Consumers: Protection

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the consumer protection for private buyers of wheelchair accessible vehicles. [57257]

Mr Davey: Under the Sale of Goods Act 1979, goods (including vehicles) must be fit for their intended purpose. If vehicles are purchased with wheelchair access in mind, they must be fit for that purpose whether that purpose is made known expressly or impliedly. If this requirement is not satisfied, the seller is in breach of contract and the consumer will have a range of remedies. The Government have no plans to change this level of protection.

Copyright: Internet

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to enforce the online copyright infringement sections of the Digital Economy Act 2010. [56616]

Mr Davey: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), gave the hon. Member for Banbury, on 24 May 2011, Official Report, column 507W.

During a recent machinery of government change, responsibility for this policy area transferred to DCMS.

Correspondence: Fraud

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to protect vulnerable individuals from receiving fraudulent mail. [57280]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 24 May 2011]: The Government fully appreciates the damage and harm that scams can have on their victims and families and recognises the need for a concerted effort to stop scams, which includes fraudulent mail.

The National Fraud Agency (which runs Action Fraud) and the Metropolitan Police are taking forward a strategy that will deal with mass marketing fraud holistically and they are engaging with partners and building a joined-up approach to tackle postal scams. This includes engagement with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and Royal Mail who has been working closely with the appropriate bodies to stop scam mail from getting into the postal system in the first place.

Government strongly advises people to be very wary of unsolicited offers which sound too good to be true, as they often are. And in those cases where people receive material through the postal system which they

7 Jun 2011 : Column 220W

believe may promote a fraud, they should draw their concerns to the attention of the appropriate authorities to allow them to take any necessary action. Scams can be easily reported to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or by completing an online fraud report via:

www.actionfraud.org.uk/

For advice on scams, people can contact Consumer Direct on 08454 04 05 06 or visit:

www.direct.gov.uk/scams

Creative Industries

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what support the Government provides to promote the UK's creative industries abroad. [57892]

Mr Prisk: UK Trade and Investment (UKTI), working in partnership with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and industry partners, aims to promote the UK's creative offer abroad by maximising its export and investment potential. An online toolkit supports UK businesses looking to expand internationally and UKTI develops and delivers international strategies alongside tailored missions and showcasing activities to promote the UK and our creative industries.

Defence and Security Equipment International: Exhibitions

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which countries have been sent invitations from the Government to the Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition at the ExCel Centre between 13 and 16 September 2011. [57715]

Mr Prisk: The following countries have been invited to send official government defence and security delegations to Defence and Security Equipment International 2011 (DSEi11):

Australia

Austria

Botswana

Brazil

Brunei

Bulgaria

Canada

Chile

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Finland

France

Germany

Ghana

Greece

Hong Kong

India

Indonesia

Italy

Japan

Netherlands

New Zealand

7 Jun 2011 : Column 221W

Norway

Pakistan

Peru

Poland

Republic of Korea

Romania

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Trinidad and Tobago

Turkey

Ukraine

UN

USA

NATO

Departmental Responsibilities

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether his Department plans to cease to fund any of its functions over the period of the comprehensive spending review. [55194]

Mr Davey: Over the course of the spending review, the Department continues to focus on driving long-term, sustainable growth while finding efficiencies and reducing levels of spending to meet the target savings. Around 10% of resource savings will be made by cancelling lower priority activities, for instance through ending Train to Gain and replacing it with small and medium enterprise (SME)-focused training programme, and through abolishing the regional development agencies in 2012. Reforms to further and higher education funding will deliver 60% of the total savings target, and the remainder of savings will largely be delivered through driving efficiencies.

Departmental Work Experience

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what advice his Department provides to those wishing to (a) work as an intern, (b) undertake a work experience placement and (c) work as a volunteer in his Department. [52809]

Mr Davey: For undergraduates, we currently offer two or three Summer Diversity Internships a year, further information about the scheme is available at:

www.civilservice.gov.uk/faststream

In addition we advertise a number of opportunities under the Graduate Internship Scheme for students. Opportunities are advertised through the Graduate Talent Pool website, hosted by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills does not offer formal opportunities to undertake work experience or volunteer in the Department.

English Language: Education

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many women he estimates will be affected by the changes to English for

7 Jun 2011 : Column 222W

Speakers of Other Languages provision in

(a)

the UK,

(b)

London and

(c)

the London borough of Newham in 2012. [57170]

Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will (a) prepare and (b) publish an equalities impact assessment prior to implementing his proposed changes to funding for English for Speakers of Other Languages. [57294]

Mr Hayes: An assessment of how the changes announced in Skills for Sustainable Growth may affect English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) learners is currently being carried out by this Department. I expect to be able to publish this before summer recess.

Mrs Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on what date he commissioned an equality impact assessment of the proposed changes to funding for English for speakers of other languages courses; and when he expects to publish this assessment. [57943]

Mr Hayes: An assessment of how the changes announced in Skills for Sustainable Growth may affect ESOL learners was agreed in principle in November 2010 and formally commissioned in February 2011 and is currently being carried out by the Department. I expect to be able to publish this before summer recess.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) if he will take steps to ensure that those on income support but not active benefits are able to afford to remain enrolled on courses of English for speakers of other languages from August 2011; [58153]

(2) if he will take steps to ensure that persons on English for speakers of other languages courses funded by the Government and not on active benefits are able to afford to continue their studies from August 2011. [58154]

Mr Hayes: As part of the spending review tough decisions about departmental budgets have been taken and, like all other areas, further education has made its contribution. This has included reviewing the extent to which automatic fee remission for adult skills is provided, and in this context we have prioritised English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) funding to unemployed people in receipt of jobseekers allowance or in the employment and support allowance (work-related activity) group, where English language skills have been identified as a barrier to entering employment. We will continue to pay 50% of ESOL course fees for other people who are settled here. We will no longer fund ESOL courses delivered in the workplace. Increased freedoms and flexibilities for providers will allow them to respond to the needs to their communities and determine within their funding where this is prioritised.

As set out by the Skills Funding Agency in Guidance Note 6

http://readingroom.skillsfundingagency.bis.gov.uk/sfa/skills_funding_agency_-_guidance_note_6_final_-v2_.pdf

any changes to funding eligibility and fee remission will be applied only to new learners. That means learners already in learning and continuing into another funding

7 Jun 2011 : Column 223W

year will not become ineligible as a consequence of these policy changes and are encouraged to successfully complete and achieve their learning aims.

Equality Act 2010

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many responses relating to the Equality Act 2010 his Department has received as part of the Red Tape Challenge to date; and how many such responses he plans to consider. [57328]

Mr Prisk: Red Tape Challenge is a website which gives members of the public, businesses and voluntary and community organisations the opportunity to comment on the entire range of regulation that might have an impact on them.

As of the 20 of May 2011 the Red Tape Challenge site has received 5,078 responses relating to the Equality Act 2010. All responses received through the Red Tape Challenge site will be considered by the relevant Secretary of State in this case, the Secretary of State for the Home Department and Minister for Women and Equalities.

Fossil Fuels

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps UK Trade and Investment is taking to end support for dirty fossil fuel projects. [56289]

Mr Prisk: In line with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills' definition of the phrase “dirty fossil-fuel energy production”, in point 18 of the coalition agreement, to mean unabated coal-fired power generation, UK Trade and Investment will not assist UK equipment or service providers to win international work on such projects.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consideration he gave to seeking the inclusion of measures to end UK Trade & Investment support for dirty fossil fuel projects in its corporate strategy Britain open for business. [57362]

Mr Prisk: Careful consideration has been and is being given to the implementation of article 18 of the coalition agreement. The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, is involved fully in the ongoing discussions across Whitehall on how the fullest possible implementation can be achieved. Within the framework of its corporate strategy—Britain Open for Business—UK Trade & Investment is also playing its part, including by strongly promoting exports of green equipment and services.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what definition of dirty fossil fuel energy production UK Trade & Investment uses. [57363]

Mr Prisk: UK Trade & Investment uses the same definition as the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills: ‘dirty’ fossil fuel power generation means unabated coal-fired power stations.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 224W

Higher Education: Regulation

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to enable (a) further education colleges, (b) universities and (c) independent training providers to contribute to the Red Tape Challenge initiative. [57159]

Mr Prisk: The Red Tape Challenge website invites comments from all those affected by regulation including further education colleges, universities and independent training providers at

http://www.redtapechallenge.cabinetoffice.gov.uk

It aims to take a comprehensive look at regulation on a rolling, sector by sector basis. Regulations specific to the education sector will be published on the website later this year.

