Water Power

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent progress his Department has made in the development of the Offshore Energy Strategic Environmental Assessment for English and Welsh waters to support the deployment of marine energy devices. [69230]

Charles Hendry: The Offshore Strategic Environmental Assessment (OESEA) has been completed and was subject to a 12-week public consultation period. The assessment document can be found at:

http://www.offshore-sea.org.uk/site/index.php

My officials are currently preparing a post-consultation report which should be published on the SEA website shortly.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department plans to take to accelerate the development and deployment of marine renewable technologies at commercial scale through the UK Marine Energy Programme. [69231]

Gregory Barker: At the start of this year I launched the UK Marine Energy Programme which has established three working groups, Financing, Planning and Consenting and Knowledge Sharing, to examine the issues and potential barriers to the development and deployment of marine renewable technologies at commercial scale. The working groups draw their representatives from across the industry including the energy utilities, industrial companies, technology developers, financiers as well as Government.

The outputs of the Financing working group fed into the Department's deliberations on innovation support and it provided evidence to support the Department's decision to invest up to £20 million, subject to a value for money assessment, in wave and tidal power to help develop marine energy technologies from prototype stage to demonstration of arrays of devices. The group has also fed into the current renewables obligation banding review.

The next board meeting will take place towards the end of the year.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether marine energy projects will be eligible to receive support through his proposed feed-in tariff with Contract for Difference. [69234]

Charles Hendry: Under the reforms outlined in the EMR White Paper, the competitive market will continue but four inter-locking policy instruments are proposed to change the returns generators can expect for the power stations they build and the electricity they generate:

Greater long-term certainty around the additional cost of running polluting plant through a carbon price floor. Proposals from the Treasury to provide greater support and certainty to the

6 Sep 2011 : Column 523W

carbon price will increase investment in low carbon generation by providing a clearer long-term price for carbon in the power sector.

Long-term contracts for low carbon generation will make clean energy investment more attractive still. Through a ‘contract for difference' feed-in tariff, the Government will agree clear, long-term contracts, resulting in a top-up payment to low carbon generators if wholesale prices are low but clawing back money for consumers if prices become higher than the cost of low carbon generation. An alternative ‘premium' feed-in tariff is also set out in the consultation document.

Additional payments to encourage the construction of reserve plants to ensure the lights stay on. A capacity mechanism will ensure there remains an adequate safety cushion of capacity as the amount of intermittent and inflexible low carbon generation increases.

A back-stop to limit how much carbon the most dirty power stations—coal—can emit. An Emissions Performance Standard will reinforce the existing requirement that no new coal is built without carbon capture and storage.

The reforms are aimed at giving existing players and new entrants in the energy sector the certainty they need to raise the level of investment they need. Ofgem's review into the liquidity of the wholesale electricity market will be an essential complement to the reforms.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what progress he has made in establishing the South West Marine Energy Park. [69379]

Gregory Barker: At the first meeting of the UK Marine Energy Programme Board earlier this year I asked stakeholders in the south-west of England to come forward with plans for how they could create a marine energy park in the region which could form a potential model for other regions looking at establishing their own marine energy park.

Regen South West, along with representatives of Plymouth and Cornwall council, presented their concept of a Marine Energy Park to the UK Marine Energy Programme Board last June. The presentation was well received and showed the right balance of ambition, practicality and flexibility necessary to design a sustainable park and build on the strengths which exist in the region.

They are developing their proposals further and will provide an update at the next programme board. I have had meetings with other regional stakeholders to discuss how they might create Marine Energy Parks in their own areas.

Wave Power

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans he has to support the Siadar Wave Energy Project. [69314]

Gregory Barker: It would not be appropriate for me to comment on whether the Government will provide support for individual companies or projects.

However, the coalition Government is committed to supporting the development of marine energy in the UK. I am working with the sector, through the Marine Energy Programme Board, to address the barriers which exist to the development of the wave and tidal sector in the UK. This includes the Department's ongoing plans to establish Marine Energy Parks and our recent announcement of up to £20 million innovation funding, subject to value for money assessment, to support the demonstration of arrays of devices.

6 Sep 2011 : Column 524W

Wind Power

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what support he plans to provide for the development of the Eneco wind park. [69237]

Charles Hendry: Offshore wind farms are supported at the technology level, based on the amount of electricity they generate. Currently, wind farms accredited by 31 March 2014 are supported under the renewables obligation (RO) at two renewable obligation certificates (ROCs) per MWh. We are currently carrying out a banding review to determine RO support levels beyond then. Through electricity market reform, we are putting in place future support for low carbon electricity generation, as set out in our White Paper(1). The UK's Renewable Energy Roadmap(2) ( )sets out a comprehensive action plan to accelerate the UK's deployment and use of renewable energy. This includes offshore wind as one of the eight technologies that have the greatest potential to help meet our renewable energy target. Both documents were published on 12 July this year.

I co-chair the Offshore Wind Developers Forum, which is working with UK offshore wind developers to ensure the deliverability of offshore wind and to identify economic opportunities for business in the UK.

(1) ( )http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/legislation/white_papers/ emr_wp_2011.aspx

(2) ( )http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/meeting_energy/renewable _ener/re_roadmap/re_roadmap.aspx

Home Department

UK Border Agency Worker Scheme

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 19 July 2011, Official Report, columns 805-6W, on the UK Border Agency Worker Scheme, how many applications to the UK Border Agency Worker Registration Scheme have been accepted since the establishment of the scheme; and what the nationality was of (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful applicants. [69549]

Damian Green: The Worker Registration Scheme was established in May 2004 and ended on 30 April 2011. The total number of applications that were accepted since the scheme was established is 2,001,254.

The number of applications approved and refused by nationality is provided in the table.

Nationality Approved Refused

Czech Republic

78,114

939

Estonia

16,100

147

Hungary

82,997

452

Latvia

140,852

836

Lithuania

213,309

1,793

Poland

1,209,698

6,045

Slovakia

181,507

2,022

Slovenia

1,694

18

Other

6

1,116

Total

1,924,277

13,368

6 Sep 2011 : Column 525W

Animal Welfare

Neil Parish: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether it will be a mandatory requirement for designated establishments to meet or exceed the standards set out in future codes of practice on (a) humane killing and (b) housing and care of animals used in scientific procedures. [69763]

Nick Herbert: Annexes III and IV of European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes set out mandatory requirements for the care and accommodation of animals and methods of killing, respectively. The requirements of annex IV must be implemented in UK legislation from 1 January 2013 and those of annex III from 1 January 2017.

Article 2 of the European directive allows member states to retain stricter national provisions in force on 9 November 2010 provided such measures do not inhibit the free market by prohibiting or impeding the supply or use of animals from another member state applying the minimum standards set out in the directive, or the placing on the market of products developed with the use of such animals.

