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26 Jan 2011 : Column 342W—continued


Prison Sentences

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders serving custodial sentences received sentences of (a) less than six months , (b) between six and 12 months, (c) between 12 months and five years, (d) between five and 10 years, (e) between 10 and 25 years and (f) over 25 years. [36262]

Mr Blunt: From the most recent available data, 30 September 2010, the number of prisoners serving custodial sentences of:

There were 432 cases with a sentence length of five years or more where it was not possible to provide an exact sentence length and there were 13,271 prisoners serving indeterminate sentences at 30 September 2010.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Reoffenders

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the reoffending rate of offenders with a diagnosed mental health disorder was in each English region in each of the last five years for which figures are available; [36230]

(2) what the reoffending rate of offenders was in each English region in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [36231]

Mr Blunt: The Ministry of Justice publishes local reoffending data for all adult offenders on the probation caseload (which includes offenders out on licence and those with court orders). These data are produced at the probation area level and measure the reoffending of all offenders under probation supervision over a period of three months. The results are produced by aggregating four quarters of data.

The following table shows the reoffending rate for adult offenders on the probation caseload. Each period shown is based on the offenders on the probation caseload at the end of March, June, September and December of each year. Data are not available prior to 2007.

On 1 April 2010, Probation Trusts were established following a rigorous formal application process, resulting in all 42 former Probation Boards being replaced by 35 Probation Trusts. The table presented here is based on data prior to this date.

Reoffending data for offenders with a diagnosed mental health disorder are not available.

Further information on adult reoffending is available at:


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Local adult reoffending rates by offenders, in 2007-09, by probation area in England
Percentage
1 April to 31 March each year
Region 2007- 08 2008- 09 2009-10

East Midlands

9.47

9.16

9.04

East of England

8.65

9.22

9.29

London

8.72

8.67

8.50

North East

14.93

14.67

14.24

North West

9.78

10.22

9.88

South East

8.82

8.92

9.48

South West

9.37

10.32

10.06

Unknown

11.15

10.53

10.46


Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

George Eustice: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce the incidence of alcohol-related crime and disorder. [34903]

James Brokenshire: The Government take the issue of alcohol-related crime and disorder very seriously. In the coalition agreement, we set out a clear programme of reform around alcohol licensing to tackle the crime and antisocial behaviour that is too often associated with binge drinking in the night time economy.

Following our recent consultation and the publication of the consultation response in December, we have committed to the following programme of work to introduce measures to deliver the coalition agreement commitments through the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill:

Additionally, on 18 January the Government announced their intention to ban the sale of alcohol sold below duty + VAT. By introducing this new measure, we will stop the worst instances of deep discounting and prevent alcohol being sold so cheaply that it leads to a greater risk of health harms or drunken violence.

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce the incidence of alcohol related crime and disorder. [35528]

James Brokenshire: The Government are determined to reform the licensing regime to ensure that alcohol is no longer a driver of crime and disorder. To this end, we
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have set out our proposals in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill which include giving licensing authorities more power to refuse or revoke premises licences, introducing a late night levy so that premises contribute to the cost of policing the night time economy and reforming the temporary event notice (TEN) system to ensure that loopholes can no longer be exploited.

Additionally, we are running a series of intensive support visits for police and local authority areas which request this support. The visits take place over three days, and involve classroom based training for the operational staff on the powers they have to tackle alcohol related crime and disorder, as well as practical support on licensing visits to premises.

Bolivia: Drugs

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to lodge a formal objection to the request made by the Bolivian Government to amend the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs to remove the ban on coca leaf chewing. [35183]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 21 January 2011]: The Government submitted an objection on 21 January 2011 to the Bolivian proposal to amend the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961 to remove coca leaf as an illicit drug.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on the proposal by Bolivia to exempt traditional uses of coca from the provisions of the 1961 UN Convention on Narcotic Drugs; and if she will make a statement. [34627]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 18 January 2011]: The Government submitted an objection on 21 January 2011 to the Bolivian proposal to amend the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961 to remove coca leaf as an illicit drug. If coca leaf were permitted to be removed from the Convention, it would likely result in more coca cultivation, which in turn would lead to greater cocaine production.

The Government remain committed to working with Bolivia to tackle cocaine supply and trafficking and I have recently signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bolivian Government to reinforce that close cooperation.

Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many detainees being transferred (a) from Campsfield House immigration removal centre and (b) to Campsfield House immigration removal centre have required medical treatment in connection with their transfer in the latest period for which figures are available. [35190]

Damian Green: Details on the numbers of detainees being transferred to and from Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre who have required medical treatment in connection with their transfer could be provided only by detailed examination of individual records at disproportionate cost.


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All escorting officers are trained in first aid, should a detainee require medical assistance while in their care. Officers could also divert to a hospital if they thought it appropriate.

Every detainee is seen by a nurse within two hours of arrival at an immigration removal centre and is given an appointment to see a GP within 24 hours, unless an earlier appointment is required. This service extends to detainees who have transferred from another immigration removal centre.

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many detainees were transferred from other immigration removal centres and other immigration detention facilities to Campsfield House immigration removal centre in (a) 2006, (b) 2007, (c) 2008, (d) 2009 and (e) 2010; and for what reasons each such transfer was made. [35228]

Damian Green: The following table shows the number of detainees who were transferred to Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) in the calendar years 2008-10. Data are not available for prior years.

Number of detainees transferred

2008

2,320

2009

1,715

2010

1,910


The data provided includes transfers to Campsfield House from other IRCs and other immigration detention facilities, including short term holding facilities and holding rooms. It does not include transfers from prisons or police stations. The information is taken from data normally used for management information only. It has not been subject to the detailed checks that apply for National Statistics publications and is provisional and subject to change.

Details on the reasons for each individual transfer are not available and could be provided only by examination of individual records at disproportionate cost.

The Detainee Escorting and Population Management Unit (DEPMU) is responsible for bed space management within the UK Border Agency's detention estate. The unit seeks to minimise movements within the estate in the interests of providing a settled regime and the efficient use of escorting resources.