Industry: Food

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of businesses in the food production industry are small and medium-sized enterprises. [58148]

Mr Prisk: At the start of 2010, it is estimated that 98.3% of private sector businesses in the manufacture of food products industry in the UK were small and medium-sized enterprises.

Insurance Guarantee Scheme Directive

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills when he expects agreement to be reached on the text of the EU Insurance Guarantee Scheme Directive. [58140]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply.

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer given today to the hon. Member for Calder Valley (Craig Whittaker).

Intellectual Property

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his policy is on (a) maintaining the intellectual property in corporate brands owned by shareholders and (b) the role of brands in consumer competition and choice. [57573]

Mr Davey: It is the responsibility of the owners of any intellectual property (IP) to maintain and exploit the right in the way they believe most appropriate to their needs. It is, however, for the Government to provide a framework suitable for enabling such exploitation, balancing the interests of the IP owner against the public interest. The Government recognise that for many products and services, brands play an important role in facilitating competition and choice. They allow consumers to readily identify and purchase products and services they are seeking which offer the qualities that they associate with a particular brand.

Jewellery

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what regulations govern the sale and purchase of (a) precious metals and (b) gold and silver jewellery. [56715]

Mr Willetts: The Hallmarking Act 1973 makes it illegal to sell or describe any item as being made wholly

7 Jun 2011 : Column 225W

or partly of gold, silver, platinum or palladium unless it has been independently assayed and hallmarked in the UK by one of the four UK Assay Offices or, alternatively, bears a hallmark struck under the International Hallmarking Convention. In addition subordinate legislation has, at various times, been made under the Act.

Joint International Unit

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills for what reason he decided to close the Joint International Unit between his Department, the Department for Education and the Department for Work and Pensions. [58100]

Mr Hayes: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, my right hon. Friend the Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), did not take the decision for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) to withdraw from the Joint International Unit. The Joint International Unit was an administrative arrangement between the relevant Departments. The decision to change this arrangement was taken by the BIS management board in December 2010 as part of a wider review aiming at improving the efficiency of BIS's international policy functions.

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what functions the successor body to the Joint International Unit in his Department will perform. [58101]

Mr Hayes: The functions previously performed by Joint International Unit (JIU) officials reporting to BIS Ministers will now be carried out by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) (with the exception of the European Social Fund which remains entirely within the Department for Work and Pensions—DWP). This is mainly policy and programme activity in the area of international higher and further education. The relevant staff and budgets are being transferred to BIS from DWP. BIS will continue to co-ordinate closely with the Department for Education and DWP where necessary, for example where there is a single education input to a bilateral relationship or in one of the international organisations.

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the (a) staff grading is and (b) overall salary costs are for the successor body of the Joint International Unit in his Department. [58102]

Mr Hayes: In total nine posts were transferred from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS)—65 posts remain in DWP and 16 move to the Department for Education. The staff grading for the posts moved to BIS is as follows: two posts at Grade 7 level, two Senior Executive Officers, two Higher Executive Officers and three Executive Officers. The salary costs are approximately £440 000, which is being transferred from the DWP to the BIS budget.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 226W

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the costs were of moving the functions of the Joint International Unit into his Department. [58103]

Mr Hayes: Not all the functions of the Joint International Unit were moved to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); only the activities for which BIS Ministers were responsible were transferred across to BIS. The Department for Education's (DfE) international work has moved to DfE and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has retained its own international responsibilities. Budget transfers between the Departments are being made to reflect these changes. The costs of the physical move of nine members of staff from DWP to BIS premises has not been calculated, but is estimated to be less than £1,000.

Members: Correspondence

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills when he plans to respond to the letter sent to him by the hon. Member for Witham of 7 April 2011 regarding Ms Amelia Rope; what representations he has made to the banks regarding Ms Rope; and whether he plans to make further such representations. [57275]

Mr Davey [holding answer 24 May 2011]: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, will respond shortly. He has raised the matter of fair access to credit for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) such as Ms Rope's business via correspondence; however, it would be inappropriate for Government to urge banks to offer finance to specific businesses contrary to their own risk assessment procedures. However, we continue to robustly support the case for the UK's SMEs in our discussions with the banks.

National Apprenticeship Service

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills for how many days per week the chief executive of the National Apprenticeship Service is employed; and what his pro-rata salary is. [56457]

Mr Hayes: The chief executive of the National Apprenticeship Service is currently employed to work three days per week and his pro-rata salary is £96,000.

The chief executive's salary position is currently available on the Skills Funding Agency website:

http://skillsfundingagency.bis.gov.uk/aboutus/transparencyingovernment/salary/index.htm

As part of the Government's transparency agenda, the salaries of all senior civil servants below director level will also be made publicly available. The publication date for Agencies is 31 May.

National Vocational Qualifications

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) how much funding was provided by his Department to each industrial sector in each of the last five years; and how many NVQs were awarded by each of those sectors in each of those years; [58104]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 227W

(2) how many NVQs have been started in each industrial sector in each of the last five years. [58178]

Mr Hayes: Information is not collected on how much funding was provided to each industrial sector.

Table 1 shows the total number of learners participating on National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) in England between 2005/06 to 2009/10. It is not possible to disaggregate this information across industrial sectors.

However, Table 2 shows the number of further education starts and achievements by Sector Skills Council in 2009/10. These have been categorised based upon the qualifications that a Sector Skills Council have formally agreed sit within their sector. The qualification footprint includes both NVQs and a range of other vocational qualifications.

Table 1: Further Education starts and achievements in Further Education by Sector Skills Council Qualification Footprint (1) , 2009/10
  Total FE & Skills
Sector Skills Council Starts Achievements

Active Leisure, Learning & Well-being

136,980

110,240

Adult Social Care

12,520

13,330

Adult Social Care/Healthcare

152,430

119,570

Automotive Industries

47,010

35,890

Automotive Industries/Customer Service & Contact Centre

10

0

Building Services Engineering

64,990

50,280

Business Information Technology & Telecommunication

224,970

153,020

Business Information Technology & Telecommunication/Business, Administration & Governance

10

Business Information Technology & Telecommunication/Creative Media

Business, Administration & Governance

101,010

73,450

Central Government including Armed Forces

33,380

24,410

Chemicals, Life sciences, Pharmaceuticals, Nuclear, Oil, Gas, Petroleum, Polymer

1,590

1,070

Children & Young People

93,220

72,760

Construction

158,090

128,870

Construction/Process & Manufacturing

Creative & Cultural

134,040

108,160

Creative & Cultural/Creative Media

2,180

1,680

Creative Media

30,810

22,190

Customer Service & Contact Centre

97,500

76,660

Employability

124,830

84,830

Energy & Utility

9,650

9,620

Engineering Construction Industry

1,080

1,020

Enterprise & Small Business

9,920

7,440

Facilities Management, Housing, Property, Planning & Cleaning

29,570

25,500

Facilities Management, Housing, Property, Planning & Cleaning/Construction

Fashion & Textiles

4,790

3,740

Finance, Accountancy & Financial Services

66,470

47,650

Food & Drink

14,370

13,100

Freight Logistics & Wholesale

56,580

47,730

Hair & Beauty

123,730

96,860

Health & Safety

33,900

32,720

Healthcare

93,010

85,680

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel & Tourism

140,150

111,340

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel & Tourism/Active Leisure, Learning & Well-being

600

440

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel & Tourism/Retail

780

660

Industrial Relations

Justice & Community Safety

5,040

5,390

Land-Based & Environmental Industries

59,510

44,420

7 Jun 2011 : Column 228W

Languages & Intercultural Working

49,830

35,660

Lifelong Learning

49,770

42,800

Local Government

Management & Leadership (including HR & Recruitment)

