History and Geography: Secondary Education

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has assessed the merits of raising to 16 years the compulsory age to which history and geography must be taught. [58143]

Mr Gibb: We are currently reviewing the national curriculum in England, and as part of that will consider whether history and geography should be compulsory subjects within the national curriculum and, if so, at which key stages. We will be announcing our proposals early next year.

Primary Education: Training

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on training and continuing professional development for the primary school workforce. [56856]

Mr Gibb: The Government's policy on the training and continuing professional development of teachers is set out in the White Paper, “The Importance of Teaching” which was published on 24 November 2010.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 48W

In the White Paper we set out proposals to reform initial teacher training so that it focuses on key teaching skills including teaching early reading and mathematics, managing behaviour and responding to pupils' special educational needs. In particular for primary schools, proposals to improve the initial training of teachers in systematic synthetic phonics and develop more specialist teachers of mathematics.

We have said that we will create a new national network of teaching schools, on the model of teaching hospitals, giving outstanding schools the role of leading the training and professional development of teachers and head teachers so that all schools, including primary schools, have access to high quality professional and leadership development. We are also introducing a competitive national scholarship scheme to give teachers the opportunity to deepen their subject knowledge.

Pupils: Identification

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance his Department issues to secondary schools on the wearing of identity badges by pupils. [56376]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education does not issue formal guidance on the wearing of identity badges by pupils. It is for schools to take such measures as they think are reasonable to keep the premises secure and the pupils and staff safe from intrusion.

Reading: Teaching Methods

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 24 March 2011, Official Report, columns 61-2WS, on the Year 1 phonics screening check, how often his Department plans to update the list of approved phonics products and training; and if he will make a statement. [57169]

Mr Gibb: The process for reviewing publishers' self-assessments of phonics products against the Department's core criteria will continue until at least September 2011. We will consider whether to extend this process further.

Separately, a catalogue containing an approved list of products and training will be available in September 2011 following a procurement exercise. We expect to re- procure products and training for the catalogue by April 2012.

School Meals: Standards

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education for what reason academies and free schools are to be exempted from the requirement to meet nutritional standards for school meals. [55817]

Mr Gibb: As part of the broader freedoms given to academies and free schools, we trust the professionals to act in the best interests of their pupils. I am not aware of any evidence that suggests that academies provide meals that are less nutritious than those provided in maintained schools.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 49W

Schools: Identification

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance his Department issues to schools on the deployment of in-school identification and payment systems. [56379]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education has not issued any specific advice about identification and payment systems. Schools are expected to comply with data protection legislation and ensure the security of personal information. In 2008/09 Becta produced guidance on data security for schools. In 2007 they also developed guidance in liaison with the Information Commissioner's Office, for those schools choosing to use biometric authentication systems. This guidance remains valid.

The coalition agreement of May 2010 promised to outlaw the finger-printing of children at school without parental permission. The Government have introduced new legislation in the Protection of Freedoms Bill, currently going through Parliament, to regulate the use of biometric recognition systems in schools and colleges. The purpose of these provisions is to ensure that no children's biometric data are taken, in schools or colleges, without parental permission. The provisions would also give children the right to refuse to use biometric systems and ensure that alternatives are provided for children or their parents who opt out of using biometric technology. Subject to the passage through Parliament, the Department for Education will issue advice to schools making their duties under these provisions clear.

Schools: Information and Communications Technology

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure pupils have access to high quality ICT education and training in schools. [55968]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 May 2011]: The Department has contracted with the Open University to provide a regional network of support centres delivering continuing professional development to both specialist ICT teachers and teachers of other subjects who use ICT. Additionally, the Department has provided access for schools to an online tool to guide their self-review and development in the use of ICT and has contracted with Naace, the professional association for ICT in schools, to continue delivery of ‘ICT Mark’ assessments to recognise schools that demonstrate excellence.

Schools: Newham

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what plans he has to ensure sufficient pupil places are available for residents of the London borough of Newham up to 2013; [53036]

(2) how many children in (a) the London borough of Newham and (b) London are being taught in temporary classrooms. [53037]

Mr Gibb: The Department has allocated £800 million of capital funding to local authorities in England for 2011-12 to provide additional pupil places (basic need). This is twice the previous annual level of support.

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The Department collects information from each local authority on school capacity in maintained schools through an annual survey, which includes local authorities’ own pupil forecasts. The most recent survey data relate to the position at May 2010 and is available on the Department for Education’s website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/STR/d000982/index.shtml

The survey does not ask local authorities to report on the number of children being taught in temporary classrooms and this information is not held by the Department.

Schools: Nutrition

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the role of Ofsted will be in relation to the implementation of nutritional standards for school food for (a) academies, (b) free schools and (c) other schools. [57270]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 May 2011]:The Government are committed to refocusing school inspection for maintained schools, academies and free schools, around the core areas of pupil achievement, teaching, leadership and behaviour, and safety. We have no plans to ask Ofsted to assess the implementation of nutritional standards for school food as part of this new inspection focus.

Governing bodies of maintained schools and local authorities are responsible for ensuring that school food meets the required standards. Parents are increasingly knowledgeable about the importance of healthy eating and are well placed to hold schools to account for this.

Free schools and academies, established since September 2010, are not required to comply with the school food standards, and are free to promote healthy eating and good nutrition as they see fit.

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether free schools will be required to comply with nutritional standards for school food. [57330]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 May 2011]: Free schools will not be required to comply with the nutritional standards for school food. They will be required to provide lunches where there is demand and free school meals to all pupils who are eligible and wish to take up their entitlement. We have no reason to believe that free schools will not provide healthy, balanced meals that meet the current nutritional standards. As part of the broader freedoms available to free schools, we trust the professionals to act in the best interests of their pupils.

Schools: Repairs and Maintenance

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much per capita his Department spent on maintaining and improving state school premises in each of the last five years. [56479]

Mr Gibb: The following table shows how much capital funding the Department has spent per pupil in England since 2004-05. These figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 19 and are in real terms.

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7 Jun 2011 : Column 52W

Capital (1, 2 ) only funding per maintained school pupil (3) , 2004-05 to 2010-11 (includes academies)
Funding per maintained pupil (£)
  2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Actual Actual Actual (4) Actual Actual Actual Estimated outturn (5)

Real terms(6)

720

780

700

830

920

1,080

960

Real terms index(7)

100

108

97

115

128

150

133

(1) Figures are rounded to nearest £10. (2) Includes capital budgets (drawn from annex C of 2009 departmental report) and PFI funding streams. (3) Calculations are based on maintained sector full-time equivalent pupils (including academy pupils) aged three to 19 in England. Taken from the schools census as at January 2010. Figures exclude pupils in PVIs and alternative provision. (4) The apparent drop in funding per pupil between 2005-06 and 2006-07 is caused by the transitional effect of a change in the funding mechanism for the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme. This involves the re-phasing of payments to local authorities to better reflect the actual pattern of delivery on the ground. Any unspent capital from 2006-07 will be rolled forward to be used in future years, thereby ensuring that the BSF programme is fully delivered. This also applies to unspent capital in 2008-09, where end-year flexibility funds can be brought forward to 2009-11. (5) Figures updated for PBR 2008 fiscal stimulus of £800 million capital funds moving from 2010-11 to 2009-10. (6) Real terms figures have been calculated using the December 2010 gross domestic product deflators with 2009-10 as the base year. (7) The real terms funding index has been based with 2004-05 as 100.

