Age UK: Finance

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what funding his Department has allocated to Age UK in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [81705]

Paul Burstow: The Department has allocated the following funding to Age UK:


£

2010-11

833,370

2011-12

703,435

It should be noted that funding for 2011-12 represents the latest allocations and additional funding could be allocated in the remaining months of the financial year.

Age UK has received funding from the Department for the role it undertakes as a departmental strategic partner and as a National Agent for the Opportunities for Volunteering scheme. Age UK is also funded to deliver a regional development support role for some local involvement networks. It has also received funding under the Innovation, Excellence and Strategic Development scheme and the reaching out to Carers Innovation Fund.

22 Nov 2011 : Column 337W

Asthma: Finance

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what funding his Department has made available for tackling asthma in each of the last five years. [82053]

Paul Burstow: Funding for national health service services is devolved to primary care trusts through the resource allocation process and is not ring fenced. We have estimates of the cost of asthma services from programme budgeting data for 2006-07 to 2009-10: information was not disaggregated to the level of asthma in earlier years, and is not yet available for 2010-11.

The estimates given include treatment and prescription costs, but not prevention or general practitioner costs, and are as follows:


£ billion

2006-07

0.85

2007-08

0.97

2008-09

1.04

2009-10

1.08

Blood: Donors

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 October 2011, Official Report, column 1185W, on blood: donors, what (1) new information and analysis has become available since the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs formulated its initial recommendations; [81636]

(2) evidence the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) is considering in addition to the evidence from Imperial college; and which research groups have provided evidence to ACDP. [81637]

Anne Milton: References to all the evidence from various research groups available to the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs and to the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens are listed in this publicly available paper at:

[email protected][email protected]/documents/digitalasset/dh_130152.pdf

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 October 2011, Official Report, column 1185W, on blood: donors, (1) when the Advisory Committee on Blood, Tissues and Organs will start considering new information and analysis on fresh frozen plasma in 2012; and when he expects its conclusions to be available; [81638]

(2) whether there is a timetable for when the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs must decide whether its original recommendations should be reviewed. [81640]

Anne Milton: The Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs will provide advice after the next meeting on 17 January 2012. A summary of the meeting will be published on the Committee's website shortly thereafter.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 October 2011, Official Report, column 1185W, on blood: donors,

22 Nov 2011 : Column 338W

whether the Government plans to publish the impact assessment on the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs 2009 recommendations in advance of any new conclusion being reached by the Committee. [81639]

Anne Milton: Should any advice be received from the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs an impact assessment will be prepared and presented to Ministers for consideration with that advice. The impact assessment will be published on the Department's website when that consideration is complete.

Brain Cancer

Mr Arbuthnot: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department provided to each research study it funded on site-specific brain tumours in (a) 2010 and (b) 2011. [81273]

Mr Simon Burns: The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation Programme is funding a project on intraoperative multispectral imaging of brain tumours. Spend on this project was £107,420 in 2009-10 and £107,420 in 2010-11.

NIHR biomedical research centre expenditure on research infrastructure for brain tumour research was £148,218 in 2009-10 and £567,838 in 2010-11.

The NIHR is also currently funding a £937,149 clinician scientist award on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to characterise invasive phenotypes in cerebral gliomas, and a £130,833 healthcare scientist award,

‘Towards improved outcomes for teenagers and young adults with cancer through the development and evaluation of novel MR methods for non-invasive diagnosis and characterisation of brain tumours’.

The NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN) is currently hosting 17 trials and other well-designed studies in cancers of the brain and nervous system that are in set-up or recruiting patients. Details can be found on the UK CRN portfolio database at:

http://public.ukcrn.org.uk/search

Cancer: Clinical Trials

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what proportion of (a) pancreatic and (b) all cancer patients are able to access clinical trials during their treatment; [81116]

(2) what steps he has taken to increase the access to clinical trials for pancreatic cancer patients. [81215]

Paul Burstow: In 2010-11, the equivalent of 19.8% of new incident cancer cases were recruited into studies hosted by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Cancer Research Network (NCRN), representing a fivefold increase in recruitment in the decade since the network was established.

In 2010-11, a total of 13 pancreatic cancer studies hosted by the NCRN were open to recruitment, and 687 patients were recruited to them. In addition, the NIHR funds 15 Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres in partnership with Cancer Research UK. Since 2007, these centres have supported 23 pancreatic cancer studies.