56,720

42,590

Maritime

3,990

3,390

Marketing & Sales

4,060

2,520

Paralegal

240

100

Parking

130

140

Passenger Transport

46,670

48,080

Process & Manufacturing

59,160

54,830

Purchasing & Supply

70

20

Retail

57,860

42,790

Science, Engineering & Manufacturing Technologies

106,890

84,810

Security Industry

27,920

24,330

Supporting Teaching & Learning in Schools

33,270

28,010

Not Applicable

5,702,840

4,411,020

Voluntary Sector

380

160

Total

8,260,970

6,426,790

(1) SSC qualification footprint includes all qualifications have formally agreed sit within their sector. This will include both NVQs, and other vocational qualifications. Notes: 1. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. ‘—’ indicates a base figure of less than 5. 3. Figures include Apprenticeships, Train to Gain, University for Industry, Adult Safeguarded Learning, Further Education/Learner Responsive Provision which includes General Further Education Colleges including Tertiary, Sixth Form Colleges, Special Colleges—Agricultural and Horticultural and Art and Design Colleges, Specialist Colleges and External Institutions. 4. NVQ/GNVQ includes Additional NVQ/GNVQ, GNVQ precursor and NVQ. Source: Individualised Learner Record
Table 2: National Vocation Qualifications (NVQ) participation and achievement, 2005/06 to 2009/10


2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10

NVQ/GNVQ

Participation

511,770

670,030

1,122,210

1,291,440

1,130,020

 

Achievement

290,880

359,690

494,340

719,020

721,850

Notes: 1. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. ‘—’ indicates a base figure of less than 5. 3. Figures include Apprenticeships, Train to Gain, University for Industry, Adult Safeguarded Learning, Further Education/Learner Responsive Provision which includes General Further Education Colleges including Tertiary, Sixth Form Colleges, Special Colleges—Agricultural and Horticultural and Art and Design Colleges, Specialist Colleges and External Institutions. 4. NVQ/GNVQ includes Additional NVQ/GNVQ, GNVQ precursor and NVQ but does not include non-vocational qualifications. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Nuclear Energy: Government Assistance

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department provides to assist businesses in the nuclear energy sector. [57320]

Mr Prisk: The Department seeks to enable UK businesses, particularly manufacturers, to benefit from opportunities resulting from the growing global civil nuclear market. This has been mainly in the form of providing market information, helping to develop capability and competitiveness, and support for research and innovation.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 229W

The provision of such support has been made primarily via the Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (NAMRC), for which this Department provided a £30 million capital and start-up grant, and via the low carbon and advanced manufacturing elements of the Manufacturing Advisory Service, which has included assistance on civil nuclear new build and decommissioning opportunities.

In addition, a grant for business investment has been provided to Rolls-Royce towards the development of a new civil nuclear facility in an assisted area. This was part of a £45 million package deal that will also see the company build new aerospace facilities in the UK.

Direct and indirect support is also provided to various companies through the activities of the BIS funded research councils and Technology Strategy Board (TSB). This includes: funding for research and training provided to universities, which often collaborate with business; through research council funded activities; recent funding of £2 million for business-led feasibility projects via the TSB, and further funding for NAMRC which will be supported as one of the seven partners that will come together to form the first Technology and Innovation Centre, focused on high value manufacturing.

Oil

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which UK-based companies which develop and export tar sands oil extraction technologies were in receipt of support from UK Trade & Investment on the latest date for which information is available. [56287]

Mr Prisk: The technology used to extract oil sands has not been seen as sufficiently distinct from more mainstream oil and gas technology to warrant a separate classification in UK Trade & Investment’s Customer Relationship Management system. It is therefore not a straightforward matter to identify companies with specifically oil sands-related equipment and services that have made use of UKTI services.

Researching a comprehensive list would incur a disproportionate cost. However, in recent years the companies on the following list have all taken part in UKTI missions, or other initiatives, related to Canadian oil sands developments.

4Projects Ltd

Argon (Isotank) Ltd

Aubin Ltd

B2M Ltd

Caledonian Flow Systems Ltd

Caledyne Ltd

Centrifuges Unlimited

CiTECH Energy Recovery Systems Ltd

CMP Products

DNV Energy

Fircroft Engineering Services Ltd

FTV Proclad International Ltd

Global Data

Hydro Group plc

Hydrobolt Ltd

IMV Projects (Wood Group)

JAB Recruitment

7 Jun 2011 : Column 230W

Latent Ltd

Leighs Paints

McLaren Software

Monitor Management Control Systems

Neftemer Ltd

OPS Group Ltd

Poyry Energy (Aberdeen) Ltd

R & A Energy Ltd

Rawell Environmental Ltd

RBG Ltd

Scopus Engineering Ltd

STATS (UK) Ltd

Surface Active Solutions Ltd

Technor

The Fifth Business Ltd

Thomas Broadbent & Sons Ltd

Tracerco

TUV NEL Ltd

Walker Technical Resources Ltd

Wessington Cryogenics Ltd

Overseas Companies: Japan

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effect of the Japanese earthquake on British businesses working in that country; and what support his Department has provided to such companies. [56397]

Mr Prisk: Most British companies with significant interests in Japan have returned to normal business. One or two, with assets in the affected Tohoku region, suffered direct damage and are working on repair and recovery.

A poll of foreign companies conducted by the Foreign Chambers in Japan found uncertainty about the economic situation, and sales forecasts in the short-term. But 65% of the companies polled were looking for further growth, with only 1% considering withdrawing.

The Japanese suppliers of some British companies have been badly affected by loss of production facilities, damage to supply chain partners or the disruption to energy supply. But many are now returning to normal operations, although we expect the longer term impact will be felt for some time, in supply chains globally.

Our UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) teams, based in Tokyo and Osaka, have been in close touch with British business in Japan throughout the crisis. As concerns over the Fukushima nuclear crisis grew, British firms participated in telephone calls with Government chief scientific adviser, Sir John Beddington, who explained the situation and took questions. Transcripts were made available via our embassy website and through social media. We also assisted some British companies with the process of importing iodine tablets for their staff, and also provided iodine as a precaution to British nationals and their dependents.

We continue to provide British companies with accurate and up-to-date information on doing business in Japan, which remains the world's third largest economy and a significant market for UK exporters. We are advising on current business opportunities in a range of sectors, including some arising from the reconstruction and

7 Jun 2011 : Column 231W

recovery programme. Our UKTI team is ready to assist any UK business considering their next steps in the country, as well as any UK company in Japan in need of assistance or advice.

Finally, I am very grateful to those British businesses who generously supported Her Majesty's Government own consular relief effort, for example by making cars or hotel rooms available for our use. Others took their own initiatives to provide goods and assistance to the stricken area for Japanese nationals. The UKTI team worked closely with the British Chamber to match requests for emergency supplies to what companies could offer.

Prisoners: Education

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he plans to take to provide relevant skills to offenders to enable them to find work when they leave HM Prison Latchmere House. [57322]

Mr Hayes: “Making Prisons Work: Skills for Rehabilitation”, published on 18 May 2011, sets out our reform programme for offender learning, marking a departure from existing practice.

We will make prisons places where people learn skills to build lives beyond crime, placing a much greater focus on developing the vocational skills demanded by employers in the areas to which prisoners are to be released. We will put in place new learning delivery contracts that focus on clusters of prisons between which prisoners tend to move, putting a new emphasis on decentralised control and accountability.

That means prisoners preparing for release from HMP Latchmere House will, as our reform programme takes effect, benefit increasingly from a co-ordinated programme of vocational activity. That activity will be delivered in a coherent way across the establishments from which HMP Latchmere House receives prisoners, focusing on the vocational skills demanded by London's employers.

To bolster this, we will reflect the Government's focus on payment by results by introducing outcome incentive payments: learning providers' payments will be based, in part, on their success in helping get people into jobs.