Secondary Education: Performance Standards

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has for the future of the C-grade threshold as used in performance measures for secondary schools. [53007]

Mr Gibb: The 2011 secondary school performance tables, to be published in January 2012, will be based on indicators which reflect the Government's priorities as announced in the Schools White Paper “The Importance of Teaching”. We want to discourage schools from focusing on pupils on the C/D borderline to improve the school's standing in league tables. Performance tables will therefore include measures of pupil progress and average point scores which capture the full range of outcomes for all pupils. While we will continue to publish A-C indicators, we will also publish a wider range of information, in a supporting dataset, such as the percentage of pupils achieving A*-G in the English baccalaureate subjects and the percentage of pupils achieving 5+A*-G at GCSE or equivalent. Full details of the content of the 2011 performance tables will be published, later this term, in our annual statement of intent.

Reforming performance tables to increase flexibility and interrogative functions is part of our ambition to improve accountability and increase transparency. The objective is to create a fully flexible dataset that will allow parents, inspectors, governors and the public to challenge schools on their performance; support school improvement; and open up underlying data to allow users to create and compare the information of most importance to them.

Separation

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education to which (a) geographical areas and (b) organisations he plans to allocate the funding for relationship support services with respect to family separation in the next four years; and if he will make a statement. [57633]

Sarah Teather: In December 2010, the Prime Minister announced a dedicated fund of £30 million over the next four years to support couple relationships. The majority of this funding will be allocated to the voluntary and community sector (VCS) via the Department for Education's VCS Grants programme. To be considered for grant funding, organisations had to carry out work of national significance.

The successful organisations were announced on 25 February 2011 and those that will receive dedicated funding for relationship support (subject to negotiations) are listed as follows. The majority of the organisations deliver a mix of preventative couple relationship support, relationship counselling for couples in difficulty and work with couples who are separating or separated:

Asian Family Counselling Service

Care for the Family

Centre for Separated Families

Contact a Family

Families Need Fathers

Gingerbread

Marriage Care

National Association of Child Contact Centres

One Plus One

PACE (Project for Advocacy, Counselling and Education) "

Relate

Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships

In addition, a number of organisations are funded to provide a range of support for families which can also include relationship support.

Special Educational Needs

Ian Swales: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require schools to support the health and well-being of children with (a) medical needs and (b) myalgic encephalomyelitis. [56647]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 23 May 2011]: There is already a legal duty on schools to promote the well-being of their pupils. Within that, it is for school governing bodies and local authorities, rather than central Government, to determine their own policies on supporting pupils with medical needs. Good schools and local authorities will work with parents and local health services so that the medical needs of children, such as those with myalgic encephalomyelitis, are met while they are at school.

As we said in the Schools White Paper, ‘The importance of Teaching’, good schools have a vital role as promoters of health and well-being in the local community, and have always had good pastoral systems. They understand well the connections between pupils' physical and mental health and their educational achievement. We believe that the majority of the important work that schools do

7 Jun 2011 : Column 53W

is not as a result of government prescription, and so the Department has no plans to change the existing arrangements or to bring forward new legislative proposals.

This Department, together with the Department of Health, produced guidance for schools in 2005, entitled ‘Managing Medicines in Schools and Early Years’. This recommends, among other things, that there should be a clear policy in each school, an individual health care plan for any child with medical needs, and training for staff. The guidance can be found at:

www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationdetail/page1/DFES-1448-2005

We encourage other organisations, such as employer and staff associations and charities such as the ME Association, to play their part in supporting schools and parents and in sharing good practice.

Special Educational Needs: Autism

Julie Elliott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what financial support his Department provided for children with autistic spectrum disorders in schools in Sunderland in each of the last three years. [57296]

Sarah Teather: Funding data for special education support for children with autistic spectrum disorders are not collected by the Department.

It is for local authorities to take decisions on how to deploy the funding they receive from central Government. In the last three financial years, Sunderland planned to spend £403,646 (2008-09), £397,881 (2009-10) and £397,011 (2010-11) on special educational needs provision, including provision for children with autistic spectrum disorders.

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Teachers: Disciplinary Proceedings

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many teachers in each region of England have been (a) disciplined and (b) dismissed for disciplinary offences related to inappropriate internet usage in each of the last three years; [57000]

(2) how many teachers in each region of England have been dismissed on grounds of inefficiency in each of the last three years; [57006]

(3) how many teachers in each region of England have been (a) subject to disciplinary procedures on health grounds and (b) dismissed on such grounds in each of the last three years. [57007]

Mr Gibb: The responsibility for disciplinary procedures within schools in England, including those that result in dismissal, rests with school governing bodies and local authorities, who are the employers of teachers in schools.

The information requested about the numbers of teachers disciplined and dismissed is not held by the Department.

Teachers: Schoolmasters

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding his Department has provided to (a) the National Union of Teachers, (b) the National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers, (c) the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, (d) the National Association of Head Teachers and (e) schemes run by those organisations in each year since 1997. [56406]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is shown in the following table:

Union name Financial year Amount of payment (£) Reason for funding

National Union of Teachers (NUT)

1997 to April2002

(1)

 

April 2002 to March 2003

0

 

April 2003 to March 2004

0

 

April 2004 to March 2005

465.00

Schools Web - Schools Channels

 

April 2005 to March 2006

0

 

April 2006 to March 2007

0

 

April 2007 to March 2008

0

 

April 2008 to March 2009

402.50

Young People Directorate—14-19 Public Awareness

 

April 2009 to March 2010

4,482.50

Advertisement for First Post and Litigation

 

April 2010 to March 2011

0

 

April 2011

0

 

Total

5,350.00

       

National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers (NASUWT)

1997 to April 2002

(1)

 

April 2002 to March 2003

0

 

April 2003 to March 2004

0

 

April 2004 to March 2005

31,500.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2005 to March 2006

87,486.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc/Teachers' Performance Management

7 Jun 2011 : Column 55W

7 Jun 2011 : Column 56W

 

April 2006 to March 2007

100,000.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2007 to March 2008

130,500.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2008 to March 2009

95,070.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2009 to March 2010

125,000.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2010 to March2011

100,000.00

PE Sport Strategy for Young People—Paralympics Assoc

 

April 2011

0

 

Total

669,556.00

       

Association of Teachers and Lecturers(ATL)

1997 to April 2002

(1)

 

April 2002 to March 2003

0

 

April 2003 to March 2004

0

 

April 2004 to March 2005

0

 

April 2005 to March 2006

0

 

April 2006 to March 2007

0

 

April 2007 to March 2008

0

 

April 2008 to March 2009

230.00

Young People Directorate—14-19 Reform Local Delivery—Public Awareness

 

April 2009 to March 2010

587.50

Stakeholder Engagement Conferences and Exhibitions

 

April 2010 to March2011

0

 

April 2011

0

 

Total

817.50

       

National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT)

1997 to April 2002

(1)

 

April 2002 to March 2003

13,883.82

Communications/Public Awareness/ Conferences/ Playing Fields

 

April 2003 to March 2004

13,106.37

Playing Fields

 

April 2004 to March 2005

24,266.77

Playing Fields/Conferences

 

April 2005 to March 2006

10,950.63

Playing Fields/ Publicity/Training

 

April 2006 to March 2007

8,212.92

Playing Fields/Gifted and Talented

 

April 2007 to March 2008

8,596.91

Playing Fields

 

April 2008 to March 2009

13,075.43

Playing Fields/Conferences

 

April 2009 to March2010

9,442.84

Playing Fields/Conferences/Public Awareness

 

April 2010 to March2011

0

 

April 2011

0

 

Total

88,840.46

(1) No information available

University Technical Colleges

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many statements of intent his Department received in relation to establishing a university technical college by 1 April 2011; and if he will publish each statement received. [56712]

Mr Gibb: The deadline for sending Statements of Intent for University Technical Colleges to the Department was 15 April 2011. 51 were received by that date. Each proposer now has the opportunity to develop a full application, in line with guidance we have published on the Department's website. We will announce in due course which applications are approved.

