metres of gas, equivalent to roughly two years' of UK demand. The BGS is currently undertaking a more detailed analysis, taking account of the latest information, of the extent of prospectively gas-bearing shales in the UK and the potential resources—that is, the amount of gas which might be contained in these rocks.

However, as little drilling or testing has taken place, it is not at this stage possible to make meaningful estimates of how much of the resource may be technically and economically recoverable. It is therefore too early to make any useful estimates of the potential contribution shale gas might make to the UK energy market over the next 10 years.

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As far as the global effects of shale gas production are concerned, I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Shipley (Philip Davies) on 25 November 2011, Official Report, column 617W.

Fuels: Carers

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what contingency plans he has made to ensure that non-local authority employed care workers retain access to adequate fuel supplies in case of any restriction of supplies caused by industrial action. [106768]

Charles Hendry: The Government has in place robust resilience and contingency plans to respond to significant disruptions to fuel supplies in the UK.

In the case of the recent dispute, the Government made available 1,400 military drivers to maintain the majority of fuel deliveries to forecourts.

Prime Minister

Media Ownership

Mr Sanders: To ask the Prime Minister what discussions he has had with (a) Ministerial colleagues and (b) officials in his Office on whether he will instruct Treasury Counsel to represent him as a core participant at the Leveson Inquiry in respect of matters relating to his conduct as (i) Leader of the Conservative Party, (ii) former Leader of the Opposition and (iii) matters relating to his private social engagements; and if he will make a statement. [106572]

The Prime Minister: As set out by Lord Justice Leveson on 4 May 2012, a number of Cabinet Members have been granted core participant status and will collectively be known as Government Core Participants.

Frank Dobson: To ask the Prime Minister with reference to his oral answer of 30 April 2012, Official Report, column 1248, on the Ministerial Code (Culture Secretary), whether the (a) Cabinet Secretary and (b) source of legal advice in the Cabinet Office were aware that the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport had previously indicated his support for the News International bid to take over BSkyB. [106701]

The Prime Minister: As the then Cabinet Secretary made clear in his response of 22 December to the right hon. Member for Southampton, and Itchen (Mr Denham), in providing advice that there was no impediment to the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), taking on responsibility for media competition issues, he was aware of his former statements.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Prime Minister whether it is his intention that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport should continue to exist until 2015; and what

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discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport about the continued existence of his Department. [106564]

The Prime Minister: The Government has no plans to abolish the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport: Finance

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Prime Minister what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the spending review allocation of funding for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport for 2012-15. [106555]

The Prime Minister: I have discussions with ministerial colleagues and others on a range of subjects.

House of Commons Commission

Carbon Emissions

Luciana Berger: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate he has made of the level of carbon emissions from the Commons estate in the last 12 months. [106806]

John Thurso: In the 12 months to the end of March 2012, 18,755 tonnes of carbon dioxide was emitted due to energy use on the parliamentary estate. Of this figure, 4,884 tonnes of carbon dioxide were emitted from the use of natural gas on the estate, with the remainder emitted as a result of electricity generation.

The Houses have jointly set a target to reduce absolute carbon emissions, and the level of emissions in 2011-12 was 16.4% below those of 2008-09. 85% of the electricity supplied to the estate is procured on renewable green tariffs; however, in line with standard practice, this is not taken into account when calculating carbon dioxide emissions for energy generation.

This means that the House is on target to achieve its longer-term aim of reducing carbon emissions from energy consumption by 34% between 2008-09 to 2020-21.

I have asked the Director General, Facilities to contact the hon. Lady directly to brief her in more detail.

Energy: Costs

Luciana Berger: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, how much was spent on (a) gas and (b) electricity to heat and light the Commons estate in each of the last two financial years. [106749]

John Thurso: The amount spent to heat and light the Commons estate in the past two financial years was:

£000
  2010-11 2011-12

Gas

561.5

517.5

Electricity

2,342.4

2,433.2

The reason for the differences between the two years is mainly due to changes in tariffs.