Movement of detainees around the estate is required for operational reasons, most often to:

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people at Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre have been detained for (a) more than and (b) less than one year; [35313]

(2) what the longest period is for which a detainee has been held at Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre in the last five years. [35315]


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Damian Green: As at 30 September 2010, management information shows that of the 215 people in Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre, detained solely under Immigration Act powers, 200 had been in detention for less than a year and 15 for a year or longer. These figures are rounded to the nearest five.

The Home Office publishes statistics on the number of persons detained solely under Immigration Act powers on a quarterly and annual basis, which are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office's Research, Development and Statistics website at:

Local records show that the longest period for which a detainee has been held at Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre in the last five years was 1,041 days. The individual concerned had a very serious criminal record and was detained while attempts were made to document him for removal. This information is taken from data normally used for management information only. It has not been subject to the detailed checks that apply for National Statistics publications, is provisional and subject to change.

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the detainees in Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre were convicted of committing violent crimes in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009 and (d) 2010. [35314]

Damian Green: UK Border Agency internal management information shows that there are currently no detainees in Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre that have been convicted of violent crimes since 2007.

Cannabis

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to (a) locate and (b) close facilities manufacturing skunk cannabis; and if she will make a statement. [36117]

James Brokenshire: The unauthorised cultivation of cannabis and any subsequent supply and possession of cannabis is unlawful. The manufacture and trafficking in controlled drugs of all classes needs to be tackled robustly in order to reduce the harm drugs cause to communities and the organised criminality associated with their supply.

The Government have worked closely with the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) to support the policing of illegal cannabis production and use. On 17 August 2010 ACPO published the UK National Problem Profile Commercial Cultivation of Cannabis. The main finding of the report is that there has been a significant rise in the identification of cannabis factories in 2009-10, from 3,032 in 2007-08, to 6,866 in 2009-10. The number of cannabis plants seized has also increased, from 643,510 cannabis plants seized in 2008-09 to 758,700 in 2009-10.

ACPO is co-ordinating the police response to the issue of cannabis factories, which includes proactive operations to identify and close down these factories and disrupt the organised crime groups behind them,
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while improving police knowledge and understanding of the trade through activity-led intelligence gathering.

This activity includes the development of a UK Baseline Assessment; a National Problem Profile of commercial cannabis cultivation; engagement with UK Revenue Protection Agency (UKRPA) and power companies and the publication of National Policing Improvement Agency and ACPO practice guidance on tackling commercial cannabis cultivation and head shops. The guidance can be found at:

Detention Centres: Northern Ireland

Naomi Long: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what recent discussions she has had with the (a) Northern Ireland Minister of Justice and (b) Northern Ireland Policing Board on proposals for a new immigration detention centre in Northern Ireland; [35240]

(2) whether provision will be made for children to be held in the Northern Ireland immigration detention centre. [35241]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency successfully applied for planning consent to convert a disused police station in Larne into a residential short-term holding facility providing accommodation for up to 22 adults. No children will be held at the facility.

The Secretary of State for the Home Department has not personally met with the Northern Ireland Policing Board to discuss Larne. She met with David Ford, Northern Ireland Minister of Justice on 8 September 2010 but Larne was not discussed.

The UK Border Agency Assistant Director responsible for Immigration Group in Northern Ireland met with the Northern Ireland Policing Board on 18 March 2010 and briefed them on the Agency's plans for a short-term holding facility at Larne. Agency officials have since, on occasion, updated members of the legislative assembly, which includes Policing Board members, on the proposals for the facility.

Drugs: Professor Nutt

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether licences, authorities or permissions were required for Professor Nutt to possess and inject the class A drug psilocybin into human subjects on the BBC programme, The Brain, A Secret History. [35745]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 24 January 2011]: A licence is required to possess psilocybin, which is controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and listed in schedule 1 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001. Those working with schedule 1 drugs in their capacity as researchers and under Home Office licence to possess do not need a specific Home Office authority to administer.

The psilocybin used on the BBC programme, The Brain, A Secret History, was lawfully possessed by Bristol university under Home Office licence and was lawfully taken to Cardiff university, where the research took place, under the supervision of the licence holder.


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Entry Clearances: Overseas Students

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many students from countries outside the EU entered the UK in each year since 1997; and if she will make a statement. [35245]

Damian Green: The available statistics on the number of persons given leave to enter the United Kingdom as students, excluding EEA and Swiss nationals, 1997 to 2009, are given in the following table:

Passengers( 1, 2, 3) given leave to enter the United Kingdom for the purpose of study excluding EEA and Swiss nationals, 1997 to 2009
Number of journeys

Total Students Tier 4-students Student visitors

1997

278,000

278,000

n/a

n/a

1998

266,000

266,000

n/a

n/a

1999

272,000

272,000

n/a

n/a

2000

312,000

312,000

n/a

n/a

2001

339,000

339,000

n/a

n/a

2002

359,000

369,000

n/a

n/a

2003

319,000

319,000

n/a

n/a

2004

294,000

294,000

n/a

n/a

2005

284,000

284,000

n/a

n/a

2006

309,000

309,000

n/a

n/a

2007

361,000

358,000

n/a

3,400

2008

370,000

227,000

n/a

143,000

2009(4)

468,000

82,100

188,000

198,000

n/a = Not applicable
(1) Excludes dependants.
(2) Nationals of EU accession countries are included or excluded according to their accession date.
(3) Figures rounded to three significant figures. Figures may not sum to the totals shown because of independent rounding
(4) Provisional figures.

Statistics on passengers given leave to enter the United Kingdom by purpose of journey are published annually in the Home Office Statistical Bulletin, "Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom". These publications are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics website at:

Entry Clearances: Pakistan

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether entry clearance decisions for visitors from the Punjab, India are taken by officials in (a) Delhi, (b) London or (c) elsewhere. [34779]

Damian Green: Decisions on all applications for entry clearance lodged in the Punjab, India, including those for entry as a visitor, are made by UK Border Agency officials in New Delhi. However, an entry clearance officer may, exceptionally, refer an application to London for consideration outside the immigration rules, e.g. if there are compelling, compassionate circumstances involved.