Vocational Guidance: Finance

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department plans to provide direct funding to the all-age careers service in academic year 2011-12. [54902]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 9 May 2011]:Online and helpline service currently funded by the Department for Education for young people will, during the academic year 2011-12, be integrated with those for adults as part of the establishment of a National Careers Service. The Department for Education is providing funding through the Early Intervention Grant to support access to impartial

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careers guidance for young people in the academic year 2011-12. Subject to the passage of the Education Bill, schools will be responsible for securing independent careers guidance for their pupils from September 2012.

International Development

Departmental Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in his Department. [57128]

Mr Duncan: All Government Ministers have pledged to undertake a ‘one day challenge’ with a charity or community group of their choice. This is a clear and public commitment by Ministers to give their time to help others. The pledge aims to inspire others to consider how they might be able to support their communities to benefit themselves, as well as their chosen organisations.

Departmental Manpower

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will make it his policy to publish monthly information on changes in the numbers of his Department’s employees categorised by (a) seniority, (b) voluntary redundancy, (c) natural wastage and (d) involuntary redundancy. [57607]

Mr Duncan: In response to the Government Transparency Initiative and in line with other Government Departments, the Department for International Development publishes organograms for the entire organisation and salary information for most of the senior civil service. These data are refreshed every six months, details of which can be found on the Cabinet Office website at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/transparency

We also provide details of staff leaving DFID and their reason for doing so as part of an annual civil service employment survey return for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), details of which can be found on the ONS website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/default.asp

We have no plans to publish more frequent additional data.

Developing Countries: Climate Change

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions he has had within the Transitional Committee on the Green Climate Fund on the division of funding between climate change adaptation and mitigation measures; and if he will make a statement. [58069]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The coalition Government support the decision of the 16(th) Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which tasks the Transitional Committee to design a Green Climate Fund with the objective of achieving a balanced allocation between adaptation and mitigation. The Transitional Committee has met

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once, and there has not yet been any substantial discussion of the division of funding between adaptation and mitigation. The coalition Government will aim to secure provisions for a balanced allocation when this matter is considered in the Transitional Committee.

Developing Countries: Roads

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what his policy is on the provision by the Government of £1.5 million of grant aid to promote global road safety through the UN Global Road Safety Commission; and if he will make a statement. [57676]

Mr O'Brien: Road safety is an important issue for people in developing countries. While this project is not part of our current programme, our core funding to multilateral agencies like the World Bank will save lives by ensuring that road investments include road safety provisions.

Ecuador: Rain Forests

Mark Lazarowicz: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the proposals of the Government of Ecuador for the preservation of the Yasuni forest. [56936]

Mr O'Brien: The UK Government are aware of proposals relating to the Yasuni forest. Although at this early stage a number of important technical questions still need to be addressed, the UK Government recognise the forward looking and innovative approach set out by the Ecuadorian Government. Further attention needs to be devoted to developing environmental and social safeguard policies to ensure that investments do not have unintended harmful consequences, and to the permanence of the arrangements to conserve the Yasuni region.

The UK Government recognise the importance of forests in supporting livelihoods, protecting biodiversity and mitigating climate change. Funding has been committed over the next four years (2011-15) through the International Climate Fund to help developing countries to respond to climate change, and a substantial part of this funding is likely to be focused on forests. An independent review to inform options for UK support on forestry was published on 18 May, and its recommendations are now under consideration.

Elections

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what arrangements his Department put in place to enable its officials working overseas to vote by post in the May 2011 elections and referendum on the voting system. [57563]

Mr Duncan: In the briefing packs for officials who will be taking up an overseas posting we give them the ‘Electoral Registration form for a Crown Servant or British Council employee’. This tells them how to register to vote in an election. It is up to the individual to decide if they complete and return the form to their Electoral Registration Office.

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Pakistan: Overseas Aid

Simon Danczuk: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what proportion of his Department's aid to Pakistan was spent in the Pakistan-administered areas of Kashmir in the latest period for which figures are available. [57313]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The UK supports national programmes in Pakistan that work in, and benefit, Pakistan-administered Kashmir including the National Maternal, Newborn and Child Health programme. The proportion of this aid spent in Pakistan-administered Kashmir cannot be provided without incurring disproportionate cost. UK bilateral aid to Pakistan in 2009-10 totalled £140.4 million.

The UK repaired 450,000 damaged houses and financed building 16 new schools and 40 bridges in Pakistan-administered Kashmir as part of the Department for International Development's (DFID) earthquake reconstruction and rehabilitation programme. A number of these projects are now reaching completion, with the overall spend currently totalling £48,377,792, 58% of the £84 million committed.

In addition, DFID provides funding to the Conflict Pool, which is a joint Foreign and Commonwealth Office, DFID and Ministry of Defence fund that runs a number of programmes in Pakistan. The value of these programmes in Pakistan-administered Kashmir over the past five years was £1,108,256.

Tanzania: BAE Systems

Mr Gale: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development for what reasons his Department recommended that funds agreed with the Serious Fraud Office should be paid by BAE to the Government of Tanzania rather than to Tanzanian charities; and if he will make a statement. [56943]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: In February 2010, the Department for International Development received a request for advice from the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) about how to ensure that any money paid to Tanzania as a result of its settlement with BAE would be given in a way that would benefit the people of Tanzania, with propriety and transparency.

In the course of discussions, DFID advised that a good approach, which would achieve value for money, developmental impact and the broadest benefit to the Tanzanian people would be to make a payment via Government of Tanzania systems, with the funds ring-fenced for specific development results (in the education sector) and subject to independent, international-standard audit.

In Tanzania, government systems reliably reach most people. Donors, including the UK, already provide significant development assistance through government systems. This money is appropriated by the Tanzanian Parliament and audited by the Controller and Auditor General, and is subject to donor monitoring procedures.

Spending through non-government organisations or an entirely new mechanism were considered, but the use of government systems was deemed to be a good method for achieving value for money and wide impact with minimal additional administration cost.

No proposals for making payments outside of Government systems have been discussed with DFID.

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Yemen: International Assistance

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what funding his Department has provided for the activities of UNICEF and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Yemen in 2011. [57244]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) is providing the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) with £6 million of funding for work in Yemen in 2011. This funding will go towards addressing the basic humanitarian needs of the children of Yemen, including preventing 11,000 under five-year-olds dying from malnutrition; vaccinating 54,000 children for measles; and improving education for at least 200,000 children.

We have not provided the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) funding for work in Yemen. In view of the current uncertainty in Yemen, we are keeping all our commitments under continuous review.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to ensure the accountability of UNICEF and the office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Yemen for funding for his Department for activities in Yemen in 2011. [57247]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) has signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) setting out these agencies' obligations in respect of humanitarian funding provided by DFID in 2011. Under these MoUs both agencies will submit regular reports on progress, which will allow DFID to track project expenditure and progress against agreed targets. DFID will also monitor progress through our presence on the OCHA Emergency Relief Fund Advisory Board and meetings with agencies.

DFID has not provided the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) funding for work in Yemen. In view of the current uncertainty in Yemen, we are keeping all our commitments under continuous review.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Air Pollution

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps she is taking to reduce the effects on health of levels of air quality. [57255]

Richard Benyon: The Government take air quality issues seriously and have committed to a number of initiatives which will reduce air pollution (targeting transport in the main), including: over £400 million for measures to promote the uptake of ultra-low carbon vehicle technologies; a £560 million Local Sustainable Transport Fund to provide funding for local authorities to support sustainable travel; and a £45 million Green Bus Fund to encourage the uptake of low-emission buses.

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The Government also recently committed £5 million to fund a programme of localised measures designed to reduce concentrations of particulate matter in London—the only UK location assessed to have areas that do not comply with the European limit value for this pollutant.