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Transport

Aviation

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) if she will introduce legislative proposals based on the US Federal Aviation Administration Modernization and Reform Act 2012, Section 403, introducing a uniform national policy for taking musical instruments on airplanes; [106561]

(2) what assessment her Department has made of the effect on professional musicians of allowing airlines to set their own policies about taking musical instruments on airplanes. [106562]

Mrs Villiers: The Department for Transport has made no assessment and has no plans to introduce legislation on this issue.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations she has received about difficulties faced by musicians wishing to carry their musical instruments on airplanes. [106563]

Mrs Villiers: The Department has received a small number of representations in the last year on this issue. Our advice remains to all passengers, including musicians, to check airlines’ terms and conditions of carriage relating to baggage prior to booking and choose an airline that best suits their particular needs.

Great Western Railway Line

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment she has made of the likely effect of the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics on the extent of crowding on commuter services on the Great Western line in and out of London Paddington. [106671]

Mrs Villiers: At the time of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games, normal rail services will be supplemented with additional trains to meet extra demand. These additional services have been specified by the Olympic Delivery Authority as part of its responsibility for planning transport to address expected demand for games-related travel.

Separate from these Olympic Games-specific arrangements, the Government has agreed funding under its HLOS programme for an additional 46 carriages on First Great Western services operating into London Paddington. These extra carriages will enable lengthening of existing services, significantly increasing their capacity. The extra carriages are planned to come into service in time for the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Railways: Fares

Debbie Abrahams: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if she will meet the (a) Association of Train Operating Companies and (b) London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games to discuss discounted travel for Games Maker and London Ambassador volunteers to travel to London at the same cost as London 2012 Olympics ticket holders. [106510]

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Mrs Villiers: All volunteers are entitled to free travel on public transport in London (zones 1-6) in order to get to their shifts during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. This undertaking was set out in the London Olympics bid and contained the Host City Contract signed with the IOC (International Olympic Committee).

All potential volunteers were advised throughout the recruitment process that no accommodation or other transport costs to or from London would be provided. These costs must be covered at the expense of the volunteers.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Animal Feed

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will report on the outcome of the review conducted by her Department on the benefits and risks of using food waste in animal feed. [106560]

Mr Paice: The outcome of DEFRA's review on the benefits and risks of using food waste in animal feed (Project FO0218) will be reported at the end of 2012.

Birds of Prey: Conservation

Fiona O'Donnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether she has made an assessment of the future development of Natural England's hen harrier recovery project; and what funding from the public purse has been allocated to this project in 2012-13. [106415]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA is working closely with Natural England to develop conservation work for hen harriers, building on Natural England's hen harrier recovery project. In 2012-13 Natural England has allocated one full-time member of staff and £15,000 to the Upland Hen Harrier Recovery Project, which carries out research on and monitoring of hen harriers in England. This project uses satellite tagging and co-ordinates a network of volunteer raptor workers. In addition, Natural England contributes to two partnership projects: the Environment Council-facilitated Hen Harrier Dialogue Working Group; and £17,138 and staff time to the Langholm Moor Demonstration Project, which aims to find effective means of resolving conflicts between raptors and grouse moor management.

Fiona O'Donnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the findings were of Natural England's project to fit hen harriers with radio or satellite transmitters between 2002 and 2012; and if she will place in the Library any reports on this project submitted to her Department. [106416]

Richard Benyon: Natural England has undertaken intensive studies of the movements of hen harriers since 2002, as part of its hen harrier recovery project. The preliminary results have already been published in a report available on Natural England's website and I have arranged for a copy of the report to be placed in the Library of the House. This was based on the results

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of tracking 106 English-born hen harriers fitted with radio or satellite transmitters in the period 2002-08. This work showed that hen harriers travel over large distances and some individuals range widely over both upland and lowland areas before returning to traditional upland heather moorland sites to breed. Since 2007 a further 13 birds have been fitted with radio or satellite transmitters as part of a PhD study of the hen harrier in England, part-funded by Natural England. The data collected from tracking these birds are currently being analysed. The work will be published as part of a PhD thesis and, if appropriate, submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

Fiona O'Donnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department has taken to reduce persecution of hen harriers under the Wildlife Crime Priority for raptor persecution. [106418]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA co-chairs the UK wildlife crime tasking and co-ordinating group, where it has supported the inclusion of raptor persecution as a wildlife crime priority for the last four years. The hen harrier is one of six priority species for wildlife crime action.

