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27 Oct 2009 : Column 307W—continued


Please note that additional expenditure on these programmes occurs outside the departmental body as part of local authority spending.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families with reference to table 8.4 of his Department's annual report 2009, page 175, to which programmes (a) the 2009-10 and (b) the 2010-11 budget for child wellbeing has been allocated. [293271]

Ms Diana R. Johnson: Detail on the constituent parts of the Department's Child Wellbeing programmes, which are shown aggregated in DCSF's departmental annual report 2009, are provided in the following table for the years 2009-10 and 2010-11:

Departmental report allocation (£ million)
Child Wellbeing 2009-10 2010-11

Priority Funds—Extension of three/four year old offer

0

340

Children in care proposals

43

48

Joint birth registration

1

10

Commissioning efficiency

17

0

Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers' children/choice protects (receipts)

-15

-18

School based mental health

19

0

Teenage pregnancy grant

0

2

Treatment foster care

0

1

Child well being total

65

383


Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families with reference to table 8.4 of his Department's Annual Report 2009, page 176, what the breakdown of spending is for youth programmes for 2010-11. [293631]

Dawn Primarolo [holding answer 16 October 2009]: The Department’s programmes shown aggregated in DCSF’s departmental Annual Report 2009 for the year 2010-11 are provided in the following table:


27 Oct 2009 : Column 308W
Departmental Report Allocation
Youth programmes £000

Contact Point (Capital)

35,200

Youth Challenge Fund

4,300

Workforce Development Capital Grant

218

National Youth Agency (NYA)/National Voluntary Youth Agency (NVYO) Grants

8,000

Children and Families Directorate (CFD) Capital Grant

21,334

Voluntary Child Services (VCS) Children Young People and Families (CYPF) Grant & capacity improving

21,802

Communications/Participation/Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAHMS)

864

Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS)/Integrated Children’s System (ICS)/ Making Safeguarding Everyone’s Responsibility (MSER)/Adoption Strategy/ Quality Protects (QP)

59,523

Family Fund Trust/Contact a Family

23,322

10 Year Strategy Additions

66,000

Youth Sector Support

40,000

Peer Mentoring

240

Youth Programmes total

280,803


Departmental Visits Abroad

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department has spent on overnight accommodation for (a) Ministers and (b) officials while overseas in each of the last three years. [294688]

Ms Diana R. Johnson: The data requested was for the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF). DCSF was established under the machinery of Government changes on 28 June 2007, therefore the response covers its predecessor the Department for Education and Skills (DFES).

Overnight accommodation costs for overseas travel is inclusive for both Ministers and officials. Expotel the Department’s contractor since 2007 are unable to separate Minister and officials overseas travel and without incurring disproportionate costs are only able to supply data for a period of two years.

Since 1999 the Government have published an annual list of all visits overseas undertaken by Ministers costing £500 or more during each financial year, this information includes accommodation costs. Copies are available in the Libraries.

Derek Draper and Charlie Whelan

Mr. Maude: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families when he last (a) met and (b) communicated with (i) Mr Derek Draper and (ii) Mr Charlie Whelan in the course of his official duties. [287351]

Ms Diana R. Johnson: The Secretary of State has not had meetings with Mr. Draper or Mr. Whelan as part of his official duties as Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families.

Eating Disorders: Curriculum

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether he has given consideration to the inclusion of lessons on body confidence, positive body image and the danger of eating disorders in school curricula. [295891]


27 Oct 2009 : Column 309W

Dawn Primarolo: The Government take the wellbeing, health and safety of young people very seriously and is committed to ensuring that their time in school equips them with the knowledge, understanding and practical skills to live healthy, safe, fulfilled and responsible lives.

Furthermore we appreciate the importance of ensuring that young people learn about body image and develop their confidence on this.

Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) at Key Stage 4 (ages 14-16) currently includes a personal wellbeing study programme which deals with body image and eating disorders.

Family Intervention Projects

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many families were participating in a family intervention project on the latest date for which figures are available. [294386]

Dawn Primarolo: Provisional data from the Family Intervention Project (FIP) online monitoring information system, maintained by the National Centre for Social Research, suggests that at 16 October 2009 1,282 families were participating in a FIP. Data returns from local authorities to DCSF Families at Risk Division suggest that around 3,600 families have been supported by a FIP since 2006.

