Human Trafficking

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice for which countries his Department has prepared country business plans in relation to human trafficking; and if he will make a statement. [71116]

Damian Green: I have been asked to reply.

The Home Office is currently developing a list of priority countries in relation to human trafficking. As set out in the Government’s strategy on human trafficking, we will work with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to ensure that the aims of the strategy are included in the Country Business Plans for each of these priority countries.

National Offender Management Service Young Adult Offender Project

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) if he will place in the Library a copy of the National Offender Management Service Young Adult Offender Project report on (a) the Review of the Custodial Estate Provisions for Young Adult Offenders and (b) the Review of Community Provisions for Young Adult Offenders, completed in 2006; [71272]

(2) on what dates the Young Adult Offenders Project Board has met; and if he will place a copy of the minutes of each of those meetings in the Library; [71273]

(3) whether the National Offender Management Service Young Adult Offenders Project commissioned a detailed cost/benefit analysis in support of its proposals to deal with young adults in the prison estate; and if he will place a copy of any such assessment in the Library. [71341]

Mr Blunt: The Young Adult Offender Project informed Ministers' policy on young adult offenders but did not give rise to a published report. I understand from officials that the reports and analysis to which the hon. Member refers remained as work in progress when the project was closed. Since the project did not produce papers for publication it would not be appropriate to place those papers and minutes of meetings in the Library.

The project board met on 8 December 2005, 27 February, 27 March, 24 April, 5 June, 16 July, 4 September, 2 October, 5 November, 5 December 2006 and 20 March 2007.

Offenders: Ex-servicemen

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what information his Department holds on the number of former armed service personnel who were subjects of a court report in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11; [71361]

(2) what information his Department holds on the number of former armed service personnel remanded in custody in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11. [71362]

Mr Djanogly: In September 2010, the MOJ and Ministry of Defence published the results of a joint study to estimate how many prisoners in England and Wales had been in the regular armed forces. The report, based on the prison population as at

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1111W

6 November 2009, showed that 3.5% (2,820) of prisoners had served in the regular armed forces, and of these, 11.3% were on remand. This report may be found in the House of Commons Libraries and at the following web link:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=66&pubType=3

Information on the number of court reports prepared specifically for former armed service personnel is not held centrally by the Department.

Probation

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the size was of the probation caseload in England and Wales on 31 March 2011. [71601]

Mr Blunt: The total number of offenders supervised by the probation service on 31 March 2001 was 236,543. This figure is published quarterly on the Ministry of Justice website.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1112W

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Sentencing: York

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people received a custodial sentence at York (a) magistrates court and (b) Crown court in (i) 1997 and (ii) each subsequent year. [71498]

Mr Blunt: The number of persons sentenced to immediate custody at York local justice area and Crown court, for all offences from 1997 to 2010 (latest available) can be viewed in the following table.

Court proceedings data for 2011 are planned for publication in the spring, 2012.

Number of persons sentenced to immediate custody at York local justice area and Crown court, for all offences from 1997 to 2010 (1,2)
Court type 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

York local justice area(3)

108

161

227

239

202

139

196

228

200

118

119

164

206

209

York Crown court

282

359

376

397

448

407

360

415

448

417

387

351

440

372

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) May include more than one magistrates court. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Travellers: Legal Aid Scheme

Mr Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has provided in legal aid to Travellers at the Dale Farm site in Essex in each of the last three years. [71553]

Mr Djanogly: The information is not readily available. I will write to my hon. Friend.

Education

Academies

John Stevenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools had converted to academies as at 31 July 2011; and how many applications for conversion to an academy are outstanding. [69697]

Mr Gibb: As at 31 July 2011 529 schools had converted to academies. This was made up of (a) 124 primary schools and (b) 405 secondary schools (including 12 middle deemed secondary schools).

As at 1 September, 981 schools had converted to academies, leaving 502 applications to convert to an academy outstanding. A full list of these schools and their progress towards conversion is available on the Department for Education website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/a0069811/map-of-open-academies-and-schools-submitting-applications

Academies: Cumbria

John Stevenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Cumbria had become academies by September 2011. [69696]

Mr Gibb: To date, two primary schools and twelve secondary schools have opened as academies in Cumbria. These are Seaton Infant School (opened September 2010), Eaglesfield Paddle C of E VA Primary School (June 2011), Queen Elizabeth School, (January 2011), Kirkbie Kendal School (April 2011), The Queen Katherine School (April 2011), Queen Elizabeth Grammar (May 2011), Appleby Grammar (August 2011), Kirkby Stephen Grammar (August 2011), Settlebeck High School (August 2011), William Howard School (August 2011), Caldew School (August 2011), Dallam School (August 2011), Cartmel Priory (September 2011) and Trinity School (September 2011).

There are four sponsored academies open in Cumbria: Richard Rose Central Academy (September 2008), Richard Rose Morton Academy (2008), West Lakes Academy (September 2008) and Furness Academy (September 2009).

Children: Day Care

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that local authorities fulfil their duties under section 11 of the Childcare Act 2006 in respect of the provision of childcare for disabled children. [70253]

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1113W

Sarah Teather: Local authorities have a duty (under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006) to ensure that there is sufficient childcare locally to meet the needs of working parents and particularly families with disabled children. We want to improve the way in which local authorities keep parents informed about what they are doing to deliver this duty. The Government announced in the “Families in the Foundation Years” statement, published in July 2011,

http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/earlylearningandchildcare/early

the intention to bring forward proposals that local authorities should report annually on their Section 6 sufficiency duty, and in particular on how they are supporting families of children with disabilities to access childcare.

Local authorities have told us that the requirement (under Section 11 of the Childcare Act 2006) to publish nationally prescribed sufficiency assessments every three years is burdensome. The Government consider that a local annual report would be a more effective way of enabling parents to hold their local authority to account. The Government have therefore also decided to consult on bringing forward legislation to repeal the Section 11 duty. This consultation will be published on the Department for Education's website later in the autumn.