The Government are reviewing what further action can be taken to communicate the impacts of air pollution more effectively, and, through a partnership approach, establish stronger messages about tackling the health impacts of air pollution and what action people can take to reduce air pollution. Examples of such initiatives include ‘active travel’, which promotes walking and cycling, leading to reduced health risks and improved air quality; and ‘smarter choices’ measures aimed at behaviour change. The Government will continue to investigate measures to improve air quality and will shortly be consulting on their plans to achieve limit values for nitrogen dioxide.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Vaccination

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what recent assessment her Department has made of the efficiency and viability of inoculating badgers against bovine tuberculosis; and if she will make a statement; [56859]

(2) what her policy is on the level of evidence required in respect of the viability of inoculation of badgers to establish that method as a means to prevent the spread of bovine tuberculosis. [56860]

Mr Paice: A licensed injectable badger TB vaccine is already available for use on prescription. Experimental studies have demonstrated that vaccination is safe and effective in reducing the progression and spread of TB in badgers. DEFRA is funding a Badger Vaccine Deployment Project to assess the practicality of vaccination in the field and to train lay vaccinators. However, while we would expect vaccination to result in reduced transmission of bovine TB to cattle, we currently have no hard evidence on this. Therefore, the precise contribution vaccination could make to reducing disease in cattle is unknown.

It is important to note that vaccines can never represent a single answer to the problem of bovine TB. Vaccination is a risk reduction measure, most likely to be successful in controlling bovine TB when used alongside other disease control measures.

Despite the relative lack of scientific evidence, the public consultation document made clear that we do see a role for vaccination. We are carefully considering the large number of responses we received to the consultation.

Chewing Gum: Waste Disposal

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what her policy is on requiring companies involved in the production of chewing gum to contribute towards the clean-up of discarded gum from streets. [56644]

Richard Benyon [holding answer 23 May 2011]: There are no plans at present to require companies involved in the production of chewing gum to make a financial contribution towards the clean-up of discarded gum.

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However, the Government continue to work for changed behaviour on littering, for instance through the work of the chewing gum action group funded by gum manufacturers, and with Keep Britain Tidy through the “Love Where You Live” campaign funded by business.

Circuses: Animal Welfare

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what contact officials of her Department have had with legal representatives of the European Circus Association; and on what dates. [57420]

Mr Paice: We do not maintain a record of every contact that organisations, such as the European Circus Association (ECA), has with officials, but it has had frequent contact with officials during the last five years.

Departmental Billing

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what mechanism her Department has established to ensure its payments are passed through the supply chain to each tier in accordance with the last date for payment defined in the Government's Fair Payment guidance. [55891]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA and its Executive agencies request its suppliers to adopt and follow the Governments Fair Payment guidance.

Most of the expenditure of the core Department is on services, rather than goods. Much of the supplier responsibility fails, therefore, on prompt and correct payment of supplier staff salaries. Where goods are concerned, the spread of Tier 2 and 3 suppliers can be very wide and to collect data across such a wide range of organisations would not be efficient or effective and would incur additional cost.

Departmental Co-ordination: Communities and Local Government

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what dates (a) Ministers and (b) officials in her Department have met their counterparts in the Department for Communities and Local Government in 2011 to date. [57019]

Richard Benyon: Ministers in my Department have met with Ministers in the Department for Communities and Local Government on 2 February, 25 March, 28 March, 31 March, and 9 May on a bilateral basis. We also meet regularly with CLG Ministers at Cabinet, Home Affairs Committee, Economic Affairs Committee, Sub-Committee on Efficiency and Reform, Public Expenditure Committee, Sub-Committee on Threats, Hazards, Resilience and Contingencies, Sub-Committee on Public Health and the ministerial Green Breakfast that my Department hosts. Officials in both Departments have regular meetings and discussions together most weekdays to discuss a range of issues of mutual interest.

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Departmental Legal Opinion

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many prosecutions have been brought as a result of the work of her Department's legal team in each of the last five years for each type of offence; and how many convictions for each type of offence have resulted from such prosecutions in each of the last five years. [55459]

Richard Benyon [holding answer 13 May 2011]: The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Manpower

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will make it her policy to publish monthly information on changes in the numbers of her Department's employees categorised by (a) seniority, (b) number of employees taking voluntary redundancy, (c) natural wastage and (d) involuntary redundancy. [57611]

Richard Benyon: The Government are committed to transparency and the availability of data and are currently

7 Jun 2011 : Column 64W

exploring options for the more frequent publication of this type of work force management information across the civil service.

Departmental Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what (a) longitudinal and (b) other (i) research and (ii) collection of data her Department has (A) initiated, (B) terminated and (C) amended in the last 12 months; and what such research and data collection exercises undertaken by the Department have not been amended in that period. [56763]

Richard Benyon: This information cannot be provided due to disproportionate costs.

Departmental Travel

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much each executive agency of her Department has spent on travel by (a) private hire vehicles, (b) trains, (c) buses, (d) commercial aircraft and (e) private aircraft since May 2010. [56076]

Richard Benyon: The information requested is included in the following table.

  Executive Agencies
£

RPA CEFAS FERA VMD AH VLA

(a) private hire vehicles (may include Taxis unless stated)

67,587

63,754

23,432

7,568

50,259

75,060

(b)trains

331,554

193,247

272,397

(1)97,644

205,932

(1)110,981

(c) buses

1,151

4,921

not available

(1)

4,032

(1)

(d) commercial aircraft

49,423

224,826

144,165

(1)

95,768

150,484

(e) private aircraft

0

0

0

0

0

0

(1) Indicates brace. Notes: 1. The VMD does not record the costs of public transport types (bus, train, etc) separately other than hire cars. Instead it records the “reason for travel”, which is a more useful measure for understanding and controlling travel costs. Assuming “since May” means from 1 May 2010 to 30 April 2011 2. VLA. Trains and buses are not recorded separately (they are both included in the public transport figure), any ‘private hire vehicles’ would be included in the taxi figure. All figures are for period 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 3. CEFAS. This expenditure covers the financial period of 2010-11 and includes journeys undertaken in the fulfilment of non-government customer contracts. The travel cost for these non-government contracts is reimbursed by the recipient of these services in the charges made and income received. 4. FERA The analysis is provided by the main travel provider, further travel costs for these areas will have been via expenses through GPC, expenses claims, and other organisations. We do not capture this level of detail within our Ledgers. Period is May2010 to March 2011. RPA Expenditure is for the period May 2010 to March 2011. The figure for Private Hire vehicles excludes taxis

The information is provided on the basis that the final accounts for the year 2010-11 are still being audited by the NAO.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much her Department spent on special advisers’ travel by (a) Government car, (b) private hire car, (c) train, (d) bus, (e) commercial aircraft and (f) private aircraft since May 2010. [56104]

Richard Benyon: Since May 2010, the Department has spent £1,336.47 on travel for special advisers. This can be broken down into £739.08 on domestic rail travel and £597.39 on Eurostar.

Fishery Agreements: Morocco

Mr Mark Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 4 May 2011, Official Report, column 785W, on the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement, if she will oppose any extension to the agreement. [57418]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA is waiting for the European Commission to come forward with the proposals which will formally put into effect the extension of the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement up until February 2012. Once the proposals have been received,

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DEFRA will have to be convinced that there is enough evidence that the population of the Western Sahara will benefit from the agreement before supporting any extension to it.

Fishing Catches

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions she has had with large retailers and food producers on fish discards. [57505]

Richard Benyon: As Minister for Fisheries, I have an open dialogue with large retailers and food producers on a number of key issues including fish discards. More recently, I have met with Sainsbury's and Young's, which are active stakeholders promoting the consumption of underutilised fish species (like gurnard and red mullet) which account for 54% of the fish currently being discarded.

Discussions take place at official level on a regular basis with a number of large retailers and food producers via stakeholder fora, such as the Discards Action Group established by Seafish.