22 Nov 2011 : Column 339W

The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Upper Gastrointestinal Clinical Studies Group is dedicated to developing a portfolio of research studies in this area and has a Pancreatic Cancer Subgroup. This subgroup has developed a number of internationally-run trials.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting period is to see a chronic fatigue specialist in (a) East Lancashire and (b) nationally. [81881]

Paul Burstow: Information on waiting times to see a chronic fatigue/myalgic encephalomyelitis specialist is not collected centrally.

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many chronic fatigue specialists there are based in East Lancashire. [81882]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not collected centrally.

Diabetes

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the (a) health, (b) social and (c) financial benefits of automatic enrolment of people with diabetes on a scheme such as the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating diabetes management scheme for adults with diabetes. [R] [81962]

Paul Burstow: The Department has not made a formal assessment of the benefits of automatic enrolment of people with diabetes on a scheme such as the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) diabetes management scheme for adults with diabetes.

However, the benefits to patients and cost-effectiveness of the DAFNE scheme have been recognised through its Inclusion in the NHS Evidence Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention database. The database consists of real examples of how health and social care staff are improving quality and productivity across the National Health Service and social care.

Provision of structured education for people with diabetes is in the Diabetes Quality Standard. It is for local NHS organisations to deliver comprehensive high-quality and safe diabetes services, appropriate to the needs of their populations.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that people with diabetes have adequate access to health care professionals to assist them with day-to-day management of their condition. [R] [81973]

Paul Burstow: Local health care organisations are in the best position to determine the work force needed to deliver safe and high-quality patient care for their local populations. We expect decisions on the commissioning and delivery of local services to be informed by clinical involvement and leadership.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) children, (b) adolescents, (c) young adults and (d) other adults were diagnosed with diabetes in each of the last five years. [R] [82233]

22 Nov 2011 : Column 340W

Paul Burstow: The Department does not collect this information. Using data from the National Diabetes Audit the following table gives an indication of the total registrations, grouped by age bands, over the past five years:

  Registrations
Age band 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

0-15 years

12,585

14,500

15,136

16,503

17,796

16-24 years

11,679

17,856

20,007

22,977

26,063

25 years +

631,689

1,189,445

1,388,432

1,618,929

1,886,126

Notes: 1. The NDA does not have 100%, participation or coverage so the figures should be treated with caution. Growth in numbers of registrations in NDA needs to be assessed in the context of the growth in coverage for the audit. 2. Quality Outcomes Framework data is an aggregate return so does not contain the detail required to respond to this question. Source: National Diabetes Audit (NDA)

Diabetes: Health Services

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training he plans to provide to healthcare professionals to ensure that they offer a personalised programme of treatment for people with diabetes. [R] [81975]

Paul Burstow: The content and standard of health care training is the responsibility of the independent regulatory bodies for the professions concerned. Through their role as the custodians of standards in education and practice, these organisations are committed to ensuring high quality patient care is delivered by health professionals and that health care professionals are equipped with the knowledge, skills and behaviours required to deal with the problems and conditions they will encounter in practice.

Diabetes: Young People

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what nationwide arrangements his Department has put in place to support the provision of transitional care for adolescents and young adults with diabetes moving between paediatric and adult healthcare; [R] [81957]

(2) what assessment he has made of the difficulties faced by young people and adolescents with diabetes when moving from children's medical care services to adult medical care service; [R] [81963]

(3) what mechanism his Department has put in place to enable paediatric and adult health services to work together and share information about young people with diabetes to ensure an effective transition between paediatric and adult health services; [R] [81966]

(4) what support services his Department has put in place to enable paediatric and adult diabetes health services to engage with a patient with diabetes and their family from an early stage to assist with (a) the transition between the different health providers and (b) establishing good diabetes management behaviours; [R] [81967]

(5) what assessment his Department has made of each method and model for transitional care of young people and adolescents with diabetes; and whether his

22 Nov 2011 : Column 341W

Department considers any one method or model to be more appropriate and effective; [R] [81968]

(6) what steps he has taken to ensure that all children and young people with diabetes have access to (a) a transitional care clinic and (b) a key worker to co-ordinate their treatment and transition between paediatric and adult care services; [R] [81969]

(7) how many specialised clinics there are providing transitional care for young people and adolescents with diabetes; [R] [81971]

(8) what steps he is taking to provide a comprehensive nationwide network of transitional care clinics for young people and adolescents with diabetes; [R] [81972]

(9) what assessment his Department has made of the (a) financial and (b) social effects of providing full transitional care to young people and adolescents with diabetes. [R] [81977]

Paul Burstow: The Department does not centrally collect information about specialised clinics providing transitional care for young people and adolescents with diabetes.