English Baccalaureate

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent representations he has received from religious groups on the English Baccalaureate. [70792]

Mr Gibb: The Department has received 2,809 pieces of correspondence about religious education and the English Baccalaureate. Due to the high volume it is not practical to place copies in the House Libraries but the key points made are covered in the records of the Westminster Hall Debate on 17 May and in evidence given by Religious Education organisations to the Education Committee.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether (a) Punjabi, (b) Urdu, (c) Arabic, (d) Bengali, (e) Gujarati and (f) Hindu will be included in the English Baccalaureate. [70793]

Mr Gibb: The English Baccalaureate is designed to recognise the success of those pupils who attain GCSEs or established iGCSEs at grade A* to C across a core of academic subjects: English, maths, the sciences, a language and either history or geography. The Department for Education has published a detailed list of the GCSEs that count towards English Baccalaureate. This can be viewed at:

www.education.gov.uk/performancetables

The list includes qualifications in Panjabi, Urdu, Arabic, Bengali and Gujarati. It does not include qualifications in Hindi. This is because language qualifications which are counted towards the English Baccalaureate must have a speaking element and there are currently no Hindi GCSE qualifications which meet this requirement.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1114W

Further Education

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 18 July 2011, Official Report, column 552W, on further education, if he will publish a list of applications received by his Department to open (a) free schools for 16 to 19 year olds and (b) university technical colleges in September 2012. [70657]

Mr Gibb: The Department is still in the process of assessing the applications it has received to establish Free Schools and University Technical Colleges in 2012. As stated on 18 July, these include proposals for four 16 to 19 Free Schools and 19 UTCs. An announcement will be made around the end of September about those that are approved to move to the next stage of development.

Neil Wallis

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what communications (a) he, (b) other Ministers in his Department, (c) officials in his private office and (d) (i) press officers, (ii) other officials and (iii) special advisers of his Department have had by (A) e-mail, (B) meeting, (C) telephone call and (D) letter with Neil Wallis since his appointment; and on what dates. [68738]

Tim Loughton: A check of communications showed no record of contact between the Secretary of State for Education, other Ministers in his Department, officials in his private office, press officers, and special advisors with Neil Wallis since his appointment. The Department publishes quarterly Ministers' and Permanent Secretaries' meetings with external organisations on the website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/transparency

A list of officials’ meetings is not maintained centrally and to collect such information would incur disproportionate cost.

Physics: GCE A-Level

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that errors contained in the OCR Physics A-Level examination are taken into account by admissions tutors. [68102]

Mr Gibb: On 4 August the independent exams regulator Ofqual published a statement to reassure students and their parents about remedial work which has been undertaken by awarding organisations to address exam errors. Ofqual are satisfied that awarding organisations have taken all possible steps to ensure that no student has been unfairly disadvantaged or advantaged as a result of exam errors.

University and other higher education institution admissions tutors have been provided (via UCAS) with detailed information about the measures taken in cases involving AS and A2 papers (including those from OCR) to make sure they have been fully informed.

Ofqual have additionally been in contact with UCAS and Universities UK to ensure that useful information about the nature of errors and steps to redress has been shared, enabling these bodies to be prepared for enquiries and to assist students where necessary.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1115W

Ofqual are now conducting an inquiry into these exam errors, working in partnership with their fellow regulators in Northern Ireland and Wales. The regulators intend to complete their inquiry and publish a report by the end of the year, in time to inform actions to secure the quality of exams being taken in 2012.

Schools: Pay

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the payment of a pay award of £250 in 2011-12 to all (a) classroom assistants and (b) other school employees earning less than £21,000 per annum. [68650]

Mr Gibb: Central Government do not have a role in deciding the pay and conditions of school support staff. Pay and conditions for this group, which includes teaching assistants, are decided by their employers.

The employer of support staff in foundation and voluntary aided schools is the school's governing body. The employer of support staff in community and voluntary controlled schools is the local authority. The employer of support staff in academies and free schools is the appropriate trust.

During the two-year pay freeze, which for teachers in maintained schools started on 1 September 2011, unqualified teachers who earn a full-time salary of £21,000 or less will receive a £250 payment in each of these years in line with the recommendation made by the independent School Teachers Review Body.

Special Educational Needs

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities work with other organisations, including voluntary organisations, to develop an independent special educational needs assessment process. [69718]

Sarah Teather: The reforms to the special educational needs system in England will be tested in pathfinder areas. It is a stated condition of the pathfinder ‘Invitation to Tender’ document that pathfinders should work with voluntary organisations to test ways of improving the system.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice will include guidance on timescales and processes, including communications between different agencies; [69720]

(2) whether the Special Educational Needs (SEN) Code of Practice will require a named and trained senior person in each school to be responsible for SEN; [69721]

(3) whether the Special Educational Needs (SEN) Code of Practice will include a child's right to an identified teacher with relevant training in each school who is responsible for coordinating SEN provision; [69722]

(4) whether the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice will provide rights to children without education, health and care plans or statements but who still have special educational needs; [69723]

(5) whether the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice will include regular objective setting for individual pupils; [69724]

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1116W

(6) whether the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice will have enforceable lines of accountability between (a) schools, (b) local authorities and (c) other agencies involved in providing support; [69726]

(7) whether the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice will specify a complaints and appeals process for parents and young people with special educational needs; [69727]

Sarah Teather: The current Special Educational Needs (SEN) Code of Practice sets out the duties, rights and entitlements associated with the SEN framework in England. When changes to that framework, following the SEN and disability Green Paper, are being made a revised SEN Code of Practice will consulted on and laid before the House for approval.

The revised Code will set out the timescales and processes which attach to the proposed single assessment process and Education, Health and Care Plan and the more multi-agency approach which will be inherent in these new features of the framework. It will set out schools' continuing duty to appoint a qualified teacher as a Special Educational Needs Coordinator, to whom children with SEN can have access. It will remind schools of their duty to do their best to make special educational provision for all children with learning difficulties, including those children identified with SEN but whose needs do not exceed what is normally available in schools and may not therefore have an Education, Health and Care Plan. It will also give advice to schools on identifying children with SEN and the approaches they can use to set targets for children and review progress without increasing bureaucratic burdens.

The revised Code will set out the expectations of all parties to an Education, Health and Care Plan and the arrangements for accountability, with the local authority having a duty to make the special educational provision. The new plans will provide the same statutory protection to parents as SEN statements including the right to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal (SEND) about local authority decisions in relation to SEN and provision to meet children's SEN. This will be reflected in a revised Code. The Green Paper gave a commitment that the Department will run pilots on giving children the right to appeal to the Tribunal.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that his proposals for special educational needs assessments do not exclude relevant professionals from the assessment process. [69728]

Sarah Teather: The proposals for special educational needs assessments in England are being tested in pathfinder areas. One of the things pathfinders have been asked to test is which professionals should be involved in the assessment process. Pathfinders will begin testing in September 2011.