Regulation

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many officials in his Department are working on the Red Tape Challenge; what the grade is of each such staff member; and what the salary costs are for those officials. [58097]

Mr Prisk: There are four members of staff assigned on a full-time basis to the Red Tape Challenge. One grade 6; one grade 7 and two HEO(D)’s. The total average pay cost for these grades which include average salary, ERNIC and superannuation costs are £81,671.00; £65,645.00 and £36,205.00 respectively. The total cost for the team are therefore £219,706.00. There are a number of other officials throughout the Department who have contributed to the Red Tape Challenge. The time spent by these officials on the project is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 232W

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will publish the process by which responses to the Red Tape Challenge will be assessed. [58098]

Mr Prisk: All responses to the Red Tape Challenge site will be considered by the relevant Secretary of State. Any proposals for change to existing regulation will receive full consideration as to whether they are proportionate, practical, beneficial and in keeping with our wider commitments and legal obligations such as European legislation. This will of course include appropriate public consultation and parliamentary scrutiny.

Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what (a) longitudinal and (b) other (i) research and (ii) collection of data his Department has (A) initiated, (B) terminated and (C) amended in the last 12 months; and what such research and data collection exercises undertaken by the Department have not been amended in that period. [56756]

Mr Davey: This information cannot be provided due to disproportionate costs.

Science and Innovation Network

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 4 May 2011, Official Report, column 777W, on the Science and Innovation Network, what assessment he has made of the effects on the Science and Innovation Network of reductions in expenditure on overseas diplomatic missions by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. [58180]

Mr Willetts: As part of the 2010 spending review outcome the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and this Department agreed to continue to fund the Science and Innovation Network (SIN) direct costs on a 50/50 basis with a flat cash budget from 2011-12 to 2014-15. This positive outcome from a challenging spending review recognises the value of the BIS/FCO Science and Innovation Network in promoting UK prosperity and growth and will enable it to continue to play an important role in promoting and supporting UK science and innovation internationally.

The agreement enables SIN to maintain a strong presence in the highest priority countries as well as extend its coverage. In particular it will strengthen its teams in Brazil and Russia and create new teams in the middle east and Africa. This strategic reorganisation will improve alignment with HM Government’s priorities and maximise value for money.

Space Technology

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to support the UK space industry. [57957]

Mr Willetts: In the spending review settlement, the Department allocated around £850 million to space activities in the European Space Agency (ESA) and at a national level. This ensures the continued UK involvement

7 Jun 2011 : Column 233W

in key programmes, and the UK Space Agency works with ESA to ensure the UK industrial return from these programmes. In addition, as part of the 2011 budget, £10 million was provided to enhance the National Technology Programme and to accelerate the development of the International Space Innovation Centre in Harwell. We have also implemented the creation of the UK Space Agency in April this year. The Government are also continuing to work closely with industry to implement the growth recommendations set out in the industry-led Space Innovation and Growth Strategy published in 2010.

Supermarkets: Prices

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effects of sales in supermarkets of bread at a retail price below the cost of production on (a) employment conditions of workers and (b) competition in the food industry. [58177]

Mr Davey: None. Matters relating to the impact of below cost selling on competition in markets fall within the remit of the Office of Fair Trading.

Tobacco: Packaging

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will ensure that no regulation is introduced requiring the plain packaging of tobacco products which would remove the ability of manufacturers to distinguish their products through branding. [57510]

Mr Prisk: In March the Government published “Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A Tobacco Control Plan for England”. Within this plan, the Government have

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committed to look at whether the plain packaging of tobacco products could be effective in reducing the number of people who take up smoking and in supporting adult smokers who want to quit. The Government will undertake a full public consultation on options to reduce the promotional impact of tobacco packaging, including plain packaging, before the end of 2011. The Government have no preferred options at this time.

UK Trade & Investment Defence and Security Organisation

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what priority markets the UK Trade & Investment Defence and Security Organisation has identified for 2011-12. [57714]

Mr Prisk: UK Trade & Investment Defence and Security Organisation (UKTI DSO) has not published a list of priority markets for 2011/12, as this is under review, but plans to do so later in the year. While UKTI DSO will focus resources for priority markets, it will not ignore opportunities in other markets.

Video Games: Overseas Trade

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much UK Trade & Investment spent through the Tradeshow Access Programme to enable UK video game developers to attend overseas trade shows in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11. [57405]

Mr Prisk: Through UK Trade & Investment’s Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP), £55,000 was spent in financial year 2009-10 and £56,000 was spent in financial year 2010-11 on assisting UK video games businesses exhibit at overseas trade shows.

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 7 June 2011

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

Mr Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what powers are available to local authorities to introduce a local minimum unit price for alcoholic drinks. [56699]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 23 May 2011]: Local authorities could consider using powers in the Licensing Act 2003 or Local Government Act 1972 to introduce in their areas a local minimum unit price for alcoholic drinks. However, we continue to have reservations about the legality of such an approach. In each case, a local authority will need to ensure that their decision complies with all relevant EU and domestic law.

Earlier this year the Government announced their intention to ban the sale of alcohol below the cost of duty plus VAT. The ban is an important step to tackle the worst instances of deep discounting. It is intended to be in place by the end of the year.

Animal Experiments: Dogs

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many dogs of each breed were imported for use in laboratory experiments in (a) 2008, (b) 2009, (c) 2010 and (d) 2011 to date. [56135]

Lynne Featherstone: The Home Office does not record the information requested. Table 1 of the published annual “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals Great Britain” records the number of scientific procedures by species and primary purpose; table 1a records the number of animals used by species and primary purpose; and table 2 records the number of scientific procedures conducted by source of animals listed in schedule 2 to the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, including dogs. Annual statistics for 2008 and 2009 are the most recent currently available. Annual statistics for 2010 will be published later in 2011.

The annual publication “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals Great Britain” is available via the Library of the House and on the Home Office website.

Arrest Warrants

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many requests for surrender under the European Arrest Warrant the Serious Organised Crime Agency has received from each other requesting authority in each of the last five years. [57641]

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Damian Green: The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (for Scotland) are the designated authorities in the UK responsible for processing European Arrest Warrants (EAWs).

It is not possible to provide a breakdown of the number of requests received by each requesting member state prior to April 2009 due to the way that data was recorded prior to this date.

The following table shows the EAW requests from each requesting member state for the financial year 2009-10.

The data for the financial year 2010-11 is currently being verified and will be published in the SOCA annual report in July 2011.

Country Total

Austria

30

Belgium

90

Bulgaria

42

Cyprus

8

Czech Republic

120

Denmark

3

Estonia

6

Finland

6

France

106

Germany

235

Greece

22

Hungary

72

Ireland

43

Italy

100

Latvia

55

Lithuania

183

Luxembourg

2

Malta

3

The Netherlands

112

Poland

2,403

Portugal

23

Romania

197

Slovakia

54

Slovenia

7

Spain

167

Sweden

11

Total

4,100

Arrest Warrants: Romania

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many European arrest warrants have been issued for the surrender to the UK of suspects in Romania in each of the last five years; and how many such warrants (a) have been (i) executed and (ii) refused by the Romanian authorities and (b) are awaiting a reply. [57602]

Damian Green: The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (for Scotland) are the designated authorities in the UK responsible for processing European Arrest Warrants (EAWs).

Between Romania joining the EU in January 2007 and April 2009, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of the number of EAW requests issued to each member state due to the way that data was recorded prior to this date.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 237W

For the financial year 2009-10 the UK issued three EAW requests to Romania.

(i) In the same time period two individuals were surrendered to the UK from Romania under an EAW.

(ii) None of the warrants issued were refused by the Romanian authorities.

(iii) A person subject to an EAW is not always surrendered in the same year in which the request is made. Until the individual is arrested and the requesting member state informed there is no requirement for the recipient member state or states to reply to the warrant.

The data for the financial year 2010-11 is currently being verified and will be published in the SOCA annual report in July 2011.