However, we recognise the importance of effective transition between children's and adults' services. It is for local health service organisations to commission a comprehensive service for all people with diabetes, including adolescents and adults and those moving through transition. This is why, subject to the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, Clinical Commissioning Groups, working in conjunction with Health and Wellbeing Boards, will be required to take account of their population's needs and commission and provide services accordingly.

The National Service Framework for Diabetes, published in 2001, has a specific standard on the smooth transition of care from paediatric diabetes services to adult diabetes services, whether hospital or community-based, either directly or via a young people's clinic.

There is also NHS Diabetes commissioning guidance for diabetes in children and young people, which states that transition services for young people:

should be run by both adult and paediatric consultant diabetologists; and

the care plan must be jointly reviewed and agreed with the patient (and carer, if appropriate)

NHS Diabetes has also initiated the national Children and Young People network, to address unwarranted variation in services for this group, and to improve the care and treatment they receive. The national network constitutes 12 clinical champions roughly representing the strategic health authority regions across England, led, funded and coordinated by NHS Diabetes. A new piece of work is currently being scoped for introduction across the Network, which will look at supporting the transition from children to adult services, and at providing more individual care planning and supported self-care.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the NHS arising from emergency and urgent medical treatment of young people and adolescents with diabetes who experience difficulty managing their condition; and if he will assess what the effect of provision of comprehensive transitional care services will be on the level of such costs. [R] [81959]

22 Nov 2011 : Column 342W

Paul Burstow: We do not collect this information centrally.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what programmes equivalent to the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating diabetes management scheme for adults with diabetes his Department has put into place to provide peer-led support and educational services for young adults and adolescents with diabetes; [R] [81961]

(2) what (a) educational, (b) peer assistance and (c) other services his Department makes available to young people and adolescents to assist them with creating a personal diabetes management routine. [R] [81964]

Paul Burstow: Local national health service organisations are responsible for providing comprehensive, high-quality and safe diabetes services appropriate to their local populations, Including diabetes management schemes in place to provide peer-led support and educational services for young adults and adolescents with diabetes.

We are aware that such schemes, for example 'KICk-OFF', 'Cascade' and 'Getting Sorted', are being piloted and set up around the country by local national health service and other organisations. We look forward to seeing the evaluation and results of these schemes.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he has taken to provide young people and adolescents with diabetes with information about their condition and how to manage it; and what (a) online guides, (b) telephone services, (c) apps and (d) other educational services his Department has developed in this area; [R] [81965]

(2) if he will make it his policy to support the establishment of educational services for young people and adolescents with diabetes which are staffed by other young people with the condition; and what consideration he has given to the form such support could take; [R] [81976]

(3) what assessment his Department has made of the effect of establishing good diabetes management behaviours during childhood and adolescence on (a) the long-term health of children and adolescents and (b) costs incurred by the NHS in providing treatment of diabetes and diabetes-related issues. [R] [81978]

Paul Burstow: The NHS Operating Framework 2011-12 specifically states that primary care trusts should be commissioning the relevant structured education to support all people with diabetes.

The best practice tariff being introduced soon for paediatric diabetes also includes a requirement for 24-hour support and advice to be available to patients and their families. Local national health service organisations are responsible for providing comprehensive, high-quality and safe diabetes services appropriate to their local populations, including providing information and education to people with diabetes about their condition and how to manage it.

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance on the diagnosis and management of type 1 diabetes in children, young people and adults recommends that children and young people are offered a structured programme of education when they are newly diagnosed, and ongoing opportunities to access information, to help them manage their condition.

22 Nov 2011 : Column 343W

Charities such as Diabetes UK and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation also provide information resources in different formats for people with diabetes.

We also recognise the difficulties that some children and adolescents with diabetes have in accessing the support they need to manage their condition at school. The Department for Children, Schools and Families, in close liaison with the Department, issued guidance on “Managing Medicines in Schools and Early Years Setting” in November 2007. This guidance explains the roles and responsibilities of employers, parents and carers, governing bodies, head teachers, teachers and other staff and of local health services.

The information is not collected centrally in a way that would allow assessments to be made of the effects of establishing good diabetes management behaviours during childhood.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to co-ordinate the collection of information and medical history from young people and adolescents with diabetes to ensure that (a) the medical professionals treating them have access to all relevant information, (b) patients do not have to explain the details of their condition on each occasion and (c) duplication of data and appointments services is eliminated. [R] [81970]

Paul Burstow: In October 2010, we published a consultation document ‘Liberating the NHS: An Information Revolution’ setting out our plans to transform the way information is collected, controlled, accessed, analysed and used across the NHS and adult social care.