Views on the application of article 2 in relation to the matters covered by annexes III and IV are being sought in the public consultation on the options for transposition of the European directive. The public consultation was published on 13 June 2011 and closes today (5 September 2011). Careful account will be taken of any responses received on these matters in the development of future guidance and codes of practice.

Neil Parish: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has for (a) guidance notes and (b) codes of practice regarding humane killing, severity classification of procedures and animal housing and care to accompany legislation implementing Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes; and what plans she has to consult stakeholders from the research community, veterinarians, animal technologists and representatives of animal welfare organisations on such guidance notes and codes of practice. [69819]

Nick Herbert: Preliminary work on the preparation of guidance and a code of practice to accompany the legislation implementing European Directive 2010/63/EU has begun. We will seek input from individuals and groups with an interest, including those listed, at appropriate points in the detailed drafting process.

Neil Parish: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has any plans to change the (a) nature and (b) frequency of inspections of establishments designated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. [69820]

Nick Herbert: At present the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Inspectorate implements a risk-based approach to inspection and as such the frequency, duration and style of inspection may vary as any relevant risks alter.

Views on the inspection system have been sought in the public consultation on the options for transposition of European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes. The public consultation

6 Sep 2011 : Column 526W

was published on 13 June 2011 and closed on 5 September 2011. The arrangements for inspections will be determined after relevant responses have been considered.

Neil Parish: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to allocate additional funding for the National Committee for the Protection of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes arising from implementation of Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes. [69822]

Lynne Featherstone: The functions of the National Committee for the Protection of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes are set out in Article 49 of European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes.

Views on the National Committee are currently being sought in the public consultation on the options for transposition of the directive. The public consultation was published on 13 June 2011 and closed on 5 September 2011.

The arrangements for the National Committee, including any funding requirements, will be determined in due course after relevant responses have been considered.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to reduce the number of animals bred for use in scientific research; and if she will make a statement. [69843]

Lynne Featherstone: The licensing system under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 is demand led and provides no direct mechanism for reducing the breeding and use of animals. Instead the Act requires that animal use is kept to a minimum.

The coalition agreement includes a commitment to work to reduce the use of animals in scientific research. The commitment will be delivered through a science-led programme led by the National Centre for Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), an organisation with a strong record in reducing animal use.

The programme will focus on refinement as well as reduction and replacement and will co-ordinate action to minimise and reduce animal use and suffering while avoiding actions which might simply drive work abroad to countries where lower standards or less stringent testing guidelines apply.

Any reduction in animal use achieved by the programme is likely also to have an impact on the demand for purpose-bred animals in the UK.

Antisocial Behaviour

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to provide support to the voluntary and third sector to provide services to tackle antisocial behaviour in urban areas. [69691]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office announced the creation of the Community Action Against Crime: Innovation Fund in July 2011. This fund is worth £5 million in 2011-12 and a further £5 million in 2012-13. The fund seeks to encourage the voluntary and community

6 Sep 2011 : Column 527W

sector to develop creative new approaches to tackling crime in local neighbourhoods, including antisocial behaviour. It will open to bids at the end of this month.

The Home Office is developing work in response to the recommendations made by Baroness Newlove, the Government's Champion for Active, Safer Communities, in her report “Our Vision for Safe and Active Communities”. This includes the roll-out of the 101 non-emergency number for reporting antisocial behaviour, and driving up volunteering in the civil service. The Home Office has also provided funding for seven “Newlove Neighbourhoods”, supporting community activists to tackle the crime and antisocial behaviour problems in their neighbourhoods.

Antisocial Behaviour: Crime Prevention

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information her Department holds on the number of Mosquito devices in operation in (a) the UK and (b) each local authority area. [69559]

Nick Herbert: The Home Office does not collect information centrally on the number of Mosquito devices in operation in the UK or in individual local authority areas.

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has received representations on the (a) appropriateness, (b) ethics and (c) legality of the use of the Mosquito device; and if she will make a statement. [69560]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office has received representations from members of the public and a range of organisations on the appropriateness, ethics and legality of the Mosquito device.

Use of the Mosquito is not currently prohibited or regulated under UK law. It is a commercial product and is not endorsed by the Home Office or the Association of Chief Police Officers.

Civil Disorder

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to recover from the perpetrators the costs of (a) policing and (b) damage arising from public disorder in August 2011. [69254]

Nick Herbert: There are currently no plans to recover the policing costs from the perpetrators of the disorder. However, courts can impose a compensation order for any offence that has resulted in personal injury, loss or damage. This will apply where individual victims have been injured, as well as where individuals or businesses have experienced offences such as theft, burglary or criminal damage. The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill will strengthen the law on compensation orders by giving the courts a clear, positive duty to consider imposing such an order in any case where there is an identifiable victim.

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) homeowners and (b) businesses have sought compensation under the

6 Sep 2011 : Column 528W

Riot (Damages) Act 1886 in respect of damage or loss sustained during the disturbances in August 2011; how many have received compensation to date; what the average sum paid in compensation has been; and how much compensation she expects to be paid (i) to those who have submitted claims and (ii) in total when all claims have been received. [69786]

Nick Herbert: We do not hold this information centrally, as claims under the Riot Damages Act are made direct to police authorities.

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police forces have (a) applied for and (b) received additional funding from her Department towards the cost of responding to the disturbances in August 2011; and how much she estimates will be paid out by her Department in respect of these costs. [69788]

Nick Herbert: To date, no forces have applied for or received funding to cover the cost of policing the disturbances in August 2011.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what payments were made to each police authority under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 in each year since 1997; what estimate she has made of the amount of such payments likely to be made in the next 12 months; and if she will make a statement. [69821]

Nick Herbert: Claims for compensation under the Riot (Damages) Act 1996 are made directly to the police authorities. These data are not held centrally. There is no estimate yet for the total cost for any future claims.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) males and (b) females in each (i) age group and (ii) local authority were (A) killed, (B) seriously injured and (C) slightly injured during recent incidents of public disorder; and if she will make a statement. [69827]

Nick Herbert: Data for offences recorded by the police in England and Wales in August (the month that these incidents of public disorder took place) will be available from 19 January 2012. It will not be possible to identify which of these offences were linked to the recent incidents of public disorder.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals she plans to bring forward to tackle public disorder; what recent representations she has received on this issue; and if she will make a statement. [69828]

Nick Herbert: The Government are working closely with the police and HM Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) to ensure that they have the powers, tactics and the resources that they need to tackle public disorder on our streets.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the costs to the public purse of recent public disorder; and if she will make a statement. [69833]

6 Sep 2011 : Column 529W

Nick Herbert: There is no estimate yet for the total cost resulting from the disturbances in August 2011.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate has been made of the cost of policing in respect of public disorder in August 2011. [69255]

Nick Herbert: There is no estimate yet for the total cost of policing resulting from the disturbances in August 2011.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate has been made of the total cost of damage caused by public disorder in August 2011. [69256]

Damian Green: There is no estimate yet for the total cost of damage resulting from the disturbances in August 2011.