Asylum: Africa

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) when she plans to publish a new (a) operational guidance and (b) country of origin report for each country in Africa; and if she will make a statement; [57662]

(2) for what reasons the (a) operational guidance and (b) country of origin report for the Democratic Republic of Congo has not been updated since December 2008; and if she will make a statement; [57663]

(3) when she expects to update the (a) operational guidance and (b) country of origin report for the Democratic Republic of Congo; and if she will make a statement; [57664]

(4) on what dates the (a) operational guidance and (b) country of origin reports were updated for each country in Africa in the last 10 years; and if she will make a statement. [57665]

Damian Green: Operational guidance notes are currently published on a flexible rolling programme on a six or nine-monthly basis and focus on the top asylum intake countries. Production of operational guidance notes outside the top 20 asylum intake countries is prioritised according to changes in country situation, case law or other external factors as they arise. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has generally been outside the top 20 asylum producing countries since 2008. The next operational guidance note for the DRC is scheduled for publication by 31 July.

The last Country of Origin (COI) report on the Democratic Republic of Congo was published in June 2009. COI reports are generally produced on the 20 countries generating the most asylum applications in the UK or where there is particular operational need. As stated above the DRC has generally been outside of the top 20 countries since 2008. The next COI report on the DRC is scheduled to be published in July 2011.

A table detailing the forthcoming dates for publication of operational guidance notes and COI reports for African countries and the dates of updates over the last 10 years has been placed in the House Library.

Asylum: Appeals

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average waiting time is for an unsuccessful application for asylum to be heard at a first tier tribunal. [57261]

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Damian Green: The average waiting time for an unsuccessful application for asylum to be heard at a first tier tribunal is 74 calendar days.

All figures quoted are provisional, based on management information and are not subject to the detailed checks that apply for National Statistics and may be subject to change.

Birth Certificates: Data Protection

Nicky Morgan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the risks associated with unrestricted access to birth certificates. [57984]

Damian Green: Current legislation provides that in order to obtain a certified copy of a birth register entry an applicant must supply sufficient information to enable the entry to be identified from the relevant index and to pay the statutory fee.

A specific assessment of the risks associated with this access framework has not been made.

Crime

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the potential links between social and geographic mobility and rates of (a) homicide and (b) other crime. [57134]

Nick Herbert: There is not a simple link between changes in social and geographic mobility and rates of homicide and crime. It is not possible to disentangle changes in social and geographic mobility from other factors that may have contributed to changes in rates of homicide and crime.

Crime: West Midlands

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will assess the effects of crimemapping on levels of crime (a) in the west midlands and (b) nationally since May 2010. [56956]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 24 May 2011]: Greater transparency is at the heart of the Government's commitment to open up and allow the public to hold it, and local services, to account.

This is why, from January 2011, the Government have empowered communities to hold the police to account and transform the way in which local police and communities work together to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour issues.

Since its launch, the Police.uk website has received over 415 million hits, demonstrating the significant public appetite for such truly local information.

No assessment has yet been made of the direct effect of crimemapping on levels of crime in the west midlands or nationally.

Departmental Honours

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many entry clearance officers her Department successfully nominated for the award of an honour in each of the last 10 years. [57596]

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Damian Green: We do not hold information prior to the Queen's birthday 2008 honours round and cannot therefore provide numbers of entry clearance officers who have received an honour in the preceding years. However, since the Queen's birthday 2008 round, our records indicate that no entry clearance officers have been nominated or have received an honour.

Departmental Manpower

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make it her policy to publish monthly information on changes in the numbers of her Department’s employees categorised by (a) seniority, (b) voluntary redundancy, (c) natural wastage and (d) involuntary redundancy. [57608]

Damian Green: I can confirm information on changes in the number of the Department’s employees is published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of its Annual Civil Service Employment Survey (ACSES). Published ACSES data is available on the ONS website, at the following address:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=2899

The latest available data, as at 31 March 2010, can be found under “Civil Service 2010 Tables” in table 9 (giving information on the whole civil service) and table 40 (giving information on the Home Office and its agencies).

ONS collects data from across the civil service on reason for leaving (for those employees who left the civil service in the 12 months up to the survey date, usually 31 March each year). ONS is currently working closely with Departments to improve the quality of information that is supplied. However, this is an annual survey and there are currently no plans to change the frequency of collection.

The Home Office is fully committed to meeting the Government’s transparency agenda and is actively considering ways to make more of its key HR data more readily available. However, the Department has clear obligations to its employees to ensure that personal data is not released, and that it is not published at a level that could lead to the inappropriate identification of individual employees. In addition, and in line with the Statistics Authority code of practice, the Department has a responsibility to ensure that any data released is reliable and of a good quality, and any change in reporting frequency and content needs to be agreed with ONS and the chief statistician.

Departmental Pensions

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of her Department's budget she expects to be spent on staff pensions in each of the next five years. [54567]

Damian Green: The Home Office budget does not include expenditure for paying civil service pensions.

The Cabinet Office leads on civil service pensions, which are funded centrally under the Principal Civil Service pension scheme. The Home Office pays a monthly (employers) contribution, which is credited to this scheme.

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Departmental Public Expenditure

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received on the rate of change of her Department's budget in each year of the comprehensive spending review period. [57162]

Damian Green: The Home Office has received representations from a range of stakeholders on the implications of the spending review settlement. These have tended to focus on particular areas of spend rather than the rate of change of the whole departmental budget.

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what mechanisms her Department has put in place to monitor its spending; and what estimate she has made of the cost of these mechanisms. [57234]

Damian Green: The Home Office arrangements for financial management and reporting seek to ensure adherence to the statutory and regulatory frameworks for the management of Home Office funds agreed by Treasury and approved by Parliament.

The Home Office Board allocates resources, manages finances and assets in line with the corporate strategy, and provides challenge to business activity against strategic priorities.

Supporting the board in this role, the Home Office finance function operates a formal cycle of in-year—monthly, quarterly and mid year—reviews of our expenditure, with monthly reporting to the board and to Treasury on outturn and forecasts. A formal process of business performance reviews is also operated through the Permanent Secretary's Operating Reviews, in areas of major spend additional approval and scrutiny arrangements are exercised. These cover major investment and procurement decisions, controls over work force budgets, and approval of grant streams.

Home Office financial results are reported to Parliament annually in the Home Office Annual Resource Accounts. These arrangements are subject to independent review by our internal audit function and by the National Audit Office (NAO).

The most recent improvements put in place to monitor Home departmental spending, following NAO review, can be found in the Statement of Internal Control in the published Home Office Resource Accounts. The Resource Accounts for 2009-10 were published in July 2010, and those for 2010-11 are still being prepared and are due to be published in July 2011:

http://www.official-documents.gov.uk/document/hc1011/hc01/0193/0193.pdf

The monitoring of expenditure is not only the responsibility of the Home Office finance function but of every member of staff with delegated budgetary responsibility. As such there has been no official estimate of the cost of all mechanisms to monitor spend, and to do so could be achieved only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Research

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what proportion of reports produced by her Department's Research,

7 Jun 2011 : Column 241W

Development and Statistics Directorate in each year since 2008 have been published; and what the title is of each unpublished report. [53393]

Damian Green: The Home Office seeks to publish research and statistics reports when they are complete, in line with the Government's commitments to transparency in Government. National Statistics are produced and released in accordance with our obligations in the Statistics and Registration Services Act 2007 and the associated Code of Practice for Official Statistics under the management of a Chief Statistician who reports to the National Statistician with respect to all professional matters. Social research reports are published in line with the Government Social Research Unit publication protocol except:

(i) in the case where the Home Office Chief Scientific Advisor decides not to publish in a Home Office series on the grounds of inadequate scientific quality following peer review, or

(ii) on public interest grounds for example security concerns, where an unclassified summary document may be published with a classified version available where it is appropriate to do so, or

(iii) for operational reasons where, in some cases, the Department may decide to publish only a summary of research and allow the more detailed research to be made available separately by, for instance allowing the contractors to publish.

The number and percentage of completed research and statistics reports available on the research and statistics pages of the Home Office website (formerly Research, Development and Statistics pages) are shown in the following table.

Number of completed reports published on the research and statistics pages of the Home Office website (formerly Research, Development and Statistics)

Number of research and statistics reports published Percentage of reports published of total completed reports

2008

31

89

2009

40

95

2010

62

97

2011 (to date as at 26 May 2011)

27

Note: This excludes Country of Origin reports that were included on the research and statistics pages on the website from 2008 to 2010. There were 78 such reports in 2008, 58 in 2009 and 45 in 2010.