The consultation closed earlier this year and we have published a summary of the consultation responses. We are using these, together with the outcome from the independent NHS Future Forum, to develop an Information Strategy—which we plan to publish in the winter.

The strategy is looking at how information can be better used by and shared between health and care professionals to help ensure people experience safe, seamless and integrated care. This includes looking at how information (such as medical history) about an individual can be captured once at the point of care and then used many times across different care settings. This will help to create new opportunities for improved effectiveness, safety and a higher quality of care experienced by those using services, particularly for people who are regular users of services, for example people with diabetes.

The NHS Future Forum has been undertaking further engagement on a number of key areas, including looking at how information can be made available to improve health, care and well-being. A letter containing some interim advice was published on 17 November 2011 and recognised that data about a patient or service user should—with the right safeguards—be shared between all the organisations involved in caring for that person. We agree—and this initial feedback, together with the more detailed report which we expect to be published in December, will help to inform the strategy.

The information revolution consultation and the summary of responses are available on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Consultations/Liveconsultations/DH_120080

22 Nov 2011 : Column 344W

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of missed appointments booked on behalf of young people and adolescents with diabetes; and what steps he is taking to reduce the numbers of such missed appointments. [R] [81974]

Paul Burstow: We do not collect this information centrally.

Diamorphine

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what funding he plans to allocate to explore the wider prescribing of diamorphine up to March 2015; to whom; which activities will be funded; and which body will be responsible for allocating the funding; [81490]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of patients who will receive treatment as a result of the wider prescribing of diamorphine up to March 2015. [81491]

Anne Milton: £2 million per annum has been identified for centrally-funded pilots of supervised inject able opioid treatment for the small numbers who may benefit. The procurement process for these pilots is still subject to ministerial and HM Treasury approval. Pending such approval the other information requested is not available.

GP Patient Lists

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance he has issued to GPs on removing patients from their lists. [81279]

Mr Simon Burns: The procedures which a general practitioner (GP) practice must follow when removing a patient from its list are set out in the regulations covering the contractual arrangements between the GP practice and its primary care trust (PCT).

Under the terms of its contract, a GP practice may remove any patient from its list of national health service patients if it believes that it has reasonable grounds for doing so. Patients should be given a warning before action is taken for removal and specific reasons as to why the removal has occurred.

If anyone who has been removed from a practice list has difficulty in finding another practice, the PCT has a legal responsibility to find them a practice with which to register.

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health who will be responsible for assigning patients who have been removed from their GP list to other GP lists after the abolition of primary care trusts as part of his proposed NHS reforms. [81365]

Mr Simon Burns: Subject to the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, this responsibility will lie with the NHS Commissioning Board.

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what complaint handling procedures there will be for patients who have been removed from a GP list following the abolition of primary care trusts; and

22 Nov 2011 : Column 345W

whether this process will include

(a)

the practice manager of the relevant GP practice,

(b)

the Clinical Commissioning Group lead,

(c)

the Parliamentary and Health Services Ombudsman and

(d)

any other body; and if he will make a statement. [81366]

Mr Simon Burns: We envisage that the current arrangements for handling national health service complaints will continue following the implementation of the Health and Social Care Bill.

The Local Authority Social Services and National Health Service Complaints (England) Regulations 2009 allow for a complaint about NHS services to be made to either the commissioner or the provider of those NHS services.

Each commissioner or provider of NHS services must designate a complaints manager, to be responsible for managing the procedures for handling and considering complaints.

22 Nov 2011 : Column 346W

If a complainant is not satisfied with the outcome of their complaint at local level, they will continue to be able to take their complaint to the health service ombudsman.

Hospitals: Waiting Lists

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the performance was of (a) Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust, (b) East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, (c) Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, (d) Medway NHS Foundation Trust against the 18 week waiting time target in (i) 2008-09, (ii) 2009-10 and (iii) 2010-11; and what the performance was in England in each such year. [81862]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is shown in the following tables. The data show the performance of each of the four trusts and England in the specified years against the 18-week waiting time standards:

    Percentage of admitted (adjusted) referral to treatment (RTT) pathways within 18-weeks (waiting time standard of 90%)


England Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust Medway NHS Foundation Trust
 

April 2008

86.7

71.8

84.7

57.4

92.3

 

May 2008

88.6

80.2

87.2

62.3

91.8

 

June 2008

88.9

78.9

87.2

68.5

95.1

 

July 2008

89.9

80.8

87.5

68.1

96.0

 

Auqust2008

90.3

87.6

87.0

68.8

96.8

2008-09

September 2008

90.2

96.2

84.4

74.3

95.8

 