Forests: Ecuador

Mark Lazarowicz: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment her Department has made of the proposals of the Government of Ecuador for the preservation of the Yasuni forest. [56935]

Mr Paice: DEFRA is aware of proposals relating to the Yasuni forest. These proposals raise a number of technical questions, including ones concerning environmental and social safeguard policies to ensure that investments do not have unintended harmful consequences, and concerning the permanence of the arrangements to conserve the Yasuni region.

Funding has been committed over the next four years (2011-15) through the International Climate Fund to help developing countries respond to climate change, and a substantial part of this funding is likely to be focused on forests of Ecuador.

Hares: Conservation

Neil Parish: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether the aims set out in the Biodiversity Action Plan in respect of the brown hare population have been met. [58032]

Richard Benyon: The UK Biodiversity Action Plan (UKBAP) set many hundreds of targets including the following targets for brown hares: to increase the population of brown hares to double the 1995 level by 2010; and to maintain the range of the brown hare at the 2006 level (these targets did not apply to Northern Ireland).

We do not have data for the target concerning the range of the brown hare but the data we have show that the population of brown hares in Great Britain has continued to increase since the 1980s although not at the rate needed to meet the target in the UKBAP.

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Inland Waterways

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps she has taken to ensure that the Environment Agency navigations can transfer to the proposed new waterways charity in 2015-16; and if she will make a statement. [58155]

Richard Benyon: The Government are committed to delivering a national trust for the waterways over time, which includes both the British Waterways and Environment Agency navigations.

There will be a phased approach to the delivery of this vision, so that assets and liabilities can be transferred sustainably. Under this phased approach the Environment Agency navigations, subject to the agreement of the trustees of the new waterways charity, would transfer to the new charity in the next spending review period (2015-16).

To ensure a smooth transition, a review will be undertaken in 2014 to assess the progress and achievements of the new charity and to consider the options to enable the transfer of the Environment Agency navigations.

Motor Vehicles: Sales

Rebecca Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent representations she has received on the operation of online car trading businesses from residential properties; and if she will make a statement. [56302]

Richard Benyon: Under the provisions of the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005 it is an offence to expose or advertise for sale two or more motor vehicles parked on a road or roads within 500 metres of each other. DEFRA has not received any recent representations on the operation of these provisions.

River Rom: Pollution

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment she made of the effects on wildlife of levels of pollution in the River Rom. [57034]

Richard Benyon: The Environment Agency (EA) assesses the River Rom under the water framework directive. Since 2010 it has been carrying out investigations to identify issues, such as the impact of poor water quality on aquatic life.

The EA is working with Thames Water to tackle poor water quality by addressing misconnections and identifying improvements that are needed to its combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and surcharging sewers.

The EA is aware that there are problems associated with urban diffuse pollution in this area and is identifying the source, where it does not relate to misconnections and CSOs. It is working with relevant local authorities and other implicated parties towards addressing these issues.

Long-term problems associated with the quality and quantity of urban surface run-off entering the river put fish populations at risk. Silt deposits are often formed in the lower reaches of the River Rom because of the

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shallow gradient in the channel. Plant and invertebrate communities show limited diversity as a result of these silt deposits and elevated pollution levels.

River Thames: Standards

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department is taking to ensure the cleanliness and water quality of the River Thames. [57311]

Richard Benyon: In 2009, the Environment Agency published the Thames River Basin Management Plan, which sets out the pressures on the River Thames and the actions needed to address them. The Environment Agency and its partners are now carrying out these actions. Where the Environment Agency does not know the causes of water quality problems and the best methods for tackling them, it is carrying out a programme of investigations to inform its future approach.

A significant improvement to cleanliness and water quality will be achieved through the London Tideway Improvements scheme, which will tackle pollution from urban wastewater and ensure the Thames meets the requirements of the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive.

The scheme is being delivered by Thames Water and will:

(a) limit pollution from combined sewer overflows through the addition of two new storage and transfer tunnels: the Lee Tunnel and Thames Tunnel, which will intercept and transport storm sewage to the Beckton sewage treatment works; and

(b) improve the treatment capacity and effluent quality at five sewage treatment works: Mogden, Crossness, Beckton, Long Reach and Riverside.

Sustainable Development

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what dates the (a) Sustainable Development Programme Board and (b) Sustainable Development Policy Working Group have met since May 2010; and when their next scheduled meetings are. [57074]

Mr Paice [holding answer 23 May 2011]: The Sustainable Development Programme met on 1 July, 28 September and 9 December 2010 and the Sustainable Development Policy Working Group met on 3 June, 9 September and 4 November 2010. There were also interdepartmental meetings on sustainable development, Greening Government and the Greening Government commitments on the following dates: 14 July 2010, 5 October 2010, 8 February 2011 and 18 February 2011.

Apart from day-to-day discussions between officials, plans for standing engagement between DEFRA and other Departments on sustainable development are currently under review within our approach of mainstreaming sustainable development across Government.

Water: EU Law

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what proportion of waterways owned by the Crown Estate is expected to achieve (a) good ecological status and (b) good ecological potential under the Water Framework Directive by 2015; [53629]

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(2) how many weirs owned by the Crown Estate are without fully functional all-fish species passes which comply with the provision of the Water Framework Directive. [53630]

Justine Greening: I have been asked to reply.

The Crown Estate grants agricultural tenancies on land which includes inland waterways. The lessees are responsible for maintenance. The Crown Estate is not aware of any waterways and weirs that it owns which do not comply with the Waterways Framework Directive.

Health

Cancer Drugs Fund

20. Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the operation of the Cancer Drugs Fund; and if he will make a statement. [57831]

Mr Simon Burns: We have received representations from hon. Members, noble Lords, and members of the public on how the fund has been operating. This includes many welcoming the additional support we are giving to cancer patients in need.

Over 2,400 patients have already benefitted from the additional funding provided up to the start of April 2011, and the additional £600 million we have committed over the next three years will improve the lives of thousands more cancer sufferers.

NHS Financial Performance

21. Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the financial performance of the NHS in 2010-11; and if he will make a statement. [57832]

Mr Simon Burns: The national health service is in a strong financial position. At Quarter 3 of 2010-11, the strategic health authorities and primary care trusts were forecasting an overall surplus of £1,269 million, and the NHS trust sector was forecasting an overall surplus of £132 million. We expect the 2010-11 final year end surplus to be no less than this forecast.

Influenza Vaccine

22. Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the Scottish Executive on the availability of influenza vaccine for winter 2011-12. [57833]

Anne Milton: The Department has had an initial exchange of views with the Scottish Executive on planning for the seasonal flu vaccination programme for winter 2011-12.

Ordering of flu vaccine in England is the responsibility of general practitioner practices. Central Government will procure a small central strategic reserve to mitigate the risk of local shortages in England.

The Scottish Executive centrally procures seasonal flu vaccine for the Scottish health service.

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NHS: Competition and Collaboration

23. Mrs Glindon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the potential role of (a) competition and (b) co-operation and collaboration in the NHS. [57834]

Mr Simon Burns: Both co-operation and competition have important roles to play in improving services for patients. We want to see better integration of services to improve quality and increased choice for patients.

This is a key theme of the current listening exercise on national health service modernisation. The NHS Future Forum is seeking views on the development of choice and competition in the NHS and we look forward to the forum's report.

GP Commissioning Consortia

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the redundancy costs of staff of primary care trusts and strategic health authorities eligible to be employed by GP commissioning consortia. [57811]

Mr Simon Burns: The impact assessment estimated that redundancies would cost £852 million for primary care trusts and strategic health authorities. It also explained how our proposals for modernising the national health service would save £1.7 billion a year in administration spending by 2014-15, to reinvest in front-line patient care.

Emergency Planning

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for the future of the responsibilities of primary care trusts in emergency planning. [57820]

Anne Milton: As the right hon. Member is aware, the Government are at the end of the NHS Listening Exercise, during which we have heard a wide range of views. Future responsibility for emergency planning will be made clear in the near future.

