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7 July 2009 : Column 717W—continued



7 July 2009 : Column 718W
Table 3: Number of penalty notices for disorder given for alcohol related behaviour offences( 1,2) in Greater London (including the Metropolitan and City of London police force areas), by age group, 2004 to 2007( 3)
Police force area
Age Total

2004

16 to 17

62

18 to 24

1,616

2005

16 to 17

102

18 to 24

1,305

2006

16 to 17

100

18 to 24

1,309

2007

16 to 17

94

18 to 24

1,399

(1) Includes offences under the:
Criminal Justice Act 1967 s. 91;
Licensing Act 2003 s. 141, 146(1)(3), 149(1)(3)(4), 150(1)(2), 151;
Licensing Act 1872 s. 12;
Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 s. 12;
(2) The offence of being ‘drunk and disorderly’ moved from the lower tier (£50) to the upper tier (£80) on 1 November 2004; Sale of alcohol to a person under 18, Purchasing alcohol for a person under 18, Delivery of alcohol to a person under 18 or allowing such delivery, Consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises, Allowing consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises, were added to the scheme on 1 November 2004;
Sale of alcohol to a drunken person, Buying or Attempting to buy alcohol by a person under 18, were added to the Scheme with effect from 4 April 2005.
(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit

Animal Experiments: Licensing

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has plans to review the provisions of Section 24 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in respect of the licensing of scientific procedures on animals. [283522]

Mr. Alan Campbell: We have no plans to review the provisions of Section 24 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, the so-called ‘confidentiality clause’, before the outcome of the revision of European Union directive 86/609/EEC on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes is known.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders: Bexley

Mr. Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many anti-social behaviour orders have been (a) issued and (b) breached in the London Borough of Bexley since December 2005. [283160]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Data on the number of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) issued and breached are not available below Criminal Justice System (CJS) area level. Between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2006 (the latest period for which data are currently available), 359 ASBOs were issued at all courts in the Greater London CJS area.

During the same period, 213 ASBOs were proven in court to have been breached at least once. Many of these breaches will relate to ASBOs issued in years prior to 2006.

It is possible for an ASBO to be issued in one area and breached in another.

The breach data presented above count breaches based on the area in which the ASBO was issued.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders: Castle Point

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many anti-social behaviour orders are in force in Castle Point; [282861]

(2) how many anti-social behaviour orders Castle Point Borough Council applied for in each of the last five years. [282863]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Data on the number of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) issued on application are not available below Criminal Justice System (CJS) area level. The available published information showing the number of ASBOs issued on application at all county and magistrates courts in the Essex Criminal Justice System (CJS) area in each year for the period 2002 to 2006 can be viewed in the table.


7 July 2009 : Column 719W

ASBOs can be of a fixed duration (minimum two years) or made until further order. It is therefore not possible to determine from centrally collected data how many ASBOs are in force at a particular point in time.

N umber of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) issued at magistrates and county courts on application in the Essex Criminal Justice System (CJS) area as reported to the Home Office by the Court Service, 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2006

CJS area Essex

2002

2

2003

7

2004

9

2005

9

2006

6

Notes:
1. Previously issued data have been revised.
2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Prepared by OCJR evidence and analysis unit.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders: Kent

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many anti-social behaviour orders have been (a) issued and (b) breached in (i) Ashford constituency and (ii) Kent since 31 December 2005. [283001]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Data on the number of Antisocial Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) issued and breached are not available below Criminal Justice System (CJS) area level. Between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2006 (the latest period for which data are currently available), 29 ASBOs were issued at all courts in the Kent CJS area.

During the same period, nine ASBOs were proven in court to have been breached at least once, however, breach data from the magistrates' court administrative systems in Kent are known to have been under-reported. Many of these breaches will relate to ASBOs issued in years prior to 2006.

It is possible for an ASBO to be issued in one area and breached in another. The breach data presented above counts breaches based on the area in which the ASBO was issued.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders: North West

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many breaches of anti-social behaviour orders were recorded in (a) Merseyside and (b) Crosby constituency in each year since the inception of such orders. [283186]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) became available from 1 April 1999. ASBO breach data are available for ASBOs issued between 1 June 2000 and 31 December 2006 (latest available). ASBO breach data are not compiled below Criminal Justice System (CJS) area level.


7 July 2009 : Column 720W

Centrally collected ASBO breach data only count those instances where the breach of the ASBO was proven in court to have occurred. An ASBO may be breached on more than one occasion and in more than one year. An ASBO may be issued in one CJS area and breached in another. The available information on the total number of occasions on which ASBOs were proven in court to have been breached in the Merseyside CJS area in each year is shown in the following table.

