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Drugs: Rehabilitation

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent steps his Department has taken to provide services for those convicted of offences who are dependent on drugs. [264048]

Mr. Hanson: The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) has in place a comprehensive framework of interventions addressing drug misuse among offenders.

In prisons, drug treatment funding has increased year on year since 1996-97—up 1.184 per cent. to its current level of £92 million, with record numbers engaging in treatment.

NOMS, in partnership with Department of Health, has made steps to increase the volume and quality of treatment available to prisoners through introduction of the Integrated Drug Treatment System (IDTS).

Implementation of IDTS is progressing well, with all 53 first and second waves of IDTS prisons having an operational service providing all key elements of IDTS clinical services. In 2008-09 a further 38 prison/PCT partnerships have received funding for enhanced clinical drug treatment.

The Prison Drug Treatment Strategy Review Group, announced last year, has been established to consider recommendations made by PricewaterhouseCoopers in a 2007 report on prison drug treatment. The group, chaired by Professor Lord Kamlesh Patel, sets out to agree a single set of priorities and compile national guidance around the streamlining of the commissioning, delivery, funding and performance management of drug treatment for offenders. Work on the review started in September 2008 and is expected to take two years to complete.

In the community, Drug Rehabilitation Requirements —or DRRs—increasingly have been used as part of community sentences. The Government committed to delivering an additional 1,000 DRRs in 2008-09 compared to 2007-08 targets. NOMS is set to meet this commitment.

Drug System Change pilots are planned to start in April 2009. These two-year pilots aim to test innovative approaches to delivering improved end-to-end management of drug users, including more effective use of pooled funding and individual budgets, with a sharper focus on achieving positive outcomes for drug users, their families and their communities.

Electoral Register: Commonwealth

Mr. Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what criteria apply for a Commonwealth citizen to be lawfully resident under the Representation of the People Act 1983; and what documents an electoral registration officer requires in order to verify that status. [263729]

Mr. Wills: Under the Representation of the People Act 1983, qualifying citizens of other Commonwealth countries are entitled to register to vote at UK general and local elections. The eligibility criteria for such citizens define them as being either those who do not require leave to enter or remain under the Immigration Act 1971 or those who do require leave, but for the time being has any description of such leave. Those who
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meet this definition will have an ink stamp or a residence permit in their national passports showing the length of leave granted, and whether there are any restrictions placed on them during that time. Applications to register may only be made by those entitled to do so, subject to criminal penalties for false information. Where an electoral registration officer has doubts about a person's nationality he may require him to provide a certificate, document or declaration evidencing his status.

European Court of Human Rights

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what cases the Government have lost in the European Court of Human Rights in the last 30 years; and what financial penalties have been paid as a result of such outcomes; [264014]

(2) what payments his Department and its predecessors have made to legal firms operating on behalf of the Government in European Court of Human Rights cases in the last 30 years. [264017]

Mr. Wills: All judgments given against the United Kingdom by the European Court of Human Rights and its related bodies, including all awards of just satisfaction, are available online in the court’s HUDOC database at:

Legal advisers at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office act as agents for the Government in cases against the United Kingdom at the European Court of Human Rights. In general, external firms of solicitors are not engaged, although counsel are instructed in many cases. No central record is kept of payments made to counsel in such cases, and the information—insofar as it is still extant—for the given period could be collated only at disproportionate cost.

Human Trafficking: Convictions

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been imprisoned following conviction for human trafficking offences in each of the last three years. [263881]

Mr. Malik: The available information is shown in the following table; it shows the number of offenders sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence following conviction for a human trafficking offence.

Persons given immediate custodial sentences for human trafficking offences( 1) , 2005-07

Number of offenders

2005

14

2006

20

2007

22

(1) Asylum and Immigration Act 2004 or Sexual offences Act 2003—includes offences of trafficking into, within and out of United Kingdom for purposes of exploitation or sexual exploitation. This data is presented on the principle offence basis.
Notes:
1. These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems.
2. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.
Source:
OMS Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice

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Judiciary: Cumbria

Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost of supporting the lay magistracy in (a) Cumbria and (b) Copeland constituency was in each year since 1997. [263706]

Bridget Prentice: Prior to the formation of Her Majesty’s Courts Service (HMCS) on 1 April 2005, magistrates courts were the responsibility of individual magistrates courts committees. Consequently, HMCS has no records relating to magistrates or Crown courts prior to 1 April 2005.

HMCS accounting records reflect HMCS management structure. This does not necessarily reflect HMCS geographical or court structure. As a consequence, it is not possible to accurately identify all costs attributable to specific courts.

Lay magistracy loss of earnings and travel and subsistence costs in Cumbria for each of the last three years were as follows:

Financial year £000

2005-06

145

2006-07

176

2007-08

122


Magistrates Courts: Cumbria

Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much the provision of the magistrates court service in (a) Cumbria and (b) Copeland constituency cost in each year since 1997. [263707]

Bridget Prentice: Prior to the formation of Her Majesty’s Courts Service on 1 April 2005, magistrates courts were the responsibility of individual magistrates courts committees. Consequently, HMCS does not hold records relating to magistrates or Crown courts prior to 1 April 2005.

HMCS accounting records reflect HMCS management structure. This does not necessarily reflect HMCS geographical or court structure. As a consequence, it is not possible to identify accurately all costs attributable to specific courts.

The cost of providing magistrates court services in Cumbria for each of the last three years were as follows:

Financial year £000

2005-06

3,490

2006-07

3,731

2007-08

2,940


The cost of district judges costs are not held at court level and have been excluded.

Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many trials in magistrates courts in (a) Cumbria and (b) Copeland constituency did not take place on the agreed date of the hearing in each year since 1997. [263716]

Bridget Prentice: Information is only available on the number of trials that failed to take place on the agreed hearing date in each year since 2003 in the magistrates
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courts in Cumbria. This information is set out in the following table. The data for Copeland are split and reported within two other districts of the Cumbria area (Whitehaven and Furness, and district) and are therefore unavailable separately.

Period Total number of trials Number of trials which did not take place on agreed date

2003-04

1,482

420

2004-05

1,562

415

2005-06

1,668

473

2006-07

1,672

459

2007-08

1,789

541


Offenders: Uniforms

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many beneficiaries of unpaid work have requested that offenders do not wear identifiable clothing. [263841]

Mr. Straw: In January 2009 a total of 2,501 work projects were operated with offenders wearing distinctive clothing and 310,130 hours were worked on these projects. The majority of these projects will have involved groups of offenders working outdoors. 1,298 unpaid work projects were operated without offenders wearing distinctive clothing at the request of the beneficiary and 111,798 hours were worked on these projects.

Where beneficiaries request in writing that offenders do not wear high visibility vests, exemptions may be granted by the probation area only where convincing evidence is provided on the basis of health and safety concerns, business risk to the beneficiary or suitability of the placement. Probation areas are actively engaging with these beneficiaries with a view to increasing the number of work projects in which distinctive clothing is used.

Distinctive clothing is also not used if a risk assessment, endorsed by a senior manager, determines that distinctive clothing would potentially place the public, supervisory staff or offenders at risk. During January almost 70 per cent. of the hours worked by offenders on sites within the scope of the policy were undertaken using distinctive high visibility clothing.

Performing Arts

John Mason: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether his Department has engaged any (a) actors, (b) musicians and (c) other performers to support its initiatives over the last five years. [264057]

Mr. Malik: The Ministry of Justice has engaged the following to support its initiatives in the last five years:

Actors


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Musicians

Other performers

Police Custody

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners were held in police or court cells for (a) two successive nights, (b) three successive nights and (c) more than three successive nights in 2008. [263839]

Mr. Straw: In 2008 court cells were used between the nights of 5 and 28 February on 1,115 occasions. Out of the 1,115 occasions, there have been 192 occasions where a prisoner was held in court cells for two successive nights. There have been no occasions in which a prisoner was held for three or more successive nights in a court cell.

Although records are kept on the number of occasions prisoners are held in police cells, there is no readily available breakdown on how many prisoners spent more than one night in police custody. This information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Police Custody: Costs

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice for how much his Department was invoiced by each police force in respect of costs incurred under Operation Safeguard (a) in total and (b) in each month in 2008; and if he will make a statement. [256659]

Mr. Straw: Operation Safeguard was activated in mid-October 2006 and ended just before Christmas 2006. It was then re-activated between 16 January 2007 and 31 October 2008. Police cells have not been used since 22 September 2008 and no police cells have been on stand-by since the end of October 2008.

As NOMS is invoiced by police forces in arrears, the monthly payments in the following table do not relate directly to the numbers of prisoners held in police cells in each police force in any particular month.

Invoices to the value of £14,373,500 were paid for the activation of Operation Safeguard in the 2006-07 financial year, £50,687,200 for the 2007-08 financial year and £10,790,000 for the 2008-09 financial year (up to 31 December 2008).

The following tables provide a breakdown of cost by police force area for the use of Safeguard in calendar year 2008.


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18 Mar 2009 : Column 1220W
Breakdown of cost by police force area for the use of Safeguard in calendar year 2008
Payments (£)
Police force January February March April May June July

Bedfordshire

82,436.42

80,143.78

90,619.43

Cambridge

548,573.57

295,693.20

Cheshire

1,195,270.61

1,301,098.13

1,068,049.71

142,449.01

Derbyshire

113,735.23

197,496.09

157,030.54

83,575.62

Devon and Cornwall

247,310.90

105,280.45

16,537.50

126,113.49

Dorset

52,229.77

111,006.82

Durham

412,525.51

208,951.30

Dyfed

88,067.09

Essex

435,828.57

217,750.37

207,903.05

98,690.78

210,065.96

GMP

146,933.09

773,584.74

492,479.77

303,232.47

293,072.87

Gwent

4,361.55

179,249.83

218,753.52

Hampshire

311,113.78

93,470.41

161,117.85

262,228.51

Hertfordshire

103,692.63

178.733.90

203,937.34

102,923.43

38,011.00

Kent

290,759.19

288,436.77

-604.38

Lancashire

564,388.00

201,859.00

Leicestershire

927,514.40

23,628.19

49,510.40

266,053.13

121,162.86

Lincolnshire

108,986.38

36,341.00

166,013.46

Metropolitan

2,294,279.92

983,585.02

6,236,135.15

1,029,660.65

1,721,789.20

Merseyside

4,605.58

North Wales

1,679.39

436,337.55

452,758.10

South Wales

314,075.31

953,347.46

South Yorkshire

98,022.82

81,643.56

199,426.15

34,656.33

68,095.49

921.98

Staffordshire

41,297.24

Suffolk

605,507.69

Sussex

Thames Valley

256,657.39

286,443.72

266,276.05

132,475.66

130,018.66

240,098.36

Warwickshire

197,843.05

149,594.25

117,001.80

279.50

231,660.78

West Midlands

422,856.34

1,084,575.77

1,577,130.02

347,259.80

West Yorkshire

992,893.48

181,080.66

232,210.13

320,493.85

Cumbria

80,285.62

69,723.64

66,906.35

Northumbria

89,726.00

79,159.00

50,100.00

Wilts

35,777.04

2,118.45

Northants

98,415.60

ACPO

40,865.59

Total

5,286,573.45

904,145.27

8,880,095.38

10,029,573.02

6,322.169.69

2,049,902.86

4,670,669.47


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