Crime

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) murders and (b) sexual offences recorded in each police force area in the last 12 months have not yet resulted in a conviction; and if she will make a statement. [66808]

James Brokenshire: Available homicide data are collected by the Home Office from police forces in England and Wales and have been extracted from the Homicide Index. Table A shows the number of offences recorded as homicide (murder, manslaughter and infanticide) in 2009-10 for which no-one has been convicted. It is not possible to separately identify those offences recorded as murder.

Data are as at 28 September 2010 and subject to revision as cases are dealt with by the police and by the courts, or as further information becomes available. This is particularly the case for 2009-10 data given the time it can take to bring suspects to trial.

The data include cases for which: the principal suspect committed suicide or died before proceedings could be initiated or before proceedings could be concluded; the suspect was found to be insane; all suspects were acquitted and police investigations are continuing; and, no suspects have been charged.

Although provisional homicide data for 2010-11 were published in “Crime in England and Wales” 2010-11 on 14 July 2011, these figures do not include convictions data. A first analysis of 2010-11 homicide data including convictions will be available in January 2012.

Data on police recorded sexual offences are collected by the Home Office. The data relating to police recorded sexual offences for 2010-11 are provided in Table B. Data relating to conviction status are not available.

Data on reported sexual offences which have not yet resulted in convictions are not available centrally. The Ministry of Justice collects data on convictions for sexual offences but these data are published on a calendar year basis and are counts of persons classified by their principal offence. As such, convictions data cannot be linked to police recorded crime data to track individual offences through to their outcome at court.

6 Sep 2011 : Column 530W

Table A: Offences (1) currently recorded by the police as homicide (2) not resulting in conviction (3) : police forces in England and Wales, 2009-10 (4)
Force Total offences Offences with no conviction (3) Proportion (percentage)

Avon and Somerset

16

10

63

Bedfordshire

6

6

100

British Transport Police

2

2

100

Cambridgeshire

8

3

38

Cheshire

8

7

88

Cleveland

6

5

83

Cumbria

Derbyshire

2

Devon and Cornwall

16

15

94

Dorset

5

2

40

Durham

10

8

80

Dyfed Powys

2

Essex

10

7

70

Gloucestershire

4

1

25

Greater Manchester

35

12

34

Gwent

18

18

100

Hampshire

19

17

89

Hertfordshire

6

5

83

Humberside

13

2

15

Kent

16

16

100

Lancashire

26

11

42

Leicestershire

13

8

62

Lincolnshire

6

5

83

London, City of

2

2

100

Merseyside

21

20

95

Metropolitan Police

120

91

76

Norfolk

7

4

57

North Wales

7

3

43

North Yorkshire

6

6

100

Northamptonshire

5

4

80

Northumbria

14

12

86

Nottinghamshire

15

14

93

South Wales

16

7

44

South Yorkshire

12

8

67

Staffordshire

13

10

77

Suffolk

10

3

30

Surrey

8

7

88

Sussex

13

9

69

Thames Valley

14

13

93

Warwickshire

11

10

91

West Mercia

15

10

67

West Midlands

27

17

63

West Yorkshire

32

17

53

Wiltshire

4

3

75

6 Sep 2011 : Column 531W

England and Wales

619

430

69

(1) As at 28 September 2010; figures are subject to revision as cases are dealt with by the police and by the courts, or as further information becomes available. (2) Offences recorded as murder, manslaughter or infanticide. (3) Includes cases with outcome of: court proceedings pending; suspect found by court to be insane, suspect died/committed suicide before proceedings were initiated or could be concluded; all suspects acquitted; no suspects charged. (4) Offences are shown according to the year in which they were initially recorded as homicide. This is not necessarily the year in which the incident took place or the year in which any court decision was made.
Table B: Sexual offences recorded by police forces in England and Wales, 2010-11
Force Total offences

Avon and Somerset

1,521

Bedfordshire

442

British Transport Police

720

Cambridgeshire

771

Cheshire

741

Cleveland

562

Cumbria

391

Derbyshire

1,153

Devon and Cornwall

1,695

Dorset

775

Durham

477

Dyfed Powys

405

Essex

1,440

Gloucestershire

531

Greater Manchester

2,881

Gwent

555

Hampshire

2,109

Hertfordshire

653

Humberside

1,263

Kent

1,402

Lancashire

1,505

Leicestershire

1,045

Lincolnshire

718

London, City of

39

Merseyside

1,130

Metropolitan Police

10,230

Norfolk

743

North Wales

786

North Yorkshire

1,090

Northamptonshire

653

Northumbria

591

Nottinghamshire

1,107

South Wales

831

South Yorkshire

906

Staffordshire

1,004

Suffolk

705

Surrey

785

Sussex

1,467

Thames Valley

2,195

Warwickshire

472

West Mercia

1,206

West Midlands

2,707

West Yorkshire

1,970

Wiltshire

610

England and Wales

54,982

6 Sep 2011 : Column 532W

Crossbows

Mr Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many incidents involving crossbows were recorded by the Police in (a) St Helens, (b) Merseyside and (c) England in each of the last 10 years. [68908]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not available centrally. Offences involving crossbows cannot be identified in the recorded crime statistics.

Compensation

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 22 March 2011, Official Report, column 933W, on departmental compensation, what steps she is taking to reduce the level of special payments, including compensation to the public, made by her Department and the non-departmental public bodies for which she is responsible. [69330]

Damian Green: The Home Office is taking active steps to reduce the cost of special payments, which include compensation payments and legal costs, and arise principally from immigration and detention legal challenges.

The UK Border Agency has, for example, set up a Litigation Strategy Board, which meets monthly to review litigation risks, to ensure ownership of significant legal challenges and that appropriate strategies are in place for managing new areas of challenge. The board has driven the implementation of new processes to manage more routine, high volume litigation at lower cost, and early identification of potential litigation risks. It also works to increase awareness of legal risks in policy development and improve the information and guidance available.

Procurement

Owen Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what methodology (a) her Department and (b) the non-departmental public bodies for which she is responsible used to estimate savings to the public purse made in respect of its procurement and purchasing since May 2010. [69270]

Damian Green: Since May 2010, the Home Office, its agencies and non-departmental public bodies have estimated procurement and purchasing value for money savings in line with the Office of Government Commerce (now the Efficiency and Reform Group, Cabinet Office) methodology.