For the period 2008 to 2010, the following nine research reports were produced but not published by the Home Office. The list does not include some other reports produced in 2009 and 2010, for reasons of national security.

2008

(i) Independent Domestic Violence Advisors: A Process Evaluation (The report available on the Cardiff University website)

(ii) Exploring the service and support needs of male, lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgendered and black and other minority ethnic victims of domestic and sexual violence (subject to final clearance, this report is to be published by University of Bristol)

(iii) Organised crime: revenues, economic and social costs, and criminal assets available for seizure (This has been released under the Freedom of Information Act)

(iv) Modelling High Impact but Low Probability Events

2009

(v) Visa Decision Research, including Survey of Entry Clearance Officers and Managers and case-file analysis

(vi) Quantifying Domestic Violence: A Review of Police Recording Processes across Wales

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2010

(vii) Evaluation for the West Midlands Partnership Peer Support Programme

(viii) Evidence review of Organised Crime

2011

(ix) DNA retention policy: results of analysis relating to the protections of the ‘Scottish model’

In addition to these the following 12 reports have been completed but the publications arrangements have not yet been finalised at the time of the question:

(i) Khat—social harms and legislation: a literature review

(ii) The factors involved in the movement away from violent extremism and promising practices from youth gangs and religious cults

(iii) Understanding vulnerability and resilience in individuals to the influence of violent extremism

(iv) Al-Qaeda influenced radicalisation—an approach using Situational Action Theory

(v) Teaching methods that help build resilience to violent extremism

(vi) Deaf Integration Project by Royal Association for the Deaf: Process and impact assessment

(vii) An Evaluation of the Trans-national Resettlement Project: UK and Ireland

(viii) Evaluation of phase 1 of the Alcohol Arrest Referral pilots (to be finalised once the evaluation of the phase two pilots also complete)

(ix) The role of the third sector: a research mapping exercise

(x) An evidence assessment of the literature on the routes of human trafficking in the UK

(xi) Marriage related migration to the UK

(xii) Crime costs of a quality-adjusted life year

Deportation: Asylum

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) failed asylum seekers and (b) foreign national prisoners have sought to challenge a deportation decision under the provisions of the European convention on human rights since 1998. [54545]

Damian Green: The information is as follows:

(a) In relation to failed asylum seekers, deportation has been taken to mean removals, as deportations are a specific subset of removals which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the United Kingdom is conducive to the public good. Information regarding challenges to the removal of failed asylum seekers would require a case by case search of individual records and is not held centrally.

(b) Information regarding challenges to the deportation of foreign national prisoners would also require a case by case search of individual records and assessment of grounds for appeal. This information is not held centrally by the UK Border Agency.

Rule 39 of the European convention on human rights permits an application for interim relief from someone who domestically has exhausted their appeal rights. According to internal management information, approximately 180 foreign national prisoners liable for deportation applied rule 39 to their deportation decision between the period January 2008 to December 2010. However, rule 39 does not become a barrier to deportation until the European Court issue a rule 39 indication.

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Please note these figures are based on internal management information and should be treated as provisional and subject to change. They have not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols and may not agree with published figures. Data before 2008 is not available.

Deportation: Zimbabwe

Pete Wishart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions the UK Border Agency has appealed rulings by an immigration court in respect of individuals facing removal to Zimbabwe in each of the last two years. [57879]

Damian Green: The number of appeals submitted by the UK Border Agency against rulings made by an immigration court in respect of individuals facing removal to Zimbabwe was 2,639 for financial year 2009-10, and 1,630 for financial year 2010-11.

Figures include cases where the UK Border Agency has sought permission to appeal a decision made at an immigration tribunal. Data are based on the date permission to appeal was sought.

Figures include both asylum, temporary and permanent migration case.

All figures quoted are internal management information only and are subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

Entry Clearances: Jordan

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps the UK Border Agency is taking to deal with outstanding visa cases from Jordan. [56629]

Damian Green: From January to April this year, the Amman visa section has seen a significant increase in applications compared to the same period last year. In addition, unforeseen staff shortages and visa process improvements to the section, following the chief inspector's review of the Amman operation in October 2010, have placed further pressure on staff resources. These have resulted in Amman not meeting published customer service standards. The UK Border Agency has provided additional staff in Amman to deal with legacy cases and put in place process improvements. The UK Border Agency is committed to providing an efficient visa service to all its customers, and anticipates that the Amman visa section will meet its customer service standards by the end of July.

Entry Clearances: Overseas Students

Jonathan Lord: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the contribution to the UK economy arising from the issuing of Tier 4 student visas. [57050]

Damian Green: Changes to the student visa route were announced on 22 March. An Impact Assessment has been prepared and will be published shortly.

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Jonathan Lord: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many colleges or schools in the UK (a) holding and (b) not holding the Highly Trusted Sponsor rating for Tier 4 student visas were recorded as having allowed a violation of the terms of Tier 4 visas in each of the last three years. [57051]

Damian Green: The information required is not centrally recorded in the format requested and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. All Tier 4 sponsors are regularly visited to monitor their compliance with their Tier 4 sponsor obligations. Those sponsors found to have violated their obligations may be downgraded to a B rating with an action plan or have their licence suspended which may also lead to revocation.

Mrs Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the effects of the implementation of requirements for students to meet level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages on the number of prospective students with university offers who may have such offers withdrawn. [58062]

Damian Green: Changes to the student route were announced on 22 March following a public consultation. Amendments to the Immigration Rules were laid on 31 March, coming into force on 21 April. These amendments introduced some changes to the requirements in English language proficiency needed to obtain a student visa.

The new rules do not apply to Certificates of Acceptance of Studies issued before 21 April. The new rules contain a number of important flexibilities for students at universities, and should not prevent genuine students from taking up their offers.

Firearms: Licensing

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will take steps to even the balance of renewals of firearm and shotgun certificates which occur over a five year period. [57293]

Nick Herbert: The Government will be responding shortly to the report of the Home Affairs Select Committee on Firearms Control which contains a recommendation on steps which might be taken to balance out the peaks and troughs of the renewal process.

Firearms: Young Offenders

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people under the age of 18 years were reported to the police for alleged illegal use of airguns in each constituent part of the UK in each of the last five years. [57727]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not collected centrally. The age of persons reported to the police in England and Wales for alleged illegal use of firearms cannot be identified from the police recorded crime statistics collected by the Home Office. The collection of police recorded data for Scotland and Northern Ireland is a matter for the devolved Administrations.

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Forensic Science Service

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the proposed closure of the Forensic Science Service on the quality and impartiality of forensic science used in the criminal justice system. [58135]

James Brokenshire: The Association of Chief Police Officers has been clear that the forensics market can cope with the managed wind-down of the Forensic Science Service (FSS). Private companies already provide approximately 35% of forensics services to the Criminal Justice System. The market is overseen by an independent Forensic Science Regulator to ensure services are impartial and quality standards are maintained.

The evidential value and integrity of forensic exhibits is tested under the intense scrutiny of the courts from the point of collection, through analysis and to interpretation and reporting. Each step in the process must be able to withstand these critical reviews. Forensic science laboratories across the UK work to demanding quality standards and are accredited against BS/EN ISO 17025 (general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories) by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service. This is the core standard adopted by the Forensic Science Regulator for forensic science laboratory functions and is a requirement of police contracts with private laboratories. The Regulator has made it clear that the standards must apply regardless of where and by whom the capture, analysis and interpretation of science evidence takes place.

Frontex

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Frontex activities the UK has supported in each of the last five years; and what these activities consisted of. [57507]

Damian Green: In 2010, the UK supported 30 Frontex activities alongside other EU states. In 2009, the UK supported 21 Frontex activities alongside other EU states. In 2008, the UK supported 28 Frontex activities alongside other EU states. In 2007, the UK supported 27 Frontex activities alongside other EU states. In 2006, the UK supported 22 Frontex activities alongside other EU states.