October 2008

90.6

93.9

83.5

81.0

95.4

 

November 2008

90.6

91.8

81.9

85.2

93.6

 

December 2008

92.8

94.3

86.1

90.6

96.5

 

January 2009

92.9

95.4

90.2

90.6

94.2

 

February 2009

92.8

95.0

90.2

90.2

93.3

 

March 2009

93.0

94.2

91.3

90.6

94.4

 

April 2009

93.3

92.0

90.1

90.1

93.1

 

May 2009

93.7

91.7

90.8

92.3

94.8

 

June 2009

93.6

91.4

90.4

90.3

94.0

 

July 2009

93.7

91.8

91.9

90.9

95.3

 

August 2009

93.6

90.9

91.5

90.1

94.3

2009-10

September 2009

93.3

91.0

91.4

92.3

95.9

 

October 2009

93.0

91.2

92.3

93.3

96.1

 

November 2009

92.8

91.1

92.6

92.4

96.3

 

December 2009

93.3

92.8

92.5

92.2

95.9

 

January 2010

92.6

91.5

91.5

92.5

95.0

 

February 2010

91.9

91.1

84.3

93.2

93.7

 

March 2010

92.0

93.5

81.8

95.0

93.3

2010-11

April 2010

92.1

94.3

86.0

93.3

92.1

 

May 2010

92.9

95.3

86.9

93.6

91.6

 

June 2010

93.1

96.0

89.0

94.3

90.8

 

July 2010

93.3

95.8

91.8

94.4

90.6

 

August 2010

93.2

93.7

92.2

93.8

91.8

 

September 2010

92.5

92.8

91.5

93.7

90.5

 

October 2010

92.4

91.9

92.0

93.0

90.6

 

November 2010

92.0

92.4

91.1

93.9

90.3

 

December 2010

92.2

90.1

90.6

94.2

92.9

22 Nov 2011 : Column 347W

22 Nov 2011 : Column 348W

 

January 2011

90.7

87.8

89.4

92.9

90.1

 

February 2011

89.8

89.4

86.5

92.9

90.2

 

March 2011

89.6

94.5

86.1

92.7

91.5

    Percentage of non-admitted RTT pathways within 18-weeks (waiting time standard of 95%)

Month England Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust Medway NHS Foundation Trust
 

April 2008

92.1

90.3

96.9

80.0

94.7

 

May 2008

92.8

91.2

96.2

86.4

97.1

 

June 2008

93.7

95.7

96,4

90.0

98.0

 

July 2008

94.6

93.6

96.6

91.1

99.7

 

Auqust2008

95.0

95.2

97.0

91.4

97.6

2008-09

September 2008

95.4

95.6

96.5

94.2

96.7

 

October 2008

94.8

96.2

97.5

96.7

96.4

 

November 2008

96.2

96.5

97.0

95.0

96.3

 

December 2008

96.8

96.5

97.2

95.4

97.9

 

January 2009

97.1

97.4

98.6

95.6

98.1

 

February 2009

97.1

97.4

98.5

95.1

97.3

 

March 2009

97.2

97.3

97.9

95.2

97.3

 

April 2009

97.3

97.1

98.3

95.1

97.7

 

May 2009

97.6

97.2

96.5

95.8

97.5

 

June 2009

97.6

97.2

97.0

95.4

98.6

 

July 2009

97.6

97.6

99.5

95.2

97.8

 

August 2009

97.6

97.8

99.3

95.0

97.4

2009-10

September 2009

97.5

97.7

99.2

95.2

97.8

 

October 2009

97.6

97.9

99.1

96.0

98.5

 

November 2009

97.7

97.6

97.6

96.4

98.7

 

December 2009

97.8

98.2

98.9

95.9

99.0

 

January 2010

97.7

97.6

95.3

96.2

98.3

 

February 2010

97.7

97.4

99.0

96.1

98.4

 

March 2010

97.8

97.9

99.2

96.1

98.9

2010-11

April 2010

97.9

98.0

99.2

96.1

98.7

 

May 2010

98.1

98.1

98.0

96.0

99.4

 

June 2010

98.1

98.5

97.7

95.9

98.8

 

July 2010

98.0

98.4

97.5

96.2

99.2

 

August 2010

98.0

98.5

97.9

95.8

98.7

 

September 2010

97.8

98.2

97.2

95.8

98.7

 

October 2010

97.6

98.7

97.4

96.5

98.8

 

November 2010

97.5

98.3

96.2

96.0

98.3

 

December 2010

97.5

98.4

97.1

97.1

98.3

 

January 2011

97.2

97.7

95.6

95.9

98.2

 

February 2011

97.1

97.5

95.3

95.7

98.3

 

March 2011

97.2

98.0

96.2

97.7

98.6

Notes: 1. Admitted RTT pathways are waiting times for patients whose treatment started during the month and involved admission to hospital. 2. Non-admitted RTT pathways are waiting times for patients whose treatment started during the month and did not involve admission to hospital. 3. Adjustments are made to admitted RTT pathways for clock pauses, where a patient had declined reasonable offers of admission and chosen to wait longer.