Telephone Services

Nia Griffith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding she has allocated to each telephone helpline operated by her Department in 2011-12; and what the purpose is of each such helpline. [68551]

Damian Green: The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), has allocated £8,923,733 to

6 Sep 2011 : Column 533W

helplines operated by the Home Department in 2011-12. The following table provides a summary of the amount allocated and the purpose of each helpline.

Helpline Purpose of helpline 2011-12 total budget (£000)

UKBA

   

Immigration Enquiry Bureau—Croydon Contact Centre

Provides information about requirements regarding permission to stay and settle in the United Kingdom for those subject to immigration control. This Contact Centre also offers a Public Enquiry Office (PEO) appointment booking service for customers who have been unable to book an appointment online

2,404

The Sponsorship and Employers Helpline—Sheffield Contact Centre

Provides information for employers and education providers about sponsorship under the points based system, advice to employers about preventing illegal working and an e-mail service to employers who want to verify the entitlement to work for people awaiting the outcome of an application. The Contact Centre also provides information about Bulgarian and Romanian work permits and accession worker cards

1,176

The Nationality Contact Centre—Liverpool Contact Centre

Provides information about British citizenship. The Contact Centre also answers general enquiries from supported asylum seekers in relation to their weekly cash support, accommodation or emergency cash payments

736

Total 2011-12 UKBA funding

 

4,316

     

IPS

   

General Register Office First Point of Contact

The General Register Office Advice Line provides advice in respect of birth, marriage and death registrations and certificate issues; services are provided by Identity and Passport Service staff

2,100

The Customer Enquiry Centres (CECs)

Customer Enquiry service provided by Identity and Passport Service staff,

1,800

Total 2011-12 IPS funding

 

3,900

6 Sep 2011 : Column 534W

     

NFA

   

Action Fraud, the national fraud reporting centre

Action Fraud, the national fraud reporting centre run by the National Fraud Authority, operates a fraud reporting telephone line as part of its service to collect fraud reports on behalf of the Police

708

     

Total Home Office funding

 

8,924

Internships

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Liverpool, Wavertree (Luciana Berger) of 17 November 2010, Official Report, columns 811-13W, on departmental work experience, what the beginning and end dates of each internship were; how many weeks each intern worked in the Department; how many hours were worked by each intern per week; whether each intern worked fixed hours; what the recruitment process was for each vacancy; and where the positions were advertised. [69477]

Damian Green: The following table lists the beginning and end dates of each internship; how many weeks each intern worked in the Home Office; how many hours were worked by each intern per week; and whether each intern worked fixed hours.

Internships for sandwich course students are advertised through fair and open competition to universities offering relevant degree courses.

The Fast Stream summer placements were advertised through the Cabinet Office at:

www.faststream.gov.uk

The Windsor Fellowship Programme is advertised by the Cabinet Office at:

www.windsor-fellowship.org

In Annex A we have redacted figures less than five to prevent disclosure of personally sensitive information and the potential identification of small groups or individuals. Supplying these figures would contravene the Department's policy on statistical disclosure control, implementing the Statistics and Registration Act 2007 and the Data Protection Act.

Table A
Start date End Date Number of weeks Number of staff Number of hours per week Number of hours per day

Sandwich students

         

26 July 2010

25 June 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

2 August 2010

2 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

9 August 2010

9 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

6 August 2010

7 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

16 August 2010

16 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

17 August 2010

16 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

23 August 2010

23 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

6 Sep 2011 : Column 535W

6 Sep 2011 : Column 536W

25 August 2010

23 July 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

15 June 2009

2 October 2009

16

Less than 5

37

7.24

15 June 2009

14 May 2010

48

Less than 5

36

7.12

13 July 2009

11 June 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

13 July 2009

12 July 2011

48

Less than 5

36

7.12

20 July 2009

19 June 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

20 July 2009

20 June 2011

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

13 July 2009

13 June 2010

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

29 July 2009

29 June 2010

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

10 August 2009

10 July 2010

48

Less than 5

36

7.12

17 August 2009

16 July 2010

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

18 August 2009

16 July 2010

48

Less than 5

36

7.12

24 August 2009

23 July 2010

48

Less than 5

37

7.24

1 September 2009

31 July 2010

48

Less than 5

36

7.12

26 October 2009

20 August 2010

43

Less than 5

36

7.12

           

Graduate Fast Stream Programme

         

21 June 2010

30 July 2010

6

Less than 5

36

7.12

21 June 2010

6 August 2010

7

Less than 5

36

7.12

28 June 2010

20 August 2010

8

15

36

7.12

28 June 2010

27 August 2010

9

Less than 5

36

7.12

28 June 2010

10 September 2010

11

Less than 5

36

7.12

5 July 2010

27 August 2010

11

5

36

7.12

19 July 2010

10 September 2010

11

Less than 5

36

7.12

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) persons undertaking unpaid work experience, (b) unpaid interns and (c) other persons in unpaid positions were working in her Department as of 1 July 2011. [69518]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not centrally hold data on the number of persons undertaking unpaid work experience. As at 1 July 2011 only paid interns were working in the Department.

Deportation

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many citizens of other EU member states normally resident in the Peterborough city council area were not (a) in employment, (b) looking for employment and (c) in education and have been removed by the UK Border Agency in each month since May 2010; and if she will make a statement. [68606]

Damian Green: Since the UK Border Agency EU rough sleepers pilot began in March 2010 there have been 39 enforced removals. All those removed had no fixed abode and were not in employment or studying. A further 100 have taken advantage of the reconnection service provided by Peterborough city council and returned to their country of origin voluntarily after being encountered by UK Border Agency and served a “minded to remove” letter.

Detention Centres

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the proposed (a) locations and (b) operational dates are of the reception and removal centres to be established in Turkey under twinning arrangements with the UK Border Agency; and if she will make a statement. [69681]

Damian Green: Turkey has proposed the seven new Reception, Screening and Application (RSA) centres for asylum seekers and refugees will be near the cities of Ankara, Erzurum, Gaziantep, Izmir, Kayseri, Kirklareli and Van. The proposed sites of the two new removal centres for illegal migrants will be Ankara and Erzurum co-located with the RSA centres. Turkey has yet to finalise all the details regarding construction of the centres, which has not yet commenced, so the precise operational dates are not known, but it is not expected that any will be operational before 2013.

The Secretary of State for the Home Department does not intend to make a statement on this issue at this juncture.

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many UK Border Agency staff are working on the projects to establish reception and removal centres in Turkey under twinning arrangements. [69682]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency (UKBA) has been involved in two EU Twinning Projects on reception and removal centres in Turkey. At the present time UKBA has two staff dedicated to two projects. In addition the UK Border Agency has also provided 15 different short term UKBA staff to support these projects from an expert perspective.