Hinkley Point Power Stations: Demonstrations

Mr Liddell-Grainger: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she has taken to prevent protestors from accessing Hinkley Point nuclear power station via the Bristol Ports Habitat Wetland scheme. [35143]


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James Brokenshire: The policing of protest is an operational matter for the local police force.

Human Trafficking

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many decisions by the competent authority regarding the National Referral Mechanism have been subsequently reversed through judicial review. [35226]

Damian Green [holding answer 21 January 2011]: We are not aware of any competent authority decisions being reversed by judicial review. There have been a very small number of cases where a judicial review application has caused the competent authority to reconsider the case and this has led to a negative decision being reversed.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to support more effective enforcement internationally to combat human trafficking. [35321]

Damian Green: The Government work closely with international counterparts, including through regional bodies such as the European Union and the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, to strengthen joint enforcement activity in source and transit countries, to tackle criminal networks and to raise awareness among potential victims. Law enforcement partners work in collaboration with international counterparts, using Joint Investigation Teams where appropriate. The forthcoming human trafficking strategy will set out what steps we will take to reinforce these efforts.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to encourage the reporting of human trafficking. [35350]

Damian Green: The reporting of human trafficking is crucial if the United Kingdom is to be successful in its effort to combat this brutal crime.

To this end, the UK Human Trafficking Centre, in conjunction with the National Policing Improvement Agency, has introduced mandatory training for all new police officers on human trafficking.

The UK Border Agency has introduced mandatory e-learning on human trafficking for all operational staff below the level of Assistant Director. This has helped to improve their ability to identify and report potential incidents of human trafficking, and where applicable to refer onwards via the National Referral Mechanism.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the work of the UK Human Trafficking Centre's prevention sub-group in each year since its inception. [35351]

Damian Green: There has been no Home Office assessment of the UK Human Trafficking Centre's prevention sub-group.


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Immigrants: Detainees

Mr Scott: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many passengers have been detained at Britain's ports and airports while travelling on forged or stolen travel documents in each of the last three years. [35310]

Damian Green: The following table outlines the number of false travel documents detected by Border Force officers at UK ports and airports and juxtaposed controls for each of the last three calendar years.

Total

2008

2,745

2009

1,770

2010

1,589


We are unable to provide figures based on the number of passengers detained in possession of forged documents because the data are not centrally recorded in this way. In order to retrieve the information in the requested format we would have to refer to individual records at disproportionate cost.

These figures do not include the number of inadequately documented passengers denied boarding by commercial carriers' overseas, who work in conjunction with UK Border Agency immigration liaison officers and managers (formerly airline liaison officers). Since 2004, the number of immigration liaison officer deployments to key travel hubs has more than doubled resulting in significant numbers of passengers being stopped with false documents before they travel to the UK. Greater numbers are also subject to visa controls and the safeguards and biometric capture involved also has a significant deterrent effect.

Immobilisation of Vehicles: Private Land

Angie Bray: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to ensure that plans to tax clamping and towing on private land do not leave property owners unable to tackle illegal parking on their land. [35693]

Lynne Featherstone: The Government intend to include in the Protection of Freedoms Bill, to be introduced by February, provisions that will make it an offence to immobilise or tow away a vehicle without lawful authority, with the intention of preventing the motorist from moving their vehicle.

This will not prevent landowners from using other forms of parking control which remain legal: for example, ticketing or fixed barriers. Where appropriate, the Government would expect landowners to use those other types of parking control.

The Bill will also include provisions to extend the powers of the police to move cars that are parked dangerously or obstructively on private land in the same way as they can do at present on public roads.

Legal Highs

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to identify new and emerging legal highs. [35965]


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James Brokenshire: The Government takes the issue of new psychoactive substances (so called 'legal highs') very seriously.

On 30 November 2010 we introduced to this House legislative proposals, in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill, to amend the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 with provisions for temporary banning powers on new 'legal highs' and for the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD's) membership to have the flexibility required to respond to a challenging drugs landscape.

On 1 January 2011 the Home Office launched a three month pilot to explore improvements to the current forensic early warning system for identifying new and emerging drugs. This includes working with forensic and chemical suppliers, law enforcement agencies and experts in the field to develop a co-ordinated UK-wide approach to laboratory testing and analysis of law enforcement seizures and wider test purchasing to identify new psychoactive substances more quickly. The creation of a 'virtual reference library' of characterised chemical reference standards is also being explored.

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to respond to the letter from the right hon. member for Manchester, Gorton of 13 December 2010 in regard to Mr R Bestford. [36032]

James Brokenshire: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 20 January 2011.

Misuse of Drugs Act 1971

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to review the provisions of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971; and if she will make a statement. [35957]

James Brokenshire: I refer my hon. Friend to the written answer I gave on 6 December 2010, Official Report, column 103W.

Police: Demonstrations

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the adequacy of (a) resources, (b) the legal framework, (c) guidance issued by her Department and (d) her Department's policy for dealing with public order issues relating to public protests and ensuring public safety and proportionate policing. [28530]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 3 December 2010]: The Government's policy is to support the police in striking the right balance between facilitating peaceful protest and dealing robustly with individuals engaged in crime and disorder at demonstrations. The Government continue to work closely with the police and other agencies in respect of recent, current and forthcoming public order challenges to assess their impact on the police's responsibility in maintaining this balance.


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Sexual Offence Liaison Officers

Ed Balls: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many sexual offence liaison officers were employed in each police force in the latest period for which figures are available. [36057]

Lynne Featherstone [holding answer 25 January 2011]: The Home Office does not hold this information centrally. Decisions on the deployment of officers are for each force to make.

Vetting

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to announce the completion of the review into the future of criminal record checks and the vetting of volunteer workers. [35627]

Lynne Featherstone: The Government have commissioned a review of the criminal records regime which we expect to report within the next few weeks. We shall consider carefully and respond to the outcomes and recommendations of the review. The Government continue to be committed to reducing the barriers to volunteering.

Visas: Internet

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has plans to enable (a) students and (b) other visitors from abroad to submit applications for visas entirely online. [34778]

Damian Green: There are three main parts to the overseas visa application process:

Given that an applicant will be required to submit biometrics in person, there are no plans to enable (a) students and (b) other visitors from abroad to submit applications for visas entirely online.