Teachers: Manpower

Mr Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) primary and (b) secondary school teachers were employed in (i) Jarrow constituency, (ii) South Tyneside, (iii) the north-east and (iv) nationwide in each year since 1997. [70421]

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1117W

Mr Gibb: The following table gives the full-time equivalent number of regular teachers employed in local authority maintained schools in Jarrow constituency, South Tyneside local authority, the north-east and England in each year from 1997 to 2010.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1118W

Further school work force statistics are available from the November 2010 School Workforce Statistical First Release which is available at the following web link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000997/index.shtml

Full-time equivalent teachers in local authority maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools. Years: 1997-2010. Coverage: Jarrow constituency, South Tyneside local authority, the north-east Government office region and England
  Jarrow constituency South Tyneside local authority North-east Government office region England

Nursery and primary schools Secondary schools Nursery and primary schools Secondary schools Nursery and primary schools Secondary schools Nursery and primary schools Secondary schools

January

               

1997

360

300

700

590

10,400

10,790

191,670

189,430

1998

350

300

690

580

10,280

10,650

190,100

189.5B0

1999

350

310

690

610

10,310

10,640

191,120

191,780

2000

350

320

640

590

10,190

10,740

193,100

193,200

2001

360

340

680

650

10,350

11,070

194,960

196,680

2002

340

360

660

700

10,440

11,380

197,370

203,170

2003

330

350

630

690

10,210

11,340

197,430

206,670

2004

320

350

630

680

10,170

11,270

196,640

211,000

2005

310

350

610

670

10,050

11,430

196,270

215,060

2006

310

360

590

720

10,070

11,440

193,190

216,290

2007

300

360

580

680

10,020

11,450

197,100

216,850

2008

300

360

570

690

9,920

11,450

198,090

215,270

2009

300

340

590

670

9,840

11,150

198,540

212,580

2010

310

390

530

680

9,810

10,920

200,860

210,260

                 

November

               

2010

340

340

550

640

9,790

9,910

195,740

192,980

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Sources: School Census, (parliamentary constituency figures). Form 618g Survey and School Workforce Census , (November 2010)

Teaching Assistants: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teaching assistants were employed in maintained schools in Warrington borough (a) in May 2010 and (b) on the most recent date for which figures are available. [70757]

Mr Gibb: The information requested was collected in January and November 2010. The full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants employed in maintained schools in Warrington local authority in January 2010 was 860. In November 2010 there were 780 teaching assistants employed in Warrington local authority.

The January 2010 figure was collected through the School Census. The School Workforce Census (SWF) was run, in its complete form, for the first time in autumn 2010 and is the source for the November figure. Although the SWF was designed to provide figures that are comparable with those from the earlier survey data providers may not have categorised staff roles in the same way and therefore the two figures provided may not be equivalent.

Further school work force statistics are available from the November 2010 School Workforce Statistical First Release which is available at the following web link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000997/index.shtml

Health

Alzheimer’s Disease: Newham

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in Newham in (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010. [71383]

Paul Burstow: The information requested is not centrally held. However, the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) records the number of patients registered with practices in England who have had a diagnosis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. This information is available by financial year only and is presented in the following table for Newham Primary Care Trust.

Financial year Number of patients on QOF dementia register in Newham Primary Care Trust

2007-08

690

2008-09

725

2009-10

808

Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework

The hon. Member may wish to contact Newham Primary Care Trust for more specific information.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1119W

Ambulance Services: Manpower

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information data his Department holds on the number of ambulance staff in band (a) 4, (b) 5, (c) 6 and (d) 7 employed in (i) 2007, (ii) 2009 and (iii) 2011. [71217]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Bowel Cancer: Screening

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people who participated in the bowel cancer screening programme (a) in Bolton and (b) nationally in the latest period for which figures are available. [71085]

Paul Burstow: Roll-out of the NHS bowel cancer screening programme began in April 2006 and full roll-out was completed in August 2010. The programme currently invites men and women aged 60 to 69 to participate in screening every two years and it is in the process of being extended to invite men and women up to their 75th birthday.

As of July this year 10,071,589 people had been invited and 5,528,266 had been adequately screened (54.89%). Adequately screened means the return of a testing kit that produces a definitive test result. It should be noted that these figures include people who have been invited by the programme for screening more than once on separate screening rounds.

Figures for the Bolton screening centre over the same period show that 208,328 people had been invited and 105,396 people had been adequately screened (50.59%).

Cancer: Drugs

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients have accessed drugs through the Cancer Drugs Fund. [71167]

Mr Simon Burns: The Cancer Drugs Fund was launched on 1 April 2011. Over three years, the Fund is providing £200 million a year to help thousands of cancer patients access the drugs their clinicians believe will help them. As an interim measure, an additional £50 million was made available to strategic health authorities in 2010-11 to support improved access to cancer drugs. The funding we have made available since October 2010 has so far helped over 5,000 cancer patients in England to access the cancer drugs their clinicians recommended.

Community Nurses

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for the future of the district nurse service. [71093]

Anne Milton: District nurses deliver safe high quality care in the community both to patients currently receiving care in hospitals and to the growing numbers of older people with multiple health and care needs. It is for local commissioners and providers to ensure they have the work force to meet these changing health care needs.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1120W

Departmental Private Finance Initiative

Stella Creasy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will publish the value of estimated tax receipts, calculated in accordance with the green book, in each public sector economic assessment of private finance initiative projects in procurement by his Department as of March 2011. [71225]

Mr Simon Burns: Two NHS trusts—Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospitals NHS Trust—were in the procurement phase of the private finance initiative (PFI) process in March 2011. Both schemes followed the Green Book guidance and the percentage by which the public sector comparator was uplifted in the economic analysis to reflect the additional tax take that accrues to the Government from the private finance option was 6% in both cases.

This economic analysis was done for the Outline Business Cases (OBCs) at the pre-market appraisal stage and therefore is not used to assess tax takes from specific providers after contracts have been signed.

Two NHS foundation trusts—Papworth Hospitals NHS Foundation NHS Trust and Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust—exercised their powers as foundation trusts to take forward PFI schemes which were also in the procurement phase in March 2011. The OBCs for these schemes were not reviewed for approval purposes by the Department prior to March 2011. The information requested is therefore a matter for Papworth Hospitals NHS Foundation NHS Trust and Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust. We have written to the respective chairs of these two trusts, Robert Burgin at Papworth and Sir David Henshaw at Alder Hey, informing them of the hon. Member's inquiry. They will reply shortly and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library.

Departmental Written Questions

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of written questions tabled to him for answer on a named day did not receive a substantive answer on the day named for answer between (a) 27 May 2010 and 19 July 2011 and (b) 9 March 2011 and 19 July 2011. [71142]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department received 1,322 written questions due for answer on a named day between 27 May 2010 and 19 July 2011. Of those, nine questions, or 1%, were not answered substantively on the day named for answer.

Between 9 March and 19 July 2011, the Department received 523 written questions due for answer on a named day. Of those, one question, or 0.2%, was not answered substantively on the day named for answer.

Euthanasia

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent discussions (a) he, (b) Ministers of his Department and (c) officials in his Department have had with the Dementia Champion on assisted suicide; what his policy is on assisted suicide; and if he will make a statement; [R] [71018]

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1121W

(2) what recent representations he has received on the recent statements by his Department's Dementia Champion on assisted dying; what response he gave to the representations; and if he will make a statement. [R] [71080]

Paul Burstow: The comments attributed to Martin Green were made in his capacity as the chief executive of the English Community Care Association, and not in his role as the Dementia Champion for the independent sector, and do not reflect the Government's position.