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what involvement the UK Border Agency will have in (a) training staff and (b)

6 Sep 2011 : Column 537W

managing reception and removal centres to be established in Turkey under twinning arrangements. [69683]

Damian Green: The UK Border along with our Greek (on the removal centres project) and Dutch partners has provided training developed with the Turkish authorities in accordance with the contracts for the respective EU Twinning Projects. The training provided was to the future trainers, staff and managers of the centres. The UK Border Agency will have no involvement in the managing of the reception and removal centres in Turkey.

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether those to be detained in reception and removal centres to be established in Turkey under twinning arrangements with the UK Border Agency will include (a) families with children and (b) unaccompanied minors. [69685]

Damian Green: Illegal migrants including families with children are likely to be within the scope of being detained in the Removal Centres for Illegal Migrants. The reception, screening and accommodation centres for asylum seekers and refugees are not detention facilities and those accommodated there will be free to interact with the local population. Unaccompanied minors in Turkey fall under the responsibility of the Social Service and Child Protection Agency of the Prime Ministry and will not routinely be accommodated in these facilities.

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the projects to establish reception and removal centres in Turkey under twinning arrangements with the UK Border Agency have been or will be subject to approval by (a) Parliament and (b) the European Parliament. [69686]

Damian Green: The participation of the UK Border Agency in these two EU Twinning Projects does not require parliamentary approval.

All candidate countries seeking to join the European Union are eligible to request capacity building projects under the provisions of twinning. As such approval by the European Parliament is not required for each requirements document which is developed by the beneficiary country in consultation with the EU delegation in situ.

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the maximum time limit for detention will be in the removal centres to be established in Turkey under a twinning project with the UK Border Agency. [69687]

Damian Green: The maximum time limit for detention in the removal centres will be determined by new national legislation which is currently being drafted by the Turkish authorities before being presented before their Parliament. Full consultation with the member state partner countries of both removal and reception centres Twinning Projects and with the European Commission has been undertaken by Turkey during this process with a view to alignment with the EU law requirements.

6 Sep 2011 : Column 538W

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what health, education, legal advice and counselling services will be required to be provided by new reception and removal centres established in Turkey under twinning arrangements with the UK Border Agency; and whether any decisions have been taken on the providers of such services. [69688]

Damian Green: New national legislation currently being drafted by the Turkish authorities before being presented before their Parliament is likely to encompass the requirements for health, education, legal advice and counselling services within the reception and removal centres. Full consultation with the member state partner countries of both removal and reception centres Twinning Projects and with the European Commission has been undertaken by Turkey during this process with a view to alignment with the EU law requirements in these areas. However, as far as we are aware the Turkish authorities have made no decisions as to who these providers will be or the anticipated level of provision of these services.

Drugs: Ion Spectrometry Technology

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department's policy is on the distribution of ion spectrometry technology in the detection of drugs and explosive traces; how many such devices have been issued to police forces in the last year; and if she will make a statement. [66809]

James Brokenshire: Equipment for the detection of traces of drugs or explosives is widely used by UK police forces. Such equipment, which includes devices based on ion mobility spectrometry technology, is purchased independently by individual forces. It is not purchased or distributed centrally. There is no requirement for forces to notify a central point of contact when such equipment has been purchased or issued.

European Union

Mr Kennedy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what third pillar EU measures for which her Department is responsible have not yet been implemented; when they will be implemented; and if she will make a statement. [69469]

James Brokenshire: There are around 80 to 90 Acts currently in force that were adopted before 1 December 2009 under the Police and Criminal Judicial Co-operation chapter (Title VI) of the Treaty on the European Union. This list is subject to change as Acts are repealed and replaced or amended by new instruments. Approximately two thirds of these are the responsibility of the Home Office and a majority have been fully or partially implemented.

Article 10 of the Protocol on Transitional Provisions (Protocol 36) to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and to the Treaty on European Union applies to these Acts, under which the UK has the right to opt out (en bloc) from all these measures in 2014 when they will become subject to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. The UK must decide whether or not to opt out by 31 May 2014. The Government are therefore considering the implementation of the remaining measures in light of the wider process for making that

6 Sep 2011 : Column 539W

decision. In accordance with the Minister for Europe's written ministerial statement on 20 January 2011, Parliament will be kept informed of developments.

Europol

Stephen Gilbert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions there were in the UK resulting from a Europol operation in each year since Europol became operational; what the offence was in each case; and if she will make a statement. [68475]

Nick Herbert: Europol does not undertake operational activity itself. It acts as a conduit for the secure exchange of information between member states and assists with the co-ordination of investigations when requested by member states. It also provides analytical support at the request of member states.

Any investigation remains the responsibility of the investigating member state and it is therefore not possible to provide information on the number of convictions in the UK resulting from Europol activity in each year since Europol's inception.

Forensic Science Service

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to ensure that the closure of the Forensic Science Service does not adversely affect the gathering of forensic evidence. [68490]

Lynne Featherstone: The closure of the Forensic Science Service (FSS) does not affect the gathering of forensic evidence as this is an activity predominantly carried out by police forces to submit for examination and analysis. The continuity of service to the Criminal Justice System remains our primary objective during the wind-down of the FSS.

Government Authorised Exchange Medical Training Initiative

Sir Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received from consultant doctors on the Government Authorised Exchange Medical Training Initiative (GAE MTI); what discussions her Department has held with the Royal College of Anaesthetists on the contribution of overseas trainees to (a) filling gaps, (b) reducing the level of locum cover and (c) avoiding the cancellation of training activity; how the MTI is regulated; whether she has received reports of any misuse of the initiative; and if she will allow Sri Lankan trainees to come for the two years overseas period their government requires for a consultant appointment. [69781]

Damian Green: The Government are committed to reducing net migration to the United Kingdom. This requires action across all immigration routes of entry. Against that background, the consultation document ‘Employment-Related Settlement, Tier 5 and Overseas Domestic Workers’, published on 9 June, sets out proposed changes to Tier 5. This includes a proposal to cap leave across the Tier 5 Temporary Worker route, which includes

6 Sep 2011 : Column 540W

Government Authorised Exchange schemes, of which the Medical Training Initiative is one. The purpose of the consultation is to invite views on this proposal. The consultation closes on 9 September.

A decision on the way forward will be assessed in the light of responses to the consultation, including those from the Royal Colleges.

Larne House Residential Detention Facility

Christopher Pincher: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the development costs are for the UK Border Agency's Larne House residential detention facility; and what the estimated annual operating costs for this facility are. [69429]

Damian Green: The contracted development costs for Larne House are £812,173.65 excluding VAT. The final invoice has not yet been received, but the cost has been confirmed by the contractor as within budget.