In 2011 DEFRA stepped up its involvement by participating in the police-led raptor persecution wildlife crime priority delivery group. The group's objective is to raise community trust and awareness to encourage intelligence and incident reporting, which should in turn lead to prevention and enforcement activity for raptor persecution.

Dogs

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to the written ministerial statement of 23 April 2012, Official Report, columns 30-32WS, on tackling irresponsible dog ownership, how much of the £50,000 funding for the RSPCA, Battersea Cats and Dogs Home and the Dogs Trust (a) had and (b) had not previously been committed or given to each organisation. [106744]

Mr Paice: The RSPCA, Battersea Dogs and Cats Home and the Dogs Trust have received all of the £50,000 funding. The RSPCA were paid at the end of the 2010-11 financial year in respect of ongoing projects due to report by 31 December this year. Payment was made to Battersea Dogs and Cats Home and the Dogs Trust at the end of March 2012. They are due to report by 31 March 2013.

National Parks

Roger Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many applications Natural England is considering for the designation of a national park; and for which areas such applications have been made. [106702]

Richard Benyon: Natural England is not currently considering any new national park designations. However, following extensive public consultation, Natural England has recently proposed extensions to the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, to the Secretary of

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State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Meriden (Mrs Spelman). Full details are available on the Natural England website.

Supermarkets: Competition

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions she has had with (a) farming unions and (b) the Welsh Government regarding plans for a groceries code adjudicator. [106839]

Mr Paice: The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Meriden (Mrs Spelman), has not met with farming unions or the Welsh Government to specifically discuss plans for the Groceries Code Adjudicator recently. The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is leading Government implementation of the Groceries Code Adjudicator Bill.

UN Conference on Sustainable Development

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the (a) dates and (b) attendees were of each of her meetings with the (i) Prime Minister, (ii) Deputy Prime Minister, (iii) Foreign Secretary, (iv) Secretary of State for International Development and (v) Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change to discuss the Rio+20 conference. [106745]

Richard Benyon: The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Meriden (Mrs Spelman), discusses Rio+20 (the UN Conference of Sustainable Development) with her Cabinet colleagues in the normal course of Government business. In addition to other meetings, most recently on 9 May, the Secretary of State attended a meeting focussing on Rio+20, along with the Deputy Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for International Development, my right hon. Friend the Member for Sutton Coldfield (Mr Mitchell), with 30 representatives from the UK business and civil society community. The list of attendees will be published in due course, as part of the Government's established procedure of publishing meetings that have taken place between Ministers and external organisations.

Home Department

Entry Clearances

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were granted an investment visa in each of the last five years. [106757]

Damian Green: The available statistics relate to the number of visas granted in the work route Tier 1 Investors (excluding EEA nationals). The statistics are given in the table and are published in table be.04, in the Home Office statistical release ‘Immigration Statistics'.

These data may include individuals who have not yet entered the country and some who have subsequently left the country. Individuals could be counted more than once within the data.

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A copy of the latest release, ‘Immigration Statistics October—December 2011', is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science, research and statistics web pages at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/migration/migration-statistics1/

Entry clearance visas issued—(Tier 1) Investors
  Main applicants Dependants

2007

n/a

n/a

2008

43

95

2009

153

282

2010

211

372

2011

331

529

n/a = Not applicable. Notes: 1. Provisional figures. 2. Figures are numbers of visas granted. Source: Table be.04, ‘Immigration Statistics October—December 2011’, Migration Statistics, Home Office, February 2012

Human Trafficking

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when officials in her Department last discussed with their Dutch counterparts the effects of the Independent National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings on the Dutch government's human trafficking policies. [106565]

Damian Green: Discussions take place regularly at official level between the United Kingdom and other EU member states to exchange national experiences, develop best practice and co-ordinate efforts across Europe. Officials will be meeting the Dutch Rapporteur shortly.