Young Offenders

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people aged 10 to 16 years were (a) arrested for an offence, (b) charged with an offence, (c) cautioned for an offence and (d) convicted of an offence in 2009. [35880]

James Brokenshire: The arrests collection held by the Home Office is an aggregate collection covering specific age bands. Figures are collected on arrests of persons in the 10-17 age band, rather than the 10-16 band requested.

In 2008-09 (latest available) the number of persons aged 10-17 arrested for notifiable offences in was 273,041.

Data provided by the Ministry of Justice on the number of 10-16 year olds given reprimands and final warnings (juvenile cautions), proceeded against at
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magistrates courts (provided in lieu of charges as charges data are not available) and found guilty at all courts for all offences in 2009, are provided in the table.

The arrests data provided by the Home Office covers notifiable offences only whereas the data provided by the Ministry of Justice covers all criminal offences, therefore the data are not directly comparable.

Number of offenders aged 10 to 16 years given a reprimand or warrning( 1, 2) and the number of defendants aged 10 to 16 proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts, for all offences, England and Wales, 2009( 3, 4)

Number

Reprimand or warning

63,380

Proceeded against

65,929

Found guilty

52,083

(1) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings.
(2) The reprimand or warning statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been given a reprimand or warning for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence.
(3) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.
(4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Justice Statistics Analytical Services-Ministry of Justice.

International Development

Burma: Overseas Aid

Malcolm Wicks: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what funding was allocated by his Department to (a) the Mao Tao Clinic and (b) Backpack Health Worker teams operating in Burma in the last year for which figures are available. [35614]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) provided £119,999 in 2009-10 to the Mao Tao Clinic. We are considering a proposal for additional health aid for displaced people in conflict-affected parts of eastern Burma.

Malcolm Wicks: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his Department has allocated aid to ethnic Karen refugees in response to the current political situation in Karen State, Burma. [35615]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) is providing approximately £1.6 million this financial year for food, housing, other supplies and improved access to legal assistance for the 146,000 Burmese refugees living in camps in Thailand. We have not provided additional funding in response to the recent upsurge in fighting in Karen state.


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Departmental Communication

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what measures he has undertaken to reduce jargon and promote plain English in Departmental communications. [35790]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) is committed to ensuring that UK taxpayers understand where their money goes and the results it achieves. DFID aims to communicate this as clearly as possible to the public.

There is an expectation that staff use plain English, as set out in guidance on how to present advice to Ministers, and respond to inquiries from the public. Work is routinely returned for redrafting if it does not meet this expectation. Staff are supported through face-to-face and online training; the latter is provided in partnership with the Plain English Campaign. Professional editors produce all content for DFID's online and print publications.

Ministers have been forceful in requiring clear prose and high standards of punctuation and grammar.

Malaria: Disease Control

Anas Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what estimate he has made of the unit cost of (a) anti-malarial mosquito nets and (b) pentavalent vaccines provided by his Department. [36265]

Mr O'Brien: The Department for International Development (DFID) uses a variety of channels to fund and deliver long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) including through its support to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, UNITAID and through bilateral support at country level. The purchase and delivery cost of LLINs varies between countries and by delivery channel. Recent analysis of 55 countries reporting on procurement by the Global Fund, which accounted for 35% of global purchases, estimated the average unit cost of purchasing a LLIN to be US $5.30 in 2009. This does not include distribution costs.

DFID provides funds through the GAVI Alliance to roll out the pentavalent vaccine. Due to increased demand for the vaccine and a reduced price offer by an emerging market vaccine manufacturer, GAVI estimates that in 2011 the average weighted price for the vaccine will go down to US $2.58, compared to the current average price of US $2.97.

Nigeria: Education

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will provide additional funding and capacity for the element of the Education Sector Support Programme in Nigeria that supports the development of schools-based management committees. [36675]

Mr O'Brien: Support for school management committees is one of the four main elements of the Education Sector Support Programme in Nigeria (ESSPIN). To date ESSPIN has supported nearly 1,000 school management committees, which has led to significant improvements in local accountability and involvement.


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There is no plan at present to provide additional resources for this particular aspect of ESSPIN's work. However, a mid-term review which will begin in May 2011 will look at how funds can be best utilised within the programme to ensure greatest benefits to students, schools and communities. We are also supporting school management committees through other partners, including UNICEF, and will be reviewing how to achieve greatest results and best value for money.

Sri Lanka: Food

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent representations he has received from the World Food Programme on the effect on food rations in Sri Lanka of insufficient donor funding in 2011; and if he will make a statement. [35721]

Mr Duncan: The British high commission in Colombo has recently discussed food aid funding issues with representatives of the World Food Programme (WFP) and the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Our understanding is that, at present, WFP only has sufficient funding for its food aid programme in Sri Lanka until April 2011.

Sri Lanka: Internally Displaced People

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees on the provision of shelter cash grants to internally-displaced families being resettled in Sri Lanka. [35876]

Mr Duncan: The British high commission in Colombo is in regular contact with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Sri Lanka on this and other issues. In 2010, the Department for International Development (DFID) provided £300,000 to UNHCR for shelter cash grants. In total, more than 70,000 families returning to their home areas have now benefitted from UNHCR's cash grants programme.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made on the level of involvement of (a) Tamil community groups and (b) independent politicians in the process of resettlement in Sri Lanka. [35877]

Mr Duncan: Tamil community groups, such as rural development societies, are helping internally displaced people to re-establish their livelihoods on their return to their home areas. Opposition and minority parties and politicians have raised concerns over issues such as the pace of resettlement with the relevant authorities.

Sri Lanka: Schools

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what representations he has received from UNICEF on the effect on the schooling of children in Sri Lanka of the use of school property in the Northern Provinces for military or rehabilitation purposes. [35728]


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Mr Duncan: The British high commission in Colombo is in regular contact with UNICEF about humanitarian issues in Sri Lanka. We have received no representations from UNICEF on this particular question.