The annual operating cost for Larne House will be around £1.479 million excluding VAT. The costs include those of the operating contract (including 24 hour healthcare), lease of the building, rates, security and utilities.

Legal Aid Scheme: Reform

Catherine McKinnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has made an assessment of the likely effect of the Government's proposed reforms of civil legal aid on the work of the Sojourner Project; and if she will make a statement. [68798]

Damian Green: We are working closely with the Ministry of Justice to ensure that the needs of those involved in the Sojourner Project are taken into account in the development of the legal aid reform programme. The Under-Secretary of State for Justice, my hon. Friend the Member for Huntingdon (Mr Djanogly) announced to the Public Bill Committee on the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill on 19 July that the Government intend to table an amendment in relation to cases arising under the immigration domestic violence rule, so that they will remain within the scope of civil legal aid.

Licensing

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has plans to review the effectiveness of the implementation of the Licensing Act 2003 in ensuring consistent application of licensing powers across the country. [69440]

James Brokenshire: The Licensing Act 2003 gives powers to local authorities to make licensing decisions that reflect the needs of their local communities. Reflecting those needs means that there will be variations between communities. Last summer the Home Office consulted on empowering individuals, families and local communities to shape and determine local licensing. Those proposals are now being taken forward through measures in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill.

6 Sep 2011 : Column 541W

Licensing laws

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her proposed exemption from regulation for micro-businesses will include exemption from the late night levy. [68484]

Lynne Featherstone: The late night levy is a power of taxation, not a new regulation. On this basis, the exemptions for micro and start-up businesses will not apply to the late night levy.

Members: Correspondence

Graham Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weaver Vale (Graham Evans) of (a) 1 March 2011 and (b) 2 June 2011 on behalf of Mrs Andrea Quinton. [69421]

Nick Herbert: A reply has been sent to my hon. Friend.

Catherine McKinnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the Minister of State for Policing and Criminal Justice plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Newcastle Upon Tyne

6 Sep 2011 : Column 542W

North (Catherine McKinell) of 19 April 2011, on the Winsor Review and a Royal Commission on Policing. [68797]

Nick Herbert: A reply has been sent to the hon. Member.

North Yorkshire Police

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers of each rank and grade were employed by North Yorkshire Police on (a) 31 March 2010, (b) 30 September 2010 and (c) 31 March 2011; and how many she expects to be employed in North Yorkshire at each rank and grade on 31 March (i) 2012, (ii) 2013 and (iii) 2014. [69846]

Nick Herbert: The available information shows the number of police officers employed in North Yorkshire police, by rank, as at 31 March 2010, 30 September 2010 and 31 March 2011. Decisions around the size and deployment of the police work force are a matter for chief constables to take locally in conjunction with their police authority and, from next year, their elected police and crime commissioners (PCCs); therefore estimates for the number of police officers for 2011-12, 2012-13 and 2013-14 are not available centrally.

The number of police officers employed in North Yorkshire police, by rank, as at 31 March 2010, 30 September 2010 and 31 March 2011 (1)
  ACPO rank Chief Superintendent Superintendent Chief Inspector Inspector Sergeant Constable Total police officers

2010

               

31 March

4

5

10

16

83

250

1.118

1,486

30 September

4

4

10

16

85

207

1.126

1,452

                 

2011

               

31 March

3

6

10

18

76

241

1,104

1,458

(1) This table contains full-time equivalent figures mat have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

Parliament Square

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with the Mayor of London on removal of (a) tents and (b) other objects located on the pavements of Parliament Square; and if she will make a statement. [69837]

Nick Herbert: The Government continue to work closely with the Greater London Authority, Westminster city council and the Metropolitan Police Service on the measures the Government are bringing forward in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill to prevent the erection of tents and to deal with other disruptive activities on Parliament Square in a targeted, proportionate and enforceable way.

Police

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police officers and (b) police community support officers were serving in the London borough of Harrow on 5 April 2011; and if she will make a statement. [68747]

Nick Herbert: The latest available information shows that there were 392 full-time equivalent police officers and 99 full-time equivalent police community support officers serving in the London borough of Harrow as at 31 March 2011.

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many North Yorkshire police officers were deployed in (a) London, (b) Birmingham, (c) Manchester and (d) other places in response to public disorders in August 2011; and how much the police authorities in each of the receiving areas will pay North Yorkshire police for these deployments. [69656]

Nick Herbert: This information is not collected centrally by the Home Office.

Police: Ealing

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many complaints her Department has received on the performance of police officers based in the London borough of Ealing in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [69054]

6 Sep 2011 : Column 543W

Nick Herbert: The Home Office does not collect such data.

Police: Ports

Jackie Doyle-Price: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to alter the jurisdiction of port police forces. [R][68622]

Nick Herbert: As I have previously said in correspondence with my hon. Friend, officials at the Home Office and the Department for Transport are exploring a range of potential legislative options to address the issues that she has raised around the jurisdiction of port police forces.

Speed Limits: Cameras

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what type testing has been carried out on the super speed camera or TruCam; what plans she has for its future use; and if she will make a statement. [69756]

Nick Herbert: For reasons of commercial confidentiality the Home Office does not comment on individual devices that may or may not be going through the type approval process. All devices submitted to the process undergo tests of their compliance with HO prescribed standards and field tests with the police as to their operational practicality. Once a device has been type approved, it is an operational matter for the police how they use it.

Telephone Hacking

Nick Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will discuss with the Metropolitan police (a) the allocation of (i) staff and (ii) financial resources to Operation Weeting and (b) the rate at which the operation is contacting potential victims of telephone hacking. [69424]

Nick Herbert: The resourcing and conduct of the investigation are operational matters for the Metropolitan Police Service. The Prime Minister has told Parliament that he has been assured that Operation Weeting is fully resourced.

Metal Theft

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the risks to the critical national infrastructure from metal thieves. [69809]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office is working with other Government Departments to assess the impact of metal theft on communities, businesses and the national infrastructure, and to develop a range of potential solutions.

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Tynemouth of 30 March 2011, Official Report, column 371W, on metals: sales, what progress she has made in exploring with the Association of Chief Police Officers Conductive Metal

6 Sep 2011 : Column 544W

Theft Working Group the feasibility of introducing a non-statutory cashless trading model for scrap metal dealers. [69812]

James Brokenshire: Discussions are continuing with the scrap metal trade, the police and other Government Departments to develop a range of potential solutions to tackle the theft of metal.

Warwickshire Police Authority

Chris White: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department provided to Warwickshire Police Authority in each year since 2005. [69499]

Nick Herbert: The funding provided to Warwickshire for the years 2005-06 to 2011-12 is set out in the following table.