Work and Pensions

Apprentices: Disability

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidelines Jobcentre Plus have been given for supporting young disabled people to access apprenticeships. [106765]

Chris Grayling: When claimants express an interest in an apprenticeship vacancy Jobcentre Plus signposts the individual to the National Apprenticeship website. The guidance contained in this site directs the claimant to an online web inquiry form which facilitates the application process.

If the claimant is disabled and requires additional help, Jobcentre Plus will utilise the services available through Access to Work to ensure that appropriate assistance and adjustments, over and above what would be reasonable for an employer to pay, are provided. This support is available to all those who receive a salary, including those on apprenticeships.

Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he expects to publish the report of the Comptroller and Auditor General on the client funds accounts of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission for (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [106804]

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Maria Miller: The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Noel Shanahan:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he expects to publish the report of the Comptroller and Auditor General on the client funds accounts of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission for (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [106804]

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission's Client Funds Account 2010/11 was published on 14 May 2012.

The 2011/12 Client Funds Account is yet to be audited and will be published later in the year.

Cleaning Services

Mr Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the hourly rate of payment is for cleaners at his Department's headquarters building; and whether that rate is higher or lower than the hourly rates paid to cleaners in other Government Departments. [106558]

Chris Grayling: In 1998 the Department entered into a 20-year PFI contract with Telereal Trillium for the provision of fully serviced accommodation which includes cleaning services. The Department does not therefore directly employ any cleaners. Telereal Trillium delivers their cleaning obligations through their service partners, Mitie Group, who actually employ the cleaning operatives. Cleaners working in the Department's headquarters buildings in London are paid at or above the national minimum wage.

Details of commercial arrangements between other Government Departments and their cleaning contractors are not known by this Department so I am unable to provide information about the pay rates paid elsewhere.

Employment and Support Allowance: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in Warrington North constituency are in the support group for employment and support allowance. [106705]

Chris Grayling: The information requested is given as follows.

Employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants—Warrington North constituency, August 2011
  Number

All ESA recipients

1,240

Of which:

 

Are in the Support Group

110

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Employment and support allowance (ESA) replaced incapacity benefit and income support paid on the grounds of incapacity for new claims from 27 October 2008. 3. Phase of ESA claim is derived from payment details held on the source system. The three phases are Assessment phase, Work Related Activity phase and Support Group phase. 4. This information is published on our tabulation tool at: http://83.244.183.180/100pc/tabtool.html Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study 100% data

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Employment Schemes: Disability

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent discussions he has had with the Welsh Government on the transfer of the disability work budget to the Welsh Government. [106841]

Maria Miller: On the morning of 7 March 2012 before the written ministerial statement on Employment Support was made, Official Report, columns 63-66WS, I spoke with my colleague Leighton Andrews, Minister for Children, Education and Lifelong Learning in the Welsh Government.

I also met with Leighton Andrews on 13 March to discuss the Government's response to the Sayce review and its impacts on the Remploy facilities in Wales.

At this meeting we discussed that the UK Government has taken a considered policy decision to reduce funding to Remploy, and move to supporting individuals rather than institutions. We firmly believe that this will allow us to support thousands more disabled people into work. It was therefore explained to the Welsh Government that it would not be beneficial to disabled people for the UK Government to transfer a subsidy to the Welsh Government for this purpose as this would not allow us to implement our UK wide policy.

Following these meetings I have been in contact with Leighton Andrews and Carwyn Jones, First Minister of Wales, on this subject and my officials and other ministerial colleagues continue to engage with Welsh officials regarding employment support in Wales.

Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefits

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in Warrington North constituency were in receipt of housing benefit and council tax benefit and qualified to set 100 per cent of childcare costs against earnings for calculating their entitlement to these benefits in the latest period for which figures are available. [106706]

Steve Webb: Information on housing benefit and council tax recipients who qualified to set 100% of child care costs against earnings for calculating their entitlement to these benefits is not available.