The Government believe that any changes to the law, in this emotive and contentious area are an issue of individual conscience and a matter for Parliament to decide rather than Government policy. Assisted dying remains unlawful in the United Kingdom. This is the position that Ministers have set out in response to any inquiries on this matter.

Neither Ministers nor officials from the Department have had any discussions with Mr Green about assisted suicide. A departmental official spoke to Mr Green to confirm that his comments were made in his role as chief executive of the English Community Care Association and not in his capacity as Dementia Champion. Ministers have not met with, or discussed this matter with, Mr Green.

General Practitioners: Pensions

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the sums accruing to the Exchequer in respect of GP pensions in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will reconsider the proposed reform of GP pensions. [71241]

Mr Simon Burns: General practitioners (GPs) have access to the NHS pension scheme. The following table provided by the NHS Pensions Agency illustrates the sum of contributions paid by GPs between 2009 and 2011.

GP contributions to the NHS pension scheme
£000

2009-10 2010-11

Employer contributions

463,000

470,754

Employee contributions

365,858

317,225

Total contributions

829,426

787,979

Source: The NHS pension scheme and NHS compensation for retirement scheme resource accounts

Contributions made by and on behalf of GPs are to pay for pension promises being built up and are assessed by the scheme actuary using SCAPE methodology (Superannuation Contributions Adjusted for Past Experience).

The amount paid out by the NHS Pensions Agency in respect of former GP members in receipt of pensions is not available separately.

In March 2011, the independent Public Service Pensions Commission chaired by Lord Hutton concluded that given increased longevity and changes in working patterns, current arrangements for public sector pensions are unfair and unsustainable and that reform is needed.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1122W

Methadone: Wirral

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people living in the Wirral have been using methadone for (a) up to one year, (b) up to two years, (c) up to five years and (d) 10 years or more. [71675]

Anne Milton: Information is not available in the format requested.

Data on the number of people receiving a prescribing intervention for their opioid dependency in the Wirral in 2009-10 and showing how long they have been continuously receiving substitute prescribing is shown in the following table.

Length of stay in prescribing Number

Less than 12 months

454

1-2 years

256

2-3 years

170

3-4 years

114

4 years +

967

Total in prescribing

1,961

Notes: 1. The National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (NDTMS) collects information on the number of people receiving substitute prescribing interventions for substance misuse in England, but does not distinguish between methadone and other drugs such as buprenorphine which are also recommended for the treatment of drug misuse by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). 2. The National Treatment Agency took over full responsibility for managing NDTMS in 2004-05. Only the annual data from 2005-06 onwards are considered robust enough to provide detailed information about individual treatment journeys. This means that 2009-10 was the first year that robust data for those in treatment for four years or more are available.

NICE recommends that substitute prescribing should always be accompanied by psychosocial interventions. In addition “Drug Misuse and Dependence: UK Guidelines on Clinical Management” (2007), a copy of which has already been placed in the Library, states that any decision to maintain a patient on long-term prescribing should be an active one agreed between the clinician and patient, reviewed at regular intervals, and part of a broader programme of care-planned social and psychological support.

Tomography: Waiting Lists

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people waited more than six weeks for (a) MRI and (b) CT scans in (i) Bolton and (ii) England in the latest period for which figures are available. [71083]

Mr Simon Burns: Latest figures (31 July 2011) for the numbers of people waiting more than six weeks for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans in Bolton and England are provided as follows.

Waiting times for MRI and CT scans in Bolton primary care trust (PCT) (Commissioner level data) on 31 July 2011
Name Diagnostic test name Total waiting list Number waiting 6+ w eeks

Bolton PCT

MRI

431

9

Bolton PCT

CT

233

2

Waiting times for MRI and CT scans in England (Commissioner level data) on 31 July 2011
Diagnostic test name Total waits list Number waiting 6+ weeks

MRI

107,329

804

CT

65,191

691

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1123W

Deputy Prime Minister

Abdelbaset al-Megrahi

Gordon Banks: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether he has had any discussions with (a) the First Minister of Scotland and (b) other Ministers in the Scottish Government on the possible return to the UK of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi since 1 February 2011. [71343]

The Deputy Prime Minister: I have not had any such discussions with the First Minister of Scotland or any other Ministers in the Scottish Government. The possible return to the UK of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi is a matter for the Scottish Government, not the UK Government.

Departmental Responsibilities

John Mann: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister on what dates he stood in for the Prime Minister between 24 December 2010 and 6 January 2011. [67946]

The Deputy Prime Minister: The Prime Minister remains the head of the Government including when he is on holiday or away from London, whether for Government business or not. When away from the office, he has Downing street staff with him and he is in regular contact with staff and senior ministerial colleagues in London. Over the holiday periods, I and other senior Ministers are on hand to deal with urgent issues arising in London.

Departmental Written Questions

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what proportion of written questions tabled to him for answer on a named day did not receive a substantive answer on the day named for answer between (a) 27 May 2010 and 19 July 2011 and (b) 9 March 2011 and 19 July 2011. [71137]

The Deputy Prime Minister: The figures are shown in the following table:

Dates Number of named day questions tabled Number of questions answered substantively on the specified date

9 March to 19 July 2011

30

24

27 May 2010 to 19 July 2011

116

83

Cabinet Office

Cross-Departmental Working

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent steps he has taken to promote effective cross-departmental working. [70794]

Mr Maude: Departments are responsible for spending money wisely and for delivering excellent public services, and they are already delivering substantial reform programmes within their delivery chains. However, in many areas departments are unable to secure maximum value for money, and unable to reform services in the most effective manner by working in isolation.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1124W

The Cabinet Office provides a cross-Government centre of expertise through the Efficiency and Reform Group, which was setup to work across departmental boundaries where this is the best way to tackle waste, improve efficiency and reform the way services are delivered.

A recent example is the £360 million saved across departments by centralising spend on common goods and services. We have also established Crown Commercial Representatives, who saved over £800 million last year by renegotiating deals with some of our largest suppliers on a cross-Government basis. We are also promoting centres of excellence in departments where others are best placed to lead for the Crown. This includes the Next Generation HR shared service which DWP is delivering, and the Government's ICT strategy where elements of the implementation programme are being led by different departments.

