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29 Oct 2009 : Column 558W—continued

Prisoners Release

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many 18 to 24-year-olds released from prison received support under (a) section 21 of the National Assistance Act 1948 and (b) section 47 of the National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 immediately on their release in (i) 2007, (ii) 2008 and (iii) 2009. [295834]

Maria Eagle: Data on the release of offenders who subsequently receive accommodation related support from both local authorities and community care services is not routinely collected by NOMS. Additionally, approximately 55 per cent. of all sentenced releases from custody do not receive a period of statutory supervision. Therefore there is no facility for recording such information and to provide the data requested would be at disproportionate cost.

Prisoners: Mothers

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many and what proportion of the female prison population are mothers. [295827]

Maria Eagle: This information is not collected centrally and in order to provide it staff would need to look at each individual's record. This could be completed only at disproportionate cost. In addition, it would not be possible to guarantee the accuracy of the data as it is often reliant on information being provided by the prisoners themselves.

The 2003-04 resettlement survey commissioned by the then Prison Service Custody to Work Unit showed that half of all female prisoners had dependent children (including stepchildren), and that 46 per cent. of those women had lived with at least one dependent child before custody.

Reoffenders

Keith Hill: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the reconviction rate of offenders (a) under and (b) over the age of 18 following (i) a non-custodial sentence and (ii) each successive custodial sentence up to and including the tenth was in the most recent period for which figures are available. [295212]


29 Oct 2009 : Column 559W

Maria Eagle: Tables 1 and 2 following show the one year reoffending rates for adult offenders released from custody or commencing a court order in the first quarter of 2007; table 1 by custodial and court orders and table
29 Oct 2009 : Column 560W
2 by previous custodial sentences. The tables show the proportion of offenders that committed at least one further offence and the number of further offences committed per 100 offenders.

Table 1: Actual reoffending rate and frequency rate per 100 offenders from the 2007 adult cohort
Sentence type Number of offenders released from prison or commencing a court order Actual reoffending rate Number of offences per 100 offenders

Custody

12,810

47.2

223.2

Court orders under probation supervision(1)

37,275

36.1

121.3

(1) Court orders include community sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders supervised by the probation service. They do not include any pre or post release supervision.

Further information on adult rates of reoffending can be found in:

Table 2: Actual reoffending rate and frequency rate per 100 offenders, by number of previous custodial sentences, from the 2007 adult cohort
Number of previous custodial sentences Number of offenders released from prison or commencing a court order Actual reoffending rate Number of offences per 100 offenders

No previous

26,819

25.2

72.6

One previous

6,225

40.3

131.4

Two previous

3,629

48.9

179.9

Three previous

2,491

52.4

198.2

Four previous

1,883

56.6

236.3

Five previous

1,585

59.9

256.8

Between six and 10

4,516

64.5

288.7

More than 10

2,937

76.4

447.1

Total

50,085

39.0

147.3


Tables 3 and 4 following show the one year reoffending rates for juvenile offenders released from custody, commencing a non-custodial court disposal or those given an out-of-court disposal in the first quarter of 2007; table 3 by custodial and non-custodial sentences and table 4 by previous custodial sentences. The table shows the proportion of juvenile offenders that committed at least one further offence and the number of further offences committed per 100 offenders.

Table 3: One year reoffending rates, offenders leaving custody by custodial and non-custodial sentences, from the 2007 juvenile cohort

Number of juvenile offenders released from custody, commencing a noncustodial court disposal or those given an out-of-court disposal Actual reoffending rate Number of offences per 100 offenders

Out-of-court disposal

33,318

26.4

59.7

First-tier penalty

10,869

47.4

154.5

Other disposal

822

65.2

288.0

Community penalty

6,757

69.0

280.4

Custody

778

75.3

359.0

Total

52,544

37.5

115.7


Table 4: Actual reoffending rate and frequency rate per 100 offenders, by number of previous custodial sentences, from the 2007 juvenile cohort
Number of previous custodial sentences Number of juvenile offenders released from custody, commencing a non-custodial court disposal or those given an out-of-court disposal Actual reoffending rate Number of offences per 100 offenders

No previous

51,101

36.2

106.9

One previous

778

80.5

372.4

Two previous

333

85.0

452.6

Three previous

161

86.3

539.8

Four previous

78

88.5

485.9

Five previous

54

90.7

472.2

More than six previous

39

89.7

594.9

Total

52,544

37.5

115.7


Further information on rates of reoffending of juveniles can be found in:


29 Oct 2009 : Column 561W

Sentencing

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what (a) minimum and (b) maximum sentence applies for someone convicted of an offence involving stealing car keys from a house then stealing a vehicle parked outside. [295743]

Mr. Straw: The more serious matter here is the stealing of keys within the house. This constitutes burglary in a dwelling, for which the maximum penalty is 14 years’ imprisonment. That is the offence likely to be charged. There is no minimum penalty unless this is a third offence of domestic burglary, in which case there is a minimum penalty of three years for an adult.

Shoplifting: Sentencing

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many incidents of shoplifting led to (a) a caution
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and (b) a conviction resulting in (i) probation and (ii) a custodial sentence in each parliamentary constituency in the East of England in each year since 1999. [295948]

Claire Ward: Information held by the Ministry of Justice on the number of offenders cautioned, found guilty, sentenced and those given a sentence that includes an element of probation at all courts for ‘stealing from shops and stalls’ (shoplifting), in the East of England region, 1999 to 2007, are shown in the following tables 1 and 2.

The court proceedings database does not hold specific information on the offender beyond age, gender and the court where the case was heard; therefore the Ministry of Justice cannot tell if the offender was a resident of the East of England region.

Court proceedings data for 2008 are planned for publication at the end of January 2010.

Table 1: Number of offenders cautioned( 1, 2 ) for ‘Shoplifting’( 3) , East of England region, 1999 to 2007( 4)
Region/police force area 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Bedfordshire

681

492

647

513

641

753

855

887

687

Cambridgeshire

433

532

430

428

420

550

843

770

601

Essex

1,016

946

1,014

810

767

805

1,277

2,069

2,611

Hertfordshire

568

704

777

604

662

760

749

897

980

Norfolk

573

638

495

382

400

580

648

886

708

Suffolk

379

572

599

396

428

466

487

521

604

East of England region

3,650

3,884

3,962

3,133

3,318

3,914

4,859

6,030

6,191

(1) The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time, the principal offence is the more serious offence.
(2) From 1 June 2000, the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals.
(3) Stealing from ‘shops and stalls’ (shoplifting) is an offence under Theft Act 1968, section 1.
(4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Office for Criminal Justice Reform: Evidence and Analysis Unit.

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