The delivery of health care resilience is currently through a combination of roles and responsibilities across a number of national health service organisations, and the Health Protection Agency.

Health care resilience is part of much wider planning for emergencies both at a local level, including local authorities, ambulance trusts, fire brigades and police forces and at a national level by Government Departments and agencies.

Health and Social Care Bill

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects to table amendments for consideration during the Report stage of the Health and Social Care Bill. [57835]

Mr Simon Burns: The NHS Future Forum are now reflecting on what they have heard and will be publishing their report shortly. We will then respond and set out the improvements to the Health and Social Care Bill.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 70W

Care Quality Commission

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the average amount of Care Quality Commission staff time needed to conduct a service review for an (a) NHS trust, (b) independent hospital and (c) adult social care provider, broken down by (i) time for site visit, (ii) review and assessment of (A) information held by the Care Quality Commission on the organisation and (B) completed provider compliance assessments and (iii) completion and publication of a report. [58079]

Mr Simon Burns: In terms of delivering its regulatory functions, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) is an independent body and is therefore responsible for determining the time needed to undertake reviews of registered services in order to carry out its functions efficiently and effectively.

The time taken to carry out a service review varies enormously depending on the circumstances, size and nature of the service. We are advised by the CQC that the information requested is not gathered centrally.

The CQC is, however, currently conducting an activity-based management review with a sample of compliance staff to study the time demands of the different parts of the regulatory process. Once complete, the findings will be used to establish the value of activity-based information in carrying out the commission’s regulatory functions, and will inform the CQC’s ongoing resource planning.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training staff at the Care Quality Commission will receive on registration and inspection of (a) dental services and (b) GP services. [58082]

Mr Simon Burns: In terms of delivering its regulatory functions, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) is an independent body and it is therefore for the CQC to determine the appropriate training staff require so that the CQC can carry out its functions efficiently and effectively.

The following information has been provided by the CQC.

CQC staff have received specific training relating to dentistry which includes:

a sector overview of primary dental care;

system training including the registration process for primary dental care providers; and

training on compliance monitoring of primary dental care providers.

Specific training relating to general practitioners will include (this has not been rolled out universally yet):

sector overview of primary medical care;

system training including the registration process for primary medical care providers; and

training on compliance monitoring of primary medical care providers.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the maximum amount of time that can elapse is before a health or social care provider will receive a site inspection under the Care Quality Commission’s regulation methodology. [58086]

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Mr Simon Burns: Under the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) current methodology, every provider should be reviewed at least every two years. However, in line with the principles of proportionate, risk-based regulation, the CQC carries out site visits based on its judgment of risk and where a site visit is the most effective way of gathering information about compliance. This enables the CQC to target its resources on providers where the risk is highest, while reducing the regulatory burden on providers where the risk is low. Site visits will therefore take place wherever necessary to gather information about compliance.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consideration the Care Quality Commission gives to provider self-assessment in its assessment of whether a health or social care provider is compliant with its essential standards. [58088]

Mr Simon Burns: The following information has been provided by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The CQC uses its quality and risk profiles (QRP) and its Outliers programme (which identifies services whose performance lies outside the expected range) to identify the risk of non-compliance by registered providers with the safety and quality registration requirements.

Providers self assessments of compliance are not included in either the QRP or the Outliers programme. The purpose of provider compliance assessments is to help the provider itself in considering whether it is compliant with the safety and quality requirements. Provider compliance assessments are not mandatory. When carrying out a review, the CQC may ask to see any provider compliance assessment that has been undertaken and this information may add to the evidence base upon which the inspectors judgment is founded. However the provider compliance assessment will not form part of the decision to undertake a responsive review.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many separate indicators are available within the Care Quality Commission's quality and risk profiles for (a) NHS providers, (b) independent health care providers and (c) adult social care providers. [58089]

Mr Simon Burns: The following information has been provided by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The precise number of indicators used by CQC changes over time as data sets become less timely or are superseded by better data. The number of indicators for each provider is different as not all sources of data apply to all providers, depending upon the precise mix of services they provide. However, at the last update (10 May 2011) of the Quality and Risk Profile, the average number of separate indicators for each national health service provider was approximately 500 with approximately 50 indicators for independent health care and adult social care providers.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of the Care Quality Commission's assessors and inspectors hold a (a) nursing qualification, (b) social work qualification, (c) professional qualification in regulation and (d) another professional qualification relating to health or social care. [58090]

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Mr Simon Burns: It is for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to determine the appropriate staffing complement and qualifications in order to carry out its functions efficiently and effectively.

The following information has been provided by the CQC.

As part of its recruitment process, the CQC does not specifically require inspectors and assessors to hold a nursing qualification, social work qualification, professional qualification in regulation or another professional qualification relating to health or social care. Therefore, the CQC does not have a record of these data.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of the Care Quality Commission's assessors and inspectors are registered with (a) the Nursing and Midwifery Council and (b) the General Social Care Council. [58091]

Mr Simon Burns: It is for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to determine the appropriate staffing complement and qualifications in order to carry out its functions efficiently and effectively.

CQC has provided the following information.

As part of its recruitment process, CQC does not specifically require inspectors and assessors to be registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Council and the General Social Care Council. Therefore, CQC does not hold these data.

Bowel Cancer: Older People

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that elderly patients are not underrepresented in clinical trials for bowel cancer therapies. [57064]

Paul Burstow: The Government are committed to opening up information about clinical trials in all therapeutic areas including bowel cancer, so that patients can find out about trials that may be relevant to their condition. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is developing a web-based UK Clinical Trials Gateway. It will present, in accessible form, information about trials conducted in the United Kingdom. By 2012, the Gateway will make it easy for patients, their doctors and carers, friends and families to see what a trial is about, where it is taking place, and who is running it. It will help patients, including elderly patients, to join in clinical trials if they are suitable and choose to do so with full information and advice.

The NIHR encourages patients and the public to be actively involved in all NIHR-funded health and social care research. The NIHR funds INVOLVE, which promotes active public participation in national health service, public health and social care research to improve the way that research is prioritised, commissioned, undertaken, communicated and used.

Cancer

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department has taken to assess the effects of lifestyle and behaviour on rates of cancer. [57067]

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Paul Burstow: The Department draws on evidence from a range of sources, including academic research, to assess links between lifestyles and rates of cancer and this is kept under constant review. Evidence of the link between lifestyle behaviours—such as tobacco use (including smoking), alcohol consumption, drug misuse, poor diet and nutrition, being overweight or obese and physically inactive—is well established. This research shows that up to half of all cancers could be prevented by changes in lifestyle behaviours, so it is clear that these behaviours have an effect on cancer rates.

“Healthy Lives, Healthy People: our strategy for public health in England” sets out our strategy for improving public health and reducing the risk factors associated with developing conditions such as cancer.

Cancer: Medical Treatments

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the capability of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to carry out appraisals for innovative inhibitor therapies for rare cancers where the target population is very small; and if he will make a statement. [57488]

Mr Simon Burns: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave my hon. Friend the member for Wirral West (Esther McVey) on 23 May 2011, Official Report, column 426W.

Cancer: Waiting Lists

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting time for cancer patients in Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency to receive treatment (a) was in each year from May 2005 to April 2010 and (b) has been in 2011 to date. [56751]

Paul Burstow: Statistics on average waiting times between diagnosis and treatment for cancer are not collected centrally. The cancer waiting time standard of a maximum wait of 31 days from diagnosis to first cancer treatment was introduced for all patients from December 2005. In the most recent period for which statistics are available (quarter 3 2010-11), 98.7%, of patients treated for cancer at South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust began their treatment within 31 days.