Number of occasions in the Merseyside Criminal Justice System area( 1) where persons were proven in court to have breached their antisocial behaviour order (ASBO) in each year between 1 June 2000 and 31 December 2006
CJS area Merseyside

Number

2000-02(2)

16

2003

25

2004

79

2005

156

2006

170

1 June 2000 to 31 December 2006

446

(1) ASBOs may be issued in one area and breached in another. Breaches are counted in this table by area of BREACH.
(2) From 1 June 2000.
Notes:
1. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
2. Prepared by OCJR Evidence and Analysis Unit.
Source:
OCJR Court Proceedings Database

Antisocial Behaviour Orders: South Yorkshire

Jeff Ennis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many acceptable behaviour contracts have been agreed in (a) Barnsley and (b) Doncaster in each year since the inception of such contracts; [282786]

(2) how many breaches of antisocial behaviour orders have been recorded in (a) Barnsley and (b) Doncaster in each year since the inception of such orders; [282787]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The number of acceptable behaviour contracts (ABCs) is collected by the Home Office through a voluntary survey of crime and disorder reduction partnerships (CDRPs) use of antisocial behaviour tools and powers. The latest data published indicates that over 30,000 ABCs have been made between October 2003 and September 2007, with over 2,730 issued in South Yorkshire during the same period. Currently, data on the number of ABCs issued are not available below regional level.

Antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) became available from 1 April 1999. ASBO breach data are available for ASBOs issued between 1 June 2000 and 31 December 2006 (latest available). ASBO breach data are not compiled below criminal justice system (CJS) area level. Centrally collected ASBO breach data only count those instances where the breach of the ASBO was proven in court to have occurred. The number of occasions in each year on which ASBOs were proven in court to have been breached in the South Yorkshire CJS areas is shown in the table.


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7 July 2009 : Column 722W
Number of occasions in the South Yorkshire criminal justice system area( 1) where persons were proven in court to have breached their antisocial behaviour order (ASBO) in each year between 1 June 2000 and 31 December 2006
CJS area 2000-02( 2) 2003 2004 2005 2006 1 June 2000 to 31December 2006

South Yorkshire

20

47

76

156

191

490

(1) ASBOs may be issued in one area and breached in another. Breaches are counted in this table by area of breach.
(2) From 1 June 2000.
Note:
Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
OCJR Court Proceedings Database.
Prepared by OCJR Evidence and Analysis Unit.

Antisocial Behaviour: West Midlands

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding his Department has allocated to tackle antisocial behaviour in (a) Tamworth constituency, (b) Staffordshire and (c) the West Midlands in each year since the inception of such programmes. [282427]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The Home Office allocated £25,000 a year from 2003-04 to each crime disorder and reduction partnership (CDRP) in West Midlands which includes Tamworth and Staffordshire, as a contribution towards funding ASB co-ordinator posts. In 2005-06, in England the antisocial co-ordinators grant was pooled within the safer and stronger communities fund. This pooled budget supported the delivery of outcomes and indicators relating to antisocial behaviour in local area agreements (LAAs). As of 2008-09, Home Office funding for local authorities to tackle antisocial behaviour now form part of the general area-based grant (ABG) paid by the Department for Communities and Local Government. This funding has been renewed for the period 2008-11 and it is for local partnerships to agree how the grants received should be allocated against locally determined priorities, including tackling antisocial behaviour.

Respect Programmes in the West Midlands have also had an impact on antisocial behaviour. These programmes, now the responsibility of the Department for Children, Schools and Families, were designed to kick-start a change in the way the area worked to tackle antisocial behaviour. Other Home Office led activities also act to tackle antisocial behaviour, for example, the introduction of community support officers in the West Midlands, including Staffordshire but a monetary value cannot be assigned to that contribution.

Similarly, other programmes and services contribute, sometimes indirectly, to tackling antisocial behaviour, including diversionary activities for young people, neighbourhood wardens, as well as neighbourhood policing and neighbourhood management.

Asylum: Finance

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 19 March 2009, Official Report, column 69WS, on asylum support, what estimate he has made of the annual administrative cost of operating a plastic payment card system for the provision of section 4 support for asylum seekers. [271650]

Mr. Woolas: The annual administrative cost is estimated at £200,000. We are confident that the benefits of replacing vouchers with a payment card outweigh the financial investment.

Crime: Drugs

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in Merseyside aged (a) under 18 and (b) between 18 and 24-years-old have been (i) cautioned and (ii) prosecuted for drug-related offences in each of the last five years. [283190]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Information provided by the Ministry of Justice, showing the number of persons cautioned or proceeded against at magistrates courts for drug related offences in Merseyside police force area, broken down by age group, from 2003 to 2007 (latest available) can be viewed in Tables 1 and 2. Information for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Table 1: Number of offenders cautioned for drug related offences in the Merseyside police force area, broken down by age group, 2003 to 2007( 1, 2, 3)

10 to 17 -years-old 18 to 24 -years-old

2003

421

506

2004

487

306

2005

293

177

2006

223

216

2007

610

682

(1 )The cautions statistics cover simple and conditional cautions, reprimands and warnings. They relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence.
(2 )From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals.
(3 )Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit.

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