The Department does collect some information on the amount of child care disregard allowed on the Housing Benefit/Council Tax Benefit data Source (SHBE) but to assess the completeness of recording and quality assure the figures would incur disproportionate cost.

Departmental Staff

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many jobs formerly in his Department and its agencies and non-departmental bodies were transferred to the private sector in 2011-12. [106700]

Chris Grayling: A total of 60 jobs were transferred from DWP, its agencies and non-departmental public bodies to the private sector in 2010-12. The transfers were from Remploy.

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The Remploy staff were engaged on Flexible New Deal contracts and were transferred to the private sector providers who had secured the prime contracts for the Work programme which replaced the Flexible New Deal contracts the Remploy staff were engaged on.

Pensions

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the effect of Solvency II directives on UK defined benefit pension schemes. [106632]

Steve Webb: The European Commission is carrying out a review of Directive 2003/41/EC on Institutions for Occupational Retirement Provision, but it has not yet made any legislative proposals.

The review includes a study of how methodology used in the Solvency II directive might be adapted for occupational pension schemes. We have made clear that, due to the differentiating characteristics of occupational pensions we do not believe this is an appropriate position from which to undertake this review, and that, given the potential for a huge increase in the costs of providing defined benefit schemes—perhaps by over £100 billion—we will oppose any proposals to align pension fund capital rules with those in the Solvency II directive.

Personal Independence Payment

Stephen Gilbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when his Department expects to publish the responses to its consultation on the personal independence payment assessment criteria and thresholds; and when he expects to publish the Government response to the consultation. [106694]

Maria Miller: The consultation on the second draft of the assessment criteria for personal independence payment closed on 30 April 2012. We have received approximately 1,000 responses to the consultation from both individuals and organisations.

We will now carefully consider all of the responses we have received, along with feedback from stakeholder meetings held during the consultation period, before reaching conclusions on the changes that need to be made to the criteria. We plan to publish our response to the consultation in autumn 2012.

Church Commissioners

Proceeds of Crime

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the hon. Member for Banbury, representing the Church Commissioners, whether the

14 May 2012 : Column 14W

Church Commissioners have had discussions with the Secretary of State for the Home Department on allowing churches to make claims from proceeds of crime funds. [106524]

Tony Baldry: The Cathedral and Church Buildings Division of the Church of England did make proposals regarding the use of the proceeds of crime fund in its report to the Home Office, March 2011. The report was about the impact metal theft was having on the Church of England. The Church Commissioners have not had discussions with the Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), regarding access to the proceeds of crime funds.

Justice

Electronic Tagging

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much was paid to each service provider of electronic monitoring services in each of the last three years. [106513]

Mr Blunt: The following table shows the amounts paid by the Ministry of Justice to G4S plc and Serco Group plc to provide electronic monitoring services in each of the last three financial years. These figures do not include payments made by the United Kingdom Border Agency directly to the service providers for providing services in immigration cases.

£ million (inc VAT)
  2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

SERCO plc

40.7

46.1

54.6

G4S plc

53.2

55.5

62.3

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people were on tag in each criminal justice area in each of the last 10 years; and what the average number of days on tag was in each such year; [106511]

(2) if he will place in the Library any annual statistical and performance data returns supplied to his Department or the National Offender Management Service by suppliers of electronic monitoring services in England and Wales; [106512]

(3) what the average number of offenders on electronic monitoring was for each type of programme in each year since the contracts for those programmes were let; and what the number of tagging days was for each programme in each such year. [106514]

Mr Blunt: The information requested is as follows:

(1) Information on new electronically monitored supervision starts in England and Wales for each financial year between 2002-03 and 2011-12, by Criminal Justice System Area, is contained in the following table:

Table 1: New electronic monitoring starts by Criminal Justice System area, 2002-03 to 2011-12 (1,2)
  New electronic monitoring starts in financial year
Region/area 2002-03 (2) 2003-04 (2) 2004-05 (2) 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 (3) 2011-12 (3)

Cleveland(4)

(6)

(6)

(6)

914

1,194

1,521

1,871

1,737

1,945

(6)