The supporting information for these activities are provided in the Library of the House.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Frontex activities the UK supports; and what these activities consist of. [57508]

Damian Green: In 2011, the UK has committed to support 26 Frontex activities alongside other EU states. In detail, these comprise of:

Joint operations

Poseidon Land, which targets illegal migration on the land borders from Turkey to Greece.

Neptune, which targets illegal migration on the land borders from the Western Balkans to Slovenia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Greece.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 246W

Air border operations Hammer, Hubble, Mizar and Meteor. These form part of the Pulsar Programme, which aims to disrupt illegal migration from third country hubs into the EU.

Poseidon Sea, which targets irregular migration by sea from Turkey to Greece.

Pilot Projects

Argonaut, to update the handbook for the "Management of massive transit of passengers at the EU external borders" in view of European Football Championships cup and the Olympics in 2012.

Protection, to agree a best practice guide for EU border guards dealing with minors, asylum seekers and witness protection.

Vega, to compile a handbook on best practices for the detection and interception of facilitators using airports for human smuggling and trafficking.

Big Dipper, to explore the possibility of EU airline liaison officer activities in a selected third country hub (following amendments to the Frontex regulation going through EU co-decision procedure).

Attica, to increase the Greek authorities capabilities to return third country nationals with no right of stay in the EU.

Joint r eturn activities to third countries

Take the lead on up to two joint return operations to third countries.

Participate in up to six joint return operations to third countries.

Participate in core country group meetings.

Frontex R isk Analysis Unit

Quarterly Frontex risk analysis network meetings.

Bi-annual tactical meetings.

Tailored risk analysis projects.

Analytical training.

Provide bi-monthly intelligence reports and statistics.

Training

Maintain a Partnership Academy at Gatwick, hosting Frontex training activities.

Support false document expert groups and workshops.

Develop Frontex common core curriculum training.

Develop Frontex high and mid-level curriculum training.

Provide human rights and English terminology training.

Develop human trafficking training.

Research and d evelopment

Participate in the implementation of the border checks programme.

Participate in the development of the European Surveillance System (Eurosur).

Develop a report on Advance Passenger Information for the European Commission to inform the review of the API directive.

Participation in Frontex management b oard meetings

Maintaining a seconded national expert at Frontex headquarters in Warsaw, as special adviser to the executive director on external relations.

Attending European Patrol Network meetings.

Illegal Immigrants

Mr Meacher: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what recent estimate has been made of the number of people who remain in the UK for (a) one to five and (b) more than five years beyond the length of stay permitted by their visa; [57565]

(2) what recent estimate has been made of the number of asylum seekers who remain in the UK (a) between one and five and (b) more than five years after having had their application turned down; and how many such asylum seekers appealed (i) once and (ii) twice and were unsuccessful. [57566]

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Damian Green: The UK Border Agency is not able to provide the information requested. It is not possible to accurately quantify the number of individuals currently in the UK in breach of immigration controls, as some deliberately evade immigration control in order to remain in the country illegally.

The e-Borders system enables checks to be made on individuals arriving or exiting the country at a majority of the points of entry to the UK but is not yet fully rolled out. e-Borders is currently tracking around 55% of inbound and 60% of outbound passenger movements to and from the UK. This equates to approximately 126 million passengers a year on over 2,800 routes, and includes over 90% of non-EU aviation passengers. The Government are committed to ensuring that the number of UK ports undertaking exit checks is increased to ensure a more complete travel history is recorded on passengers: This will enable provision of the information requested to be developed as e-Borders is progressively rolled out.

Immigration: UK Border Agency

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department by what dates she expects the UK Border Agency to complete its work on immigration legacy cases. [55491]

Damian Green: The “legacy” case load dates back to July 2006. The UK Border Agency has completed its review of all the outstanding “legacy” cases. A small unit has been set up to continue concluding those cases that have been reviewed but not concluded. They will also monitor the controlled archive and take forward any cases that come to light.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the Minister of State for Policing and Criminal Justice plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Torbay of 3 September 2010 on consultation on the change in indexation of public service pensions. [51180]

Nick Herbert: I wrote to my hon. Friend on 24 May 2011.

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to reply to the letter from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton of 12 April 2011 with regard to Miss K Nwozuzu. [57385]

Damian Green: I wrote to the right hon. Member in respect of Miss K Nwozuzu on 16 May.

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to respond to the letter from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton of 21 March 2011 with regard to Mrs L Kirkwood. [57386]

Damian Green: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 12 April 2011.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 248W

Migration

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the economic effects of migration over the last 15 years. [56674]

Damian Green [holding answer 23 May 2011]:I have recently commissioned the Migration Advisory Committee to research the labour market, social and public service impacts of non-EEA migration; to advise on the use of such evidence in cost-benefit analyses of migration policy decisions and to report in November 2011.

Police

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which local authority areas fall within the boundaries of each police authority area. [57425]

Nick Herbert: The following table sets out which local authority areas fall within each police authority.

Force Top Tier Lower Tier Council t ype

Avon and Somerset

Bristol

 

Unitary

 

Somerset

 

County

   

Mendip

District

   

Sedgemoor

District

   

South Gloucestershire

District

   

South Somerset

District

   

Tauton Deane

District

   

West Somerset

District

 

South Gloucestershire

 

Unitary

 

Bath and North East Somerset

 

Unitary

 

North Somerset

 

Unitary

Bedfordshire

Luton

 

Unitary

 

Bedford

 

Unitary

 

Central Bedfordshire

 

Unitary

Cambridgeshire

Cambridgeshire

 

County

   

Cambridge

District

   

East Cambridgeshire

District

   

Fenland

District

   

Huntingdonshire

District

   

South Cambridgeshire

District

 

Peterborough

 

Unitary

Cheshire

Cheshire West and Chester

 

Unitary

 

Cheshire East

 

Unitary

 

Halton

 

Unitary

 

Warrington

 

Unitary

Cleveland

Redcar and Cleveland

 

Unitary

 

Hartlepool

 

Unitary

 

Middlesbrough

 

Unitary

 

Stockton

 

Unitary

Cumbria

Cumbria

 

County

7 Jun 2011 : Column 249W

   

Allendale

District

   

Barrow in Furness

District

   

Carlisle

District

   

Copeland

District

   

Eden

District

   

South Lakeland

District

Derbyshire

Derbyshire

 

County

   

Amber Valley

District

   

Bolsover

District

   

Chesterfield

District

   

Derbyshire Dales

District

   

Erewash

District

   

High Peak

District

   

North East Derbyshire

District

   

South Derbyshire

District

 

Derby

 

Unitary

Devon and Cornwall

Devon

 

County

   

East Devon

District

   

Exeter

District

   

Mid Devon

District

   

North Devon

District

   

South Hams

District

   

Teignbridge

District

   

Torridge

District

   

West Devon

District

 

Cornwall

 

Unitary

 

Torbay

 

Unitary

 

Scilly

 

Sui Generis

 

Plymouth

 

Unitary

Dorset

Dorset

 

County

   

Christchurch

District

   

East Dorset

District

   

North Dorset

District

   

Purbeck

District

   

West Dorset

District

   

Weymouth and Portland

District

 

Poole

 

Unitary

 

Bournemouth

 

Unitary

Durham

Darlington

 

Unitary

 

Co Durham

 

Unitary

Oyled-Powys

Carmarthenshire

 

Welsh

 

Ceredigion

 

Welsh

 

Pembrokshire

 

Welsh

 

Powys

 

Welsh

Essex

Essex

 

County

   

Basildon

District

   

Braintree

District

   

Brentwood

District

   

Castle Point

District

   

Chelmsford

District

   

Colchester

District

7 Jun 2011 : Column 250W

   

Epping Forest

District

   

Harlow

District

   

Maldon

District

   

Rochford

District

   

Tendring

District

   

Uttlesford

District

 

Southend

 

Unitary

 

Thurrock

 

Unitary

Gloucestershire

Gloucestershire

 

County

   

Cheltenham

District

   

Colswold

District

   

Forest of Dean

District

   

Gloucester

District

   

Stroud

District

   

Tewkesbury

District

Greater Manchester

Bolton

 

Metropolitan

 

Rochdale

 

Metropolitan

 

Wigan

 

Metropolitan

 

