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27 Oct 2009 : Column 321W—continued

Sporting Events: Finance

Mr. Andy Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what contribution his Department has made to the cost of the bid to host (a) the 2018 Football World Cup, (b) the 2005 Rugby Football World Cup, (c) the 2014 Commonwealth Games and (d) the 2013 Rugby League World Cup; what assessment he has made of the effect on the economy of holding each such event in the UK; and if he will make a statement. [295374]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Department has made no financial contribution to the costs of bids to host the FIFA World Cup, the 2015 Rugby World Cup, the 2014 Commonwealth Games or the 2013 Rugby League World Cup, although there have been discussions with the FA about a potential loan in support of their bid.

The economic impact of events can be significant. To take them in order (a) the 2018 Bid Company have commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers to produce an economic impact assessment; this has estimated a boost to the economy of between £2.1 billion and £3.2 billion; (b) the International Rugby Board have published a report predicting potential economic benefits of up to £2.1 billion for a Rugby World Cup in 2015; (c) the Glasgow Commonwealth Games organisers are estimating the creation of 1200 jobs; and (d) the Rugby Football League are working with development agencies to assess the impact of the 2013 World Cup, though research shows one Melbourne match at the 2008 World Cup generated a boost to the Victoria’s gross state product of 15.6 million Australian dollars.

Sports: Corporation Tax

Mr. Andy Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on an exemption from corporation tax for national sport governing bodies; and if he will make a statement. [295363]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Department most recently submitted this proposal to the Treasury as one of its tax proposals for the Budget 2009.


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Sports: Females

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what targets Sport England has set each of the sports governing bodies on increasing levels of participation of women and girls in sport; and how much funding has been allocated for this purpose in each case. [294749]

Mr. Sutcliffe: As part of their target of getting 1 million people doing more sport by 2012-13, Sport England includes an emphasis on the need to encourage women and girls to participate in sport.

Over the period 2009-12 Sport England will invest £480 million in the national governing bodies (NGBs) of sport to deliver increases in participation within their individual sports. While Sport England has not set specific targets for NGBs on increasing participation among particular groups of people, funding levels for the sports were in part assessed on the strength of their strategic plans to deliver on increased participation amongst women, black and minority ethnic groups, and disabled people.

Furthermore, Sport England, acting as a centre of best practice and working with their national partners, are committed to continuing to help NGBs deliver and to push them to do as much as possible to deliver for these groups. In the particular case of women and girls, funded and supported by Sport England, the Women’s Sport and Fitness Foundation is actively engaged with all of the NGBs, working in a consultancy capacity to advise the individual NGBs on best practice for increasing women’s participation in sport.

For the NGBs, developing the girls’ and women’s game, disability sport, and reaching out to diverse communities is not an optional extra but a vital part of what they are required to do. If any sport does not accept this challenge, Sport England will switch their funding to those that do.

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps (a) Sport England and (b) the Youth Sport Trust is taking to encourage women and girls to participate in sport. [294751]

Mr. Sutcliffe: One of the key ambitions at Sport England is to help partners such as governing bodies to deliver sporting opportunities to as many people as possible, including women and girls. Through Sport England’s investment process each national governing body of sport (NGB) was asked to produce a Whole Sport Plan outlining the ways in which they intend to drive up participation within their specific sport from 2009-13. Funding levels for the sports were in part assessed on the strength of their strategic plans to deliver on increased participation among women, black and minority ethnic groups, and disabled people.

To support NGBs in the design and delivery of provision to encourage women and girls to participate in sport, NGBs now receive tailored support from the Women’s Sport and Fitness Foundation (WSFF). Funded and supported by Sport England, the WSFF is actively engaged with each of the NGBs, working in a consultancy capacity to advise the individual NGBs on best practice for increasing women’s participation in sport.


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Sport England is also ensuring that new funding streams, such as the Themed Rounds and the Innovation Fund, support the development of women’s participation in sport.

The Sport Unlimited programme, a Sport England funded initiative, which aims to increase opportunities for children and young people aged five to 19 to participate regularly in sport, also targets girls to take part. The latest statistics show that 49 per cent. of girls versus 51 per cent. of boys have so far taken up this scheme.

As with Sport England, all Youth Sport Trust programmes are inclusive, although a number have been specifically developed as tools to support the work of schools to increase girls’ participation, involvement and enjoyment of physical education and sport.