Drugs: Misuse

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many deaths related to drug poisoning or misuse there were in each year since 2000; and how many were incurred by offenders who had been released within two weeks from prison [71718]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated September 2011:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many deaths related to drug poisoning or misuse there were in each year since 2000; and how many were incurred by offenders who had been released within two weeks from prison. (71718)

The table provides the number of deaths where (i) the underlying cause was drug poisoning and (ii) the underlying cause was drug poisoning and any drug controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 was mentioned on the death certificate, in England and Wales, for 2000 to 2010 (the latest year available).

It is not possible to determine from information collected at death registration whether the deceased was an offender who had recently been released from prison, since this information is not routinely recorded.

The number of deaths related to drug poisoning registered in England and Wales each year by sex, age, cause and the specific substance involved are published annually on the National Statistics website. The latest Statistical Bulletin on deaths from drug-related poisoning was published on 23 August 2011 at:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/subnational-health3/deaths-related-to-drug-poisoning/2010/index.html

Table 1: Number of deaths from drug-related poisoning and drug misuse, England and Wales, 2000-10 (1, 2, 3)
Deaths (persons)

All drug poisonings Drug misuse

2000

2,932

1,604

2001

3,093

1,808

2002

2,830

1,613

2003

2,623

1,432

2004

2,787

1,497

2005

2,762

1,608

2006

2,570

1,560

2007

2,640

1,727

2008

2,928

1,939

2009

2,878

1,876

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1125W

2010

2,747

1,784

(1) Cause of death for was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision (ICD-9) for the year 2000 and Tenth Revision (ICD 10) from 2001 onwards. The ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes for drug poisoning are shown in Box 1 as follows. Figures for drug misuse include all drug poisoning deaths where a drug controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 was mentioned on the death certificate. (2) Deaths in England and Wales include non-residents. (3) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.
Box 1. ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes for deaths related to drug poisoning
Description ICD 10 Codes ICD 9 Codes

Mental and behavioural disorders due to drug use (excluding alcohol and tobacco)

F11-F16, F18-F19

292, 304, 305.2-305.9

Accidental poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X40-X44

E850-E858

Intentional self-poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X60-X64

E950.0-E950.5

Assault by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X85

E962.0

Poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances, undetermined intent

Y10-Y14

E980.0-E980.5

Ex-servicemen: Medals

Mrs Moon: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when the Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals held meetings to discuss the Pingat Jasa Malaysia medal; what the cost of each such meeting was; and if he will make a statement. [71148]

Mr Maude: The Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals discussed the Pingat Jasa Malaysia Medal at its meeting on 7 December 2005. There were no direct costs associated with this meeting.

Home Department

Animal Experiments: Scotland

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 involved (a) cats, (b) dogs, (c) rabbits, (d) horses and other equids, (e) new world primates and (f) old world primates in 2010; and how many such procedures involved (i) genetically-modified animals and (ii) animals with a harmful genetic defect. [67999]

Lynne Featherstone: During 2010, in Scotland, there were four procedures using cats, 720 procedures using dogs, 3,826 procedures using rabbits, 2,380 procedures using horses and other equids, 47 procedures using new world primates and 885 procedures using old world primates used in regulated procedures started under the 1986 Act. None of these procedures involved (i) genetically modified animals and (ii) animals with a harmful genetic defect.

Antisocial Behaviour

Mr Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many incidents of antisocial behaviour were reported to the police in (a) South Tyneside, (b) the North East and (c) England and Wales in (i) 2009-10 and (ii) 2010-11. [70096]

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1126W

James Brokenshire: The number of antisocial behaviour incidents recorded by the police in each of the specified areas are provided in the table. These figures relate to the police record of antisocial behaviour incidents; that is, the number of “calls to service” received by them.

Anti social behaviour incidents recorded by the police (non-National Statistics) (1)
Number

2009-10 (2) 2010-11 (3)

South Tyneside

12,222

11,886

North East Region

249,744

229,448

England and Wales

3,532,297

3,235,977

(1) All police forces currently use the National Standard for Incident Recording (NSIR) to record incidents which are reported to them. While incidents are recorded under NSIR in accordance with the same 'victim focused' approach that applies for recorded crime, these figures are not accredited National Statistics and are not subject to the same level of quality assurance as the main recorded crime collection. (2) Management information on ASB incidents were collected by the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) in 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10. (3) Management information on ASB incidents were collected by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) in 2010-11.

Asylum: York

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum applicants she estimates are living in York. [71497]

Damian Green: The number of asylum applicants with a last known address with a 'YO' postcode listed is 62. This figure relates to main applicants with first time asylum claims that have yet to be concluded. All applications were made on or after 21 June 2005.

As cases are decided or applicants inform UK Border Agency of a change of address the number of applicants in York will change.

All figures quoted are internal management information only and are subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

Burglary

Mr Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases of domestic burglary were reported in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England and Wales in each year since 1997. [70089]

James Brokenshire: Data are not centrally available for Jarrow.

The Home Office collects data on the numbers of offences recorded by the police. Data are provided in the following tables for cases of domestic burglary in South Tyneside, the North East and for England and Wales.

Table 1: B urglary in a dwelling offences recorded by the police in 1997
Area 1997

Jarrow Constituency

(1)

South Tyneside CDRP/CSP

(1)

North East Region

31,310

England and Wales

519,265

(1) Data not centrally available. Notes: 1. These data are not comparable with those for later years due to the counting rules and offence coverage in use at the time. 2. Prior to 2009-10, Community Safety Partnerships {CSPs) were referred to as Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs).

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Table 2: Burglary in a dwelling offences recorded by the police from 1998-99 to 2001-02
Area 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02

Jarrow Constituency

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

South Tyneside CDRP/CSP

(1)

1,351

1,337

1,115

North East Region

28.806

24,300

21,720

23,614

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1128W

England and Wales

473,349

442,602

402,984

430,347

(1) Data not centrally available. Notes: 1. These data are not comparable with those before or after this period due to the counting rules and extended offence coverage in use at the time. 2. Prior to 2009-10, Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) were referred to as Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs).
Table 3: Burglary in a dwelling offences recorded by the police from 2002-03 to 2010-11
Area 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Jarrow Constituency

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

South Tyneside CDRP/CSP

1,169

1,036

792

647

606

489

424

306

235

North East Region

21,583

19,550

14,934

13,095

12,303

10,881

10,408

8,597

7,618

England and Wales (inc. BTP)

437,583

402,345

321,507

300,517

292,260

280.696

284,431

268,610

258,148

(1) Data not centrally available. Notes: 1. These data are not comparable with previous years data to the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard (NCRS) across all forces in April 2002. 2. Prior to 2009-10, Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) were referred to as Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships {CDRPs).

Cannabis: Crime

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police raids on properties in (a) Berkshire, (b) Reading and (c) Reading West constituency resulted in the discovery of cannabis farms in the last 12 months. [70805]

James Brokenshire: The information requested on the number of cannabis farms discovered in the areas concerned is not held centrally.