Trafford

 

Metropolitan

 

Stafford

 

Metropolitan

 

Stockport

 

Metropolitan

 

Oldham

 

Metropolitan

 

Bury

 

Metropolitan

 

Tameside

 

Metropolitan

 

Manchester

 

Metropolitan

Gwent

Newport

 

Welsh

 

Caerphilly

 

Welsh

 

Gwent

 

Welsh

 

Torfaen

 

Welsh

 

Monmouthshire

 

Welsh

Hampshire

Hampshire

 

County

   

Basingstoke and Deane

District

   

East Hampshire

District

   

Eastleigh

District

   

Fareham

District

   

Gosport

District

   

Hart

District

   

Havant

District

   

New Forest

District

   

Rushmoor

District

   

Test Valley

District

   

Winchester

District

 

Portsmouth

 

Unitary

 

Southampton

 

Unitary

 

Isle of Wight

 

Unitary

Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire

 

County

   

Broxbourne

District

   

Dacorum

District

   

East Hertfordshire

District

   

Hertsmere

District

   

North Hertfordshire

District

7 Jun 2011 : Column 251W

   

St Albans

District

   

Stevenage

District

   

Three Rivers

District

   

Watford

District

   

Welwyn and Hatfield

District

Humberside

Hull

 

Unitary

 

East Yorkshire

 

Unitary

 

North Lincolnshire

 

Unitary

 

North East Lincolnshire

 

Unitary

Kent

Medway

 

Unitary

 

Kent

 

County

   

Ashford

District

   

Canterbury

District

   

Dartford and Gravesham

District

   

Dover

District

   

Maidstone

District

   

Medway

District

   

Sevenoaks

District

   

Shepway

District

   

Swale

District

   

Thanet

District

   

Tonbridge and Mailing

District

   

Tunbridge Wells

District

Lancashire

Lancashire

 

County

   

Burnley

District

   

Chorley

District

   

Fylde

District

   

Hyndeburn

District

   

Lancaster

District

   

Pendle

District

   

Preston

District

   

Ribble valley

District

   

Rossendale

District

   

South Ribble

District

 

'

West Lancashire

District

   

Wyre

District

 

Blackpool

 

Unitary

 

Blackburn

 

Unitary

Leicestershire

Leicestershire

 

County

   

Blaby

District

   

Charnwood

District

   

Harborough

District

   

Hinckley and Bosworth

District

   

Melton

District

   

North West Leicestershire

District

   

Oadby and Wigston

District

 

Leicester

 

Unitary

 

Rutland

 

Unitary

Lincolnshire

Lincolnshire

 

County

   

Boston

District

7 Jun 2011 : Column 252W

   

East Lindsey

District

   

Lincoln

District

   

North Kesteven

District

   

South Holland

District

   

South Kesteven

District

   

West Lindsey

District

Merseyside

Liverpool

 

Metropolitan

 

Sefton

 

Metropolitan

 

Wirral

 

Metropolitan

 

Knowsley

 

Metropolitan

 

St Helens

 

Metropolitan

Norfolk

Norfolk

 

bounty

   

Breckland

District

   

Broadland

District

   

Great Yarmouth

District

   

Kings Lynn and West Norfolk

District

   

North Norfolk

District

   

Norwich

District

   

South Norfolk

District

North Wales

Gwynedd

 

Welsh

 

Isle of Anglesey

 

Welsh

 

Conwy

 

Welsh

 

Denbighshire

 

Welsh

 

Flintshire

 

Welsh

 

Wrexham

 

Wetsh

North Yorkshire

North Yorkshire

 

County

   

Craven

District

   

Hambleton

District

   

Harrogate

District

   

Richmondshire

District

   

Ryedale

District

   

Scarborough

District

   

Selby

District

 

York

 

Unitary

Northamptonshire

Northamptonshire

 

County

   

Corby

District

   

Daventry

District

   

East Northamptonshire

District

   

Kettering

District

   

Northampton

District

   

South Northamptonshire

District

   

Wellingborough

District

Northumbria

Northumberland

 

Unitary

 

Newcastle

 

Metropolitan

 

N Tyneside

 

Metropolitan

 

S Tyneside

 

Metropolitan

 

Gateshead

 

Metropolitan

 

Sunderland

 

Metropolitan

Nottinghamshire

Nottinghamshire

 

County

   

Bassetlaw

District

   

Mansfield

District

7 Jun 2011 : Column 253W

   

Newark and Sherwood

District

   

Ashfield

District

   

Broxtowe

District

   

Rushcliffe

District

   

Gedling

District

 

Nottingham

 

Unitary

South Wales

Bridgend

 

Welsh

 

Cardiff

 

Welsh

 

Merthyr Tydfil

 

Welsh

 

Port Talbot

 

Welsh

 

Rhondda Cynon Taf

 

Welsh

 

Swansea

 

Welsh

 

Glamorgan

 

Welsh

South Yorkshire

Sheffield

 

Metropolitan

 

Rotherham

 

Metropolitan

 

Don easier

 

Metropolitan

 

Barnsley

 

Metropolitan

Staffordshire

Staffordshire

 

County

   

Tamworth

District

   

Lichfield

District

   

Cannock Chase

District

   

South Staffordshire

District

   

Stafford

District

   

Newcastle-under-Lyme

District

   

Staffordshire Moorlands

District

   

East Staffordshire

District

 

Stoke

 

Unitary

Suffolk

Suffolk

 

County

   

Ipswich

District

   

Suffolk Coastal

District

   

Waveney

District

   

Mid Suffolk

District

   

St Edmundsbury

District

   

Forest Heath

District

   

Babergh

District

Surrey

Surrey

 

County

   

Spelt home

District

   

Runnvmede

District

   

Surrey Heath

District

   

Woking

District

   

Elmbridge

District

   

Guildford

District

   

Waverley

District

   

Mole Valley

District

   

Epsom and Ewell

District

   

Reigate and Banstead

District

   

Tandridge

District

Sussex

W Sussex

 

County

   

Arun

District

7 Jun 2011 : Column 254W

   

Chichester

District

   

Worthing

District

   

Horsham

District

   

Mid Sussex

District

   

Adur

District

   

Crawley

District

 

E Sussex

 

County

   

Rotherham

District

   

Hastings

District

   

Wealden

District

   

Lewes

District

   

Eastbourne

District

 

Brighton

 

Unitary

Thames Valley

West Berkshire

 

UrtHarv

 

Wokingham

 

Unitary

 

Slough

 

Unitary

 

Windsor and Maidenhead

 

Unitary

 

Reading

 

Unitary

 

Bracknell Forest

 

Unitary

 

Oxons

 

County

   

Oxford

District

   

Vale of White Horse

District

   

West Oxfordshire

District

   

Cherwell

District

   

South Oxfordshire

District

 

Buckinghamshire

 

County

   

Aylesbury Vale

District

   

South Bucks

District

   

Chiltern

District

   

Wycombe

District

 

Mill on Keynes

 

Unitary

Warwickshire

Warwickshire

 

County

   

North Warwickshire

District

   

Nuneaton and Bedworth

District

   

Rugby

District

   

Stratford upon Avon

District

   

Warwick

District

West Mercia

Shropshire

 

Unitary

 

Telford

 

Unitary

 

Herefordshire

 

Unitary

 

Worcestershire

 

County

   

Worcester

District

   

Mavern Hills

District

   

Wyre Forest

District

   

Bromsgrove

District

   

Redditch

District

   

Wychavon

District

Wesl Midlands

Wolverhampton

 

Metropolitan

 

Birmingham

 

Metropolitan

 

Walsall

 

Metropolitan

7 Jun 2011 : Column 255W

 

Sandwell

 

Metropolitan

 

Solihull

 

Metropolitan

 

Coventry

 

Metropolitan

 

Dudley

 

Metropolitan

West Yorkshire

Leeds

 

Metropolitan

 

Wakefield

 

Metropolitan

 

Kirklees

 

Metropolitan

 

Calderdale

 

Metropolitan

 

Bradford

 

Metropolitan

Wiltshire

Wiltshire

 

Unitary

 

Swindon

 

Unitary