Infant Foods: Marketing

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions his Department has had with baby milk manufacturers on the advertising and marketing of their products. [81899]

Anne Milton: There have been no recent discussions between the Department and infant formula (baby milk) manufacturers on the advertising and marketing of their products.

22 Nov 2011 : Column 349W

Medicine: Research

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills and (b) Minister for Science and Universities on the effects of the Government's policies on (i) medical research and (ii) the future of the Clinical Excellence Awards Scheme. [81145]

Mr Simon Burns: In line with the. practice of previous Administrations, details of ministerial discussions on ongoing policy issues are not disclosed, as this could undermine effective Government decision-making. Any issues that require the consideration of Cabinet or reporting to Parliament will be dealt with according to the proper protocol.

In 2011, the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration led a review on the Clinical Excellence award scheme. Their report is currently being considered by Ministers.

NHS: Pensions

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of active members of the NHS Pension Scheme earning less than £15,000 per year (a) are female and (b) work part-time. [81572]

Mr Simon Burns: Estimates based on data extracted from the Electronic Staff Record in March 2011 for Hospital and Community Health services staff show that the proportion of active members of the NHS Pension Scheme earning less than £15,000 per year that (a) are female is 90% and (b) work part-time is 88%.

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many members of the NHS pension scheme of each NHS profession had a pension fund worth more than £1 million at retirement in each financial year since 1997. [82228]

Mr Simon Burns: The information is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

NHS: Standards

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the Information Commissioner's recent ruling in respect of his Department's strategic risk register, if he will arrange for the register to be published. [81581]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department is considering its response to the Information Commissioner's decision of 2 November to require its release, and expects to respond by early December.

Nutrition

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 31 October 2011, Official Report, column 746W, on nutrition, whether any impact assessments were carried out in cases where his Department has developed Public Health Responsibility Deal pledges on a basis of limited evidence; and if he will make a statement. [81560]

22 Nov 2011 : Column 350W

Anne Milton: Impact assessments have not been carried out on the Public Health Responsibility Deal's pledges. The pledges represent a series of voluntary commitments, which public, private and third sector organisations are able to sign up to if they wish.

Obesity

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in England aged (a) under five, (b) between five and 16 and (c) over 16 years old, were classified as obese in each financial year since 1997. [82226]

Anne Milton: Information is not available in the format requested.

Information on the percentage of obese children in England is available in the ‘Health Survey for England—2009 trend tables'’ Child trend tables, Table 4. Information is provided for children aged two to 15 in England for the years 1995 to 2009. This information is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse09trends

Information on the percentage of obese adults aged 16 and over in England is available in the ‘Health Survey for England—2009 trend tables’, Adult trend tables, Table 4. Information is provided for adults in England for the years 1993 to 2009. This information is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/hse09trends

Further information on the prevalence of obesity in children is available through the National Child Measurement Programme. Information is available for children in reception (four to five years) and year 6 (10 to 11 years) for the years 2006-07 to 2009-10. Information showing the prevalence of obesity in these two school years in England is available for each year from the following links:

Table 1 in the excel file accompanying ‘National Child Measurement Programme: results from the 2007/08 school year, headline results’ is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/obesity/national-child-measurement-programme-results-from-the-school-year-2007-08

Table 1 in the excel file accompanying ‘National Child Measurement Programme: results from the 2006/07 school year, headline results’ is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/obesity/national-child-measurement-programme-results-from-the-2006-07-school-year

All these documents have already been placed in the Library.

Table 1 in the excel file accompanying ‘National Child Measurement Programme: England, 2009/10 school year’ is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/obesity/national-child-measurement-programme-england-2009-10-school-year

Table 1 in the excel file accompanying ‘National Child Measurement Programme: England, 2008/09 school year’ is available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/obesity/national-child-measurement-programme-england-2008-09-school-year

Copies of these documents have been placed in the Library.