UN Agencies: Finance

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding his Department contributed to the UN Division for the Advancement of Women in each of the last four years. [35874]

Mr Duncan: The Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW) is part of the UN Secretariat. It is funded from UN member states' assessed contributions to the UN regular budget. The UK's contribution to the regular budget is managed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). The Department for International Development (DFID) has not made any additional contribution to DAW in the last four years.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding his Department contributed to the UN Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues in each of the last four years. [35887]

Mr Duncan: The UN Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues (OSAGI) is part of the UN Secretariat. It is funded from UN member states' assessed contributions to the UN regular budget. The UK's contribution to the assessed budget is managed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). The Department for International Development (DFID) has not made any additional contribution to OSAGI in the last four years.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding his Department contributed to the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women in each of the last four years. [35888]

Mr Duncan: The International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW) is part of the UN Secretariat. It is funded from UN member states' assessed contributions to the UN regular budget. The UK's contribution to the assessed budget is managed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). The Department for International Development (DFID) has not made any additional contribution to INSTRAW in the last four years.

Defence

Armed Forces

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) where each regiment of the (a) Royal Artillery, (b) Royal Engineers, (c) Royal Signals and (d) Household Cavalry is stationed; [35889]

(2) where each infantry battalion is stationed. [35902]


26 Jan 2011 : Column 357W

Nick Harvey: The name and location of each Regular and Territorial Army Infantry Battalion is shown in the following table:


26 Jan 2011 : Column 358W
Name of Infantry Battalion (Bn) Barracks (Bks)/Station/Location

1st Bn Grenadier Guards

Wellington Bks, London

1st Bn Coldstream Guards

New Mons Bks, Aldershot

1st Bn Scots Guards

Bourlon Bks, Catterick

1st Bn Irish Guards

Victoria Bks, Windsor

1st Bn Welsh Guards

Lille Bks, Aldershot

The London Regiment

Battersea, London

1st Bn The Royal Regiment of

Dreghorn Bks, Edinburgh, Scotland

2nd Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Glencorse Bks, Edinburgh

3rd Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Fort George, Inverness

4th Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

St Barbara Bks, Fallingbostel

5th Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Howe Bks, Canterbury

6th Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Walcheren Bks, Glasgow

7th Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Queen's Bks, Perth

1st Bn The Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

Barker Bks, Paderborn

2nd Bn The Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

Napier Lines, Woolwich

3rd Bn The Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

Leros TA Centre, Canterbury

1st Bn The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Mooltan Bks, Tidworth

2nd Bn The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Trenchard Bks, Celle

5th Bn The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Gilesgate Armoury, Durham

1st Bn The Royal Anglian Regiment

Queen Elizabeth Bks, Pirbright

2nd Bn The Royal Anglian Regiment

ESBA, Dhekelia, Cyprus

3rd Bn The Royal Anglian Regiment

Blenheim Camp, Bury St Edmonds

1st Bn The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

Somme Bks, Catterick

2nd Bn The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

WSBA, Episkopi, Cyprus

4th Bn The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

Kimberley Bks, Preston

1st Bn The Yorkshire Regiment

Oxford Bks, Munster

2nd Bn The Yorkshire Regiment

Weeton Bks, Preston

3rd Bn The Yorkshire Regiment

Battlesbury Bks, Warminster

4th Bn The Yorkshire Regiment

Worsley Bks, York

1st Bn The Mercian Regiment

Marne Bks, Catterick

2nd Bn The Mercian Regiment

Palace Bks, Belfast

3rd Bn The Mercian Regiment

Lumsden Bks, Fallingbostel

4th Bn The Mercian Regiment

Wolseley House TA Centre, Wolverhampton

1st Bn The Royal Welsh Regiment

The Dale, Chester

2nd Bn The Royal Welsh Regiment Lucknow Bks, Tidworth

3rd Bn The Royal Welsh Regiment

Maindy Bks, Cardiff

1st Bn The Rifles

Beachley Bks, Chepstow

2nd Bn The Rifles

Abercorn Bks, Ballykinler

3rd Bn The Rifles

Redford Bks, Edinburgh

4th Bn The Rifles

Kiwi Bks, Bulford

5th Bn The Rifles

Allanbrooke Bks, Paderborn

6th Bn The Rifles

Wyvern Bks, Exeter

7th Bn The Rifles

Brock Bks, Reading

1st Bn The Royal Irish Regiment

Clive Bks, Tern Hill

2nd Bn The Royal Irish Regiment

Portadown, Northern Ireland

2nd Bn The Parachute Regiment

Merville Bks, Colchester

3rd Bn The Parachute Regiment

Merville Bks, Colchester

4th Bn The Parachute Regiment

Thornbury Bks, Pudsey

1st Bn The Royal Gurkha Rifles

Sir John Moore Bks, Shorncliffe

2nd Bn The Royal Gurkha Rifles

Seria, Brunei


The name and location of each Regular and Territorial Army Regiment of the (a) Royal Artillery, (b) Royal Engineers, (c) Royal Signals and (d) Household Cavalry is shown in the following tables:

The Royal Artillery
Name of Regiment Barracks (Bks)/Station/Location

1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

Assaye Barracks, Hampshire

3rd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

Caen Barracks, Hohne

4th Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

Alanbrooke Barracks. Topcliffe

5th Regiment Royal Artillery

Marne Barracks, Catterick

7th (Parachute) Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

Merville Barracks, Colchester

12th Regiment Royal Artillery

Baker Barracks, Hampshire

14th Regiment Royal Artillery

Royal Artillery Barracks, Larkhill

16th Regiment Royal Artillery

St Georges Barracks, North Luffenham

19th Regiment Royal Artillery

Bhurtpore Barracks, Tidworth

26th Regiment Royal Artillery

Mansergh Barracks, Gutersloh

29 (Commando) Regiment Royal Artillery

RHQ 8, 23,79 Batterys, Plymouth

32nd Regiment Royal Artillery

Roberts Barracks, Larkhill

39th Regiment Royal Artillery

Albemarle Barracks, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne

40th Regiment Royal Artillery

Thiepval Barracks, Lisburn

47th Regiment Royal Artillery

Baker Barracks, Thorney Island

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery

Ordnance Hill, St Johns Wood, London

Honourable Artillery Company

Finsbury Barracks, London

100th (Yeomanry) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

RHQ/201 Bty RA(V), TA Centre, Luton

101st (Northumbrian) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

R.HQ, Napier Armoury, Gateshead

103rd (Lancashire Artillery Volunteers) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