Home Office funding for Warwickshire 2005-06 to 2010-11
  Core Home Office funding (£)

2005-06

30,620,500

2006-07

31,947,346

2007-08

32,748,367

2008-09

33,185,839

2009-10

34,143,978

2010-11

34,361,644

2011-12

35,185,705

These figures do not include grants from the Department for Communities and Local Government or funding relating to counter-terrorism.

Chris White: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the costs of administration were of the Warwickshire Police Authority in each year since 2005. [69501]

Nick Herbert: The internal running costs of the Warwickshire Police Authority are not collected centrally. However, these data are available at:

http://www.warwickshire.police.uk/pubscheme2009/Publicationscheme09/whatspendandhow

Written Questions: Government Responses

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to answer question 54715 tabled on 3 May 2011 for answer on 9 May 2011 on categorisation of police functions. [68478]

James Brokenshire: I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 18 July 2011, Official Report, column 654W.

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which elements of the Royal Marines are deployed on operations in Afghanistan. [68829]

6 Sep 2011 : Column 545W

Nick Harvey: I refer the right hon. Member to the statement made by the Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for North Somerset (Dr Fox) on 14 December 2010, Official Report, columns 90-93WS.

Air Force: Military Bases

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment his Department has made of the socio-economic effects of his recent announcement on RAF basing. [68918]

Dr Fox: In my written ministerial statement of 18 July 2011, Official Report, columns 60-70WS, I set out our strategic long-term direction on Defence basing across the United Kingdom. I said we

“recognised that Defence decisions have broader regional, economic and social consequences”

and these formed part of the wider Government consideration.

Comprehensive planning work is now under way to assess in detail the likely socio-economic effects on affected communities across the United Kingdom such as on local schools and housing. This will involve appropriate and necessary engagement with partners such as the relevant local authorities, devolved Administrations, and other Government Departments and agencies. We intend to base our armed forces in a way that is sensitive to economic and social pressures but is consistent with the needs of Defence, our people, and their families.

Armed Forces: Deployment

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the impact of implementation of the proposals contained in the Strategic Defence and Security Review on the (a) size, (b) capability and (c) deployability of 3 Commando Brigade. [68827]

Nick Harvey: The reductions in naval manpower announced in the Strategic Defence and Security Review will include a reduction of around 650 in the Royal Marines' headcount. The Royal Marines' 3 Commando Brigade will provide a key element of our high readiness response force. With the Royal Navy's amphibious shipping, 3 Commando Brigade will have strategic reach and will be able to land and sustain from the sea a commando group of up to 1,800 personnel, together with protective vehicles and other equipment. Other elements of the Royal Marines will continue to undertake a wide range of tasks including protecting the nuclear deterrent and contributing to operations against piracy in the Indian Ocean.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) who will lead 3 Commando Brigade following implementation of the proposals in the Strategic Defence and Security Review; [68828]

(2) what the current state of readiness is of 3 Commando Brigade. [68877]

Nick Harvey: We do not disclose specific readiness levels of our units, but by implementing the proposals set out in the Strategic Defence and Security Review, 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines will continue to

6 Sep 2011 : Column 546W

provide an agile and capable landing force, led by a Brigadier, based around a Lead Commando Group of up to 1,800 personnel plus enablers.

Astute Class Submarines

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has contingency plans in place for the independence relocation of Astute-class submarines in the event of the devolution of defence policy in Scotland. [69465]

Dr Fox: The Ministry of Defence is not spending any of its time or resources planning for the hypothetical situation of an independent Scotland.

Defence Equipment and Support: Recruitment

Anas Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of recruitment and retention rates for Defence Equipment and Support staff based in (a) Glasgow and (b) Bristol. [69386] [Official Report, 10 October 2011, Vol. 533, c. 1MC.]

Mr Robathan: Defence Equipment and Support currently employs around 100 civilian staff in Glasgow and around 5,500 civilian staff at its headquarters in Bristol. The significant difference in numbers means that direct comparisons cannot readily be made. In the year to July 2011, about 2.5% of Bristol staff and about 1% of Glasgow staff left through retirement or resignation compared with around 4.5% for Defence Equipment and Support as a whole.

The restrictions on recruitment across the whole of the Ministry of Defence mean that there has only been external recruitment into critical or specialised posts. In the year to July 2011, we recruited around 150 new staff in Bristol and none in Glasgow.

Official Hospitality

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what budget his Department plans to allocate to (a) entertainment and (b) the purchase of alcohol in each of the next three years. [67085]

Mr Robathan: We use official entertainment to pursue UK security policy interests, facilitate a wider public understanding of the armed forces, and enhance professional contacts within the UK and with other nations. Expenditure on official entertainment must be modest and is incurred according to business need. Expenditure has shown a significant reduction over the past few years, as illustrated in the following table:

  £ million

1997-98

5.0

1998-99

5.6

1999-2000

5.5

2000-01

6.0

2001-02

7.2

2002-03

7.3

2003-04

8.0

2004-05

6.5

2005-06

5.4

6 Sep 2011 : Column 547W

2006-07

4.3

2007-08

4.2

2008-09

4.3

2009-10

3.8

2010-11

1.8

While current planned annual expenditure stands at some £3 million over the next three years, we expect actual expenditure to remain low as we continue to restrain this business activity.

There is no separate forecast for alcohol. The provision of alcohol at public expense must be in moderation and the circumstances in which alcohol may be offered is constrained.

Departmental Assets

Mr Arbuthnot: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether a data standard is used to identify his Department's assets; and if he will publish any such standard. [68523]

Peter Luff: The Ministry of Defence uses data standards to identify both its non-current assets, formerly referred to as fixed assets, and its inventory assets. This information is contained within Joint Services Publications (JSPs) 472 (Financial Accounting and Reporting Manual) and 886 (Inventory Management), which are available on the internet, at the following addresses:

JSP 472 Annex 8

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/AboutDefence/CorporatePublications/FinanceandProcurementPublications/FinancialJSPs/Jsp472ResourceAccountsPolicyManual.htm

JSP 886—Volume 2 Inventory Management Part 6 —Financial Accounting for Inventory—Page 8

http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/188EDF70-6F1E-48FE-A24C-C304698FC270/0/JSP886_Vol2_Pt6_FinancialAcc091209 V1_2.pdf

Freedom of Information Requests

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent discussions he has had with the Information Commissioner's Office on steps to improve his Department's performance in responding to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. [69773]

Mr Robathan: The Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for North Somerset (Dr Fox), has not discussed the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000 with the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO).