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Organs: Donors

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 2 November 2011, Official Report, column 628W, on organ donors, what the evidential basis is for the conclusion that his Department is on track to meet the 50 per cent. improvement in deceased donor rates by 2013 anticipated by the Organ Donation Taskforce; and if he will make a statement. [81139]

Anne Milton: The Organ Donation Taskforce anticipated that we would meet a 50% improvement in deceased donor rates by 2013. Latest available figures show that deceased donor numbers have increased by 31.4% against the 2007-08 baseline. We are on target to achieve a 35% increase by March 2012 and a 50% increase by the following year as it is expected that there will be even greater increments in the last year.

Since the publication of the report by the Organ Donation Taskforce in 2008, a great deal of work has taken place to strengthen the donation programme and increase the number of organs available for patients. There are now over 200 highly trained specialist nurses for organ donation based in hospitals across the country and NHS Blood and Transplant is continuing to train and recruit more staff into this vital role. Clinical leads for organ donation have been appointed in every acute hospital working closely with hospital organ donation committees to increase donation rates.

The appointment of Chris Rudge to chair a Transitional Steering Group pending the introduction of the new Commissioning Board will help maintain the momentum of improvement focusing action on increasing consent rates, encouraging deceased donation in all appropriate circumstances and increasing donation from emergency medicine.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress the NHS has made towards its target of a 50 per cent. increase in organ donation by 2013. [81439]

Anne Milton: Latest available figures show that deceased donor numbers have increased by 31.4% against the 2007-08 baseline. We are on target to achieve a 35% increase by March 2012 and a 50% increase by the following year.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many organ donation registrations there have been in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [81599]

Anne Milton: The information requested is provided in the following table.

Additions to the organ donor register (ODR), April 2008 to March 2011, by year
Added in year ODR Percentage increase

2008-09

1,073,000

7.4

2009-10

1,191,000

7.6

2010-11

930,000

5.5

Total on ODR at 31 March 2011

17,765,000

Notes: 1. The reason for the reduced rate of increase for 2010-11 when compared to the previous years is because registration to the ODR was put on hold while NHS Blood and Transplant resolved a registration system issue. 2. The number of people signed up to the ODR as at 15 November 2011 was 18,412,041. Source: NHS Blood and Transplant.

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Palliative Care

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many bed days the NHS provided for palliative care in the last 12 months. [81592]

Paul Burstow: The number of finished consultant episode bed days for the main specialty ‘palliative medicine’ in 2010-11 as reported in the Hospital Episode Statistics was 115,487(1). However, these data reflect the specialty of the consultant responsible for the care of the patient not the range of treatment that the patient received. It is not possible to extrapolate from these data to say how many people receive palliative care in national health service hospitals: for example, a patient under the care of a cardiologist might also receive palliative care but the data would record the cardiology specialism.

The final report of the independent Palliative Care Funding Review (PCFR) recognised that there is a paucity of data available on palliative care. The Department is working with the National End of Life Care Intelligence Network and through the work to take forward the PCFR to address this issue.

(1) source:

Hospital Episode Statistics and The NHS Information Centre for health and social care.

Pancreatic Cancer

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effects of implementing the actions contained in his Department’s document, “Improving Outcomes: a Strategy for Cancer” on pancreatic cancer survival rates. [81438]

Paul Burstow: The coalition Government’s document, “Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer”, was published on 12 January, it sets out a range of actions to improve cancer outcomes, including diagnosing cancer earlier, helping people to live healthier lives to reduce preventable cancers, screening more people, introducing new screening programmes and ensuring that all patients have access to the best possible treatment, care and support.

The strategy sets out our ambition to bring England’s cancer survival rates in line with the European average by 2014-15. Research has shown that to match the European average we need to save 5,000 additional lives per year. This research also shows that if England’s survival rates were as good as the best in Europe we would save 10,000 additional lives per year. This figure has also been broken down by tumour site, and we estimate that we would save 75 additional lives each year if we matched the best European survival rate for pancreatic cancer.

The strategy’s first annual report will be published this winter.

Schools: Sports

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how he plans to assess the health benefits children gain from participating in the School Games programme; and if he will make a statement; [81949]

(2) what assessment he has made of the additional health benefits children are likely to derive from being involved in competitive sport as part of the School Games programme; and if he will make a statement. [81950]

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Anne Milton: The School Games will have a focus on encouraging participation in sport across the spectrum of abilities and experience and those who have not previously engaged in competitive sport. Currently over a third of schools in England have signed up for the School Games. Through their participation, thousands of children and young people will be working towards the Chief Medical Officer's guidelines of 60 minutes of moderate intensity activity a day. The health benefits will flow from the levels of participation, particularly those who are least active.