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14 May 2012 : Column 16W

Durham(4)

(6)

(6)

(6)

491

717

943

1,217

1,335

1,367

(6)

Durham Tees Valley(4)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,618

Northumbria

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,706

2,606

3,124

3,649

3,540

3,606

2,797

Cheshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,052

1,552

2,145

1,941

1,824

1,904

1,590

Cumbria

(6)

(6)

(6)

650

1,036

1,232

1,418

1,478

1,391

1,348

Greater Manchester

(6)

(6)

(6)

5,552

6,579

7,958

7,993

7,456

8,208

7,448

Lancashire

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,212

2,770

4,278

5,131

5,230

5,687

4,688

Merseyside

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,681

3,582

4,634

4,914

4,777

4,903

4,320

Derbyshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,324

1,356

1,710

1,976

1,958

1,948

1,850

Leicestershire

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,213

1,210

1,364

1,312

1,141

1,322

1,214

Lincolnshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

481

377

449

715

693

810

836

Northamptonshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

358

316

688

720

847

923

827

Nottinghamshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,247

1,542

1,933

1,862

1,997

2,287

2,218

Humberside

(6)

(6)

(6)

691

838

1,242

1,517

1,709

1,746

1,711

North Yorkshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

615

798

1,068

1,151

1,248

1,224

1,077

South Yorkshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,256

2,533

3,066

3,496

3,559

3,427

3,041

West Yorkshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

4,541

5,152

5,849

6,068

6,116

6,031

5,257

Hampshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,473

2,555

3,237

3,214

3,052

3,246

2,797

Kent

(6)

(6)

(6)

750

1,081

1,463

2,032

2,442

2,956

2,590

Surrey(5)

(6)

(6)

(6)

637

770

948

852

908

986

(6)

Sussex(5)

(6)

(6)

(6)

865

1,155

1,495

1,860

1,833

2,116

(6)

Surrey and Sussex(5)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,527

Thames Valley

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,450

1,600

2,203

2,576

2,823

3,088

2,840

Avon and Somerset

(6)

(6)

(6)

2,172

2,431

3,324

3,652

3,658

4,167

3,839

Devon and Cornwall

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,169

1,339

1,474

1,688

2,107

2,279

2,068

Dorset

(6)

(6)

(6)

518

504

707

926

1,019

960

802

Gloucestershire

(6)

(6)

(6)

578

510

564

983

998

759

786

Wiltshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

393

516

674

935

1,023

978

746

Staffordshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

977

1,292

1,373

1,448

1,486

1,540

1,453

Warwickshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

201

237

309

259

270

364

371

West Mercia

(6)

(6)

(6)

817

1,080

931

1,086

1,262

1,356

1,429

West Midlands

(6)

(6)

(6)

3,352

3,303

3,764

4,284

5,155

5,980

6,514

Dyfed Powys

(6)

(6)

(6)

224

305

341

399

358

422

382

Gwent

(6)

(6)

(6)

623

721

613

638

663

926

1,131

North Wales

(6)

(6)

(6)

978

1,237

1,329

1,295

1,420

1,401

1,205

South Wales

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,170

1,213

1,352

1,665

2,028

2,347

2,078

London

(6)

(6)

(6)

8,352

11,883

14,645

16,824

19,899

23,772

21,723

Bedfordshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

645

895

1,072

1,303

1,227

1,370

1,214

Cambridgeshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

602

674

861

901

1,198

1,216

1,163

Essex

(6)

(6)

(6)

1,021

1,277

1,559

1,534

1,586

1,920

1,908

Hertfordshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

956

1,122

1,289

1,504

1,471

1,546

1,455

Norfolk

(6)

(6)

(6)

521

596

606

606

669

704

640

Suffolk

(6)

(6)

(6)

578

751

699

640

573

746

604

Total

37,924

46,472

53,230

60,006

73,205

90,036

100,055

105,773

115,874

105,105

(1) These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. (2) New starts were not split by Criminal Justice System area before the start of the current contract in 2005-06. (3) New starts in 2010-11 and 2011-12 cannot be compared directly to previous years as before October 2010 extensions of pre-trial curfews (e.g. when a monitored defendant attended court and was re-bailed) were classed as new starts, whereas afterwards they were not. This caused an apparent fall in pre-trial new starts. (4) From 2011-12 Cleveland and Durham are reported together as Durham Tees Valley. (5) From 2011-12 Surrey and Sussex are reported together as Surrey and Sussex. (6) Data not collected in this form.