The Ministry of Defence (MOD)'s Permanent Under-Secretary met the Information Commissioner on 22 June 2011 having previously signed an undertaking to improve the MOD's performance in dealing with requests for information under FOIA. The undertaking is available on the ICO website at the following address:

http://www.ico.gov.uk/what_we_cover/promoting_openness/~/media/documents/library/Freedom_of_Information/Notices/mod_foi_undertaking.ashx

6 Sep 2011 : Column 548W

Defence Transformation

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to his oral statement of 18 July 2011, Official Report, columns 643-62, on defence transformation, what he expects the ratio of staff of his Department to full-time military personnel to be after the implementation of his proposed changes. [68486]

Dr Fox: The ratio of Ministry of Defence civilian staff to full time trained service personnel in 2010, and expected ratios for 2015 and 2020 are as follows:

  Ratio of civilian to service personnel

2010

1:2.1

2015

1:2.6

2020

1:2.7

Official Cars

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost to his Department was of the provision of ministerial cars in each financial year between 2000-01 and 2010-11; how many (a) cars for the exclusive use of Ministers and (b) ministerial car journeys were paid for by his Department in each such year; what the average cost to his Department of a ministerial car journey was in each such year; and what steps his Department has taken to reduce the cost of ministerial cars since his appointment. [62989]

Dr Fox: This information is not held in the format requested for all the years. Available information on the provision of official cars for Defence Ministers is as follows:

Financial year Car cost (£) Car numbers

2000-01

191,000

(1)

2001-02

192,500

(1)

2002-03

209,000

(1)

2003-04

142,000

(1)

2004-05

142,000

(1)

2005-06

(1)

(1)

2006-07

(1)

(1)

2007-08

(1)

(1)

2008-09

290,100

(2)5

2009-10

324,433

(2)5

2010-11

(3)171,041

(4)0

(1) Not recorded. (2) Four Ministry of Defence (MOD) vehicles and one provided by the Government Car and Despatch Agency. (3) This includes £39,419 for ministerial car services provided by the Government Car and Despatch Agency. (4) The Secretary of State is driven and protected by the Metropolitan Police. Junior Defence Ministers use a central MOD car pool that provides a service to them and to senior military officers and officials working in Main Building.

We do not collect information on individual ministerial car journeys and cannot therefore make estimates of their average cost.

To reduce costs, the junior Defence Ministers have given up their cars with a dedicated driver and now share pool cars. As a further savings measure, they will use public transport instead of a car where practicable.

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Procurement

Owen Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what methodology (a) his Department and (b) the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible used to estimate savings to the public purse made in respect of its procurement and purchasing since May 2010. [69276]

Peter Luff: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, my right hon. Friend the Member for Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey (Danny Alexander), on 15 November 2010, Official Report, columns 615-16W, to the hon. Member for Southport (John Pugh). He said that the Government had announced a more specific and innovative approach to efficiency and reform across the public sector, including:

a reduction in administration budgets of 34% across the whole of Whitehall and its arm's length bodies saving £5.9 billion a year by 2014-15;

radically reducing the number of arm's length bodies across government; and

6 Sep 2011 : Column 550W

the Efficiency and Reform Group's tough new efficiency regime which will drive savings in procurement, major projects and estate management;

and that, in result, Departments would no longer be required to report against the previous Government's efficiency target.

In August 2011, the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), announced that the Efficiency and Reform Group's new measures had saved £3.75 billion over 2010-11. Ministry of Defence (MOD) savings in the relevant categories were included in the overall figure. The MOD also spends substantial amounts on procuring and purchasing goods and services that are not covered by the Efficiency and Reform Group's regime, particularly the acquisition of military capability. The MOD does not use a set method for estimating savings to the Defence budget from changes to these activities.

This impact was assessed using methodologies as shown in the following table. The assessment has been independently verified by Government auditors who found the benefits assertions to be fairly calculated and presented.

Activity and calculation method
Area Activity description Evidence b ase/Calculation

Consulting

Government put in place a moratorium on new consulting spend, and extensions to existing contracts. Where spend was considered operationally critical (for example, where it might put at risk critical services) an exception process existed for Department Ministers to sign off expenditure over £20,000.

Savings are calculated by subtracting total departmental reported spend on consultancy for 2010-11 from total departmental reported spend on consultancy for 2009-10. To reduce the risk of costs shifting between categories, we also monitored expenditure on other Professional Services categories, including contingent labour.

     

Crown commercial

Government have renegotiated deals with some of the largest suppliers to government.

The method of calculation varies according to the initiative that yields the saving, but was based on cash releasing savings against a baseline of what would have otherwise been spent. This was often price savings against the previous price paid. Savings agreed with suppliers are recorded in memoranda of understanding as guaranteed-in-year or conditional-in-year savings. Realised savings were subsequently tracked back to departmental verification of supplier progress reports.

     

Contingent Labour

Government has significantly cut the number of temporary staff.

Savings are calculated by subtracting total departmental reported spend on contingent labour for 2010-11 from total departmental reported spend on contingent labour for 2009-10.

     

Communications

Government froze all new marketing spend unless it is an operational necessity. Where spend was proposed, ministerial sign-off was required for £20,000 or above.

Calculations compare departmental spend on marketing and advertising through COI for 2010-11 with that for 2009-10.

     

Centralising procurement

Government have started to centralise spend on common goods and services to drive down prices. These savings derive from the 10 categories of expenditure targeted for centralisation, and relate to price savings through increased aggregation.

For each initiative, calculations are performed using individual benefit methodologies that set out how savings will be calculated against an 2009-10 price baseline. Evidence is management information provided by suppliers.

     

ICT

We implemented: a) a moratorium on all new ICT spend above £1 million; and b) a review of all ongoing ICT commitments. Departments also reported those projects that were closed before undergoing the review.

Calculations are based on departmental reports of spend that has not proceeded. Spend that has not gone ahead in 2010-11 is recorded, as a result of stopping or reducing spend. Further, sustainable savings are targeted through the Government ICT strategy.

     

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6 Sep 2011 : Column 552W

Major projects

We reviewed the Government's biggest projects to see where 2010-11 costs could practically be reduced within contractual constraints, or wasteful projects stopped altogether. We have halted or curtailed spend on four projects: 14-19 Reform—£60 million Identity Cards—£50 million Highways Agency Projects—£54 million Whole Farm—£5 million. We have redacted £22 million of potential double counting from these figures, that arises between this work and our supplier renegotiation work stream. £14.9 million arises from the Home Office National Identity Cards and £6.7 million from DEFRA Whole Farm.

HMT have provided assurance that the relevant amounts were removed from departmental budgets following the Major Projects related negotiations

     

Property

We put in place national property controls such that signature of new property leases or lease extensions were approved centrally. It has not always been possible to net off all costs associated with vacating buildings. However, we have also not claimed savings in respect of revenue from property disposals.

Calculations are property by property based on the amount departments have reported saved through the Government's property database by non-renewal of property leases at lease breaks or upon lease expiry.