GirlsActive, launched in 2006, is an initiative designed to empower teenage girls to enjoy more sporting activity on their own terms. Seven centres have now been established across the country, which are driving the work around increasing girls’ participation within each of their own regions. The regional centres are a joint approach between the Sports College and the School Sport Partnership.

The Sports College lead on high quality PE and curriculum innovation work and the School Sport Partnership drive the implementation and innovation of an agreed regional delivery plan to increase girls’ participation across the region. Over 20,000 girls have been reached since September 2008.

Justice

Advocacy: Qualifications

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the adequacy of regulation of companies offering representatives without appropriate legal qualifications to represent parties in employment tribunals; and if he will make a statement. [294924]

Bridget Prentice: Parties attending employment tribunals are not required to have representation, legal or otherwise and if they wish to use a representative it is a matter for them, and there is no requirement for the representative to be legally qualified. However, all businesses who represent claimant parties in employment tribunals must be authorised under the Compensation Act 2006, (unless they are exempted), and are required to comply with strict rules of conduct which includes a requirement that they are competent to provide the claims management service. The impact of regulation has been independently assessed on an annual basis since regulation commenced in April 2007. The latest report concluded that in the employment sector

However, to make a significant impact on poor quality representation, the report proposes that competency tests would be required, which would take years to establish and more resources being devoted by the Regulator. We are currently considering the findings of the report with key stakeholders.


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Aleksey Baranovsky

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps (a) he and (b) the National Offender Management Service have taken in response to the report of the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman on the circumstances surrounding the death of a prisoner at HMP Rye Hill; and what plans he has to respond to the recommendation of the Ombudsman on further investigations in relation to the death of Aleksey Baranovsky. [295489]

Maria Eagle: The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) drew up an action plan in response to the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman's 22 recommendations following Mr. Baranovsky's death in 2006 at HMP Rye Hill. 18 of the recommendations have been fully addressed, including those to do with further investigations. The remaining four were referred to Primecare, the healthcare provider at the time of Mr. Baranovsky's death, who have failed to respond. Following the death, the contract with Primecare was terminated.

Approved Premises: Females

Mr. Martyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many bail and safe accommodation places are available for women in England and Wales. [295203]

Maria Eagle: The Ministry of Justice provides funding for 129 places for women within approved premises and 104 places for women through the bail accommodation and support service. In addition, a range of other providers exist at local level including partnerships between probation areas, local authorities and the third sector which provide accommodation for women but information on the numbers involved is not held centrally.

Copyright: Music

Mr. Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 9 September 2009, Official Report, column 2018W, on copyright: music, how many actions have been brought under section 107 of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 for copying from one medium to another; what proportion of such actions resulted in a criminal conviction; and if he will make a statement. [296186]

Claire Ward: Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice combines offences under Section 107 of the 1988 Copyright, Designs and Patents Act with other similar offences under that Act. It is therefore not possible to provide prosecutions and convictions specifically under Section 107.

The following tables, for the years 1988 to 2007 (latest available) show the number of prosecutions and convictions in England and Wales where Section 107 may have been used. Data for 2008 are planned for publication at the end of January 2010.

Copying from one media to another becomes a criminal offence under Section 107 of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 only if conducted on a scale prejudicial to the interests of the legitimate rights holder, or in the course of business.


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27 Oct 2009 : Column 326W
Number of defendants p roceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under section 107 of the 1988 Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, England and Wales, 1988 to 2007( 1, 2)
Proceeded against
Offence 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Makes, imports or distributes illicit recordings. Makes for sale or hire, imports possesses or distributes articles which infringes copyright.(3)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

219

154

78

Other offences(4)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

1

110

39

91

Person infringes copyright in a work by communicating the work to the public(5)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total

1

329

193

169


Offence 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Makes, imports or distributes illicit recordings. Makes for sale or hire, imports possesses or distributes articles which infringes copyright.(3)

86

65

72

59

38

47

65

107

132

176

Other offences(4)

72

87

79

51

59

56

51

62

130

253

Person infringes copyright in a work by communicating the work to the public(5)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

6

16

33

Total

158

152

151

110

97

103

122

185

278

462


Found guilty
Offence 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Makes, imports or distributes illicit recordings. Makes for sale or hire, imports possesses or distributes articles which infringes copyright.(3)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

151

125

73

Other offences(4)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

1

87

35

74

Person infringes copyright in a work by communicating the work to the public(5)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total

1

238

160

147


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