We are also funding the development of Change4Life school sport hubs in order to inspire the least active children and young people into participating in the School Games. Initial findings from the recent establishment of 3,000 Change4Life School Sports Clubs in secondary schools are encouraging. We will shortly publish the independent evaluation of the first year of the programme.

Competitive sport is a way for young people to develop their talents and increase their self-confidence, resilience and self-esteem. It can also help develop important life skills such as teamwork and dedication. The benefits of competitive sport and regular activity can also be seen in improved concentration and academic performance, enhanced cardio-metabolic and bone health and improved psychological well-being.

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the health benefits of increased participation by children in school sports over the last six years; and if he will make a statement. [81951]

Anne Milton: Participation in school sport supports children and young people to develop the skills and confidence to play sport and be physically active. The benefits of physical activity include healthy weight, enhanced cardio-metabolic and bone health and improved psychological well-being.

Initial findings from the recent establishment of 3,000 Change4Life school sports clubs in secondary schools are encouraging. We will shortly publish the independent evaluation of the first year of the programme.

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to promote healthy lifestyles among school age children; and if he will make a statement. [81952]

Anne Milton: The Public Health White Paper, ‘Healthy Lives, Healthy People’, makes clear our life-course approach to health promotion. Subject to the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, the responsibility for health improvement and promotion will transfer to local authorities. They will receive ring-fenced funding from 2013 to promote healthy lifestyle choices by school-aged children such as risky sexual behaviour, smoking, drugs, alcohol and lack of physical activity.

The school nursing service plays a key role in supporting schools as health-promoting environments. The Department is developing a new vision for school nurses, drawing on views of young people and collaboration with the sector.

In addition, the Healthy Schools toolkit remains available for schools to support their work on health promotion and behaviour change. The Healthy Child Programme for school-aged children outlines for commissioners and professionals the evidenced based interventions to promote good health.

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Furthermore, the new social marketing strategy ‘Changing Behaviours, Improving Outcomes’ recognises that young people need tailored support to assist them with making healthy and responsible choices. A new approach, to be launched next year, is being developed. It aims to reduce harmful lifestyle choices through better signposting for both young people and their parents to credible and high quality health advice.

Social Services

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people receiving care in the community in (a) Kent and (b) England in (i) 2008-09, (ii) 2009-10 and (iii) 2010-11. [81863]

Paul Burstow: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care collects and publishes data on the number of adults (aged 18 and over) receiving community-based services, funded either partially or wholly by councils with adult social services responsibilities (CASSRs).

Community-based services include home care, day care, meals, short-term residential (but not respite) care, direct payments, professional support, equipment and adaptations.

Information on such services which are arranged and funded privately by service users is not collected centrally.

The following table shows the number of people, aged 18 and over, who received community-based services from CASSRs in the period 1 April to 31 March, 2008-09 and 2009-10 in Kent and England.


2008-09 2009-10

Kent

37,465

39,310

England total

1,537,380

1,464,140

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest five. Source: NHS Information Centre—Referrals, Assessments and Packages of Care (RAP) Return P1

Provisional data for the period 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 are due to be published by the Information Centre on 30 November 2011.

Surgery

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research his Department has commissioned on the minimum number of procedures carried out per year required for an arterial centre to provide the most effective care for patients. [81408]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has not commissioned research on this specific topic.

The National Institute for Health Research funds the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination at the University of York, one of the largest groups in the world engaged exclusively in evidence synthesis in the health field. The centre produces the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, which is focused primarily on systematic reviews that evaluate the effects of health care interventions and the delivery and organisation of health services, including evidence on standards relating to vascular surgical procedures.

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Transplant Surgery: Public Appointments

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department plans to recruit a new national clinical director for transplantation following the retirement of the current appointee. [81437]

Anne Milton: On 9 November 2011, the Government announced that Chris Rudge has been appointed to chair a Transitional Steering Group (TSG). The TSG has been established to help maintain the momentum to achieve the target of a 50% increase in organ donation rates by 2013 pending the introduction of the NHS Commissioning Board. During the transitional period, the TSG will Focus on—optimising deceased donation

22 Nov 2011 : Column 356W

rates through undertaking brainstem death testing and considering donation after cardiac death in all appropriate circumstances, increasing consent rates, increasing donation from emergency medicine, timely referral of donors and better donor management.

The independent Organ Donation Taskforce was established in December 2006 to identify barriers to organ donation and to recommend what action needed to be taken to increase organ donation within the United Kingdom. Chris Rudge was a member of the taskforce and wrote its first report, published in January 2008, “Organs for Transplants”. The report made a total of 14 recommendations broadly to increase donor rates and to make organ donation a usual part of end-of-life care.