Only headline figures are available for 2002-03 to 2004-05, prior to the current contract. There is a break in the time series at October 2010 due to a change in the policy concerning pre-trial use. Before this date electronic monitoring equipment for pre-trial defendants was removed before each court appearance; from October 2010 the equipment is only removed if a bail condition requiring electronic monitoring is not retained. This led to an apparent fall in the number of pre-trial new starts and affects any derived statistics.

It is not possible to provide the actual average number of days a person is electronically monitored for the full time period except at disproportionate cost. However, an estimated number of days in each monitored period is contained in the following table:

Table 2: Estimated length of each period of electronic monitoring, by type, 2005-06 to 2011-12 (1)
  Estimated (3) average length of each period of electronic monitoring

2005-06

68

2006-07

66

2007-08

65

2008-09

65

2009-10

65

14 May 2012 : Column 17W

2010-11(2)

69

2011-12(2)

85

(1) These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. (2) Figures in 2010-11 and 2011-12 cannot be compared directly to each other or to previous years as before October 2010 extensions of pre-trial curfews (e.g. when a monitored defendant attended court and was re-bailed) were classed as new starts, whereas afterwards they were not. This caused an apparent fall in Pre-trial new starts and an apparent increase in the length of each period of electronic monitoring. (3) Information on the average number of days that a person is electronically monitored is not routinely available and can be obtained only at disproportionate cost. This estimate has been calculated by dividing the estimated total days of electronic monitoring for the period by the total number of new starts in the period.

14 May 2012 : Column 18W

(2) The National Offender Management Service is currently reviewing the information provided by the suppliers of electronic monitoring services to determine what should be published in future.

(3) Information on the average caseload in England and Wales for each financial year between the start of the current contract in 2005-06 and 2011-12, by Criminal Justice System stage, is contained in the following table:

It is not possible to provide the actual total number of days of electronic monitoring for each stage for the given period except at disproportionate cost. However, an estimated total number of days for each stage is contained in the following table:

Table 3: Annu al electronic monitoring data— average caseload by type and estimated total days of electronic monitoring per year, 2005 - 06 to 2011 - 12 (1)
    2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 (2) 2011-12 (2)

Average caseload(3,4)

Total

11,243

13,267

16,097

17,736

18,965

21,847

24,375

 

Pre-trial

787

2,100

2,859

3,680

4,979

6,517

9,174

 

Court order

6,907

8,304

10,306

11,074

10,922

12,165

11,856

 

Post-release

3,549

2,863

2,931

2,983

3,065

3,166

3,345

                 

Total days of electronic monitoring

Total

4,104,000

4,842,000

5,875,000

6,474,000

6,922,000

7,974,000

8,897,000

 

Pre-trial

287,000

766,000

1,044,000

1,343,000

1,817,000

2,379,000

3,348,000

 

Court order

2,521,000

3,031,000

3,762,000

4,042,000

3,986,000

4,440,000

4,328,000

 

Post-release

1,295,000

1,045,000

1,070,000

1,089,000

1,119,000

1,155,000

1,221,000

(1) These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. (2) Total and pre-trial new starts in 2010-11 and 2011-12 cannot be compared directly to each other or to previous years as before October 2010 extensions of pre-trial curfews (e.g. when a monitored defendant attended court and was re-bailed) were classed as new starts, whereas afterwards they were not. This caused an apparent fall in pre-trial new starts. (3) An individual may appear in more than one category over the course of a single set of proceedings. For example, pre-trial a defendant may be released on electronically monitored bail and then, when convicted, be sentenced to a community order with an electronically monitored curfew requirement. (4) The average caseload is the average number of individuals monitored at the same time on any day in the year. Note: Pre-trial includes defendants on conditional bail with an electronically monitored curfew requirement. Court order includes community orders with an electronic monitoring requirement. Post release includes prisoners released on home detention curfew.