Further Education: Admissions

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether statutory guidance to be issued under clause 43 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Bill will ensure colleges are able to refuse admission to a potential student felt to pose a threat to the safety of their students or staff; and if he will make a statement. [295627]

Mr. Iain Wright: Clause 44 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Bill (as amended in Lords Committee (previously clause 43)) is intended to enable local authorities to support young people, particularly the most vulnerable, in securing a suitable learning place in which they can thrive and achieve. It gives local authorities powers to require institutions within the FE sector to provide a specified young person, aged 16-19, with education suitable to their requirements. This will be particularly important within the context of the forthcoming raised participation age in supporting young people to fulfil their duties to participate.

In exercising these powers, we would expect local authorities to consider both the individual needs of the learner and that of the institution. The power will not undermine providers' duties to safeguard and ensure the health and safety of both their staff and students. It is expected that the statutory guidance made under clause 44 will include guidance on these specific considerations. This guidance will be subject to full public consultation prior to local authorities assuming their responsibilities.

Health Education: Sex

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much and what proportion of the education budget is expected to be used for sex and relationships education in 2009-10. [293984]


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Ms Diana R. Johnson: The Department for Children, Schools and Families does not hold this information.

Sex and relationship education (SRE) in schools is taught as part of the statutory science curriculum and non-statutory Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education framework. Since April 2004, it has been for schools and local authorities to decide on the level of funding to support sex and relationship education in schools taking account of local priorities.

Independent Safeguarding Authority

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people he estimates will register with the Independent Safeguarding Authority in each of the next five years. [295513]

Meg Hillier: I have been asked to reply.

It is estimated that up to 11.3 million individuals will register with the scheme between 2010 and 2015. The phased approach expects the annual volume to be registered per annum will average out at 2.5 million per annum in years 1-4 and the residual balance in year 5.

Independent Safeguarding Authority: Databases

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what procedures will be used to remove information about an individual from the Independent Safeguarding Authority’s database after their death. [295512]

Meg Hillier: I have been asked to reply.

There is presently no routine method of updating the Independent Safeguarding Authority of the death of any individual barred under the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act. However this is an area which the Independent Safeguarding Authority intends to address.

The issue of retention of information for deceased persons is presently being explored and will be included as part of the Independent Safeguarding Authority’s record retention and review policy which is presently being drafted. This policy will be published once it has been agreed.

Until a policy has been established, if the Independent Safeguarding Authority receives a report of the death of a barred individual, the record will be marked “reported deceased”. These records will be processed in accordance with the record retention and review policy when this is available.

National Curriculum Tests: Disadvantaged

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many pupils (a) on free school meals and (b) not on free school meals achieved (i) level 4 and (ii) level 5 in English at Key Stage 2 in the last year for which figures are available; [293558]

(2) how many pupils (a) on free school meals and (b) not on free school meals achieved (i) level 4 and (ii) level 5 in mathematics at Key Stage 2 in the last year for which figures are available; [293557]

(3) how many pupils (a) on free school meals and (b) not on free school meals achieved (i) level 4 and (ii) level 5 in science at Key Stage 2 in the last year for which figures are available. [293556]


27 Oct 2009 : Column 311W

Ms Diana R. Johnson: The requested information can be found in Tables 6, 7 and 8 of SFR32/2008, Attainment by Pupil Characteristics, in England 2007/08. This Statistical First Release (SFR) can be found at:

Nurseries: West Yorkshire

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many nursery places per head of population there were in (a) Leeds West constituency, (b) Leeds City area and (c) West Yorkshire in each year since 2005. [294026]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department publishes information on the part-time equivalent number of free early education places filled by three and four-year-olds in maintained, private, voluntary and independent providers. This is derived by counting children taking up 12 and a half hours per week as one place, 10 hours per week as 0.8 places, seven and a half hours per week as 0.6 places, five hours per week as 0.4 places and two and a half hours per week as 0.2 places. Table 1 shows the number of part-time equivalent places filled by three and four-year-olds in Leeds West constituency, Leeds local authority and the West Yorkshire region from 2005 to 2009.

Table 1: Part-time equivalent number of free early education places( 1, 2) filled by three( 3) and four( 3) -year-olds, position in January each year

Leeds West constituency Leeds local authority West Yorkshire( 4)

2005

1,700

14,700

47,400

2006

1,600

14,800

47,800

2007

1,700

15,200

48,900

2008

1,800

16,400

51,400

2009

1,900

17,200

53,700

(1) A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.
(2 )Figures are rounded to the nearest 100.
(3 )Age of all children taken at 31 December in the previous calendar year.
(4 )Includes Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield.
Source:
Early Years Census and School Census

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