Figures are available by police area, which in this case is Thames Valley Police. The most recent figures were published in the UK National Problem Profile, Commercial Cultivation of Cannabis, July 2010. The Association of Chief Police Officers found there to be 172 cannabis farms in the Thames Valley Police area representing eight farms per 100,000 population.

Civil Disorder

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral statement of 11 August 2011, on public disorder, Official Report, columns 1051-1105, what her latest estimate is of the likely cost of insurance payments to policyholders who suffered losses in the August 2011 disturbances; and if she will estimate the total cost to the public purse of the disturbances including a breakdown of expenditure for each purpose. [69783]

Nick Herbert: There is, as yet, no estimate for the total cost of insurance payments or cost to the public purse resulting from the disorder in August 2011. Discussions are ongoing between the Home Office, HM Treasury, police authorities and the Claims Bureau to assess the financial impact of the recent disorder.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was paid to each individual for claims submitted under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and if she will make a statement. [69825]

Nick Herbert: Claims for compensation under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 are made directly to the police authorities, which take the final decision as to whether a payment is made, and the size of that payment. These data are not held centrally.

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were arrested in England and Wales in connection with public disorder in August 2011. [70126]

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were arrested in England and Wales following the public disorder in August 2011. [71183]

Nick Herbert: The Ministry of Justice is currently publishing frequent updates on people arrested who were dealt with by the court system in relation to the disturbances on 6-9 August. These reports can be found on the Ministry of Justice website at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/ad-hoc/index.htm

As the publication notes, the Ministry of Justice chief statistician will review the quality of data and release further breakdowns as reliable data become available. It is intended to release further data on 13 September. A more detailed release will be published on 15 September containing detailed information on age, gender, offence committed, sentence given, and previous criminal history.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to bring forward proposals to amend or repeal the Riot (Damages) Act 1886. [70133]

Nick Herbert: We are in the process of reviewing the Act and are considering all options for reform. However, the legislation still remains in place and claims for compensation following the recent disorder can still be made from businesses and households to police authorities.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many businesses (a) in

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1129W

Birmingham and

(b)

elsewhere in England have sought to claim damages under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 since August 2011. [70488]

Nick Herbert: It is not yet possible to provide information on the number of claims received for businesses as the data are still being received and collated locally. Claims for compensation under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 are made to the local police authority, who assess claims made to them and take the final decision as to whether a payment is made, and the size of that payment. The Home Office is supporting police authorities to enable these claims to be processed quickly.

Confiscation Orders

Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were removed at the request of the Serious Organised Crime Agency in each year since 2006. [70444]

Damian Green: The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) routinely monitors any case of interest to them where a Judge recommends a deportation at end of sentence, or where an individual will automatically be considered for deportation by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) by virtue of their length of sentence.

SOCA notifies the UKBA of convicted cases where they have an interest, but this does not signify a request to remove.

In addition to those cases where convictions have been obtained SOCA has referred to UKBA 14 individuals of interest to establish if an immigration solution can be presented as a means of disrupting organised criminal activity, principally through removal of the individual from the United Kingdom. Of those 14 cases three individuals were identified as having left the UK; two were reviewed but are not removable currently, and nine are being monitored and if appropriate will be considered for removal action.

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Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the monetary value was of criminal assets recovered by the Serious Organised Crime Agency through the use of (a) its taxation powers, (b) civil recovery, (c) criminal confiscation and (d) cash forfeiture in each year since 2006. [70445]

Nick Herbert: Since 2006 the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) has recovered criminal assets with the following monetary value:

£ million

Civil recovery and tax receipts (1) Confiscation orders enforced Cash forfeiture

2006-07

n/a

4.3

2.3

2007-08

n/a

8.0

2.9

2008-09

16.7

7.0

4.5

2009-10

6.8

7.4

10.2

2010-11

8.0

7.6

4.7

(1) SOCA did not have civil recovery and tax powers prior to April 2008.

Civil recovery and tax receipts are shown as a combined figure because in a number of cases a single settlement figure is agreed.

Crime

Mr Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many offences of (a) crime related to vehicles, (b) burglary of a dwelling, (c) other burglary, (d) criminal damage, (e) theft, (f) violence and (g) other crimes were committed in (i) Coventry and (ii) Warwickshire in each of the last five years. [70344]

James Brokenshire: The available information relates to offences recorded by the police and is given in the following tables:

Table 1: Offences recorded by the police in Coventry
Offence 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Offences against vehicles

5,828

3,862

3,887

3,458

3,929

Burglary in a dwelling

2,431

2,152

2,164

2,195

2,715

Burglary in other building

2,218

1,917

1,623

1,782

1,744

Criminal damage

8,120

6,600

5,976

5,723

5,221

Other theft offences(1)

6,562

5,758

5,467

5,446

5,860

Violence against the person

7,592

7,229

6,631

6,552

5,153

Other crimes

4,210

3,499

3,364

3,322

3,159

Total

36,961

31,017

29,112

28,478

27,781

(1) Excluding offences against vehicles.
Table 2: Offences recorded by the police in Warwickshire
Offence 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Offences against vehicles

7,649

5,790

5,769

4,740

4,268

Burglary in a dwelling

2,844

2,373

2,216

2,261

2,014

Burglary in other building

3,601

3,173

3,428

3,262

3,305

Criminal damage

10,267

9,234

8,006

6,458

6,016

Other theft offences(1)

8,686

7,818

8,251

7,860

8,075

Violence against the person

7,386

7,526

5,957

5,302

5,369

Other crimes

4,824

4,054

3,741

3,945

3,780

Total

45,257

39,968

37,368

33,828

32,827

(1) Excluding offences against vehicles.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1131W

Crime Prevention

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made on the introduction of gang injunctions. [70150]

James Brokenshire: The Government introduced gang injunctions for adults in January 2011. As we announced last month we will make them available for 14 to 17 year olds by the end of the year.

Departmental Written Questions

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of written questions tabled to her for answer on a named day did not receive a substantive answer on the day named for answer between (a) 27 May 2010 and 19 July 2011 and (b) 9 March 2011 and 19 July 2011. [71129]

Damian Green: From 27 May 2010 until 19 July 2011, the Home Office gave a substantive answer to 425 out of 1,241 (34.2%) questions on the day named for answer. From 9 March 2011 until 19 July 2011, the Home Office gave a substantive answer to 154 out of 449 (34.3%) questions on the day named for answer.

The Government have committed to providing the Procedure Committee with information relating to written parliamentary question performance on a sessional basis and will provide full information to the Committee at the end of the Session. Statistics relating to Government Departments' performance for the 2009-10 parliamentary Session were previously provided to the committee and are available on the Parliament website.