Care Homes

Stephen Gilbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the number of care homes in each region that were found not to be compliant with national minimum standard (a) 10.1 on privacy and dignity, (b) 9.6 on medicines management, (c) 12.2 and 15.4 on nutrition and (d) 18.1 on protection from abuse in each year since the standards were established. [57671]

Paul Burstow: The Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator of health and adult social care in England and, as such, holds information on providers' compliance.

Information showing where compliance with the national minimum standards was designated ‘not met’

7 Jun 2011 : Column 74W

or ‘almost met’ has been placed in the Library. The data are by financial year and by current region under the Care Standards Act 2000 from 1 April 2002 to 30 September 2010.

Information showing the compliance and non-compliance of care homes in each region, and those in process of being assessed, has been placed in the Library. This covers the period 1 October 2010 onwards, by current region.

Colorectal Cancer: Health Services

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the 30-day mortality rate was for patients with a diagnosis of bowel cancer who received a major surgical resection for bowel cancer for each stage of cancer in each (a) provider, (b) cancer network and (c) strategic health authority in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [55818]

Paul Burstow: The information is not available in the format requested. However, in April 2011 the National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN) published an eAtlas following a study of the 30-day mortality rate for patients with a diagnosis of bowel cancer, who received a major surgical resection. Information on the number of surgical resections and proportion of deaths is provided at trust and cancer network level for the period from 1998 to 2006 and is available on the NCIN website at:

www.ncin.org.uk/cancer_type_and_topic_specific_work/cancer_type_specific_work/postoperative_mortality.aspx.

An eAtlas of preliminary information for trusts with significantly better or worse post-operative mortality rates than expected during 2002 to 2006 was also published. This showed that the performance of trusts with worse than expected 30-day post-operative mortality rates in 2003 to 2006 had improved in 2007-08. The NCIN has advised that information for 2007-08 will be updated in due course when analysis is complete.

A data briefing summarising some of the key findings in relation to year of diagnosis and stage of diagnosis is also available on the NCIN website.

Dental Services: Equipment

Natascha Engel: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the number of people who are offered a statement of manufacture with their dental device. [57208]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not collected centrally.

Departmental Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in his Department. [57119]

Mr Simon Burns: I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave him on 17 March 2011, Official Report, column 631W.

Departmental Equality

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what account he has taken of the effects of income inequality in the (a) formulation and (b) implementation of policy. [57153]

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Anne Milton: “Healthy Lives, Healthy People”, the public health White Paper, accepted the analysis in the Marmot review on health inequalities (“Fair Society, Healthy Lives”, 2010) that emphasised the importance of social factors—including income inequalities—in shaping inequalities in health and contributing to wider disadvantage. This approach will underpin our efforts to strengthen public health and narrow the health gap by improving the health of the poorest fastest.

Subject to the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, from 2013-14, the Department will allocate a ring-fenced public health grant to local authorities, weighted for inequalities. A new health premium will reward communities for the improvements in health outcomes they achieve, and incentivise action to reduce health inequalities. Disadvantaged areas will see a greater premium if they make progress, recognising that they face the greatest challenges.

Departmental Manpower

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make it his policy to publish monthly information on changes in the numbers of his Department's employees categorised by (a) seniority, (b) voluntary redundancy, (c) natural wastage and (d) involuntary redundancy. [57609]

Mr Simon Burns: Cabinet Office has recently commissioned monthly workforce management reports from Departments across Whitehall, which include numbers of, and expenditure on, permanent and non-permanent workers. This forms part of the Government's cross-departmental transparency agenda. This information will be made publicly available in due course.

The Department already publishes its annual resource accounts, which include workforce information. It also provides quarterly returns (Quarterly Public Sector Employment Surveys) to the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and an annual return to ONS for their Annual Civil Service Employment Survey. The Department also publishes, again, as part of the Government's transparency agenda, organograms (organisational structure charts) which include staffing structures, numbers and pay levels.

Drugs: Misuse

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many heroin addicts were treated with diamorphine in the latest period for which figures are available. [57338]

Anne Milton: A national survey of a one in four sample of community pharmacies in England and Wales in 1995 reported that 64 people were receiving diamorphine prescriptions for opiate addiction. (Published in “Drug and Alcohol Review”, Volume 16, Issue 1, pages 7-16. March 1997.)

In 2009 the Specialist Clinicians in Addiction Network and the Substance Misuse Management in General Practice network facilitated a survey by the National Treatment Agency. The numbers of respondents to this survey were too small for it to have independent validity, but the results were of the same general order as the 1995 data.

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Enforcement Actions

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many applications for registration have been refused for (a) NHS trusts, (b) independent healthcare providers and (c) adult social care providers in each of the last three years. [58094]

Mr Simon Burns: The following information has been provided by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Number of applications for registration refused
    Independent health care providers Adult social care providers
Financial year NHS trusts CSA HSCA CSA HSCA

2010-11

0

35

1

0

2

2009-10

0

62

0

2008-09(1)

n/a

24

21

n/a = Not applicable. NHS providers were not required to register prior to 1 April 2009. (1) These are applications for registration refused by CQC’s predecessor bodies, the Healthcare Commission and Commission for Social Care Inspection. CSA = Applications where registration was refused under the Care Standards Act 2000. HSCA = Applications where registration was refused under the Health and Social Care Act 2008.

General Practitioners

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will prepare guidance to general practitioners on the collection of psychosocial data to assist in the health care of patients. [57108]

Mr Simon Burns: No. General practitioners already collect a range of personal information about patients registered with them that is relevant to their health needs. In addition, guidance issued by the General Medical Council, “Good Medical Practice”, states that:

“Good clinical care must include adequately assessing the patient's conditions, taking account of the history (including the symptoms, and psychological and social factors), the patient's views, and where necessary examining the patient.”

Duncan Hames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has prepared guidance on remuneration for board members of GP consortia. [57429]

Mr Simon Burns: Subject to the NHS Listening Exercise and the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, we propose that commissioning consortia must have a constitution, which will specify the arrangements for how it will discharge its functions, including in relation to determining the remuneration and terms and conditions of its employees. The arrangements may also include provision for the appointment of committees of a consortium, and for such committees to include persons other than members of employees of consortia. The Department has not issued guidance on remuneration arrangements of consortia.

Haematological Cancer

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that all blood cancer patients have access to a clinical nurse specialist; [57239]

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(2) what steps he is taking to improve blood cancer survival outcomes; and if he will make a statement; [57240]

(3) what support the NHS provides to blood cancer patients who wish to remain in or return to the workforce. [57241]

Paul Burstow: “Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer”, published on 12 January, sets out a range of actions to improve survival outcomes for all cancers in England, including haematological cancers. These actions include diagnosing symptomatic cancer earlier, helping people to live healthier lives to reduce the incidence of preventable cancers, screening more people, introducing new screening programmes and ensuring that all patients have access to the best possible treatment, care and support. A copy of the strategy has already been placed in the Library.

We know that cancer patients greatly value the care and support of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The results of the 2010 Cancer Patient Experience Survey show that 81% of haematological cancer patients reported having a CNS. To support the national health service to develop the CNS work force, the strategy sets out our intention to build the evidence base for the benefits and costs savings that CNSs can offer. This follows an independent report we published in December 2010 that showed that in many scenarios the costs of additional support roles are likely to be outweighed by the savings that can be achieved.

For many people with cancer, being supported to stay in or return to work can provide a huge boost to self-esteem, financial security and emotional wellbeing. Through the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, we are working in partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support to ensure that cancer survivors receive the support they need to live as healthy and as active a lifestyle as possible. This work includes looking at models of support to enable those cancer survivors who want to, to get back to work. Seven vocation rehabilitation pilots were established in 2010 to take this work forward, and these are set to run until July this year. The evaluation report on the pilots is due for publication in September 2011.