R.HQ, Jubilee Barracks, St Helens

104th Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

Raglan Barracks, South Wales

105th Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

RHQ, Artillery House, Edinburgh

106th (Yeomanry) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers)

Napier House, Grove Park, London

Central Volunteers Headquarters Royal Artillery and Headquarters Woolwich Station

Royal Artillery Barracks, Woolwich


26 Jan 2011 : Column 359W

The Royal Engineers
Name of Regiment Barracks (Bks)/Station/Location

21 Engineer Regiment

Claro Bks, Ripon, N Yorks

22 Engineer Regiment

Swinton Bks, Tidworth, Hants

23 Engineer Regiment (Air Assault)

Rock Bks, Woodbridge, Suffolk

24 Commando Engineer Regiment

RM Chivenor, Barnstaple, Devon

25 Engineer Regiment (Air Support)

Waterbeach Bks, Waterbeach, Cambs

26 Engineer Regiment

Swinton Bks, Tidworth, Hants

28 Engineer Regiment

Gordon Bks, Hameln, Germany

32 Engineer Regiment

Campbell Bks, Hohne, Germany

33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

Carver Bks, Wimbish, Essex

35 Engineer Regiment

Barker Bks, Paderborn, Germany

36 Engineer Regiment

Invicta Park Bks, Maidstone, Kent

38 Engineer Regiment

RAF Aldergrove, Northern Ireland

39 Engineer Regiment (Air Support)

Waterbeach Bks, Waterbeach, Cambs

42 Engineer Regiment (Geographic)

Denison Bks, Hermitage, Berks

101 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

Carver Bks, Wimbish

62 Works Group Royal Engineers 1

Chetwynd Bks, Chilwell, Notts

63 Works Group Royal Engineers 1

Chetwynd Bks, Chilwell, Notts

64 Works Group Royal Engineers 1

Chetwynd Bks, Chilwell, Notts

66 Works Group Royal Engineers 1,2

Chetwynd Bks, Chilwell, Notts

67 Works Group Royal Engineers 1,2

Chetwynd Bks, Chilwell, Notts

Work Group Royal Engineers (Airfields) 1

Waterbeach Bks, Waterbeach, Cambs

1 Royal School of Military Engineering Regiment

Brompton Bks, Chatham, Kent

3 Royal School of Military Engineering Regiment

Gibraltar Bks, Camberley, Surrey

Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia)

The Castle, Monmouth, Gwent

71 Engineer Regiment (Volunteers)

RAF Leuchars, St Andrews, Fife

72 Engineer Regiment (Volunteers)

Napier Armoury, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear

73 Engineer Regiment (Volunteers)

TA Centre, Nottingham, Notts

75 Engineer Regiment (Volunteers)

Peninsula Bks, Warrington, Cheshire



26 Jan 2011 : Column 360W
The Royal Signals
Name of Regiment Station/Location

1st (United Kingdom) Armoured Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment

Hammersmith Barracks, Herford (GE)

2nd Signal Regiment

Imphal Barracks, York

3rd (United Kingdom) Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment

Picton Barracks, Bulford

7th Signal Regiment

Javelin Barracks, Elmpt (GE)

10th Signal Regiment

Basil Hill Site, Corsham

11th Signal Regiment

Blandford Camp, Blandford Forum

14th Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare)

Cawdor Barracks, Brawdy (nr Haverfordwest)

16th Signal Regiment

Javelin Barracks, Elmpt (GE)

18th (United Kingdom Special Forces) Signal Regiment

Stirling Lines, Hereford

21st Signal Regiment (Air Support)

Azimghur Barracks, Colerne (nr Bath)

22nd Signal Regiment

Beacon Barracks, Stafford

30th Signal Regiment

Gamecock Barracks, Bramcote (nr Nuneaton)

32nd Signal Regiment (Volunteers)

Glasgow

37th Signal Regiment (Volunteers)

Redditch

38th Signal Regiment (Volunteers)

Sheffield

39th Signal Regiment (Volunteers)

Bristol

71st (City of London) Yeomanry Signal Regiment (Volunteers)

Bexley, London


The Household Cavalry
Name of Regiment Barracks (Bks) Station/Location

The Household Cavalry Regiment

Combermere Bks, Windsor

The Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment

Hyde Park Bks, Knightsbridge, London


Armoured Fighting Vehicles

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if he will estimate the cost per unit of renovating (a) Mastiff, (b) Ridgback and (c) Jackal vehicles to long-term service; [36078]

(2) how many (a) Mastiff, (b) Ridgback and (c) Jackal vehicles will remain in long-term service. [36079]

Peter Luff: The Mastiff, Ridgback and Jackal vehicles were purchased as urgent operational requirements, specific to the conditions and threats faced in Afghanistan by our armed forces. No decision has yet been taken as to whether any of the 1,000 plus vehicles so far purchased will be taken into the core equipment programme. The cost of renovating any vehicles will depend on the number of vehicles to be taken into the core equipment programme and the state of repair of these vehicles on their return from theatre.

Departmental Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what allowances and payments in addition to salary were available to officials in his Department and its non-departmental public bodies in each year since 1997; and what the monetary value was of payments and allowances of each type in each such year. [18726]

Peter Luff: The Department currently has over 500 pay-related allowances and payments in addition to salary available to civilian staff, the majority of which are listed on the People, Pay and Pensions Agency (PPPA) website:


26 Jan 2011 : Column 361W

Travel and subsistence claims and transfer allowances are payable to civilian staff, in addition to salary. These are listed on the PPPA website:

Information on the monetary value of each type of allowance and payment in each year since 1997 is not held in the format requested, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, information is available from July 2007, but will take a short while to compile. I will write to my hon. Friend with the information as soon as possible.

As the strategic defence and security review made clear, we intend to simplify the allowance structure, as part of an update of the current package of terms and conditions of service.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much was paid to officials in his Department and its non-departmental public bodies in bonuses and other payments in addition to salary in each year since 1997; how many officials received such payments; and what the monetary value was of the largest 20 payments made in each such year. [18725]

Mr Robathan: The information is as follows:

Non-consolidated performance awards-MOD: A close and effective link between pay and performance is a key element of the reward arrangements for the civil service. The performance element of pay is colloquially known as a bonus, but it is a misleading description because the performance-related element of pay is not additional, it is part of the departmental pay bill.