Deportation: Offenders

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Sufi and Elmi v. the United Kingdom, what steps she plans to take to protect the public from foreign offenders living in the UK who cannot be deported. [63853]

Damian Green: During their custodial sentence foreign national prisoners are managed in the same way as other prisoners. They are referred to the UK Border Agency by the National Offender Management Service to establish their immigration status near to the start of their sentence.

The UK Border Agency seeks to deport from the UK foreign national offenders who meet the following criteria:

A court recommendation.

For non-EEA nationals—a custodial sentence of 12 months or more either in one sentence or as an aggregate of two or three sentences over a period of five years, or a custodial sentence of any length for a drug offence (other than possession).

For EEA nationals—a custodial sentence of 12 months or more for an offence involving drugs, violent or sexual crimes or a custodial sentence of 24 months or more for other offences.

Deportation is pursued where possible.

Where deportation is pursued, but delayed due to documentation and other issues, at the end of an individual's custodial sentence the UK Border Agency will decide if detention under immigration powers is appropriate.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1132W

Every detention decision is made on a case by case basis. The criminal history is considered in terms of the potential risk of harm to the public if a foreign criminal is released. Those who are detained have always been able to apply to an independent immigration judge for bail. Where the UK Border Agency believes there is a risk to the public we will vigorously oppose bail applications or ask the court to impose reporting and electronic tagging restrictions if bail is granted.

In terms of managing the risk of reoffending in the community foreign offenders are treated in the same way as British offenders.

Foreign offenders who are eligible for Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), by the nature of the offence they have committed and sentence received, are managed in the same way as British MAPPA eligible offenders. All MAPPA eligible offenders are identified following sentence. Information is shared with relevant agencies and a risk assessment conducted to ensure an appropriate risk management plan is in place for the offenders management in the community.

Detention Centres: Death

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what investigations she has undertaken into deaths in immigration detention which occurred during August 2011; and if she will publish the findings of any such investigation; [70818]

(2) what deaths occurred in immigration detention in each month of each of the last five years. [70820]

Damian Green [holding answer 8 September 2011]:The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) is currently investigating a death that occurred in immigration detention in August 2011. Upon completion the findings of the investigation will be published on the PPO website.

The police are informed of any deaths that occur of individuals detained in, or travelling to or from, an immigration removal centre in the care of UK Border Agency staff or its contractors. They take a decision independent of the UK Border Agency as to whether or not a police investigation is appropriate. All deaths are also referred to the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman who conduct a separate investigation in to the circumstances of the death.

Following the conclusion of the investigation, the office of the PPO will publish an anonymised report on its website.

Five deaths have occurred in the last five years of individuals detained in, or travelling to or from, an immigration removal centre as follows:

April 2010

October 2010

July 2011—two unrelated incidents

August 2011.

It would be inappropriate to comment on the details of these deaths whilst they are the subject of ongoing investigations by the PPO. When concluded, the Ombudsman's report of his investigation will be published on the PPO website.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1133W

Domestic Violence

Mr Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assistance her Department provides to victims of domestic violence who flee their homes. [70182]

Lynne Featherstone: For the next four years the Home Office has committed over £28 million of funding for specialist services to tackle violence against women and girls.

For domestic violence this includes:

national helplines including the National Domestic Violence helpline, Respect, the Men's Advice Line and Broken Rainbow;

support for Independent Domestic Violence Advisors (IDVAs) and Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) nationally;

investment in the training and quality assurance process for MARACs and IDVAs; and

a contribution to the running costs of the joint Home Office/Foreign Commonwealth Office Forced Marriage Unit.

Decisions around the provision of accommodation and services for victims of domestic abuse are a local matter and it is the responsibility of the individual local authority to identify any gaps in service provision and put in place appropriate solutions to address this. We would expect local authorities to build services based on the needs of their communities, taking account of locally available data sources. In 2009-10—the most recent year for which data are available—local authorities spent £70.9 million on housing related support for victims of domestic violence.

Drugs: Crime

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the street value of illegal drugs confiscated during police raids in (a) Berkshire, (b) Reading and (c) Reading West constituency in each of the last five years. [70806]

James Brokenshire: The information requested on drug seizures is not collected centrally by the Home Office.

Drug seizures are not recorded by street value due to the value of illegal drugs varying according to a number of factors including: purity, availability, demand and locality.

Seizures are therefore usually recorded by weight and/or or units.

Entry Clearances: Overseas Students

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on support for individuals who have paid course fees and application fees to colleges subsequently disaccredited by the UK Border Agency. [71191]

Damian Green: Where the UK Border Agency revokes the licence of a Tier 4 sponsor their students have 60 days to find another college that is willing to sponsor them or to leave the UK. The new sponsor must issue a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies and the student must apply for new leave to remain. We would expect

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1134W

colleges to have insurance in place in order to repay fees if necessary, and students should check the position before accepting an offer.

Our reforms mean that in future only responsible colleges offering high quality education will be able to sponsor students to come to the UK.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many removals involving individuals granted entry clearance to the UK via the student visa route there have been in each of the last five years. [71192]

Damian Green: The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The UK Border Agency standard reports record removals either on the basis of the immigration offence (i.e. illegal working, overstaying) or the removal category (i.e. enforced removal, voluntary departure). The entry clearance route under which the applicant originally entered the UK is not recorded within these removal reports.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received from colleges on proposed changes to the student visa system. [71193]

Damian Green: The Government are making radical changes to the immigration system. The old student visa regime was open to widespread abuse and failed to protect legitimate students from being exploited by poor quality colleges. The changes we are implementing will tighten up the system, tackle abuse and continue to attract the brightest and the best students from across the world. We have had a significant amount of correspondence from colleges, as they seek to understand and adapt to the new system.

Forensic Science Service

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the Government's plans are for the archive of the Forensic Science Service. [70660]

Mrs May [holding answer 8 September 2011]: The Forensic Science Service archive will remain publicly-owned, and historical data within the archive will continue to be available to the criminal justice system.

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will provide a breakdown of the costs to date of closing down the Forensic Science Service. [70661]

Mrs May [holding answer 8 September 2011]: The Forensic Science Service (FSS) has been making significant financial losses and we are determined to make the managed closure as cost-effective to the taxpayer as possible. To date the Government have provided the FSS with £20 million of funding to maintain operational continuity during the transition as well as £8.7 million to cover staff redundancy payments.

The final cost of the managed closure is not yet known.

13 Sep 2011 : Column 1135W

Government Procurement Card

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) transaction date, (b) transaction amount and (c) supplier was of each transaction undertaken by the (i) UK Passport Agency and (ii) Parole Board using the Government Procurement Card in (A) 2008-09 and (B) 2009-10; and which of these transactions attracted level three or enhanced transaction entry. [70836]

Damian Green [holding answer 12 September 2011]: In the financial year 2008-09 the Identity and Passport Service (formerly the UK Passport Agency) total Government Procurement Card (GPC) expenditure was £711,586.15 and in 2009-10 it was £357,000. It is not possible to provide a breakdown of GPC transactions for the financial years 2008-09 and 2009-10 without incurring disproportionate cost.