Health

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will evaluate research into the recovery rates of patients who are (a) married or in long-term relationships and (b) not married or in long-term relationships from (i) heart disease, (ii) cancer and (iii) mental health conditions. [57104]

Paul Burstow: Although the Department has not formally evaluated any research specifically in these areas it does aim to keep abreast of major developments in research relevant to its responsibilities. However, we do know that good social relationships and connectedness are associated with a range of positive outcomes, including better physical and mental health. Reducing isolation and building supportive social networks and relationships promotes good mental health and recovery as well as preventing mental health problems.

Physical illness greatly increases the risk of mental illness and mental illness can itself be a causal factor in the onset of physical disease. Depression is associated

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with a two-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease and unhealthy behaviour such as poor diet, less exercise, self-harm and significantly greater prevalence of smoking and drug and alcohol misuse.

Health Services: Older People

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what documented procedures are in place for (a) GPs and (b) hospitals to ensure thorough and proper care of the elderly. [57487]

Paul Burstow: There are a number of indicators in both the Quality and Outcomes Framework for General Practitioners and the NHS Operating framework for hospitals to support better care for older people around dementia care, hospital acquired infections, readmission rates and non-payment for emergency readmissions. In future, all licensed doctors will need to revalidate regularly, if they wish to keep their license to practise up to date and fit to practise. However, the content and standard of health care training is the responsibility of the independent regulatory bodies.

The Government are also funding several national audits on continence, falls and bone health, hip fracture, dementia care in general hospital through the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership by involving all hospitals to promote transparent information about care gaps. There are National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines in place for a range of conditions and pathways affecting older people including continence, nutrition, delirium, dementia, falls and bone health.

In addition, local commissioning is also informed by joint strategic needs assessments for the local population and the Care Quality Commission also has a regulation and inspection function for primary care services. However, many of these solutions depend on high quality local clinical leadership and advocacy from professional bodies such as royal colleges and specialist societies.

Health Services: Learning Disability

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that people with profound and multiple learning difficulties have access to personalised services; and if he will make a statement; [57236]

(2) what recent representations his Department has received on the personalisation of services for people with profound and multiple learning difficulties; and if he will make a statement; [57237]

(3) what steps his Department is taking to (a) monitor and (b) assess the effectiveness of the personalisation of services for people with profound and multiple learning difficulties; and if he will make a statement. [57238]

Paul Burstow: The Department is not directly involved in monitoring or assessing services. The Care Quality Commission is responsible for assessing and ensuring the quality of its inspection and monitoring of specific providers on a day to day basis.

We know that people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and those whose behaviours are viewed as challenging have not benefited from

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personalisation as much as they should have. The Government have encouraged a move away from out of area placement and the development of small-scale services which are closer to home.

The Government are funding the Challenging Behaviour Foundation and the National Strategy Group for Challenging Behaviour to:

strengthen their national network;

support best practice to drive improvements in services; and

develop a national care pathway with all key partners.

In addition, we have driven forward work to improve the way in which the national health service responds to the needs of all people with learning disabilities, including general practitioners offering all people with learning disabilities annual health checks.

The Department is working with strategic health authorities and primary care trusts to embed a health care self-assessment process which engages local decision makers, people with learning disabilities and their families to drive up quality of health care provision locally. The first section of standards explicitly refers to out of area placements and ensuring they are delivering for individuals.

A number of representations have recently been made via parliamentary questions. I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave the hon. Member for Arfon (Hywel Williams) on 26 April 2011, Official Report, columns 108-09W.

Health Services: Transsexuality

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department has taken to raise awareness of the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities among health professionals. [57066]

Paul Burstow: The Department has published a series of guidance documents on sexual orientation and gender identity for health and social care professionals, which are available on the Department's website.

In March 2011 the Department supported Stonewall to run a leadership programme for lesbian, gay and bisexual staff in the national health service. These staff will help form a key group of Champions to advance Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGB & T) equality at local level. The Department has recently confirmed that the National LGB & T Partnership will join its Strategic Partnership Programme for 2011-12 providing strategic advice on LGB & T health and social care issues.

Health: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which longitudinal studies monitoring the physical health and emotional well-being of children his Department has undertaken in each of the last five years; when each study commenced; what each was monitoring; what the budget of each was in each year; what plans there were for the future of each such study; and what their budgets have been to date. [57107]

Mr Simon Burns: The Millennium Cohort Study (MCS), commissioned by the Economic and Social Research Council, is a longitudinal study following the lives of around 19,000 children born in the United

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Kingdom in 2000-01. The MCS covers topics such as parenting, child care, school choice, child behaviour and cognitive development, child and parental health, parents' employment and education, income and poverty, housing, neighbourhood and residential mobility, and social capital and ethnicity. Funding support for the study is provided across Government, and the Department is contributing £1.1 million over the period from June 2001 to June 2014. The Department's spend on the MCS in each of the last five years is shown in the following table:


£

2006-07

100,000

2007-08

100,000

2008-09

82,000

2009-10

97,000

2010-11

121,000

Heart Diseases: Children

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent progress has been made on proposals to re-locate children's heart services in Hampshire to Bristol; [56928]

(2) for what reasons he proposes to re-locate children's heart services in Hampshire to Bristol. [56929]

Mr Simon Burns: The “Safe and Sustainable” review of children's heart services in England is being conducted by the NHS Specialised Commissioning Team. We have however been following its progress.

No decision has yet been made on the location of children's heart surgery units. The proposed options for children's congenital heart services are currently being consulted on. Patients and the public have the opportunity to make their views known during the formal public consultation process which closes on 1 July. This is an open consultation and is not pre-determined. Alternative options may be proposed and will be considered. The Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts, overseeing the consultation, will consider an independent analysis of the consultation responses, reports from overview and scrutiny committees, and a health impact assessment. The Committee is expected to make a decision in autumn 2011.

Jason McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate he has made of the proportion of the population of England which lives within an hour's journey time of (a) the Freeman hospital, Newcastle and (b) Leeds general infirmary; [57341]

(2) on how many different sites at (a) the Freeman hospital, Newcastle and (b) Leeds general infirmary children's services are provided; [57342]

(3) whether post-operative care in the same unit is provided for children who have undergone heart surgery at (a) the Freeman hospital, Newcastle and (b) Leeds general infirmary; [57343]

(4) whether adult and children's heart surgery is carried out on the same site at (a) the Freeman hospital, Newcastle and (b) Leeds general infirmary; [57344]

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(5) whether the Safe and Sustainable Reviews of specialist paediatric services, or any committee connected to the reviews, has engaged the services of a public affairs company or consultancy; [57347]

(6) what evidence his Department has evaluated on the incidence of congenital heart disease among minority ethnic communities from the Indian sub-continent. [57382]

Mr Simon Burns: The Safe and Sustainable review of children's heart services in England is being conducted by the NHS Specialised Commissioning Team. However, we have been following its progress.

Details about the travel analysis is available in appendix S, page 208 of the pre-business consultation case. This is available at:

www.specialisedservices.nhs.uk/document/meeting-joint-committee-primary-care-trusts-jcpct-16th-february-2011-agenda

We are informed that both the Freeman hospital and the Leeds general infirmary are single-site hospitals with children's services provided at both hospitals. At both hospitals, children receive post-operative care at the same hospital that provides heart surgery. Both the Freeman hospital and the Leeds general infirmary provide adult and children's heart surgery.

The National Specialised Commissioning Team has engaged a communications company to assist with the production of public literature, the organisation of public events and media handling in relation to the Safe and Sustainable review of children's heart surgery services.

The Department has made no evaluation of the incidence of congenital heart disease among minority ethnic communities from the Indian sub-continent. As part of the work on the Safe and Sustainable review the National Specialised Commissioning Team have developed projections of future activity, including considering the future needs of areas with high black and ethnic minority groups. This information is in annex 6 of the consultation document, which is available at:

www.specialisedservices.nhs.uk/safeandsustainable/consultation_document