For the senior civil service (SCS) performance incentives are paid primarily as non-consolidated performance payments. Any award is based on a judgment of how
26 Jan 2011 : Column 362W
well an individual has performed against their peers and awards are made to those judged to have made the greatest in-year contribution to business objectives. There is no restriction on the nature of the contribution but it must benefit the Department or defence more widely. Recommendations for awards are considered by moderation committees and must be linked to clear evidence of delivery.

All satisfactory performers at SCS level were eligible to be considered for a non-consolidated performance award in line with Cabinet Office guidelines and the MOD pay strategy.

Financial year 2003-04 was the first year in which the MOD paid non-consolidated performance awards to any of its staff.

The following table details how much was paid to members of the SCS in non-consolidated performance payments by financial year.

Senior fixed term employees are individuals who are recruited through fair and open competition from outside the civil service. Those employed as senior fixed term appointees (FTAs) are on individual contracts and have a higher percentage of pay set to performance awards which are judged against stringent and stretching delivery based objectives. Some have staged payments and it is now usual to pay a smaller annual performance award with the remainder deferred for two to three years and judged against the delivery of medium to longer term objectives. Performance is judged by line management with assistance from senior officials, stakeholders, remuneration committees and in some cases internal audit.

Details of how much has been paid in non-consolidated awards and to how many SCS each year are shown in tables 1 and 2. Table 3 shows the monetary values of the largest non-consolidated payments made in each year to the combined SCS population of permanent staff and fixed term appointees.

Table 1-SCS permanent staff
Performance year
2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04
Financial year

2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05

Number of awards paid

169

195

187

186

181

181

136

Value of awards paid (£)

995,500

1,594,500

1,501,700

1,325,700

1,178,500

899,822

711,737


Table 2 -SCS fixed term appointees
SCS FTA performance year
2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04
Financial year

2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05

Number of awards paid

(1)17

27

16

10

12

16

13

Value of awards paid (£)

338,122

838,393

333,915

78,874

80,478

119,688

80,347

(1) Six yet to be decided

26 Jan 2011 : Column 363W


26 Jan 2011 : Column 364W

26 Jan 2011 : Column 365W
Table 3-Top 20 highest non-consolidated awards for combined SCS population
Financial year £

2010-11

49,937

49,900

35,113

25,755

24,360

22,153

17,000

15,750

15,605

15,000

15,000

13,800

12,500

12,500

12,500

12,500

12,500

12,500

12,485

10,674

2009-10

84,563

75,000

72,540

55,350

50,000

50,000

48,720

48,000

31,470

30,750

30,000

30,000

25,765

24,101

22,888

21,337

21,033

16,200

15,000

15,000

2008-09

88,296

61,250

50,000

48,000

37,675

31,703

30,780

30,000

30,000

30,000

27,600

24,000

23,085

22,085

22,000

21,546

20,480

19,000

17,163

17,091

2007-08

63,000

50,000

48,000

24,000

21,000

20,000

18,468

17,716

17,600

17,600

17,340

15,450

15,341

14,500

14,500

12,750

12,750

12,240

10,690

10,000

2006-07

19,253

16,000

14,721

14,000

14,000

14,000

14,000

12,546

11,000

11,000

11,000

11,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

2005-06

14,340

12,250

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

9,000

9,000

9.000

7,863

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

2004-05

11,358

10,445

9.821

9,203

8,777

8.759

8.695

8.650

8.600

8,540

8,463

8,365

8,256

8,226

8,226

8,125

7.400

7,370

7,069

7,004


For staff below the SCS, non-consolidated performance awards are paid to staff who meet the eligibility criteria. Higher levels of award are available for those who have contributed most to the business. These awards are distributed on the basis of relative assessment among peers and are designed to encourage continuous high attainment against stretching objectives.

The MOD also operates an in year non-consolidated payment scheme, the special bonus scheme (SBS), which rewards eligible MOD civilians for exceptional performance in a specific task or for the achievement of a professional qualification the use of which benefits MOD and the individual. Separate arrangements apply to Ministry of Defence police (MDP) officers.


26 Jan 2011 : Column 366W

In 2007 the Department moved to a new pay system and the ability to interrogate payments made through the SBS before this date has been diminished and therefore any effort now to try and access this data would require a disproportionate cost. SBS data is though available for financial years 2003-04 to 2006-07 because it was reported in previous parliamentary questions.

The following table details the total value of payments made to staff below the SCS by way of non consolidated performance payments and SBS awards by financial year.

Financial year Total value of awards made (£) Total number of awards made( 1)

2003-04

24,113,406

39,369

2004-05

33,947,217

46,269

2005-06

43,038,937

49,093

2006-07

41,060,624

55,339

2007-08

46,256,490

61,878

2008-09

47,516,913

71,940

2009-10

44,231,916

66,585

2010-11

0

0

(1) It is not possible to state how many individuals received awards since the data is held as number of awards made and not the number of recipients.
Note:
Figures for financial year 2010-11 will not be available before 30 April 2011 since SBS awards are payable in year.

This response excludes information on staff below the SCS in MOD trading funds which have separate pay delegations.

With the exception of the National Museum of the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force Museum, figures for the Department's non-departmental public bodies are included in the figures above.

Like the MOD, financial year 2003-04 was the first year in which non-consolidated performance awards were paid to staff at the National Museum of the Royal Navy. The following table details the total value of payments made to staff by way of non consolidated performance payments awards by financial year.

Financial year Total value of awards made (£) Number of staff receiving awards Value of largest 20 payments

2003-04

12,100

19

£425-£1,300

2004-05

19,650

21

£625-£2,100

2005-06

21,860

20

£625-£2,025

2006-07

20,525

23

£300-£2,900

2007-08

21,750

29

£400-£1,560

2008-09

27,020

43

£400-£1,565

2009-10

5,203

37

All £141


The National Museum of the Royal Navy has no special bonus scheme.