A schedule of corporate charge card transactions for the Parole Board, an arm’s length body of the Ministry of Justice, will be placed in the House of Commons Library. There were no GPC transactions in 2008-09 and 2009-10 which were level three or required enhanced transaction entry.

Stella Creasy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will publish the value of estimated tax receipts, calculated in accordance with the Green Book, in each public sector economic assessment of private finance initiative projects in procurement by her Department as of March 2011. [71224]

Damian Green: The Home Office, its Executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) did not have any private finance initiative projects in procurement as of March 2011. Had it done so, the economic assessment of options would have been carried out in accordance with HM Treasury's Value for Money model which accompanies the Green Book.

Hillsborough Independent Panel

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many times the Hillsborough Independent Panel has met since it was formed. [70045]

Nick Herbert: The Hillsborough Independent Panel's terms of reference indicate that it is expected to meet monthly. In accordance with its terms of reference it has now met 19 times since its first meeting in February 2010.

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many documents the Hillsborough Independent Panel has reviewed. [70063]

Nick Herbert: The Hillsborough Independent Panel is accessing and researching hundreds of thousands of documents and other materials relating to the context, circumstances and aftermath of the disaster. It will publish a comprehensive, independent and analytical report and establish a public archive. I understand that it is the panel's intention to publish all documents simultaneously.

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Immigration

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been in the UK without valid leave to remain for longer than 10 years. [71073]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency is not able to provide the information requested. It is not possible to accurately quantify the number of individuals currently in the UK without valid leave to remain, as some deliberately evade immigration control in order to remain in the country illegally.

The e-Borders system enables checks to be made on individuals arriving or exiting the country at a majority of the points of entry to the UK but is not yet fully rolled out. The Government are committed to ensuring that the number of UK ports undertaking exit checks is increased to ensure a complete travel history record on all passengers.

The UK Border Agency is currently in the process of establishing local immigration teams across the UK to gather intelligence, tackle illegal working, and track down and detain immigration offenders. The focus of these teams will include the prevention and disruption of illegal activity and the arrest and removal of offenders.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall North (Mr Winnick) of 9 August 2011 regarding the proposed reduction in the number of police in the West Midlands. [70662]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 8 September 2011]: I wrote to the hon. Gentleman on 22 August 2011.

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she intends to answer the letter sent to the Minister for Immigration by the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton (Sir Gerald Kaufman) on 4 July 2011 with regard to Mrs S Rahman. [69815]

Damian Green: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 6 September 2011.

Telephone Hacking

Ms Ritchie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has had discussions with the Metropolitan police on allegations of telephone hacking of (a) public figures and (b) victims of terrorism in Northern Ireland. [66158]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 14 July 2011]: The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), discussed the allegations of phone hacking generally with the Metropolitan Police.

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North Yorkshire Police: Expenditure

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much the North Yorkshire police authority has spent in (a) cash and (b) real terms in each year since 1996-97. [71496]

Nick Herbert: While the Government provide core police funding, spending decisions are made locally by the chief constables and police authorities. Data on expenditure are not collected centrally. However, this information is published annually by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA).

Nottinghamshire Police Authority

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hours officers in Nottinghamshire police spent on front-line activities in (a) 2009 and (b) 2010. [70505]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 7 September 2011]: The requested information is not collected centrally.

Parliament Square: Demonstrations

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidance is issued to Metropolitan police officers in respect of the policing of permanent demonstrations in Parliament Square; and what factors police officers take into account in determining whether to permit or deter any demonstration at the point at which they commence. [71031]

Nick Herbert: The Home Office does not issue any such guidance. Section 134 of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 sets out the criteria that the Metropolitan police would use to manage protest in Parliament Square. The Government are bringing forward reforms in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill to ensure that Parliament Square can be enjoyed by all, and we have given a commitment to issue guidance to support effective enforcement of the new provisions.

Police

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what estimate she has made of the amount of police officer time spent on (a) administrative duties and (b) front line policing in each of the last five years; and what steps she plans to take to monitor the balance of such time in the future; [66820]

(2) what proportion of police officer time on average was spent on administration and internal organisation in each of the past five years; and if she will make a statement. [66811]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 18 July 2011]: According to the Front Line Policing Measure commissioned by the last Government, police officers spent 21.7% of their time on paperwork and 13.8% on patrol in 2007-08, the last year for which figures were available.

The Government are clear that the police should focus on police work not paperwork and the Home Office is now engaged in a comprehensive programme

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of action to deliver this commitment. That is why on 9 May 2011 I announced a new package of policies that will cut police bureaucracy, saving up to 2.5 million police hours per year.

In moving away from central control to local accountability it will be for chief constables to monitor how they use their resources to cut crime.

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) which foreign countries have provided security training to police forces in the UK in the latest period for which figures are available; [69358]

(2) which police forces purchased security training from outside the UK in the latest period for which figures are available. [69359]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 7 September 2011]: This information is not collected centrally.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers there were in Nottinghamshire on (a) 5 May 2010 and (b) the latest date for which figures are available. [70310]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 7 September 2011]: Police personnel data are not centrally collected for May 2010. Published statistics from the Home Office police personnel database show that as at 31 March 2010 there were 2,409 and as at 31 March 2011, there were 2,319 full-time equivalent (FTE) police officers in the Nottinghamshire police force area.

The latest published police personnel statistics relate to 31 March 2011 and were published in July 2011. They are available online at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/police-research/hosb1311/hosb1311?view=Binary

Mr Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many full-time equivalent (a) police officers, (b) police community support officers and (c) police civilian staff were employed by (i) West Midlands Police force and (ii) Warwickshire Police force in (A) May 2010 and (B) the latest period for which figures are available. [70353]

Nick Herbert: The available information shows the number of (full-time equivalent) police officers, police community support officers and police civilian staff that were employed by West Midlands police force and Warwickshire police force as at 31 March 2010 and 31 March 2011 and appears within the following table. Figures are collected on a financial year basis and the latest period for which figures are available are as at 31 March 2011.

Number of police officers, police community support officers and police civilian staff that were employed by West Midlands police force and Warwickshire police force, as at 31 March 2010 and 31 March 2011 (1)
  West M idlands Warwickshire

2010 2011 2010 2011

Police Officers

8,626

8,149

973

919

Police Community Support Officers

811

758

138

136

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Police Civilian Staff

3,667

3,184

765

720

(1) This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Source: Home Office using data received from police forces via the Annual Data Requirement