Employment Tribunals Service

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice on how many occasions a closed material procedure has been used in an employment tribunal in each of the last 10 years. [106557]

Mr Djanogly: The information is not readily available or held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Prisoners: Foreign Nationals

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign national prisoners there are in UK prisons; what the highest number has been; and how many there were in May 2005. [106766]

Mr Blunt: Numbers of foreign national prisoners are published quarterly. On 31 March 2012 (latest available) the foreign national prisoner population in England and Wales was 11,127. The highest quarterly number was 11,546 on 31 December 2009. On 30 June 2005, the population was 9,651.

Issues arising in Scotland and Northern Ireland are matters for the Scottish Government and Northern Ireland Executive respectively.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Proceeds of Crime

Heidi Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment his Department has carried out of the effectiveness of the Community Cashback initiative piloted in 2009-10. [106503]

Mr Blunt: The Government has not undertaken any detailed assessment of the Community Cashback scheme.

Young Offender Institutions: Greater Manchester

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many additional days of imprisonment were awarded to children in Hindley Young Offender Institution by an outside adjudicator for breaches of prison rules in each month of the last two years; [106746]

14 May 2012 : Column 19W

(2) what the ethnicity is of each child awarded additional days of imprisonment by outside adjudicators in Hindley Young Offender Institution in each month of the last two years; [106747]

(3) how many cases have been referred to an outside adjudicator for breaches of prison rules in Hindley Young Offender Institution in each month of the last two years. [106748]

Mr Blunt: Table 1 shows the ethnicity of each person awarded additional days of imprisonment by outside adjudicators in Hindley under 18 Young Offender Institution in each month from January 2010 to April 2012. This excludes 18-year-olds at Hindley (106747).

The second table (Table 2) shows how many additional days of imprisonment were awarded to people in Hindley

14 May 2012 : Column 20W

under-18 Young Offender Institution by an outside adjudicator for breaches of prison rules in each month from January 2010 to April 2012. This excludes 18-year-olds at Hindley (106746).

The third table (Table 3) shows how many cases were referred to an outside adjudicator for breaches of prison rules in Hindley under 18 Young Offender Institution in each month from January 2010 to April 2012 (106748).

These data have been provided by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and the Youth Justice Board (YJB) from Hindley Young Offender Institution (YOI).

These figures have been drawn from YOI records. As such they are subject to possible recording errors and can be subject to change over time.

Table 1: Ethnicity of each person awarded additional days of imprisonment by outside adjudicators in Hindley Young Offender Institution in each month from January 2010 to April 2012
  W1 W2 W9 M1 M2 M3 M9 A1 A2 A3 A9 B1 B2 B9 O1 O9 Total

2010

                                 

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

1

1

2011

                                 

January

February

1

1

March

1

1

April

1

1

May

June

1

1

July

3

1

4

August

1

1

2

September

1

1

1

1

4

October

1

1

2

November

2

1

3

December

5

2

7

2012

                                 

January

1

1

February

4

1

5

March

9

2

11

April

3

3

Notes: 1. Ethnicity key: W1: White – British W2: White – Irish W9: White - Other White M1: Mixed - White and Black Caribbean M2: Mixed - White and Black African M3: Mixed - White and Asian M9: Mixed - Other Mixed A1: Asian or Asian British - Indian A2: Asian or Asian British - Pakistani A3: Asian or Asian British - Bangladeshi A9: Asian or Asian British - Other Asian B1: Black or Black British - Caribbean B2: Black or Black British - African B9: Black or Black British - Other Black O1: Chinese - Chinese O9: Other Ethnic Group - Any Other 2. This table covers 10-17 year olds at Hindley. No 18 year old received any additional days for breaches of prison rules in this time period. 3. These figures have been drawn from YOI records, as such they are subject to possible recording errors and can be subject to change over time.