The Museum does not keep records going back to 1997, but since 2004 non-consolidated performance awards and other payments have been available for staff employed by the museum and its trading subsidiary through one or more of the following:

The largest payments made were to the director general under the conditions set out in the last paragraph and the directors (where performance awards were percentage-based) although these would have generally been below £5,000.

Other payments: The Department currently has over 500 pay-related allowances and payments in addition to salary available to civilian staff. The majority of which are listed on the People, Pay and Pensions Agency services website:

In addition allowances and payments in addition to salary in regard to civilian travel and subsistence claims and transfer allowances are payable. These are listed on the PPPA services website:

Information on the monetary value of each type of allowance and payment in each year since 1997 is not held in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost for such a large number of allowances and payments. Information is available from July 2007, but will take a short while to compile. I will write to my hon. Friend with the details as soon as possible.

Substantive answer from Andrew Robathan to Priti Patel, dated 25 January 2011:


26 Jan 2011 : Column 368W

Trident

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what preparatory work for the assessment phase for the replacement programme for Trident has been commissioned on (a) the hull structure and structural fittings, including on castings and forgings and on steel and control surfaces, (b) primary and secondary propulsion systems and (c) electrical generation, conversion and distribution, including turbo generators, platform management system software, main switchboards, internal communications, diesel generators, main static converters, main DC distribution, distribution convertors, cathodic protection system, the degaussing system, computer information systems, main battery, and remote visual surveillance system; from which companies such work has been commissioned in each case; and what the value is of each such contract. [35910]

Peter Luff: Two of the purposes of the concept phase of the programme to replace the Vanguard submarines are to identify technology and procurement options for meeting the requirement, and to provide information to support initial gate decisions.

During the concept phase the Ministry of Defence has placed contracts with Rolls-Royce Power Engineering plc that include design and development work for the primary propulsion plant, with design verification and validation activities, to a value of some £220 million. A number of technical demonstrator contracts have also been placed with industry and other bodies to inform work on the options and recommendations made in the initial gate business case.

Some of this work will inform decisions on the purchase of the long lead items listed in the question, but further information is not held centrally and to attempt to reconcile the information against the list of long lead items given could be done only at disproportionate cost.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what work his Department has commissioned on spatial arrangements covering boat compartments under the assessment phase of the Vanguard submarine replacement for Trident programme to date; and what the monetary value is of each contract for such research and design work; [35907]


26 Jan 2011 : Column 369W

(2) what enabling work has been contracted on (a) value engineering and (b) the management of design margins under the assessment phase of the Vanguard submarine replacement for Trident programme; what the monetary value is of each such contract; and how much has been spent under each such contract to date; [35908]

(3) what contracts have been placed to undertake research and development work on (a) combat system design and engineering and (b) primary and secondary propulsion design and engineering for the assessment phase of the replacement programme for Trident; and what the value is of each such contract; [35911]

(4) what contracts have been placed to undertake research and development work on (a) combat system design and engineering and (b) primary and secondary propulsion design and engineering in respect of the assessment phase for the Vanguard submarine replacement programme for Trident; and what the monetary value is of each such contract; [36065]

(5) which companies have been contracted to date (a) to deliver System Drawings and Equipment Technical Specifications and (b) to demonstrate system performance and compliance with system functional requirements under the assessment phase for the Vanguard submarine replacement for Trident programme; and what the monetary value is of his Department's contract with each such company. [35923]

Peter Luff: No such contracts have been placed as the programme to replace the Vanguard Class submarine has yet to enter the assessment phase.

Health

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of long-term trends in hospital admittances for alcohol consumption by teenagers. [35802]

Anne Milton: Alcohol misuse is a major public health issue. We know that teenagers can be especially vulnerable to the harmful effects of drinking. 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People', published in December 2010, sets out how we can best harness the effects of individuals, families, local and national government and the private, voluntary and community sectors to take better care of our children's health and development.

The Government's new drug strategy, published in December 2010, includes measures to prevent young people's alcohol misuse by providing accurate information, simplified guidance for schools and a review of Personal Social Health and Economic education (PSHE).

Data on the number of alcohol-related hospital admissions are collected by the Health and Social Care Information Centre and published in their annual Statistics on Alcohol, England report. The most recent estimates show that hospital admissions of teenagers aged 13 to 15 have started to decrease, while hospital admissions for 16 to 19 and 20 to 24-year-olds are still increasing. Estimates of the number of teenage alcohol-related hospital admissions is given in the following table.


26 Jan 2011 : Column 370W
Estimate of alcohol-related admissions for selected age groups for the years 2002-03 to 2009-10 in England
Admissions

13-15 years 16-19 years 20-24 years

2002-03

3,804

13,777

18,210

2003-04

4,313

15,075

20,290

2004-05

4,337

16,994

22,599

2005-06

4,700

19,792

25,461

2006-07

4,578

20,583

26,447

2007-08

4,250

21,503

27,862

2008-09

3,317

20,691

28,693

2009-10

3,331

21,470

30,488

Notes:
1. Estimate of Alcohol-related admissions
Alcohol-related admissions
The number of alcohol-related admissions is estimated, based on the methodology developed by the North West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO). Figures for under 16s only include admissions where one or more of the following alcohol-specific conditions were listed:
Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (I42.6)
Alcoholic gastritis (K29.2)
Alcoholic liver disease (K70)
Alcoholic myopathy (G72.1)
Alcoholic polyneuropathy (G62.1)
Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing's syndrome (E24.4)
Chronic pancreatitis (alcohol induced) (K86.0)
Degeneration of nervous system due to alcohol (G31.2)
Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol (F10)
Accidental poisoning by and exposure to alcohol (X45)
Ethanol poisoning (T51.0)
Methanol poisoning (T51.1)
Toxic effect of alcohol, unspecified (T51.9)
The application of the NWPHO methodology was updated in summer 2010 and is now available directly from HES. As such, information about episodes estimated to be alcohol related may be slightly different from previously published data.
2. Age at start of episode
This derived field, calculated from episode start date (epistart) and date of birth (dob), contains the patient's age in whole years
3. Finished admission episodes
A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
4. Assessing growth through time
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in national health service practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

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